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Borderland China



DESCRIPTION

Description
China's Borderland as a Territorial Question

In this workshop we try to bring together environmental scientists and social researchers to examine these border questions. We use "territoriality" as the platform to build dialogue across disciplines. Territoriality, the power process of a place, refers to the physical, socio-organizational, and discursive process of place occupation and control. It is not reserved exclusively for the power elite, nor is its analytical utility limited by a bipolar mechanism between the aggression of the powerful and the resistance of the powerless. Both the powerful and the powerless, and those in between co-produce territoriality Their power positions may shift and reconfigure in this process, resulting in territorial consolidation, disintegration, expansion, and contraction.

SCHEDULE

Schedule
Tuesday, May 20, 2014

9:15am–11:30am: SESSION I — RESOURCE DILEMMA

HE Gang
The coal-power conflict in northern China

Joanna LEWIS
Policies and politics of wind power in northern China

XUE Xian
Policy impact on land degradation and restoration in Minqin, Gansu, Northwest China

Discussants

John CHIANG

Kurt CUFFEY


11:30am–12:30pm: KEYNOTE SPEECH

WANG Tao
China: desert, desertification and environmental engineering in China in the past half a century


12:30–2:30pm: Lunch


2:30–5:00pm: SESSION II — STATE TERRITORIALITY AT THE BORDER

XUN Lili
Eco-governance and the logic of the state: A case study of ecological resettlement projects in Inner Mongolia and Ningxia

Jonathan SCHLESINGER
Mussels and territory in Qing Manchuria

Masato HASEGAWA
Climate, topography, and labor in the wartime transport of provisions in the Chinese-Korean borderland of the late sixteenth century

Discussant

Wen-hsin YEH


Wednesday, May 21, 2014

9:00am–12:30pm: SESSION III — TERRITORIAL LOGICS OF NON-STATE ACTORS IN BORDERLANDS

MA Jianxiong
Copper and silver miners' mobility and mobilization in Yunnan-Burma borderland forests, 1790s–1850s

WANG Yi
Across the Western Pass: Han Commercial Expansion in the Mongolian Steppe During the Qing

HSING You-tien
Neo-nomadism in the age of ecological conservation: Ejina, western Inner Mongolia

Max WOODWORTH
Informal finance and boomtown urbanism in Ordos, Inner Mongolia

Discussant

Nick TACKETT

PARTICIPANTS

Participants
Presenters
  • Masato HASEGAWA, Visiting Assistant Professor of History, New York University
  • HE Gang, PhD candidate and research fellow, Energy and Resources Group, UC Berkeley
  • You-tien HSING, Professor of Geography, UC Berkeley
  • Joanna LEWIS, Assistant Professor of Science, Technology and International Affairs at Georgetown University
  • MA Jianxiong, Professor of Anthropology, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology, Division of Humanities
  • Jonathan SCHLESINGER, Assistant Professor of History, Indiana University
  • WANG Tao, Director, Key Lab for Desert and Desertification Research, the Chinese Academy of Science, Lanzhou
  • WANG Yi, Post-doctoral Fellow, Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley
  • Max WOODWORTH, Assistant Professor of Geography, Ohio State University
  • XUE Xian, Senior Research Fellow, Key Lab for Desert and Desertification Research, CAS, Lanzhou, China
  • XUN Lili, Associate Research Fellow, Chinese Academy of Social Science, Beijing, China
Discussants
  • John CHIANG, Associate Professor of Climatology, Department of Geography, UC Berkeley
  • Kurt CUFFEY, Professor of Glaciology and Geomorphology, Department of Geography, UC Berkeley
  • Nick TACKETT, Associate Professor of History, UC Berkeley
  • Wen-hsin YEH,Professor of History, UC Berkeley

DIRECTIONS

Directions

The workshop on Borderland China will be held in the IEAS conference room on the Berkeley campus — 2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor conference room. Directions can be found here.


Directions to the Berkeley campus
By BART

If traveling by BART, exit the Richmond-Fremont line at the Berkeley station (not North Berkeley). When you leave the BART station, walk south down Shattuck Avenue to Kittredge Street (one or two blocks depending on which station exit you leave from) and turn left. Walk one block to Fulton Street and you will be facing the 2223 Fulton Street Building.

From Interstate 80

To reach the site by car from Interstate 80, exit at the University Avenue off-ramp in Berkeley. Take University Avenue east to Oxford Street and turn right. Oxford becomes Fulton Street in a couple of blocks. We are located in the six-story beige building on the east (left) side of the street.

From Highways 24/13

To reach us from Highways 24/13, exit 13 at Tunnel Road in Berkeley. Continue on Tunnel Road as it becomes Ashby. Turn right at Telegraph and drive approximately one mile north to Bancroft Way and turn left. The 2223 Fulton Street Building is at the northeast corner of the Bancroft and Fulton intersection (right side).

Directions to campus are also available at http://www.berkeley.edu/visitors/traveling.html

Parking

There are various public parking lots and facilities near campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

Other lots:

  • Kittredge Street between Shattuck and Fulton
  • Berkeley Way near Shattuck
  • Center Street near Shattuck
  • Allston Way near Shattuck
  • Kittredge Street near Milvia

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.