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Stanford-Berkeley Graduate Student Conference on Premodern Chinese Humanities

DATES: Friday-Saturday, April 21-22, 2017, 9:00am – 5:00pm

PLACE: IEAS Conference Room, 1995 University Avenue — Room 508

SPONSORS: Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley




DESCRIPTION

Description
Chinese caligraphy

The conference will feature up to sixteen student presentations of original research on any aspect of premodern (technically, beginnings to 1911) Chinese humanistic culture, drawing on but not limited to the traditional disciplines of history, literature, religion, art, social sciences, and thought.

SCHEDULE

Schedule
Chinese caligraphy

Friday, April 21, 2017

8:30 coffee

9:00–9:20 introduction

9:20–9:50 Linfang LI, The End and Beginning of Two Different Commentary Traditions: A Re-examination on Maozhuan and Zhengjian in Light of the Excavated Manuscripts
Discussant: Robert ASHMORE, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

9:50–10:05 discussant comments and discussion

10:05–10:35 Jian ZHANG, The State of Jurchen Jin in an Interregnum: Disenchanting Scholars with Official Service in Records of Returning to Retreat
Discussant: Brian BAUMANN, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

10:35–10:50 discussant comments and discussion

10:50 break

11:10–11:40 Zuoting WEN, Visit the Relics: An Excursion in Southern Beijing on the Day after Mid-Autumn Festival in 1351 (September 6, 1351)
Discussant: Paula VARSANO, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

11:40–11:55 discussant comments and discussion

11:55–1:00 lunch break

1:00–1:30 Tianya WANG, Listen to the Moon: Nature, Poetry, and Moral Law in Wang Zhenyi’s (王贞仪) The Initial Collection of Virtuous Winds Pavilion («德风亭初集»)
Discussant: Peng XU, Center for Chinese Studies Postdoctoral Fellow

1:30–1:45 discussant comments and discussion

1:45–2:15 Naixi FENG, Heavenly Fire and Mushroom Cloud: Writing the Tianqi Explosion at Beijing in the Seventeenth Century
Discussant: Sophie VOLPP, East Asian Languages and Cultures and Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley

2:15–2:30 discussant comments and discussion

2:30 break

2:45–3:15 Sijing ZHANG, Obsession with Talent: Literary Concubines in Literati’s Biographies
Discussant: Matthew SOMMER, History, Stanford University

3:15–3:30 discussant comments and discussion

3:30 break

4:00 Keynote speech: Guoxiang PENG, Qiu Shi Distinguished Professor of Chinese Philosophy, Intellectual History and Religions, School of Humanities, Zhejiang University; Director and Research Fellow, Center for Cultural China Studies, Institute for Advanced Humanities Studies, Peking University, Reading as a Spiritual and Bodily Exercise: the Religious Dimension of Zhu Xi

5:30 adjourn


Saturday, April 22, 2017

8:45 coffee

9:15–9:45 Jiayao WANG, Text, Play, Communities of Taste in Honglou meng Card Game–Honglou meng pu (Explanatory Description of Gaming Rules of Honglou meng)
Discussant: Yuming HE, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Davis (comments read by Mark Csikszentmihalyi, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley).

9:45–10:00 discussant comments and discussion

10:00–10:30 Allison BERNARD, Playwrights and Personae: Kong Shangren, Ruan Dacheng, and The Role of Drama in Early Qing Literary History
Discussant: Regina LLAMAS, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University

10:30 –10:45 discussant comments and discussion

10:45 break

11:00–11:30 Zhenpeng ZHAN, Lingering between Sacred and Secular: Decoding Daoist Thunder Ritual in the Picture of Rainmaking from the Southern Song Period
Discussant: Thomas HAHN, History, UC Berkeley

11:30–11:45 discussant comments and discussion

11:45–1:00 lunch break

1:00–1:30 Yifan LI, Making the Qianlong Emperor’s Private Garden: Imperialization of the Lion Grove in Eighteenth-Century China
Discussant: William H. MA, Art History, Lewis and Clark College

1:30-1:45 discussant comments and discussion

1:45–2:15 Yanbing TAN, The Burden of Selfish Desires: Jealousy and qing in Wu Bing’s The Remedy for Jealousy
Discussant: Yiqun ZHOU, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University

2:15–2:30 discussant comments and discussion

2:30 break

2:45–3:15 Xiaohui ZHANG, Discrimination and Non-Interference: The Mongol Rule of Yuan China and Social Criticism in Sanqu Poems
Discussant: Ronald EGAN, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University

3:15-3:30 discussant comments and discussion

3:45–4:15 Shoufu YIN, Ninth-century Appointment Edicts and The Possibility of Rewriting the History of Chinese Political Thought
Discussant: Michael NYLAN, History, UC Berkeley

4:15-4:30 discussant comments and discussion

4:30 conference concludes

Download the agenda here.

PARTICIPANTS

Participants
Chinese caligraphy
Presenters
  • Allison BERNARD, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University
  • FENG Naixi, East Asian Languages and Civilization, University of Chicago
  • LI Linfang, Chinese Language and Literature, Peking University
  • LI Yifan, History of Art, Design, and Visual Culture, University of Alberta
  • TAN Yanbing, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Washington University in St. Louis
  • WANG Jiayao, Comparative Literature, University of South Carolina
  • WANG Tianya, Comparative Literature, University of California, Davis
  • WEN Zuoting, International Letters and Cultures, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • YIN Shoufu, History, University of California, Berkeley
  • ZHAN Zhenpeng, Fine Arts, the Chinese University of Hong Kong
  • ZHANG Jian, International Letters and Cultures, Arizona State University, Tempe
  • ZHANG Sijing, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Washington University in St. Louis
  • ZHANG Xiaohui, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Illinois at UrbanaChampaign

Discussants
  • Robert ASHMORE, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
  • Brian BAUMANN, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
  • Ronald EGAN, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University
  • Thomas HAHN, History, UC Berkeley
  • Yuming HE, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Davis
  • Regina LLAMAS, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University
  • William H. MA, Art History, UC Berkeley
  • Michael NYLAN, History, UC Berkeley
Keynote speaker
  • PENG Guoxiang, Qiu Shi Distinguished Professor of Chinese Philosophy, Intellectual History and Religions, School of Humanities, Zhejiang University; Director and Research Fellow, Center for Cultural China Studies, Institute for Advanced Humanities Studies, Peking University

Download the participant list here.

DIRECTIONS

Directions

The Institute of East Asian Studies is located on the fifth floor of 1995 University Avenue — two blocks west of the University Avenue entrance to campus at the intersection of Milvia Street and University Avenue. The building is three blocks from BART and also has a public parking garage which is accessed off Bonita Street.


Directions to the Berkeley campus
By BART

If traveling by BART, exit the Richmond-Fremont line at the Downtown Berkeley station (not North Berkeley). If going to the campus, walk east up Center Street (towards the hills) one block to the edge of campus. If going to IEAS, walk two blocks north to University Avenue, then one block west (away from the hills) to 1995 University Avenue.

From Interstate 80

To reach the campus by car from Interstate 80, exit at the University Avenue off-ramp in Berkeley. Take University Avenue east (toward the hills) approximately two miles until you reach the campus.

From Highways 24/13

To reach the campus from Highways 24/13, exit 13 at Tunnel Road in Berkeley. Continue on Tunnel Road as it becomes Ashby. Turn right at College Avenue and drive approximately one mile north to Bancroft Way.

Directions to the campus are also available at www.berkeley.edu/ visitors/ traveling.html

Parking

There are various public parking lots and facilities near campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.