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Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities

DATE: Friday-Saturday, April 13-14, 2012

PLACE: IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor, UC Berkeley

SPONSOR: Center for Chinese Studies




DESCRIPTION

Description

This annual conference, which alternates between Berkeley and Stanford, brings together a keynote speaker and twelve graduate students to present innovative research on many aspects of modern Chinese cultural production in humanistic disciplines. This year's keynote speaker is Xiaobing Tang. The conference begins on Friday and continues from 10-4 on Saturday, April 14.

SCHEDULE

Schedule
Friday, April 13

2:00 pm — Panel 1: Circulating Myth and Meaning: Mediation of Socialist and Post-Socialist Culture
Discussants: Haiyan Lee, Evelyn Shih
Laurence Coderre, "Meaningful Mobility and the Ties that Bind: 1988 as Postsocialist Road Story"
Paulina Hartono, "Reading Between the Lines: Understanding Fractures within the Production Processes of Great Wall of the South China Sea (1964-1976)"
Mingming Liu, "’Rest, Rest, Perturbed Spirit!’ Zhiguai in Contemporary Chinese Cultural Production"
Emily Chua, "On and Off the Internet: News Production in Post-Mao China"

4:00 pm — Keynote speech
Xiaobing Tang, "On the Legacy of Socialist Visual Experience"

One of the main resources for contemporary art in China has been the artistic products and practices from the socialist period, in particular the Cultural Revolution. In this presentation, Professor Xiaobing Tang will examine how the legacy of socialist visual experience has been constructed and kept relevant. Focusing on the different stages in the conceptual development of contemporary artist Wang Guangyi, he will explore the paradigmatic implications of a critical cultural identity that the artist claims from the socialist past.


Saturday, April 14

10:00 am — Panel 2: Planning Art and the Art of Planning: Private Tastes and Public Desires in Republican China
Discussants: Jean Ma, Peiting Li
Elizabeth Lawrence, "Visuality, Knowledge, and Political Culture in China's First National Fine Arts Exhibition"
Hsiao-chun Wu, "Intellectual, Collector, and Dramaturg: Qi Rushan and the Collecting of Theatrical Materials in Early Republican Beijing"
Yu Zhang, "From Spectacle to Spectator: James Yen and His Rural Reconstruction Project"

Noon - lunch break (lunch not provided)

1:00 pm — Panel 3: Exploring Changing Forms of Discourse
Discussants: Alexander Cook, Lauren Eidel
Andy Zhou, "The Propagation of Mandarin in High Qing — A Study of Ortheopy Academies"
Robert Voigt, "Unmasking the Translator: A Computational Approach to Yu Hua's "To Live""

2:30 pm — Panel 4: Narrative Crossings: Recontextualizing Chinese-ness Across Boundaries
Discussants: Jason McGrath, Anna Pawlowski
Noga Ganany, "Bao-Gong as King Yama in Fiction and Religious Worship"
Michelle Chen, "Reclaiming Koxinga's Territory -- Conditions and Functions of Kanshi in Taiwan"
Heidi Kong, "The Making of Chinese Without China: Travel and Mobility of Chinese-Australian Merchants in the Nineteenth Century South Pacific"

KEYNOTE LECTURE

Keynote Lecture
On the Legacy of Socialist Visual Experience
image
April 13, 4:00-5:30 PM
Xiaobing Tang
Comparative Literature, University of Michigan

One of the main resources for contemporary art in China has been the artistic products and practices from the socialist period, in particular the Cultural Revolution. In this presentation, Professor Xiaobing Tang will examine how the legacy of socialist visual experience has been constructed and kept relevant. Focusing on the different stages in the conceptual development of contemporary artist Wang Guangyi, he will explore the paradigmatic implications of a critical cultural identity that the artist claims from the socialist past.



 

PARTICIPANTS

Participants
Presenters

Michelle I-Hsiao Chen, Regional Studies - East Asia, Harvard University

Emily Huiching Chua, Anthropology, UC Berkeley

Laurence Coderre, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

Noga Ganany, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University

Paulina Hartono, Group in Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

Heidi Kong, History, University of British Columbia

Elizabeth Lawrence, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University

Mingming Liu, Comparative Literature, UC Riverside

Robert Voigt, Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University

Hsiao-chun Wu, History, UC Los Angeles

Yu Zhang, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University

Andy Y. Zhou, Political Science, UC Berkeley


Keynote Lecture

Xiaobing Tang, Comparative Literature, University of Michigan


Discussants
Alexander Cook, Department of History, UC Berkeley

Lauren Eidel, Comparative Literature, Stanford University

Haiyan Lee, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University

Peiting Li, History, UC Berkeley

Jean Ma, Art and Art History, Stanford University

Jason McGrath, Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Minnesota

Anna Pawlowski, Art and Art History, Stanford University

Evelyn Shih, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

DIRECTIONS

Directions

The Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference on Modern Chinese Humanities will be held in the IEAS conference room on the Berkeley campus – 2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor conference room.

See section D1 on this large campus map.

IEAS


Directions to the Berkeley campus
By BART

If traveling by BART, exit the Richmond-Fremont line at the Berkeley station (not North Berkeley). When you leave the BART station, walk south down Shattuck Avenue to Kittredge Street (one or two blocks depending on which station exit you leave from) and turn left. Walk one block to Fulton Street and you will be facing the 2223 Fulton Street Building.

From Interstate 80

To reach the site by car from Interstate 80, exit at the University Avenue off-ramp in Berkeley. Take University Avenue east to Oxford Street and turn right. Oxford becomes Fulton Street in a couple of blocks. We are located in the six-story beige building on the east (left) side of the street.

From Highways 24/13

To reach us from Highways 24/13, exit 13 at Tunnel Road in Berkeley. Continue on Tunnel Road as it becomes Ashby. Turn right at Telegraph and drive approximately one mile north to Bancroft Way and turn left. The 2223 Fulton Street Building is at the northeast corner of the Bancroft and Fulton intersection (right side).

Directions to campus are also available at http://www.berkeley.edu/visitors/traveling.html

Parking

There are various public parking lots and facilities near campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

Other lots:

  • Berkeley Way near Shattuck
  • Center Street near Shattuck
  • Allston Way near Shattuck
  • Kittredge Street near Milvia

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.