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Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities

DATE: Friday-Saturday, April 18-19, 2014

PLACE: IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor, UC Berkeley

SPONSORS: Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley and Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University




DESCRIPTION

Description
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Initiated in 2010, the annual Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities brings together current graduate students from across the U.S. and around the world to present innovative research on any aspect of modern Chinese cultural production in the humanistic disciplines.

The conference provides a window into current research in Chinese studies, and serves as a platform for fostering interaction among budding scholars of geographically disparate institutions, facilitating their exchange of ideas and interests. Specifically, the organizing committee hopes that this conference will encourage interdisciplinary scholarship within and between literary and cultural studies, cultural history, art history, film and media studies, musicology and sound studies, as well as the interpretative social sciences.

Each year the conference also features a keynote address from a prominent Chinese studies scholar, chosen by the student organizing committee.









SCHEDULE

Schedule
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Friday, April 18, 2014

2:00 pm — Panel 1 — Media History: Political Machinations and Aesthetic Aspirations
Hongwei Chen, The Lightest Form of Theater: Cai Yuanpei and the Axiology of Cinema Education
Rebecca Scott, Situating Lianhuanhua in Political Culture
Tianshuang Liang, A True Record: the Interplay of Local, Regional and World Art in 1910s Shanghai
Xingzhou Hu, City Toy, Toy City — An Implicit Dialogue between Rubber Duck and City
Student discussant: Eldon Pei
Faculty discussant: Jean Ma

4:00 pm — Keynote speech
Fabio Lanza, History, University of Arizona, Tucson, When China Existed: Scholarship, Activism, and Asian Studies

This presentation looks back at the only other time in the last two centuries when Asia, as today, was the focus of sustained global interest: the 1960s and 1970s, the era of Global Maoism and wars of liberation. Through an analysis of the formation and dissolution of the Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars (CCAS), I will illustrate how China, (mis)perceived, imagined, or experienced, was not only and not simply the location of a utopia that could be deployed by idealistic youth to define more locally-specific goals. Rather, that "China" also represented a short-lived radical political alternative, one that forced the people who took it seriously to rethink their relationship to work, social roles, daily practices, and the production of knowledge. Within the field of Asian Studies, it was the existence of this particular "China" that opened up possibilities for CCAS to challenge the established narratives and produce some major political and scholarly discoveries. This presentation traces their discoveries but also the foreclosure of those possibilities once that "China" disappeared with the end of Maoism.



Saturday, April 19, 2014

10:00 am — Panel 2 — Bodies on Display: Discipline and Emancipation
Andrew Elmore, Building Modern Bodies: (Trans)nationalizing Physical Culture and Physique Photography in Early Twentieth-Century China
Jiao Lin, Memory of the Body: The Silent Practice of Breast-Binding in the Cultural Revolution
Kelly Tang, Ivory "Doctor's Ladies": The Medical and the Erotic Female Body
Student discussant: Renren Yang
Faculty discussant: Haiyan Lee

Noon — Lunch break

1:00 pm — Panel 3 — Martial Fictions: Violent Texts and and Alternative Visions
Emily Goedde, The Humming of Radios, the Explosion of Bombs: The Searchfor Everyday Sounds in Poetry from Kunming During the War of Resistance
Yunwen Gao, Race, Language and Culture in the Construction of Nationalism at the End of the Empire: Liang Qichao's "Ban Dingyuan Conquering the West"
Rachel Leng, Military Gay Comrades: Negotiating the Homosocial(ist) Identity in Mainland China's Tongzhi Fiction
Student discussant: Julia Keblinska
Faculty discussant: Andrew Jones

2:30 pm — Break

2:45 pm — Panel 4 — Transnational Encounter: Otherization and Indigenization
Elizabeth Emrich, Dueling Exhibitions: Chinese Nationalist Performance on the World Stage
Keisha Brown, Sounds of Blackness: Musical Performances and Representations of Blackness in Maoist China
Jesse Chapman, Daoism in the Age of Evolution
Student discussant: Larissa Pitts
Faculty discussant: Alexander Cook

KEYNOTE LECTURE

Keynote Lecture
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When China Existed: Scholarship, Activism, and Asian Studies
April 18, 2014, 4:00–5:30 pm
Fabio Lanza
History, University of Arizona, Tucson

This presentation looks back at the only other time in the last two centuries when Asia, as today, was the focus of sustained global interest: the 1960s and 1970s, the era of Global Maoism and wars of liberation. Through an analysis of the formation and dissolution of the Committee of Concerned Asian Scholars (CCAS), I will illustrate how China, (mis)perceived, imagined, or experienced, was not only and not simply the location of a utopia that could be deployed by idealistic youth to define more locally-specific goals. Rather, that "China" also represented a short-lived radical political alternative, one that forced the people who took it seriously to rethink their relationship to work, social roles, daily practices, and the production of knowledge. Within the field of Asian Studies, it was the existence of this particular "China" that opened up possibilities for CCAS to challenge the established narratives and produce some major political and scholarly discoveries. This presentation traces their discoveries but also the foreclosure of those possibilities once that "China" disappeared with the end of Maoism.



 

PARTICIPANTS

Participants
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Presenters
  • Keisha Brown, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Southern California
  • Jesse Chapman, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
  • Hongwei Chen, Cultural Studies and Comparative Literature, University of Minnesota
  • Andrew Elmore, History, Stanford University
  • Elizabeth Emrich, History of Art and Visual Studies, Cornell University
  • Yunwen Gao, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Southern California
  • Emily Goedde, Comparative Literature, University of Michigan
  • Xingzhou Hu, Asian and Middle Eastern Studies, Duke University
  • Lin Jiao, History, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London
  • Rachel Leng, Regional Studies - East Asia, Harvard University
  • Tianshuang Liang, School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London
  • Rebecca Scott, The School of Contemporary Chinese Studies, The University of Nottingham
  • Kelly Tang, Oriental Studies, University of Oxford

Student discussants
  • Julia Keblinska, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
  • Eldon Pei, Art and Art History, Stanford University
  • Larissa Jesanis Pitts, History, UC Berkeley
  • Renren Yang, Division of Literatures, Cultures, and Languages, Stanford University

Faculty discussants
  • Alex Cook, History, UC Berkeley
  • Andrew Jones, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
  • Haiyan Lee, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University
  • Jean Ma, Art and Art History, Stanford University

Keynote Lecture
  • Fabio Lanza, History, University of Arizona, Tucson,
 

DIRECTIONS

Directions

The Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference on Modern Chinese Humanities will be held in the IEAS conference room on the Berkeley campus – 2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor conference room.

See section D1 on this large campus map.

IEAS


Directions to the Berkeley campus
By BART

If traveling by BART, exit the Richmond-Fremont line at the Berkeley station (not North Berkeley). When you leave the BART station, walk south down Shattuck Avenue to Kittredge Street (one or two blocks depending on which station exit you leave from) and turn left. Walk one block to Fulton Street and you will be facing the 2223 Fulton Street Building.

From Interstate 80

To reach the site by car from Interstate 80, exit at the University Avenue off-ramp in Berkeley. Take University Avenue east to Oxford Street and turn right. Oxford becomes Fulton Street in a couple of blocks. We are located in the six-story beige building on the east (left) side of the street.

From Highways 24/13

To reach us from Highways 24/13, exit 13 at Tunnel Road in Berkeley. Continue on Tunnel Road as it becomes Ashby. Turn right at Telegraph and drive approximately one mile north to Bancroft Way and turn left. The 2223 Fulton Street Building is at the northeast corner of the Bancroft and Fulton intersection (right side).

Directions to campus are also available at http://www.berkeley.edu/visitors/traveling.html

Parking

There are various public parking lots and facilities near campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

Other lots:

  • Kittredge Street near Fulton
  • Berkeley Way near Shattuck
  • Center Street near Shattuck
  • Allston Way near Shattuck
  • Kittredge Street near Milvia

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.