Past Events

2006 Events

Confessions of a Diplomatic Interpreter
Cornelius Iida, Simultaneous Interpreter
January 20, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, East Asian Languages and Cultures




Speaking Pacific: A Poetic Fête
January 21, 2006
Center for Korean Studies, The Korean Center, Inc., The Intercultural Institute of California, The Korean Literature Translation Institute
Korean and American poets will "speak Pacific" in celebration of one hundred years of Korean modern poetry. Lee Ae-ju, Korean National Treasure, will open the program with dance, followed by poetry readings and discussion. Other participants include:
  • Kim Jong-Hae, President, Korean Poets Association, Poet
  • Kim Seung-Hee, Sogang University, Poet
  • Moon Chung-Hee, Dongguk University, Poet
  • Oh Sae-Young, Seoul National University, Poet
  • Shin Kyeong-nim, Poet
  • Robert Hass, U.C. Berkeley, Poet
  • Brenda Hillman, Poet
  • George Lakoff, U.C. Berkeley, Professor
  • Zack Rogow, Poet
  • Jerome Rothenberg, Poet
  • Richard Silberg, Poet
A reception and book signing will take place after the program.

The event is co-sponsored by the UC Berkeley Art Museum, which is home to the Theresa Hak Kyung Cha Archive and organizer of the 2001 retrospective of work by Cha, whose book Dictee will be featured in the program.

For further information, please contact Kay Richards at Kayrich@berkeley.edu or John Cha at John@MorningCalmBooks.com.



Exhibit: Ink Paintings by Changming Meng
January 24 – March 24, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
Changming Meng's Ink Paintings will be featured in the Institute of East Asian Studies lobby and conference room between January 24 and March 24, 2006. A reception featuring the artist will be held on Thursday, February 16, 2006 between 5:30 and 7:30 pm in the IEAS lobby.

Changming Meng is a Bay-area based artist and columnist whose work has been displayed in over 50 solo exhibits internationally. Recent shows include exhibits at the National Museum in Nanjing (PRC), Eslite Gallery in Taiwan as well as East Osaka Art Museum in Japan. In 2002, he received the Taiwan Jin Tin Literature Award for a book on Paul Klee.

For further background information, please visit Changming Meng's website at http://www.artcmm.com/

See also other IEAS Exhibits.



Behind "I'm Lovin' It": Some Observations of Globalization and Cultural Conflicts in Urban China
Yunxiang Yan, Professor, Anthropology, UCLA
January 27, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
What is the relationship between cultural flows and conflicts in the context of globalization and how has this relationship manifested itself in China? To answer these questions, I will first explore the meanings of some basic concepts in our understanding of cultures, conflict, and globalization. Then I will briefly review some noticeable cases of conflicts that are closely related to both culture and globalization in China. In the third section, I will discuss the implications of these cases and conclude the article by reiterating the important role of the Chinese state in managing cultural conflicts in the age of globalization.

Discussant: Xin Liu, Associate Professor, Anthropology, UC Berkeley



An Analytical Approach to the Moral Economy of the Late Tokugawa Rural Society
Mario Oshima, Economics, Osaka City University
January 27, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
As is in English social history or Southeast Asian studies, the concept of moral economy is employed also in Japanese late Tokugawa and early Meiji history and has built a fruitful research trend. In this talk, Oshima analyzes the social mechanism of the moral economy, a point largely unexplored so far, through a case study of one village based on komonjo document.



Japanese Polysemous Verb Yaru: Change of Location, Change of Possession and Their Extensions
Masanobu Ueda, CJS Visiting Scholar, Linguistics, Fukuoka Jogakuin University Jr. College
January 30, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
The Japanese verb yaru has a wide range of senses, from caused change of location, i.e., "to cause something/someone to go away", as in Taroo-wa mukoo-ni isu-o yatta "Taroo moved the chair away"; to change of possession, i.e., "to give something to someone equal or inferior in status", as in Taroo-wa musume-ni kozukai-o yatta "Taroo gave his daughter an allowance"; to intended action, i.e., "to do something", as in Taroo-wa syukudai-o yatta "Taroo did his homework". Though some Japanese linguists have shown a relationship between these senses, using a term such as tenzi-te "as a result of a semantic shift", within the framework of the traditional descriptive linguistics, some important questions remained unanswered in their analyses. What motivation is there behind semantic shifts? If two or more senses are somehow related, in what way are they related? And in what way are they different? The objective of this talk is to carefully examine each use of yaru (and other semantically related verbs for comparison), and provide an overall picture of the verb's semantic structures. If time permits, the speaker will discuss the nature of change of possession, and address some issues concerning the -te yaru construction.



Inside Stories from the rise & demise of the journal "Strategy & Management": 《战略与管理》杂志兴亡的内幕
Yeliang Xia, Professor, Economics, Peking University
February 1, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
This lecture will be conducted in Chinese.



Fighting HIV/AIDS Discrimination in Rural China
February 1, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Asia Society, Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation, AIDS Relief Fund for China
The Chinese government has made important strides in recent years to combat its growing HIV/AIDS epidemic, but many challenges remain. One of the most vexing is stigma and discrimination — particularly strong in rural areas — in the medical community, society at large, and the infected themselves. What are the dimensions of the problem? What steps are the government, NGOs, and the international community taking to address them? What are the most promising avenues for change? Join three renowned activists and experts on HIV/AIDS in China to learn more, and to learn how you can help.

Reservations required. Please contact the Asia Society at 415-421-8707. Tickets are $5 for Members and $10 for Non-Members.

Speakers:
Chung To is the founding Chairman of the Chi Heng Foundation. Based in Hong Kong, the Foundation is devoted to AIDS prevention among high-risk groups and to caring for AIDS patients and their children. Long term, ongoing projects in China include subsidizing HIV testing, donating milk to HIV-infected mothers, and subsidizing school fees for AIDS orphans. UNAIDS recently named the Chi Heng Foundation's MSM project as the best-practice model in China.

Eric Goosby, MD is CEO and Chief Medical Officer of Pangaea Global AIDS Foundation, a San Francisco-based non-profit that assists in-country and international partners in developing healthcare infrastructure for treating HIV/AIDS. Dr. Goosby has headed Pangaea's efforts in China since 2004. Pangaea is a partner in the Clinton Foundation's HIV/AIDS initiative in China, which assists the Ministry of Health in building a national program for HIV/AIDS care and treatment. Dr. Goosby was Deputy Director of the White House National AIDS Policy Office and Director of the Office of HIV/AIDS Policy of the Department of Health and Human Services in the Clinton Administration.

Humphrey Wou is Co-Chair of the AIDS Relief Fund for China, a San Francisco-based non-profit dedicated to supporting HIV/AIDS prevention, care, and treatment efforts in China. Born in Hong Kong, Mr. Wou speaks three Chinese dialects and works closely with grassroots NGO leaders to support pilot projects, organization start-ups, and other innovative, small-scale programs in China.

Program followed by reception.



Locating Buddhist Nuns in the Urban and Cultural Landscape of Early North India
Gregory Schopen, Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, UCLA
February 2, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
Older work on Buddhist nuns in India is not particularly interested in the question of where they actually lived. More recent work raises the issue, but is not sufficiently informed and a potential source of confusion. In fact several vinaya traditions contain ample evidence to indicate that the nuns their authors knew, or envisioned, lived — unlike monks — in towns and cities, and were required by rule to do so. Gregory Schopen will present and discuss several texts from one of these traditions, focusing on how their urban location affected the perception of nuns, the problems it created, and the economic activities that it made available to them. The recognition of the textual location of nuns in towns makes it possible to finally identify for the first time several Buddhist nunneries in the archeological record — three such sites will be briefly discussed — and to propose a demographic explanation for the decline or disappearance of Buddhist nuns from medieval India.

Gregory Schopen is a Professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at UCLA. His research focuses on the history of Indian Buddhism, the Mulasarvastiavda-Vinaya, early and medieval Mahayana Sutra literature, and Indian Buddhist epigraphy.



Social Repercussions of AIDS in China
February 2, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, AIDS Relief Fund for China
"The Most Probable Past, Present, and Future of HIV/AIDS in China"

James Chin, Professor, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley

Bringing together specialists from UC Berkeley, UCSF, and the greater Bay Area, this working group meets monthly through the 2005-2006 academic year to share current research findings, to provide a forum cross-discipline collaboration, and to educate the public about the AIDS epidemic in China.



How European abstract words took root in the Korean language
Kyung-Chul Jou, Professor of History, Seoul National University
February 3, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
A multitude of contemporary Korean words indispensable for the representation of thoughts and feelings, such as 'sahoi (society)', 'kwonri (rights)' or 'haengbok (happiness)', often believed to have developed from traditional Korean vocabulary, were in fact imported from Japan at the end of the 19th century. Japanese scholars translated the terms of Western civilization which they encountered shortly before such cultural contact by their Korean counterparts. Unfamiliar Western meanings rendered in Chinese characters were conveyed to the Korean people with relatively little resistance. The vocabulary entry of four dictionaries of foreign languages published in Korea, Japan, and in China in the turn of the century provide an overview of the adaptation of foreign words; and various contemporaneous periodical texts confirm that such abstract words were widely employed in Korean society by the early 20th century. The dawn of the 20th century thus marks the beginning of "modern" reasoning and western notions of life style and emotion that took shape through the use of abstract words quite familiar to Koreans nowadays.

Professor Jou, Kyung-chul teaches history at Seoul National University. He received his Ph.D in history at Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (Paris) with the thesis "Le Commerce des bois entre Amsterdam et Koenigsberg 1550-1650" which traced the origin of modernity in European economic history of early modern age. His research interests include economic and cultural encounters between East and West, the commercial networks of the Dutch East India Company, ecological history of the Discoveries, and cultural exchanges and acculturation on Asian waters. Seeking to understand the formation of Asian modern societies from a global perspective, he has published several books, such as Introduction to Dutch History and Global Perspectives on Cultural History, and Fernanad Braudel's Civilisation Materielle, Economie, et Capitalisme (translated).



A Text of Madness: The Multiple Versions of Kurutta Ippeiji
Aaron Gerow, Film Studies Program, Yale University
February 3, 2006
Film Studies Program
Page of Madness is often celebrated as the first truly artistic work in Japanese film history, the result of a collaboration between the filmmaker Kinugasa Teinosuke and the modernist writers of the "New Impressionist" school, particularly Kawabata Yasunari, who helped with the script. But is this text really as it has been described in film history? This talk will discuss competing readings of the film when it was released, as well as the problematic nature of the print that currently exists, to consider how much "page out of order" reflects conflicts over the historical definition of film in Japan.



Wisdom in Selection
Dr. Kai-Fu Lee, VP of Google, President of Google (China)
Pre-registration required
Lecture will be conducted in Chinese
February 4, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley Chinese Students & Scholars Association
Dr. Kai-Fu Lee, the most wanted man by Google and Microsoft, will talk about his personal experiences, Google, and the future of IT. Currently President of Google (China), Dr. Lee holds a doctorate in computer science from Carnegie Mellon University and a bachelor's degree in computer science with the highest honors from Columbia University. Lee is a Fellow of the IEEE. He began his career as an assistant professor at Carnegie Mellon University, where he developed the world's first speaker-independent continuous speech-recognition system. While at Carnegie Mellon, Lee also developed the world-champion computer program that plays the game "Othello," beating the human world champion in 1988. Dr. Lee then joined Apple, where he served for six years as vice president of the company's interactive media group, in charge of developing QuickTime, QuickDraw 3D, QuickTime VR, and PlainTalk speech technologies. Following this, he was the president of Cosmo Software, the Silicon Graphics Inc. (SGI) multimedia software business unit, then joined Microsoft in 1998, where he was the founder of Microsoft Research Asia, which has since become one of the best research laboratories in the world, with a prolific publication and product transfer record. Dr. Lee left Microsoft in July 2005.

Lecture will be conducted in Chinese



Myths and Realities of Wage Reform: Evaluating "Pay for Performance" in the Japanese Firm
Tsuyoshi Tsuru, Economics, Hitotsubashi University
February 6, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, IIS
Since the mid-1990s, many Japanese firms have implemented various personnel reforms to cope with long-standing economic stagnation and to induce greater work effort. It has been recognized that one of the major problems with Japan's HR system is that it puts too much emphasis on potential job ability and seniority. The solution proposed has been pay for performance. However, what does pay for performance mean in the context of the Japanese HR system? What effect does pay for performance have on intra-firm wage structure and on individuals' work effort? This presentation examines the processes and outcomes of the wage reforms in Japanese firms, using unique sets of personnel data and questionnaire survey results.



North Koreans Beyond the Border
February 9, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Graduate School of Journalism
The Graduate School of Journalism's Covering North Korea class, taught by Carolyn Wakeman in fall semester 2005, brought to campus a series of reporters from the field, scholars, NGO experts, and documentary filmmakers in an ongoing effort to assess information and commentary in the U.S. media about the reclusive "rogue state." In December two students traveled to South Korea and two to North China to meet North Korean migrants and defectors, and the missionaries and aid workers who support their efforts to survive and adapt after often harrowing journeys. This roundtable offers slides and first-person interview results that let you glimpse the situation North Koreans face when they journey beyond their borders. Other reporting, images, and seminar events can be viewed at http://journalism.berkeley.edu/projects/north_korea/

The Challenge of Adjustment in South Korea
Nearly 7,000 North Koreans live in South Korea today. Upon entry into South Korea, North Koreans spend their first months at Hanawon, a government resettlement center where they learn about South Korean laws, jobs, how to open a bank account and pay rent. Kai Ma will highlight the adjustment experiences of the North Koreans she interviewed, some of whom attend and graduate from South Korean universities while others struggle with psychological trauma, unemployment, discrimination, and cultural dislocation.

Aid Strategies: Social Services in Seoul
North Koreans living in South Korea face a difficult adjustment process after moving from the communist North to the capitalist South. Absent a sustained, comprehensive government program for North Koreans, a number of religious groups and NGOs have been attempting to address this need, offering classes, counseling and job training programs. Tomio Geron will discuss the educational and social service strategies of two of these groups as well as how external factors such as religion and the political context of North Korea–South Korea relations affects their work.

North Koreans' Economic Networks
The July 2002 economic reforms in North Korea were designed to generate hard currency for the North Korean state while forcing North Koreans to learn about capitalism through markets and the temporary suspension of the public distribution system. Since then, North Korean trade with China has swelled to at least $1.5 billion USD in 2005. As the North Korean government tries to come in from the cold, many of the people Ki-Min Sung interviewed in Northeast China and Seoul feel shuttered out. North Koreans continue to rely on an informal economy that depends on financial support from family members, strangers, and churches in China, Japan, and South Korea. Her talk will explore the impact of North Korea's economic reforms beyond its borders.

Of Migrants and Missionaries: North Koreans in China and Their Christian Shepherds
A majority of the estimated 10,000 to 100,000 North Koreans now living illegally in China have only one source of social support: an almost invisible network of Christian churches and missionary groups organized in loose terrorist-cell fashion to avoid being shut down by the Chinese government. Beginning with the famine of 1995-1997, when North Koreans started pouring across the border, Christian groups have been practically the only source of information about the plight of China's North Korean migrant population. Yet in reporting what missionaries in the network have to say, few in the Western press have bothered to examine the network itself. Josh Chin will describe how North Koreans survive in China given the current political climate and examine the attitudes, agendas and methods of the missionaries who help them.

Speakers:

Kai Ma is a second-year student at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism, where she is writing on North Koreans' adjustment in capitalist Seoul. She has reported on pop culture and Korean-American communities for Jane, LA Weekly, East Bay Express, and Hyphen. In 2005, she was the Kaiser Media Intern in Urban Health Reporting for Newsday in New York.

Tomio Geron is a second-year student in the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley. His work, focusing on the social effects of migration, especially in Asian communities, has been published in the San Francisco Chronicle, Oakland Tribune, Asianweek and other publications. He also previously worked as a radio producer for 99.5 FM-WBAI in New York City.

Ki-Min Sung is a student at UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism. She has reported for The San Diego Union Tribune and will write for the Dallas Morning News beginning in May. She has contributed military and political reporting to the KoreAm Journal since 2003. She was an award winning news producer of three syndicated programs on National Public Radio and Public Radio International.

Josh Chin is a second-year student in the concurrent master's degree program in journalism and Asian studies at UC Berkeley. He has spent four years living in China as a student and journalist, including a stint as copy editor at the government-run China Daily newspaper.



Daoist Modern: Inner Alchemic Body, Science, and Nation in Early 20th Century Shanghai
Xun Liu, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Chinese Studies
February 10, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
This paper deals with the reinvention of Daoist traditional inner alchemic theories and practice in early 20th century. Focusing on the career and writings of Chen Yingning 陳攖寧 (1880-1969), arguably the most influential scholar and practitioner of Daoist inner alchemy in modern China, I examine Chen Yingning's efforts at reformulating traditional Daoist cosmology and theories of the body and at advocating what he had termed as "the Immortals' Learning (xian xue 仙學)" in the context of the rising nationalism and spreading discourse of science in the first decades of the 20th century.

I show that Chen's reinterpretations of Daoist tradition began with his personal search for meaning and health, but widened into a lifelong struggle for cultural reconstruction of Daoism. Between early 1930s and mid 1940s, Chen served as the contributing editor of Yangshan banyue kan 揚善半月刊 (the Biweekly to Promote the Good), and later the Xiandao yuebao 仙道月報 (the Monthly of the Immortals' Way). In his published articles, correspondences, and monographs, Chen and a group of dedicated associates began to promote the Daoist inner alchemic meditative practice to the public in Shanghai. Using the distribution network of the proliferating modern journal, Chen and his associates developed a wide-ranging web of inner alchemic practitioner communities in various parts of China, and beyond.

I argue that the Chen Yingning and his colleagues' reforms of Daoist inner alchemy practice represented a self-conscious efforts among Daoist intellectuals to adapt and reinvent Daoist tradition to meet the changing political, cultural, and religious conditions of early 20th century China. Such efforts not only demonstrate the enduring vitality of Daoism as a religion, but they also embody the Daoist desire to create an alternative modernity to the political and cultural order which emerged in the early 20th century.

Discussant: Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, History, UC Berkeley



Yoshinokuzu's Fort-Da Games
Marghereta Long, Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages, UC Riverside
February 10, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
Tanizaki Ju'ichirô's 1930 novel Yoshinokuzu traces the genealogy both of the main character's mother, and of the Japanese imperial family. Leftist critics Watanabe Naomi and Komori Yôichi have recently followed outcast writer Nakagami Kenji to argue that the mother in Yoshinokuzu is a member of the Buraku class, and the novel a political masterpiece that shows how the Emperor System is founded in her abjection. This paper proposes that Yoshinokuzu is invested not in exposing abjection, but in overcoming it through an alternate version of mother-as-origin. Evidence comes from the novel's children's games, which I contrast to Freud's Fort-Da game from Beyond the Pleasure Principle.



Incestuous Ancestries: The Family Origins of Gautama Siddhartha and a Comparison with Stories of Abraham and Sarah in Genesis 12 & 20
Jonathan Silk, Assistant Professor of Asian Languages and Cultures, UCLA
February 10, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies, Stanford Center for Buddhist Studies




Doing Business in China: Panasonic's Growth Strategy
Yukio Shohtoku, Corporate Advisor, Matsushita Electric Industrial Company
February 14, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
Former Matsushita Executive Vice-President Yukio Shohtoku will give an overview of trade and investment opportunities in China from the perspective of a Japanese multinational company. He will discuss Panasonic's overseas investment strategy, comment in detail on the company's business experience in the PRC and give an overview of Panasonic's risk assessment and future growth strategies. Mr. Shohtoku served for many years as the Managing Director in charge of Panasonic's Corporate Division in China before being promoted to direct the company's Overseas Trade and Investment Division.



Electronic Resources on China — An Introduction
Susan Xue, Head Librarian, Center for Chinese Studies Library
February 15, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
In the ever-changing world of information technology, e-resources on China continue to grow rapidly and have become an invaluable tool for both social sciences and humanities research. In addition to English resources, the UCB libraries have started to acquire more and more electronic resources in Chinese. This brief introduction will provide a summary of some of the more useful electronic resources available at Berkeley. As the most useful and up-to-date electronic resources are in the vernacular language, focus will be on resources in Chinese, although some English language resources will also be introduced.



Reception: Ink Paintings by Changming Meng
Changming Meng, Bay-area based artist and columnist
February 16, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
Please join us for a reception with the artist, Changming Meng, on Thursday, February 16, 2006 between 5:30 and 7:30 pm in the IEAS lobby. Changming Meng's Ink Paintings will be on display in the lobby and conference room of the Institute of East Asian Studies until March 24, 2006.

Changming Meng is a Bay-area based artist and columnist whose work has been displayed in over 50 solo exhibits internationally. Recent shows include exhibits at the National Museum in Nanjing (PRC), Eslite Gallery in Taiwan as well as East Osaka Art Museum in Japan. In 2002, he received the Taiwan Jin Tin Literature Award for a book on Paul Klee.

For further background information, please visit Changming Meng's website at http://www.artcmm.com/.



Japan and China: Toward a Better Understanding
Akira Chiba, Assistant Press Secretary/Director of International Press Division, Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs
February 16, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Discussant: T.J. Pempel, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley



Theos Bernard and 1930s Tibet
Paul Hackett, Visiting Scholar, Center for Buddhist Studies, UC Berkeley
February 16, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies, The Bancroft Library
Paul Hackett will discuss the life and legacy of Theos Bernard. Theos Casimir Bernard (1908-1947), a nearly forgotten early pioneer of Indo-Tibetan religious studies and tantric yoga in America, was the third American ever to visit Tibet who, upon his return, promoted himself as the "White Lama of Tibet". Traveling to India and Tibet in the 1930s, Theos Bernard returned to America with a treasure trove of texts, film, still photos, statues, thankas, and ritual implements, which have since been scattered across the United States, including a sizable collection at UC Berkeley.

Paul Hackett is the author of A Tibetan Verb Lexicon: Verbs, Classes, and Syntactic Frames (Snow Lion, 2003) and is currently completing a biography of Theos Bernard.



Northeast Asian Regional Integration: South Korean Initiatives
Jehoon Park, University of Incheon
February 17, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
This study summarizes issues about the regional integration in Northeast Asia focusing on South Korean perspectives and initiatives. Since early 1990s there have been many studies and controversies about Northeast Asian regional cooperation in South Korea. The Asian Currency Crisis in 1997 was a turning point for making Asian countries including South Korea to pay attention to more regional integration than before. Since 2000 intellectuals as well as governments of South Korea have tried to make regional integration issues as new agenda for research and policies. The study analyzes the accumulated results of international conferences which have been annually held by a representative intellectuals' NGO for regional integration in South Korea, Northeast Asia Intellectuals' Solidarity Korea (NAIS Korea) since 2001. The study suggests that crucial factors such as North Korea Problem and roles of U.S. should be properly considered in drafting strategies and blue prints for regional integration in the region.

Dr Jehoon Park (U. Incheon) earned his Ph.D. in economics from Ohio State University. He studies Northeast Asian economies from a comparative perspective focusing on regional integration and transition of Russia and North Korea. He has led intellectuals' NGO movements for regional integration as General Secretary of Northeast Asia Intellectuals' Solidarity Korea (NAIS Korea) that was organized by 333 South Korean Scholars in 2001. The book edited by him, Dongbooka Gongdongcheryr hyanghayo (Toward Northeast Asian Community, Donga Ilbo, 2004) was selected one of excellent books by Ministry of Culture and Tourism of South Korea and recommended for Frankfurt International Book Fair.



Japanese Architecture Series — Hitoshi Abe: The Elephant and The Architecture
Hitoshi Abe, Architect, Professor at Tohoku University
February 22, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Architecture
Hitoshi Abe maintains is known for work that is spatially complex and structurally innovative, including the 1996 Yomiuri Media Miyagi Guest House, 2000 Miyagi Stadium, and the 2005 Comptoir Aobatei. Winner of the Architects Institute of Japan Award and Business Week/ Architectural Record Award in 2003, Abe is one of the most promising young architects in Japan today.



Fishing Your Wish: Sex Selective Abortion in Taiwan
Avi Ebenstein, Graduate Student, Economics, UC Berkeley
February 22, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Department of Demography
Administrative inquiries may be addressed to the Demography Office at 642-9800, or monique@demog.berkeley.edu



The 13th Annual Bakai
February 24, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
1:50–2:00: Opening Remarks: Alan Tansman
2:00–2:20: "The Inward and the Outward Man" Elisheva Perelman
2:20–2:40: "The Role of Zaibatsu on Industrialization in Meiji Japan, 1868-1912" John Tang
2:40–3:00: "Casualities of War: Neoliberalism, Katrina, and the Asian Tsunami" Peter Feng
3:00–3:20: "Changing Family Structures of Nepalese Transmigrants in Japan: Split-Households and Dual-Wage Earners" Keiko Yamanaka
3:20–3:40: "Japanese Girls' Negotiations with the Norms of Gender and Language at the Crossroads of Japanese Gakkyuu" Ayumi Miyazaki
3:40–4:00: "Introducing Japanese Historical Text Initiative" Yuko Okubo
4:00–4:15: Coffee Break
4:15–5:30: Panel on: Construction of the Japanese Periphery in Time and Space
4:15: "Sugar, Economy, and Identity in Prewar Okinawa" Luke Franks
4:30: "Between Science and Mythology: Competing Narratives of Place" John Ertl
4:45: "Invention of the Region: 'Culture Industry' in Modern Time — Vanishing/Illuminating 'Exotic' Local Identity" Kensuke Sumii
5:00: "Okinawan Diasporic Identities: Between Being a Buffer and a Bridge" Wesley Iwao Ueunten
5:15: Nelson Graburn, Discussant
5:30–6:00: Q&A and Comments



First Annual China Law Symposium: 第一届中国法研讨会
February 24, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Graduate Assembly at the University of California, Berkeley, Davis Polk & Wardwell, O’Melveny & Myers LLP, Van Pelt, Yi & James LLP, Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati
Berkeley Chinese Law Society 伯克利中国法学会 proudly presents First Annual China Law Symposium 第一届中国法研讨会 with a keynote address by Madame Xin Chunying (信春鹰) Vice Chairwoman, Legislative Affairs Commission, Standing Committee of the National People's Congress of the PRC 全国人大常委会法制工作委员会副主任.

Reception to Follow

Please RSVP to BerkeleyChineseLaw@gmail.com to reserve your seat!



The Virtual Shanghai Project
Christian Henriot, Professor, History, Lumière-Lyon 2 University
Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, History, UC Berkeley
February 28, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Virtual Shanghai is a research and resource platform on the history of Shanghai from the mid-nineteenth century to the present. The objective of the project is to write a history of the city through the combined mobilization of textual records, photographs and GIS-based maps. On the research side, the platform will offer various ways to step into the history of the city and follow its course at different levels over time. On the resource side, apart from providing original textual and visual documents, it develops a powerful cartographic tool for both analysis and creation of maps.



Current Legal Reform in Japan
Yuichi Sato, Partner, Abe Sato LLP; Professor, Tohoku University's School of Law
March 1, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
The transformation of Japan's legal system has been the subject of much debate. Professor Sato will discuss efforts to reform legal education and to institute a jury system in Japan.

Professor Yuichi Sato is a partner at Abe Sato LLP in Japan. He is a professor at Tohoku University's School of Law.



Buddhism and the Environment: The Birth of Flood Control Politics and Disaster Management in the Battle for Lhasa's Jo-khang Temple
Per Sörensen, Professor, Institute of Central Asian Studies, University of Leipzig, Germany
March 2, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
Per Sörensen will discuss the importance of environmental protection, particularly water conservation, in a Buddhist society. He will focus on the protection of one of the holiest sanctuaries in Central Asia: Jo-khang Temple in the heart of the Tibetan capital Lhasa. He will demonstrate how the struggle for pre-eminence in safeguarding and maintaining this holy site became an important component of hegemonic and political supremacy in Tibet.

Per Sörensen teaches at the University of Leipzig. He is a specialist in Tibetan and Bhutanese history and literature. The author of numerous books, his most recent publication is Thundering Falcon — An Inquiry into the History and Cult of Khra-'brug, Tibet's first Buddhist Temple.



Social Repercussions of AIDS in China
March 2, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, AIDS Relief Fund for China
Bringing together specialists from UC Berkeley, UCSF, and the greater Bay Area, this working group meets monthly through the 2005-2006 academic year to share current research findings, to provide a forum cross-discipline collaboration, and to educate the public about the AIDS epidemic in China.

The Circulatory System: Blood Donation, AIDS & the Social Body in China"
Kathleen Erwin, Research Administrator, Kaiser Foundation Research Institute




Reconsidering Nonprofit Human Service Organizations in Japanese Civil Society: Their Structure and Characteristics
Gen Miyagaki, CJS Visiting Scholar, Sociology, Konan University
March 3, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies




Korea's Recovery from the Asian Financial Crisis: An IMF success story?
Thomas Kalinowski, Postdoctoral Fellow
March 3, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
The structural adjustment programs of the International Monetary Fund (IMF) are widely criticized for the negative economic, social and political consequences entailed in bailing out international investors in participating countries. Yet South Korea's recovery from the Asian financial crisis is often seen as a successful example for IMF reforms. Facing serious problems of legitimacy, the IMF uses the Korean case to legitimize its policies. Does the case of Korea prove that the IMF critics were wrong and the IMF measures are in general adequate? I argue that the macroeconomic recovery in Korea is not only a success story but had some serious economic, social and political costs, and that the recovery was not the result of the IMF reforms, but was mainly due to the strong Korean export industry and intensive state interventions.

Thomas Kalinowski is currently a Postdoctoral Fellow at the University of California in Berkeley. He received his PhD from the Philipps Universitaet Marburg and the Freie Universitaet. He has worked at the Freie Universitaet Berlin as lecturer and research assistant and has been a lecturer at the Humboldt Universitaet, Berlin. He has published several articles on the Asian financial crisis, IMF structural adjustment programs, and reforms of the international financial system. His current research is on the consequences of structural adjustment and reforms in Korea since the crisis. He visited Korea many times as a visiting scholar at Samsung Economic Research Institute and Seoul National University and in 2005 he was postdoctoral fellow at the East West Center in Hawaii.



Architecture is More
Mark Dytham, Architect, Klein Dytham, Tokyo, Japan
March 8, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Architecture
Electrifying European architects Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham have been based in Tokyo, Japan, for nearly twenty years. Their earlier work with interactive construction fences and sinuous furnishings has yielded to an unusual and eclectic architectural practice, best known for their 2002 Bloomberg Ice and their extremely popular 2004 Leaf Chapel.



Tropes of "Home": Shifting Views of the Global Shanghai
Haiping Yan, Professor, Department of Theatre, Film, and Television, UCLA
March 8, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultures, Film Studies
Part of the special Brown-Bag Lunch Lecture series: "Between Stage and Screen: Modern Chinese Cinema and Drama in the 20th and 21st Century"

This talk explores the shifting configurations of the tropes of 'home' (jia) in contemporary Chinese culture and society. By working through a range of textual, architectural, performance and other visual materials specific to the city of Shanghai amidst its epic transformation, this talk attemps to raise some questions central to the studies of modern politics of visibility and disappearance, in an era of rapidly unfolding globalization.



  Bilateral Trade Agreements in the Asia-Pacific
March 9, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
The Asia-Pacific region has witnessed a rapid rise in bilateral preferential trade agreements in recent years. This trend could have potentially dramatic effects on the trading patterns of countries in the transpacific region and beyond. Some argue that these accords will spur multilateral negotiations, while others believe that they will irreparably damage the trading system. The first comprehensive analysis of this crucial phenomenon, Bilateral Trade Agreements in the Asia-Pacific examines the underlying political and economic factors driving these accords. Join us for a conversation with three contributors to the volume to discuss the underlying trade strategies of different countries and to understand how these new bilateral arrangements will fit or conflict with existing institutions in the Asia-Pacific and the WTO.

Panelists:
Vinod Aggarwal, Director, Berkeley APEC Study Center; Professor, Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley.
Richard Feinberg, Professor, Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies, UC San Diego.
T.J. Pempel, Director, Institute of East Asian Studies; Professor, Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley.

Program followed by reception.

Other programs in the IEAS Book Series: New Perspectives on East Asia.



Family Matters: Kinship Bonds and Buddhist History in Tibet
Bryan Cuevas, Assistant Professor of Buddhist and Tibetan Studies, Florida State University
March 10, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies, Stanford Center for Buddhist Studies




Into Space: The Political Economy of Urban Land Use in Xinji
Marc Blecher, Professor, Politics, Oberlin College
March 10, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Discussant: You-tien Hsing, Associate Professor, Geography, UC Berkeley



Consciousness, Self and Intermediate State: Some Problems in Theravada Buddhism
Mudagamuwe Maithrimurthi, Visiting Lecturer of Buddhist Studies, University of Michigan
March 15, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies, Stanford Center for Buddhist Studies




The Theater of Panorama: Modern Chinese Popular Theater at the turn of the 20th century
Weihong Bao, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley
March 15, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultures, Film Studies
Part of the special Brown-Bag Lunch Lecture series:
"Between Stage and Screen: Modern Chinese Cinema and Drama in the 20th and 21st Century"



Benevolence, Compassion, Joyousness and Equanimity: Cultivation of Mind, Ethics and Soteriology in Buddhism
Mudagamuwe Maithrimurthi, Visiting Lecturer of Buddhist Studies, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, University of Michigan
March 16, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
Mudagamuwe Maithrimurthi will discuss aspects of the so-called four Brahmic States (brahmavihâra) or Immeasurables (apramâna). The analysis will also contain an investigation of the pre-Buddhist background of these concepts, their historical development within the frame of early Buddhist thought and their Mahâyâna reinterpretation and re-evaluation.

Mudagamuwe Maithrimurthi currently teaches Buddhist Studies in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Michigan. He previously taught at the University of Leipzig, Germany. A native of Sri Lanka, he holds a Ph.D. in Classical Indology from the University of Hamburg, Germany.



Tension in the US-ROK alliance is structural, not emotional
Dave Kang, Dartmouth College
March 17, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
The tension in U.S.-R.O.K. relations over recent years has been unmistakable. Why is it there? Diverging interests, not emotion or naivete. Although both South Korea and the U.S. want to remain close allies, the partners aren't seeing eye-to-eye on regional priorities and long-term strategies. Apocalyptic concerns about the end of the U.S.-R.O.K. alliance are overblown. In fact, despite the gloom, both countries have done an excellent job cooperating on Iraq and maintaining the alliance so far. However, the tension does mean that both the U.S. and South Korea need to find a new basis for their relationship. South Korea also needs to find a way to integrate North Korea into the region, move beyond shrill nationalism and ultimately co-exist with Japan and China.

David Kang is an associate professor of government and adjunct associate professor and research director at the Center for International Business at the Tuck School of Business at Dartmouth College. He currently serves as visiting associate professor at Stanford University for the 2005-6 academic year and finishing a book on how China's rise is affecting regional politics in East Asia. Kang is author of Crony Capitalism: Corruption and Development in South Korea and the Philippines (Cambridge University Press, 2002) and co-author with Victor Cha of Nuclear North Korea: A Debate on Engagement Strategies (Columbia University Press, 2003). He has published scholarly articles in International Organization, International Security, Comparative Politics, International Studies Quarterly and Foreign Policy. Kang is a member of the editorial boards of Political Science Quarterly, Asia Policy, IRI Review, Business and Politics and the Journal of International Business Education. He received his AB with honors from Stanford University and his Ph.D. from U.C., Berkeley.



24th Annual San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival
March 17–26, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Asian American Media
This year the Institute of East Asian Studies is again co-presenting a number of special screenings during the 24th San Francisco International Asian American Film Festival. The selected films focus on China, Hong Kong, Japan, Korea and Taiwan. An overview of the co-presented films in alphabetical order is included below.

Café Lumiere (Kohi Jikou)
(Japan, 2004, 104mins, 35mm Color, Japanese w/E.S.)
In his minimalist and anti-dramatic approach to filmmaking, Hou Hsiao-hsien has often been considered the postmodern, contemporary equivalent of Yasujiro Ozu. With Café Lumiere, Hsiao-hsien paints a luminous portrait of modern Japan in this twenty-first century look at Ozu's 1953 masterpiece, Tokyo Story.
Sunday, March 19, 2006, 9:00 PM — Castro Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday, March 25, 2006, 4:45PM — Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley

Chinese Restaurants: Latin Passions
(Canada 2005, 80 mins, Color, English, Spanish, Mandarin, Cantonese w/E.S.)
Cheuk Kwan's globetrotting survey of family Chinese restaurants has turned the search for a good place to eat into a tribute to the resilience and adaptability of the Chinese diaspora. Latin Passions reveals how Chinese immigrants have not only survived but thrived as part of the complex mestizaje of Latin American life.
Saturday, March 18, 2006, 12:45 PM — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Thursday, March 23, 2006, 7:15 PM — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco

Dear Pyongyang (Annyong Pyongyong)
(Japan, 2005, 108mins, Video, Color, Korean & Japanese w/E.S.)
Dear Pyongyangis a portrait of a family divided between two different worlds. Searching for the secrets of her past, the ethnically Korean, raised-in-Japan director Yonghi Yang visits her three older brothers in North Korea, who as children were "returned" there by a father who believed that life in "the fatherland" would be easier than in Japan.
Wednesday, March 22, 2006, 7:00 PM — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Sunday, March 26, 2006, 2:00 PM — Camera 12 Cinema, San Jose

Grain In Ear (Mangzhong)
(South Korea/China, 2005, 109mins, 35mm, Color, Mandarin & Korean w/E.S.)
A patient Korean Chinese kimchee peddler discovers that she does have her limits in Zhang Lu's intricately orchestrated minimalist drama, a prizewinner at Cannes and Pesaro, and recipient of the Pusan Film Festival's New Currents Award for Best Film.
Saturday, March 18, 2006, 5:00PM — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Sunday, March 19, 2006, 4:45PM — Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley

Letter From An Unknown Woman (Yi Feng Mo Sheng Nu Ren De Lai Xin)
(China, 2004, 90mins, 35mm, Color, English w/E.S.)
A gorgeously photographed tale of unrequited love and passion, Xu Jinglei's adaptation of Stefan Zweig's memorable short story is a visual and romantic masterpiece. Unfolding over the course of twenty years, Letter chronicles the life of a woman whose self-sacrificial love for a man ultimately consumes her.
Friday, March 17, 2006, 7:00 PM — Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley
Sunday, March 19, 2006, 3:00 PM — Castro Theatre, San Francisco

Linda Linda Linda
(Japan, 2005, 114mins, 35mm, Color, Japanese w/E.S.)
After the break-up of her band, Kei decides to cobble together a scratch band of her own to compete in a high school music competition, and recruits Korean exchange student Son as her new vocalist, unfazed by the fact that Son doesn't yet speak Japanese, let alone sing it. They have just three days to master a set of songs by the Blue Hearts, Japan's best-loved punk band of the 1980s, and everything that can go wrong does.
Friday, March 17, 2006, 9:00PM — Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley
Wednesday, March 22, 2006, 9:30PM — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco

Rules Of Dating (Yeonaeui Mokjeok)
(South Korea, 2005, 114mins)
Two high school teachers decide to make sex, not romance, the basis of their relationship in this surprisingly hard-hitting look at love and intimacy — and the lack thereof — among South Korea's fabulously dressed and sexually repressed. Han Jae-rim's debut film marks new ground for South Korean cinema through its explicit portrayal of sexuality, and for romantic comedies in general, through its refreshingly adult take on the confusions of connection.
Friday, March 17, 2006, 9:30 PM — Castro Theatre, San Francisco
Saturday, March 25, 2006, 9:15PM — Camera 12 Cinema, San Jose



Buddhism at Dunhuang
March 18, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Silkroad Foundation
In the hundred years since the discovery of the hidden library at the Mogao cave complex near the oasis town of Dunhuang (Gansu Province, PRC), scholars have made significant strides towards preserving, cataloging, and interpreting the large number of manuscripts and material objects recovered from the site. In addition, they have greatly advanced our knowledge of both the layout and iconography of the caves themselves. Despite such advances, a number of questions regarding the actual practice of Buddhism at Dunhuang remain unanswered, including those related to the on-site production and circulation of Buddhist manuscripts, the development and cross-fertilization of local Buddhist traditions, as well as the function of the individual cave temples within the larger context of Buddhist ritual culture along the ancient Silk Road.

This workshop will attempt to address these issues in three panels, (1) Text and Image, (2) Esoteric Buddhism at Dunhuang, and (3) Ritual Aspects of the Mogao Caves, followed by a roundtable discussion on the state of Dunhuang studies. Confirmed participants include Stanley Abe (Duke University), Jacob Dalton (Yale University), Sarah Fraser (Northwestern University), Amanda Goodman (UC Berkeley), Kuo Liying (École française d'Extrême-Orient), Sonya Lee (University of Southern California), Ning Qiang (Connecticut College), Neil Schmid (North Carolina State University/University of Pennsylvania), Sam van Schaik (IDP, British Library, UK), Robert Sharf (UC Berkeley), Stephen Teiser (Princeton University), and Eugene Wang (Harvard University).



City, Country, Man, Woman: Recent Documentary Film From China
11:15 a.m. — The Storm 暴风骤雨, (89min., Mandarin, NO SUBTITLES)
1:25 p.m. — Before the Flood 淹没, (150 min., Mandarins with English subtitles)
4:35 p.m. — Floating 飘, (133 min., Mandarin with English subtitles)
7:30 p.m. — The Man 男人, (95 min., Mandarin with English subtitles)
Tickets $5 per screening, available online at www.ticketweb.com
March 19, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Tickets $5 per screening.

The Storm 暴风骤雨
(Mandarin/No Subtitles)
2005 / 89 minutes / Digital Betacam
Location: Yuanbao, Heilongjiang Province
拍摄地点:黑龙江 省 元宝镇
Directors: Jiang Yue and Duan Jinchuan
Synopsis: In 1945, following the retreat of Japan, China's rival parties (Nationalists and Communists) began a heated struggle for China's Northeast. Whoever could gain control of china's industrial center in the Northeast could hold all of China. In the autumn of 1946, a small communist party work team quietly slipped into the Heilongjiang Province town of Yuanbao. Their arrival shattered the peace of Yuanbao, as a land reform movement of unprecedented proportions would now commence. Quickly, the work team split the lands and people between hired farmers, subsistence farmers, mid-level farmers, rich farmers and landlords, opening up class struggle. They instigated the poor and subsistence farmers to fight against the landlords and split their holdings. Yuanbao at the time had a population of seven hundred households, and 73 landlords and rich farmers were killed, at an average of one death for every ten households. All of the land was redistributed. According to the strict distribution standards of class consciousness in Yuanbao, no landlord would ever reappear. The landlord and rich classes were wiped out. To protect the newly distributed lands, the villagers joined into the military. The balance of power in the war for the Northeast had been transformed. After the establishment of the People's Republic of China, and ten years of reforms, the descendents of those landlords and rich farmers began renting and buying land from their fellow villagers. Their slowly reacquired their lands and became big grain producing families.

简介: 1945 年,日本投降之后,国共两党在东北展开了激烈的争夺。谁能夺取当时中国的工业基地东北,谁就能夺得中国的天下。 1946年秋天,一小队共产党的工作队悄悄来到了黑龙江的元宝镇。他们的进驻打破了元宝镇的宁静,一场空前的土地变革运动即将降临在他们的头上。 很快,工作队把村子里的人划分成雇农、贫农、中农、富农和地主这五个主要层次,展开了阶级斗争。他们发动贫雇农斗地主、分田地、挖浮财。在当时,元宝镇 共有七百户人家,地主富农被砍杀枪毙了 73 人,平均每 10 户就有一人被杀,全部的土地和生产资料被重新平均分配。而按照严格的阶级意义划分,元宝镇没有一 户可以构成地主成分。 地主和富农阶级被消灭了。为了保卫刚刚分得的土地,农民们开始报名参军。东北战场的力量对比迅速发生了转变。 新中国成立了,在经历了几十年的变革之后,当年那些地主富农的后代将同村人的土地或租或买,又将土地慢慢归拢起来,形成了产粮的大户。

Jiang Yue: Born in 1962, Jiang Yue graduated from the Faculty of Literature at the China Drama Institute and joined the Beijing Film Studio in 1988. He began making independent documentary films in 1991. His major works include Tibetan Theater Troupe of Lhama Priests, The Residents of Lhasa's Potala Square, Catholics in Tibet, The Other Bank, A River Stilled, This Happy Life, The War of Love, and The Storm.

蒋 樾 年出生, 1988 年毕业于中国戏曲学院文学系编剧专业。同年入北京电影制片厂工作,参予拍摄故事片《龙年警官》、《过年》(任副导演)。 1991 年开始独 立制作纪录片, 1993 年开创《东方时空? 生活空间》短纪录片模式。主要作品有《喇嘛藏戏团》、《拉萨雪居民》、《天主在西藏》、《彼岸》、《静止的 河》、《幸福生活》、《爱情战争》、《暴风骤雨》等。

Duan Jinchuan: Born in 1962, Duan Jinchuan graduated from the Beijing Broadcasting Institute in 1984 and went to work at Tibet TV Station. In 1992, he came back to Beijing and became an independent documentary filmmaker. His major works include The Square, No. 16 Barkhor South Street, The Secret of My Success, The War of Love, and The Storm.

段锦川: 1962 年出生于中国成都。 1984 年毕业于北京广播学院,之后去西藏工作,曾就职于西藏电视台。 1992 年回到北京,成为独立纪录片制作人,导演。主要纪录片作品有《广场》、《八廓南街 16 号》、《沉船- 97 年的故事》、《拎起大舌头》、《爱情战争》和《暴风骤雨》等。

The Man 男人
(Mandarin with English subtitles)
2003 / Color / DV / 95 minutes
Location: Shanxi
拍摄地点:山西太原
Director: Hsinyu Hu
作者:胡新宇
Synopsis: With nothing better to do while he waits for a new job, Su, an unemployed bachelor, spends his time attending to his love life, making phone calls to a matchmaker and hooking up with women. Shi, also a bachelor, often comes over to stay with Su and the filmmaker to enjoy a hot meal while he waits for his girlfriend to call from Guangzhou. Aiming his camera at the story unfolding around his apartment, the filmmaker captures youth as it comes of age in all its contradictory glory, full of hormones, arrogance and obstinacy.
简介 老 苏下岗,被学校开除后就住在了我(胡新宇)这儿。极度痛苦时,就用酒精来麻醉自己。去北京找了趟工作回来,就接到婚姻介绍所打来的电话,从此电话就成了他 的知音。史霖也是单身一人,他的女友在广州。白天,代完他不多的几节课后,就提着气枪在外打鸟。晚上,在我这里,有时蹭顿饭。但他最终目的还是用我的电话 说服他的女友来太原和他一起做些事情。平时大家在一起,没有太多的爱好。除了有时候在外练练瞄准,在屋里坐着闲聊之外,更多时间和精力还是放在了电话联络 上。终于,史霖等到了女友辞职过来的消息;在我的再三追问下,老苏破了他立志不谈女友的口,道出了他几年前的一段感情经历。现实不是一本固定的教科书。当 老苏再一次为老问题困惑的时候,那些多年的经验和痛苦,早已经被他满腹哲理的牢骚所取代。

Hsinyu Hu: Born in 1969, Hsinyu Hu is an independent film producer. In 2000, he began to shoot the DV film Transition, which unfortunately came to a premature end. The Man is his only completed work.

胡新宇 独立制作人, 1969 年 4 月 22 日出生。 2001 年 2 月开始拍 DV 电影《过渡》,中途夭折, 2001 年底拍摄的纪录片《男人》为本人的第一部完整的 DV 长片。

Floating
(Mandarin with English subtitles)
2005 / Color / 133 minutes
Location: Guangzhou, Guangdong and Nanyang, Henan Province
拍摄地点:广州 河南南阳
Director: Huang Weikai
作者:黄伟凯
Synopsis: Yang is a drifter from Henan who plays his guitar on the streets of Guangzhou for spare change and dreams of becoming a pop star. As he approaches 30, he has lost sight of his dreams and realizes that he may never realize his aspirations. He spends his days running away from security guards and city inspectors and chasing off competitors in order to make a living. His love life is a mess, and day by day he grows more depressed and numb. His mood and life situation are unstable as he floats through existence. Finally, just as he turns 30, he is caught by city authorities and sent home.
简介: 杨 是一位来自河南农村的流浪歌手,在城市商业中心的过街隧道里以卖唱为生。在三十岁的这年里,当初满怀的梦想早已成为泡影,他知道自己难以成为一名歌星。他 每天都要跟驱赶他的隧道保安或城管周旋,同时还要排挤其他街头艺人,以保饭碗。另外他新旧情人间的情感纠葛,也使他变得更加痛苦和麻木。无论他的内心世界 和现实生活,一切都处于漂浮不定的状态之中。最后,他在唱歌时被收容并遣返回家。
Director: Huang Weikai (b. 1972, Guangdong) graduated from the Guangzhou Fine Arts Academy in Chinese Painting in 1995. He has been an independent filmmaker since 2002.
黄伟凯: 1972 年生于广东, 1995 年毕业于广州美术学院国画系, 2002 年作为自由职业者开始独立拍片。

Before the Flood 淹没
2004 / Color / 150 minutes
(Mandarin with English subtitles)
Location: Fengjie, Chongqing
拍摄地点:重庆奉节
Directors: Li Yifan and Yan Yu
作者:李一凡 鄢雨
Synopsis: In order to build the world's largest hydroelectric dam, the area surrounding the Three Gorges will be turned into the world's largest reservoir. Beginning in 2003 and to be completely filled by 2009, the flooding will wipe towns, villages, fertile land, archeological sites and natural wonders located along the Yangtze River off the map forever. Even Fengjie, famous for being the home of the Tang Dynasty poet Li Bai, will disappear under the waves. This film faithfully follows the whole devastating process as the advancing waters submerge Fengjie in the first trial flooding in 2002. It relates the story of an ex-volunteer soldier owner of a coolie hostel who is about to lose his livelihood and the story of a Protestant parish in decline because its members are slowly moving away. It also relates the stories of the cadres in charge of the resettlement and the subsequent erupting disputes and emotional turmoil. Before the Flood is both directors' first film.
简介: 为建造世界上最大的水电站 — 中国长江三峡水电站,长江三峡地区将建成世界上最大的水库。从 年起水库开始蓄水,至 2009 年水库蓄水完毕,沿江的城镇、乡村、文物、自然景观不少将被淹没。因中国古代最伟大诗人李白的诗而闻名天下的奉节县也在其中。 本片忠实记录了 2002 年为保证三峡水库第一次蓄水成功,在水位上涨前,奉节老县城搬迁毁灭的全过程。记录了一位开苦力旅店的志愿军老人即将失去生活依靠的 无奈;一座基督教教堂为搬迁的利益而丧失信仰的过程;以及一群移民干部和一群城市贫民在搬迁、拆除旧城过程中种种无法回避的矛盾纠葛和痛苦的内心挣扎。 《淹没》是两位导演的第一部作品。
Li Yifan: Born in 1966 in Chongqing, Li Yifan studied at the Central Drama Academy in Beijing from 1986 to 1991, after which he worked in advertising in Guangzhou. In 1996, he returned to Chongqing to become a writer. From 2000 to 2001 he was the Editor in Chief of Yu Zhou Fuwu Bao. In 2001 he began working in documentary film production and co-founded Fanyu Studio.
李一凡: 1966 年生于重庆。 1986-1991 年就读于北京中央戏剧学院, 1991-1996 年在广州从事策划和广告工作, 1996-1999 年在重庆写作读书, 2000-2001 年在重庆《渝州服务导报》任主编, 2001 年起和鄢雨组建 "凡雨工作室" 开始纪录片创作。
Yan Yu: Yan Yu was born in Chongqing in 1971. He launched his career as a photojournalist at the Chongqing TV Station News Center where he worked from 1994 to 1998. Afterward, he moved on to Beijing and worked in documentary and advertisement photography. He began working in documentary film production and co-founded Fanyu Studio in 2001.
鄢雨: 1971 年生于重庆, 1994 年 1998 年在重庆电视台新闻部做摄影记者。 1998-2001 年在北京做纪录片和广告片摄影师。 2001 年起和李一凡组建 "凡雨工作室" 开始纪录片创作。



Documentary Film Roundtable Discussion
March 20, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
"The meaning of the new documentary movement in China is that it establishes a perspective from the grassroots, revealing ordinary people's everyday struggles and emotional lives. As a supplement and critique of the dominant ideology, it provides an opportunity for individuals to be present in the making of history. It is therefore a form of social democracy. The new documentary movement is the embodiment and the product of China's momentous social and human transformations since the 1980s." — Lu Xinyu, The New Documentary Movement in Contemporary China, 2003

Hu Xinyu 胡新宇, Director: The Man
Huang Weikai 黄伟凯, Director: Floating
Li Yifan 李一凡, Director: Before the Flood
Lu Xinyu 呂新雨, Professor, Journalism, Fudan University
Weihong Bao, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley
Shana J. Brown, Visiting Assistant Professor, History, UC Berkeley
Youtien Hsing, Associate Professor, Geography, UC Berkeley
Seio Nakajima, Ph.D. Candidate, Sociology, UC Berkeley
William Schaefer, Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages & Cultures, UC Berkeley
Susan Xue, Head Librarian, Center for Chinese Studies Library, UC Berkeley
Peter Zhou, Director, East Asian Library, UC Berkeley


Lecture will be conducted in English and Chinese with English translation



Women and Poetry in 20th Century Japan: Ishigaki Rin (1920-2004)
Janine Beichman, Japanese Literature, Daito Bunka University
March 20, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, EALC
In Japan, the 20th century renaissance of poetry by women is associated most closely with Yosano Akiko, who first came to prominence at the turn of the century. But there was another renaissance, part of the general flowering of culture that characterized the immediate post-World War II period, and Ishigaki Rin was one of the poets who found her strength then. By the time she died two years ago, Ishigaki, in spite of a relatively small output, was recognized as one of the giants of contemporary Japanese poetry. I will focus on Ishigaki Rin's poetry, reading it aloud in translation and in Japanese, with excursions as appropriate into historical context, Ishigaki's poetics, and various problems of translation. The objective is to convey Ishigaki's compelling voice in English.



  Kevin J. O'Brien, Rightful Resistance in Rural China
Kevin J. O’Brien, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley
March 22, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
How can the poor and weak "work" a political system to their advantage? Drawing mainly on interviews and surveys in rural China, Kevin J. O'Brien and Lianjiang Li show that popular action often hinges on locating and exploiting divisions within the state. Otherwise powerless people use the rhetoric and commitments of the central government to try to fight misconduct by local officials, open up clogged channels of participation, and push back the frontiers of the permissible. This "rightful resistance" has far-reaching implications for our understanding of political change in contemporary China.

Kevin J. O'Brien is a Professor of Political Science at UC Berkeley. He is the author of Reform Without Liberalization: China's National People's Congress and the Politics of Institutional Change as well as numerous articles on legislative politics, local elections, and village political reform.

Program followed by reception.

Other programs in the IEAS Book Series: New Perspectives on East Asia.



The Vocal Hand of Opera in (Horror) Movie Theater: The Vicissitudes of the Voice in Film Adaptations of "The Dream of the Red Chamber"
Ling Hon Lam, Ph.D candidate, University of Chicago
March 22, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultures, Film Studies




Taiwan: Advancing Peace and Prosperity — Ma Ying-jeou in Conversation with T.J. Pempel
Ma Ying-jeou, Mayor of Taipei, and Chairman of the Kuomintang (KMT)
March 24, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
Free and open to the public.



Exhibit: Hideo Hagiwara — Mount Fuji Woodblock Prints
March 27 – August 11, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
Mount Fuji is renowned worldwide as Japan's highest and most perfectly shaped mountain. Revered since ancient times by followers of both the Shinto and Buddhist faiths and serving as a metaphor in classical poetry, Mount Fuji has taken on many roles in pre-modern Japan. In more recent times artists have projected a wide range of personal interpretations onto what was once regarded as an eternal, unchanging symbol.

This exhibit highlights prints from Hideo Hagiwara's 'Thirty-six Fujis' (Sanju-roku Fuji) series. Hagiwara, who has a house near Mount Fuji, and thus was able to observe the mountain during different seasons and times of the day, produced the series between 1977 and 1986, continuing a long tradition of representations of this famous mountain.

Hideo Hagiwara is one of the most distinguished woodblock print artists in Japan today. During the course of his long career he has exhibited all over the world and has won numerous prizes. His prints are held by major museums in Japan, the US and Europe, including the Museum of Modern Art, New York; the Art Institute, Chicago; the Victoria and Albert Museum, London; and the Vienna National Museum of Art.

A selection of Hideo Hagiwara's Japanaese woodblock prints will accompany the Yukimi Kambe Viol Consort's presentation of New Sounds from Old Instruments on March 31, 2006.

This program is organized in conjunction with Mount Fuji: Hidden in Plain Sight.

See other IEAS Exhibits.



  New Sounds from Old Instruments — The Yukimi Kambe Viol Consort
March 31, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Cal Performances
Music for the viol by contemporary Japanese composers will accompany a slideshow of 20th century Japanese art prints. The Yukimi Kambe Viol Consort was founded in Japan in 1983, its aim to perform both traditional repertoire for viols and a wide selection of contemporary music. The artists are known both for traditional viol music (including works by Purcell, Gibbons, Bach, and Charpentier) and for introducing new pieces to the repertoire, and have already given premieres of more than 80 compositions written expressly for the Consort. This evening will focus on a repertoire of music written by contemporary composers for traditional European instruments.

The accompanying slide show will cover a variety of different modern Japanese artists, some well known and others more contemporary. The presentation will showcase different methods of print-making including woodblock print, lithography, etching and mezzotint.

A selection of Japanese woodblock prints by Hideo Hagiwara, one of the most distinguished woodblock print artists in Japan today, will be on display in the IEAS lobby and conference room. The exhibit, "Hideo Hagiwara — Mt. Fuji Woodblock Prints," highlights prints from Hagiwara's 'Thirty-six Fujis' (Sanju-roku Fuji) series.

Cal Performances presents the Yukimi Kambe Viol Consort on Saturday, April 1, 2006, at Berkeley's First Congregational Church.

Program Schedule
New Sounds from Old Instruments
Sang Hwa (1999) by Yoko Sato
Hibikiatte / Ame no youni / Tawamurete / Kaze no youni hayaku

Space Line (2005) by Toshi Ichiyanagi

A Cat in Springtime (1990) by Tsutomu Mizuno
Cat's Eyes

Emotion (2002) by Shin'ya Takahashi

Seismogramme I VI III (1994) by Rudolf Kelterborn

Tilliboyo (Sunset) (1990) by F. Musa Suso

Fantasia Indian (1993) by David Loeb

Rustles in the Court Consort (1994) by Kikuko Massumoto

Shireutok Suite (2005) by Ryouhei Hirose

Dance Capriccioso of Little Fox / Nocturn of Big Owl / Toccata of Woodpecker

New Sounds from Old Instruments is free and open to the public.



New Directions in Research on Chinese Law<
April 5, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Boalt School of Law
Boalt Hall and the Center for Chinese Studies are jointly sponsoring a workshop with four specialists on Chinese law who will discuss their work in progress. Two are fellows at the Center for Chinese Law at Yale, and two are attorneys on the staff of the Congressional-Executive Commission on China (CECC) in Washington, D.C. Two Berkeley faculty members (Stanley Lubman and Kevin O'Brien) and two graduate students (Jennifer Choo, JSP and Frances Feng, JSP&1L) will comment on their talks.

8:45 — Welcome

9:00 — Pamela Phan, CEEC: Property rights and increased urbanization
Comments by Frances Feng, JSP and Boalt 1L

10:00 — Neysun Mahboubi, Yale: Citizen litigation against administrative agencies
Comments by Stanley Lubman, Lecturer at Boalt

10:45 — Coffee break

11:00 — Keith Hand, Yale: Bottom-up law reform in China's authoritarian system
Comments by Jennifer Choo, Sociology

12:00 — Lunch

1:00 — Carl Minzner, CECC: Interplay between citizens' petitions and formal legal institutions
Comments by Kevin O'Brien, Professor and Chair, Center for Chinese Studies



Japanese Proletarian Cultural Production: Japanese Inflection of Global Proletarian Cultural Production in the First Decades of the 20th Century
April 5, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, EALC
Presentations:
The Japanese Empire, Internationalism, and Proletarian Arts (Heather Bowen-Struyk)
From Proletarian Realism to the Realism of Empire: Liberated Abjects and Laboring Subjects (Mark Driscoll)
In the Tracks of Kobayashi Takiji, Forgotten/Cherished Martyr (Norma Field)
Proletarian Home Movies (Abe Markus Nornes)
Respondents: Edward Fowler (UC Irvine), Jonathan Hunt (Stanford University)



Western Theatre, Japanese Shinpa, and the Formation of Chinese Wenmingxi
Steven Liu, Ph.D. candidate, Department of Theatre Arts, University of Pittsburgh
April 5, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultures, Film Studies
Part of the special Brown-Bag Lunch Lecture series: "Between Stage and Screen: Modern Chinese Cinema and Drama in the 20th and 21st Century"

Focusing on the decade following the 1907 Spring Willow Society (Chunliu She) production of Uncle Tom's Cabin in Tokyo, this paper attempts to trace the impact of Japanese shinpa, the first form of modern Japanese theatre, as well as that of Western theatre through shinpa, on the formation of Chinese wenmingxi (civilized drama). Some of the best-known participants in wenmingxi started their acting careers through watching shinpa productions in Tokyo and staging their own versions with the help of well-known shinpa actors like Fujisawa Asajira. Their productions garnered praises from prominent Japanese critics like Ihara Seiseien and Doi Shunsho. Returning to Shanghai, they brought with them a set of Westernized theatrical conventions that gradually won the acceptance of the Chinese audience. A study of the wenmingxi repertoire reveals shinpa's influence in adaptations of both shinpa versions of European plays like La Tosca and La Dame aux Camelias and original shinpa productions including such classics as Cuckoo (Hototogisu) and The Gold Demon (Konjiki Yasha). In addition, many original wenmingxi plays followed either early shinpa's social commentary tradition in shosei shibai or the domestic drama of late Meiji shinpa. In terms of acting, shinpa's influence can be traced from the styles of many wenmingxi stars, the use of role categories, and female impersonators who followed shinpa onnagata.



Challenges to East Asian Security: Perspectives from the Region
April 5, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
Five visiting fellows from the Brookings Institution's Center for Northeast Asian Policy Studies (CNAPS) will participate in a roundtable discussion on East Asian international relations and the US role in the region. Each fellow will give a brief presentation before the floor will be opened to general discussion. Established in 1998, CNAPS performs research, analysis, and outreach designed to enhance policy development and understanding on the pressing political, economic and security issues facing Northeast Asia.

Participants:
Wonhyuk Lim, Korea Development Institute and Korea National Strategy Institute — "Energy Cooperation in Northeast Asia"
James Tang, University of Hong Kong — "The Energy Issue and Chinese Foreign Policy"
Alexander Vorontsov, Russian Academy of Sciences — "Current Russia-North Korea Relations: Challenges and Achievements"
Yuan-Kang Wang, National Chengchi University, Taiwan — "Chinese Grand Strategy and U.S. Primacy: Is China Balancing American Power?"
Yang Bojiang, China Institute of Contemporary International Relations, PRC — "Establishment of a Liaison Organization: For Implementation of the Six-Party Talks' Outcome and Beyond"

Moderator: T.J. Pempel, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley



Covering HIV/AIDS in China
April 6, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Graduate School of Journalism
With an estimated 70,000 new HIV infections in China in 2005, the AIDS epidemic shows no signs of abating, but efforts at public education are spreading. Top political figures now greet AIDS patients, CCTV ran a half-hour profile of an HIV-positive university student, the NBA distributed AIDS-awareness ads to basketball fans throughout the 2004-5 season. The media increasingly covers the epidemic, and seven journalists from leading news organizations across the country, at the end of a fact-finding trip to the U.S., will discuss their experiences reporting on HIV/AIDS.

Mr. LIU Jianqiang, Senior Reporter, Southern Weekend (Beijing Bureau)
Ms. LIU Qing, Deputy Managing Editor, Southern Metropolitan Daily (Guangzhou)
Mr. LIU Shaolong, Reporter, Xiao Xiang Morning Post (Changsha)
Ms. PING Ping, Senior Reporter, Henan Daily (Zhengzhou)
Mr. SUN Jian, Deputy Supervisor, Women's Channel, Changsha Television (Changsha)
Mr. ZHANG Jie, Executive Producer, "News Probe," CCTV (Beijing)
Mr. ZHANG Xiang, Editorial Board Member and Assistant Managing Editor, Caijing Magazine (Guangzhou Bureau)



Contemporary Issues in Japanese Education and Society
April 8, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, International & Area Studies, Center for East Asian Studies, Stanford University
Haruhiko Kanagae, Senshu University
Taeyoung Kim, Fukuoka University of Education
Yoshiro Nabeshima, Research Center for Human Rights, Osaka City University
Mamoru Tsukada, Sugiyama University
Hidenori Fujita, International Christian University
Manabu Sato, Tokyo University
Akira Sakai, Ochanomizu University
Takehiko Kariya, Tokyo University
Naomi Noiri, University of Ryukyus
Saori Kunoshi, University of Ryukyus



What Makes Holy Scriptures Holy? Rethinking the Idea of a Buddhist Canon
Oliver Freiberger, Assistant Professor, Department of Asian Studies, University of Texas
April 10, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies, Stanford Center for Buddhist Studies




'Fictionalizing' Indigenous Mourning: Taiwanese Funerals under Japanese Imperialization
Huei-chu Chu, CJS Visiting Scholar, Social Science, Okinawa Prefectural University of Arts, Naha
April 10, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies
The author discusses representations of indigenous practices of mourning in three Japanese-language fictions in the historical context of assimilative Japanese imperialization in colonial Taiwan during the period 1937-1945. Paying particular attention to how divergent observing positions function in the "othering" process, the author deal with these "ethnographic fictions as a site where colonial contact, imperial policy, and "in-between" subject position interpenetrate.



  Karl Taro Greenfeld, China Syndrome
Karl Taro Greenfeld, former editor of TIME Magazine’s Asian edition
April 11, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Graduate School of Journalism, Asia Society of Northern California
As the world braces for a potential Avian Flu pandemic, the 2003 SARS outbreak now seems even more relevant as the harbinger of crises to come. In China Syndrome Karl Taro Greenfeld tracks the outbreak of SARS from the bedside of one of the first Chinese victims to cutting-edge labs where researchers struggled to identify and subdue the virus to the war rooms at the World Health Organization where officials desperately tried to determine the extent of the epidemic. In exploring how globalization, coupled with rampant development, is ushering in a new chapter in the history of human health, Greenfeld gives a crucial blueprint for how an epidemic starts — and how next time it might not be stopped.

Karl Taro Greenfeld has been an editor and writer for TIME and Sports Illustrated, among other publications. From 2002 until 2004 he was the editor of TIME Magazine's Asian edition, based in Hong Kong. The author of two previous books about Asia, Speed Tribes and Standard Deviations, he currently lives in New York City.

Other programs in the IEAS Book Series: New Perspectives on East Asia.



Two Dreams in One Bed: Empire, Social Life, and the Origins of the North Korean Revolution in Manchuria
Hyun Ok Park, Department of East Asian Studies, New York University
April 11, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
Rethinking a key epoch in East Asian history, Hyun Ok Park formulates a new understanding of early-twentieth-century Manchuria. Drawing on a rich archive of Korean, Japanese, and Chinese sources, Park represents a compelling analysis of the constitutive effects of capitalist explanation on the social practices of Korean migrants in the region. The book de-centers the nation-state as the primary analytic rubric, in emphasizing the role of global capitalism in understanding nationalism, colonialism, and their immanent links in social space.

Hyun Ok Park (Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Studies, New York University, received her Ph.D. in Sociology from University of California, Berkeley, 1994. In addition to authoring numerous articles on Korean society she has published "Two Dreams in One Bed: Empire, Social Life, and the Origins of the North Korean Revolution" in Manchuria Duke University Press, 2005). She is currently at work on a new volume, Neoliberal Democracy, History, and the Politics of Migrant Labor: Korean Diaspora and Unification in the Post-Cold War.



Reflections on the Legacy of Tian Han: Proletariat Modernism and So Much More
Xiaomei Chen, Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Davis
April 12, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultures, Film Studies
Part of the special Brown-Bag Lunch Lecture series: "Between Stage and Screen: Modern Chinese Cinema and Drama in the 20th and 21st Century".



Social Repercussions of AIDS in China
April 13, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, AIDS Relief Fund for China
"Commercial Sex Workers and HIV/AIDS: An historical and comparative approach"

Christian Henriot, Professor, History, Lumière-Lyon 2 University
Tanya Jones, Graduate Student, Sociology, UC Berkeley
Ethan Yeh, Graduate Student, Economics, UC Berkeley

Bringing together specialists from UC Berkeley, UCSF, and the greater Bay Area, this working group meets monthly through the 2005-2006 academic year to share current research findings, to provide a forum cross-discipline collaboration, and to educate the public about the AIDS epidemic in China.



Landscape Plasticity vs. State Landscape Visions: Akha Land Use in the Modernizing States of China and Thailand
Janet Sturgeon, Professor, Geography, Simon Fraser University
April 13, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies
This talk is drawn from my book, Border Landscapes: The Politics of Akha Land Use in China and Thailand, University of Washington Press (2005). For centuries, people who call themselves Akha have practiced shifting cultivation in the mountainous region that now links China, Burma, Laos, and Thailand. Border Landscapes examines their inclusion within the national borders and state imaginaries of China and Thailand over the past 60-70 years. The book focuses on Akha access to resources and land use as mediated by two processes: their location on the Burma border and their incorporation within modernizing nation-states. This talk will cover the second aspect, as Akha and the forests around them became enclosed within China and Thailand under dramatically different terms, with distinct outcomes for livelihoods and forest condition.



Prostitutes and Painters: Japanese Migrants and Settlers in Shanghai from the 1860s
Joshua Fogel, Professor, History, York University
April 14, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies
When the Japanese began traveling abroad in the early 1860s, after over two centuries of minimal contact with the outside world, they gravitated to China both because they didn't know how to sail ships long distances and because China was not completely terra incognita. Also, all their potential trading partners had been working out of Shanghai for some years by this point, and one could find all those Western countries represented in microcosm in Shanghai. Among the first Japanese to actually settle in Shanghai, the first groups were, perhaps oddly but certainly interestingly, prostitutes and painters. This talk will examine the forces motivating the migration of these two groups.

Discussant: Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, History, UC Berkeley



Symposium: Archaeology and Japanese Identity
April 14, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Archaeological Research Facility, Department of Anthropology
Clare Fawcett (Anthropology, St. Francis Xavier University) — Archaeology and Japanese Identity: An Overview
Fumiko Ikawa-Smith (McGill University) — The Origins of the Japanese People: Single, Dual or Multiple?
Harumi Befu (Cultural Anthropology, Kyoto Bunkyo University/Anthropology, Stanford University) — Japanese archaeology in the Context of Nihonjin-ron
Junko Habu (UC Berkeley) — Jomon Archaeology, Residents: A Case Study from Sannai Maruyama

This panel attempts to examine the implications of archaeological studies on our understanding of Japanese identity. Four anthropologists will discuss multiple aspects of recent debates on Japanese identity and archaeology in relation to changing sociopolitical environment in Japan. Topics to be covered include archaeology and nationalism, discussion of /nihonjin-ron/(popular discourses on the uniqueness of the Japanese people), physical anthropological studies of prehistoric skeletal remains, Jomon period archaeology, and the dynamic interaction between archaeologists, local residents and the mass media.



Current Findings in Chinese Archaeology: Reports from the Field
April 17, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, East Asian Languages and Cultures, The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco
Duan Qingbo 段清波, Researcher, Shaanxi Institute of Archaeology, Head of Survey and Excavation Team, Qin Shi Huang Burial Mound
Xu Tianjin 徐天进, Professor of Archaeology, Peking University, Head of Survey and Excavation Team, Zhouyuan Western Zhou Archaeological Sites, Shaanxi
Zhang Zhongli 张仲立, Senior Researcher, Qin Shi Huang Terracotta Army Museum
Zhao Liguang 赵力光, Director, "Forest of Steles" Museum, Xi'an
Discussant: Jeffrey Riegel, Professor, East Asian Languages & Cultures, UC Berkeley

Lecture and discussion in Chinese with translation.



Japanese Architecture Series — Takaharu Tezuka & Yui Tezuka: Roof-Less Architecture
Takaharu Tezuka, Architect
Yui Tezuka, Architect
April 18, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Architecture
Takaharu and Yui Tezuka won the 2005 Architects Institute of Japan Award for their Corten-clad Echigo-Matsunoyama Museum of Natural Science and the 2003 Architects Institute of Japan Award for Roof House, featuring a low-slope residential roof accommodating dining, outdoor showers, and all aspects of daily living. The office is best known for rethinking architectural convention with innovative results.



Building Ladders out of Chains: The Political Economy of China's Technological Development under Globalization
Douglas Fuller, Postdoctoral Fellow, SPRIE/APARC, Stanford
April 19, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
For years policymakers in China have advocated creating "Silicon Valleys" in China, but only recently has China's information technology (IT) industry taken off. Rather than the state leading the way, economic globalization has created large flows of capital and knowledge to the developing world that have spurred China's technological development in recent years. However, not all firms in China benefit equally from these inflows of financial and human capital. Using both industry-wide data and case studies of individual firms from the critical technology core of the IT industry, semiconductors (popularly known as computer chips), this talk will explain how the politics of finance in China shape which Chinese semiconductor firms become fast learners able to compete in world markets and which ones remain technological laggards.



  Mount Fuji: Hidden in Plain Sight
Christine Guth, Independent Scholar
April 19, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Mount Fuji is a familiar sight in Japan whose myriad representations have made it more familiar still. This talk addresses the problems and possibilities of this icon's excessive familiarity.

Christine Guth is an independent scholar whose research focuses on the reception of Japanese art, past and present, within Japan and abroad. She is currently writing a book about how Hokusai's "Great Wave" became a global icon.

This program is organized in conjunction with Hideo Hagiwara — Mount Fuji Woodblock Prints.

Program followed by reception.



Writing the Virtual: Electronic Poetry Today
Stephanie Strickland, New Media Poet and Scholar
April 20, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, East Asian Languages and Cultures
A presentation of John Cayley's "riverIsland" (a setting of Wang Wei's "Wang River") and work by two other contemporary Chinese-American artists.



49th San Francisco International Film Festival
April 20 – May 4, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, San Francisco Film Society
The 49th San Francisco International Film Festival will be featuring over 185 international films, many lively Q&A sessions with both new and established filmmakers, and a number of spectacular events. This year, the Institute of East Asian Studies is co-sponsoring special screenings of the following films.

Perpetual Motion — China, 2005, 90 minutes
In Ning Ying's Perpetual Motion, four successful, intellectual women in their 40s meet in an old courtyard house on the night before Chinese New Year to celebrate and play mah-jongg. The hostess's husband is away, so it's the perfect opportunity for her to figure out which of her three friends sent him the erotic email that she discovered while looking through his desk. The result is a darkly comic, sometimes poignant evening of confession and memory set against a backdrop of feasts, evening fireworks and kitschy holiday TV specials. The film's bracingly frank discussion of sex may surprise some Western viewers, as will its irreverent references to China's past. "She won't poison him, will she?" asks the brassy real estate entrepreneur Madame Ye as she contemplates leaving her dog in the care of the cook. "Her face is so reminiscent of the 'class struggle era'." The leading actresses are an eclectic collection of well known celebrities in China: famous publisher and author Hung Huang plays the hostess, Niuniu; Huang's mother, who was once Chairman Mao's personal English interpreter, plays the cook; composer and vocalist Liu Sola is the bisexual Lala; the relentlessly perky Qinqin is played by film star Li Qinqin; and Ping Yanni, the daughter of a former state minister, portrays Madame Ye. Perpetual Motion invites viewers to examine the mystery of revelation and disappointment that can come not only within marriage, but within the hairpin turns of history.
Saturday, April 22, 2006, 6:45 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Monday, April 24, 2006, 9:25 pm — Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley
Wednesday, April 26, 2006, 3:30 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Monday, May 1, 2006, 9:30 pm — Aquarius Theatre, Palo Alto

Sa-Kwa — South Korea, 2005, 118 minutes
Winner of the FIPRESCI award at last year's Toronto International Film Festival and a screenwriting award at San Sebastian, this sensitive debut feature from Kang Yi-Kwan stars Moon So-Ri, who gave amazing performances as a young girl with cerebral palsy in Oasis (SFIFF 2003) and as the title character in A Good Lawyer's Wife (2003). Here she plays Hyun-Jung, a young office worker suddenly abandoned by her longtime boyfriend. Still grieving, she relents to the persistent and conventional wooing of another man, finally marrying him and giving birth to a son. At the same time she contemplates divorcing him and reuniting with her old boyfriend, who shows up too frequently for coincidence. Try as she might to be independent, she is loath to shut out her family, as seen in some remarkably moving and affectionate scenes with her parents. The highlight of this film is yet another extraordinary turn by Moon So-Ri, whose physicality sets her apart from her contemporaries and brings a nuanced intensity to the portrait of a young woman who tries to tease out what she wants from her life and her men. A deeply rewarding, delicately observant look at modern love and marriage, Sa-Kwa's title is a Korean homonym for "apple" and "apology," which shows up in the final cut of the film only in the form of a green apple that Hyun-Jung sends off with the man who wants her back.
Friday, April 21, 2006, 4:45 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Monday, May 1, 2006, 8:45 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Thursday, May 4, 2006, 4:30 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco

Cycling Chronicles: Landscapes the Boy Saw — Japan, 2004, 90 minutes
Known mainly for his "pink" films — low-budget erotic productions — outspoken veteran filmmaker Koji Wakamatsu delivers a surprisingly lyrical yet piercing critique of Japanese society and history in Cycling Chronicles. Wakamatsu has long been driven by a sense of political and social outrage, and a sympathy for those who have been marginalized or suppressed by dominant history and institutions. Inspired by a true story of a teenager who killed his mother and then cycled aimlessly from Tokyo to Aomori, Wakamatsu shows his protagonist (a largely wordless, engaging performance by youngster Emoto) biking through beautiful landscapes but discovering the ugly side of Japanese history as he is propelled towards his own catharsis. In mostly improvised scenes, Emoto meets a series of older citizens with deep and sometimes shocking experiences to recount: fishermen forced by government regulations to operate outside the law to survive; an elderly Korean who was brought to Japan as a comfort woman and then abandoned by her husband. Perhaps the most powerful encounter is with an old man remembering his dead brother, a Japanese soldier who was a war prisoner in Mongolia, while condemning the atrocities perpetrated by Japan during the war and questioning current geopolitical issues. Few Japanese filmmakers today are prepared to confront so directly the past that continues to shadow Japan's relations with her neighbors, and fewer still are willing to explain how the dysfunctions and violence in Japanese society can be traced to these highways and byways of Japanese history. Wakamatsu is one of those very few.
Thursday, April 27, 2006, 8:45 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Tuesday, May 2, 2006, 6:00 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco

Taking Father Home — China, 2005, 100 minutes
Against his mother's wishes, teenager Xu Yun sets off from their village for the big city to look for the father who abandoned them years ago and who is rumored to have made a fortune and a new life. Traveling with no money and only two ducks to his name, Xu Yun encounters the harsh reality of urban life in China today — petty thieves, youth gangs, swindlers and indifferent policemen. Despite these setbacks and his naiveté, Xu Yun moves towards the final confrontation with a father who turns out to be not quite as legend would have it. Director Ying Liang's talent lies in his understanding of the larger frame of society distilled into his intimate, detailed portrayal of the common man. As in his short films, Ying's first feature focuses on the issues and way of life in his home province of Sichuan — summer floods, the vanishing way of life and the deepening division between country and city as China's economic development rushes headlong into a future marked by corruption, fragmented family life and a brutally predatory business style. Ying's skill is evident in packaging all of this into an indie production that is both social drama and pungent dark comedy. Xu Yun has an innocence, honesty and humor — a truth that enables him to survive in a jungle of lies and greed. Ying identifies with Xu Yun's point of view, "I think the story is about growing up, seeking, missing, faith, development, calamity and revival." As Ying Liang shows us, it's also a good approach to filmmaking.
Saturday, April 22, 2006, 1:30 pm — Pacific Film Archive, Berkeley
Sunday, April 30, 2006, 3:30 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco
Wednesday, May 3, 2006, 6:15 pm — Kabuki 8 Theatres, San Francisco



Fifth Graduate Symposium on Korean Studies
April 21–22, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
8:45-9:00a: Coffee
9:00-09:05a: Opening Remarks (Clare You, Chair, Center for Korean Studies)

Morning Panels
Moderator: Hong Yung Lee (Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley)
Session 1: Changing International Environment of Korea
9:05-09:25a: Nam Tae Park (Texas A&M University), "Effects of Cultural Similarities and Compatibility of National Interests on Foreign Policy Choices: A Cross-National Experiment"
9:25-09:45a: June Hee Kwon (Duke University), "The Appropriation of Citizenship and the Experience of Illegality: Female Korean Chinese Immigrants in Neo-Liberal South Korea"
9:45-10:15a: Panel Discussion: Seung-Youn Oh (University of California, Berkeley) and Q&A
10:15-10:30a: Coffee break

Session 2: Technology and its Implication for the Korean Society
10:30-10:50a: Inkyu Kang (University of Wisconsin-Madison), "Confucian Cyberspace: the Social Shaping of Internet Technology in Korea and Japan"
10:50-11:10a: Jeong-ho Kim (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), "The Rise of Online Newspapers and the Public Sphere in South Korea"
11:10-11:30a: Josie Sohn (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), "Non-Churchist Performance of a South Korean Street Evangelist in a Cyber Christian Cinema"
11:30-noon: Panel Discussion: Taek-Jin Shin (University of California, Berkeley) and Q&A
12:00-1:30p: Lunch

Afternoon Panels
Moderator: Seoung-Kon Kim (Professor of English, Seoul National University)
Session 3: Subgroup Cultures and Practices in Korea
1:30-1:50p: Jin-Kyung Park (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), "Crime Unique to Korea: Gynecology, Sexuality, and Race in Colonial Korea"
1:50-2:10p: Jiye Kim (University of Massachusetts), "The Farmers Newspaper and the Ethnic Citizenship in the 1960s"
2:10-2:30p: Jung-Yup Lee (University of Massachusetts), "The Appropriation of the Traditional: Cultural Politics of 'Campus Group Sounds' in Korea from the mid-1970s to the early 1980s"
2:30-3:00p: Discussion: Jeehwan Park (University of California, Berkeley) and Q&A
3:00-3:15p: Coffee Break

Session 4: Korean Language and Literature
3:15-3:35p: Sangsook Lee-Chung (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), "The 'Wings': Another Diary of Superfluous Man"
3:35-3:55p: Hyunju Park (University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign), "Ideologies around English Mixing in South Korea"
3:55-4:25p: Discussion: Piotr Pawel Gibas (University of California, Berkeley) and Q&A
4:25-4:30p: Closing Remarks



The Depths of a Clam: Modern Korean Poetry from So Chong-ju to Kim Kwang-kyu
April 21, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
1. Presentation by Brother Anthony: "Voices Translated: Modern Korean Poetry from So Chong-ju to Kim Kwang-kyu."

Within the following narrative, I would read portions of work by a variety of poets. Modern Korean poetry begins with a strong inclination to the intensely lyrical, whether that is rooted in traditional forms, both native and Chinese, as is the case with Kim So-Wol, or in the European symbolism and imagism introduced by Japanese translations of the works of French Symbolists and Modernists. This current was leavened and undermined during the Japanese period by calls for a socially relevant literature, and by the desire to introduce subtexts indicating Korean nationalist resistance. After Liberation, with the triumphant return of the Korean language, the intensely lyrical poems of So Chong-Ju and other poets of the art-for-art's-sake trend came to dominate South Korean poetry in the period before and immediately after the Korean War. Given the identification of socially relevant literature with the Communist cause, there was little variety of models available to Southern writers and the first generation of poets who began to write after the War can for the most part be characterized as aestheticizing lyricists. This includes the early work of Ko Un, despite his later reputation as an "engaged poet." Renewal began with the new social challenge represented by the failure of the hopes for a more democratic society after the tragic sacrifice of young lives during the April Revolution, completed by the military coup of the following year; this coincides with the implementation of a policy of intense modernization by urbanization and industrialization. Two different voices emerge in the renewal of lyric poetry at this time, with the intellectual, theoretical voice of the Modernist Kim Su-Yong calling for the use of "ordinary language" in poetry and the committed, practical voice of Shin Kyong-Nim speaking out from the laboring classes, previously not thought to have any poetry to offer, using a plural "We" as speaker and finding the poetic within the arid and desolate realities of the laboring classes. The increasing polarization of Korean literary circles, partly rooted in writers' differing responses to the protests of the 1970s, led to an idea of there being 2 "schools," one putting the main stress on abstract values of aesthetic beauty and the portrayal of human dignity, the other demanding democracy and a literature related to the real life of ordinary people. It is notorious that certain writers of the first group enjoyed favor with the Park Chung-hee regime while many of the second were constantly being arrested, or, like Kim Ji-Ha, spent years in prison. But the generation of writers growing up in the Park Jung-Hee years tended to see the need for a combination of the values of both "schools," seeing no value in a poetry devoid of beauty, or utterly divorced from reality. Kim Kwang-Kyu, Mah Chonggi and Hwang Dong-Kyu each in their own way indicate this. The case of Kim Kwang-Kyu is particularly interesting because he developed his poetic voice by translating German poetry, before beginning to write his own poems in Korean. Owing virtually nothing to previous Korean poetic models, his work enjoyed immediate popularity as a model for a new poetics for the new age that began in fact with the assassination of Park Chung-Hee and grew to maturity during the residual dictatorships of the 1980s. For the first time, a satirical humor was able to speak out, pointing its dart at the follies of everyday life in the modern city.

2. Readings of Kim Kwang-Kyu's poetry: Korean poems read by the Poet, English translations read by Zack Rogow

3. Comments, questions and dialogue with Poet and Translators, including Chong Heyong who has translated Kim Kwang-Kyu's work into German.

Kim Kwang-Kyu, born in 1941, is one of Korea's most famous poets. He has published 8 volumes of poetry. His delicate satires sustained people during the dark years of dictatorship, while his ironic commentaries on the dehumanizing effects of modern city life have influenced many younger Korean writers. He recently retired from his position as professor of German literature at Hanyang University, Seoul.

Brother Anthony, born 1942 in England, belongs to the Community of Taizé (France). He has lived in Korea since 1980 and is professor of medieval English at Sogang University, Seoul. He has published some 20 volumes of translations of Korean poetry and fiction, including "The Depths of a Clam: Poems by Kim Kwang-Kyu" (White Pine Press, 2005)

Chong Heyong is Kim Kwang-Kyu's German translator. She is professor in the German department of Hanyang University, Seoul.

Zack Rogow is a poet and translator. For many years he organized the popular Lunch Poems Readings at UC Berkeley. He is now editor and artistic director of Two Lines (the Center for the Art of Translation).



Competing Perspectives: A Fresh Look at Cross-Straits Relations
April 21, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
This workshop traces the tense peace that has existed in the Taiwan Strait for the past fifty years. China has repeatedly threatened to use military power against the island if it declares independence and has staged a series of naval exercises off the coast of Taiwan. At the same time several trends have drawn mainland China and Taiwan closer together, in particular a strong economic relationship. A group of distinguished panelists from Asia and the US will evaluate these complex dynamics in light of the evolving domestic environment on both sides of the Taiwan Strait and discuss the role of the United States, Japan and other regional players.

T.J. Pempel, Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies, will moderate the program. Confirmed panelists include:

Lowell Dittmer is Professor in the Political Science Department at UC Berkeley and editor of the Asian Survey. His scholarly expertise is the study of contemporary China. He teaches courses on contemporary China, Northeast Asia, and the Pacific Rim. His current research interests include the China-Taiwan-US triangle in the context of East Asian regional politics.

Jing Huang is a Senior Fellow in Foreign Policy Studies at the Brookings Institution and advisor to the China Foundation of International and Strategic Studies. His research focuses on security issues in the Asia-Pacific region, US-China relations and the PRC military. He is currently working on a book on the relationship between mainland China and Taiwan.

Ming Lee is Professor and Chair of the Department of Diplomacy at National Chengchi University, Taipei. He is the author of several papers and research monographs on peace and security in the Pacific Rim, with a special focus on cross-straits relations.

Ming Wan is Professor in the Department of Public and International Affairs, George Mason University. His current research interests focus on Sino-Japanese relations and East Asian political economy. His most recent books are Japan Between Asia and the West: Economic Power and Strategic Balance (2001) and Sino-Japanese Relations: Interaction, Logic, and Transformation (2006).

Minghsien Wong teaches at the Graduate Institute of International Affairs and Strategic Studies, Tamkang University in Taiwan. His research interests include international security issues, globalization and military strategy. His most recent publications focus on Taiwan's defense policy and military strategy.

Philip Yang is Professor in the Department of Political Science at National Taiwan University and the Director of the Taiwan Security Research Center there. He has published extensively in the areas of East Asian regionalism, security and cross-straits relations. He is the founder and administrator of the Taiwan Security Research (TSR) website.



After Orientalism: Working Across Disciplines
April 22, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Department of English
Presentations:
10:00–11:30 — Right to Kill, Right to Make Live: Koreans as Japanese and Japanese as Americans in WWII (Tak Fujitani)
11:30–1:00 — To Heal a Chinese Mandarin: The Moral Implications of Distance (Eric Hayot)
1:00–2:00 — Lunch Break
2:00–3:30 — Tangible Objects: Materiality in South Vietnamese and Diasporic Writings (Thu-huong Nguyen-Vo)
3:30–5:00 — To Be (or Not to Be) the Poet: Maxine Hong Kingston and the Cultural Politics of Verse in Asian American Literature (Steven Yao)



Lunch Poems with Ko Un
Ko Un, Poet Richard Silberg, Poet
April 25, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
Ko Un, the preeminent Korean poet of the twentieth century, embraces Buddhism with the versatility of a master Taoist sage. A beloved cultural figure who has helped shape contemorary Korean literature, Ko Un is also a novelist, literary critic, ex-monk, former dissident, and four-time political prisoner. His verse — vivid, unsettling, down-to-earth, and deeply moving — ranges from the short lyric to the vast epic and draws from a poetic reservoir filled with memories and experiences ranging over seventy years of South Korea's tumultuous history from the Japanese occupation to the Korean war to democracy. His new collection, The Three Way Tavern, is a sampling of his poems from the last decade of the twentieth century, offering in deft translation, as lively and demotic as the original, the off-beat humor, mystery, and mythic power of his work for a wide audience of English-speaking readers. It showcases the work of a man who Allen Ginsberg has called "a magnificent poet, a combination of Buddhist cognoscente, passionate political libertarian, and natural historian," who Gary Snyder has said is a "real-world poet!" who "outfoxes the Old Masters and the young poets both," and who Lawrence Ferlinghetti has described as "no doubt the greatest living Zen poet today." Reading of English Translations by Richard Silberg.



Can China Prevent the "Japan Disease": Reform of the RMB and Macreconomic Policy
Kajitani Kai, Associate Professor, Economics, Kobegakuin University
April 26, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies




The Korean P'ansori, Past and Present: A Lecture and Demonstration Concert
April 26, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
P'ansori, a dramatic song form whose narrative solo line invites comparison with western opera, is a distinctive musical genre passed down from the 18th century. In P'ansori the singer's vocal line, delivery, and timbre diverge greatly from opera. Despite the genre's distinctiveness and cultural significance its technique and stylistic elements are fairly limited in comparison with modern musical genres. My five P'ansori works therefore reflect the distinctiveness and the tradition of the genre using contemporary compositional methods. While I adhere to P'ansori text and sounds I replace the drummer with various orchestral groups that perform modern accompaniments that acknowledge modern compositional procedures.

Chan Hae Lee received her Ph.D. from the Catholic University of America, Washington, D.C. She has been professor of music composition at Yonsei University since 1977. Her works, including orchestral music, chamber music, percussion music, Korean traditional instruments music, opera, dance music, have been presented in Korea, Japan, Taiwan, Hong Kong, the Philippines, Australia, Germany, Italy, Russia, Poland, and the United States. Her concert piece Rabbit Story, was performed at Wellesley College. The entire series of the P'ansori including Rabbit Story was performed in Seoul conducted by Rebecca Miller. Lee has received the Award for Music Composition, Universal Medal (2000) and Outstanding Woman of the 21st century (2001) from the American Biography Institute, the Korean National Prize for Composition in Western Music in 1998 and 2005. She has served as general secretary of Asian Composers League, president of the Korean Society of Woman Composers, vice president of KOWACA (Korean Women's Association for Culture & Art), Korean liaison of IAWM, and executive chairperson of the International Festival of Women in Music.

Today's musical demonstration will be performed by singers Kim Bong-Yung, Kwon A. Shin, and Park Sunghee and by percussionist Kyunghwa Yun.



China's Environment at Berkeley
April 26, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
A panel and roundtable discussion on current projects and new opportunities for collaboration featuring research from across campus:
Berkeley Institute of the Environment — Dr. Sharima Rasanayagam
Energy and Resources Group — Vice Provost and Professor Catherine Koshland, Professor Dan Kammen, and Chris Jones
Environmental Science, Policy and Management — Assistant Professor Dara O'Rourke
Geography — Associate Professor You-Tien Hsing
Haas School of Business — Professor David Levine
Journalism — Xiao Qiang, Director, China Internet Project
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory — Dr. Mark Levine, Dr. Nan Zhou, and David Fridley
Office of the President — Gretchen Kalonji
Public Health — Professor Robert Spear

And in NGOs, California and China itself …
Pacific Environment — Daniela Salaverry
UC Davis — Dr. Mark Henderson
Qinghua University — Professor Qi Ye

Moderated by Sociology Associate Professor and Berkeley China Initiative Director Tom Gold

Refreshments will be served.

For more information contact Graham Bullock (gbullock@berkeley.edu) or Jimmy Tran (jimtran@berkeley.edu).



Confucian Sagehood and/vs. Contemporary Politics
Stephen Angle, Professor, Philosophy, Wesleyan
April 28, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
After a brief review of what striving for sagehood in the contemporary context might mean, and why such an ethical project should be taken seriously, this talk will focus on possible tensions between sagehood and legitimate forms of contemporary politics. Such questions take on added urgency in light of arguments from certain intellectuals and officials in China that contemporary Chinese politics should be structured by Confucian ideals like virtue and harmony. The upshot of the talk will be that a commitment to sagehood has significant implication for politics, but not in the authoritarian direction experienced in the past and perhaps imagined today.

Discussant: Alison Kaufman, Graduate Student, Political Science, UC Berkeley



The Growing Movement to Protect Rivers in China
Yu Xiaogang, Director of Chinese NGO Green Watershed
Vinya Sysamouth, China/Lao Campaigner, International Rivers Network
May 2, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Graduate School of Journalism, International Rivers Network
Yu Xiaogang, 2006 Goldman Prize Recipient, Director of Chinese NGO Green Watershed — "The Growing Movement to Protect Rivers in China" and Vinya Sysamouth, China/Lao Campaigner, International Rivers Network — "The Protection of the Nu/Salween River"

Dammed, diverted and polluted, China's rivers are reaching an ecological tipping point. The crisis facing China's rivers is increasingly recognized by the Chinese government and its citizens, yet the government continues to dam China's rivers at an unprecedented pace. Yu Xiaogang is one of the leaders of a growing citizens' movement to protect China's rivers and people from the impacts of dams and other river development projects.

Yu Xiaogang is creating ground breaking watershed management programs in China and is raising awareness about the destructive impacts of large dams. Yu's work on documenting the social impacts of dams has led the Chinese government to mandate social impact assessments in the decision-making process for all proposed major development projects.

Yu has been a key player in the movement to protect the Three Parallel Rivers World Heritage Site in Yunnan Province from the impacts of large dams. The World Heritage Site is the epicenter of Chinese biodiversity, containing virgin forests, 6,000 species of plants and 79 rare or endangered animal species.



The Precious Raft of History: The Chinese Women's Question and the Politics of Time at the Turn of the Twentieth Century
Joan Judge, Associate Professor, History, UC Santa Barbara
May 3, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
The women's question and the question of history are central to understanding a key moment in the unfolding of Chinese modernity — the last decades of imperial rule at the turn of the twentieth century. In this talk I probe the relationship among women, history, and modernity by examining the diverse forms of historical consciousness embodied in the range of female biographies published in this period.



Mediums for Revolution: 75 Years of the Red Detachment of Women
Kristine Harris, Associate Professor, History, SUNY, New Paltz
May 3, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, East Asian Languages & Cultures, Film Studies
Part of the special Brown-Bag Lunch Lecture series: "Between Stage and Screen: Modern Chinese Cinema and Drama in the 20th and 21st Century"



The Three Gorges Dam: Art and Environment in Contemporary China
May 3, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Asia Society, Asian Art Museum
China's Three Gorges Dam: 26 million cubic meters of concrete, 395 square miles, 250,000 workers, 17 years to complete, millions resettled. With the exhibition "The Three Gorges Dam Project: Paintings by Liu Xiaodong" as backdrop, four environmental experts and activists will discuss the Dam, its social and environmental costs, and the mounting environmental crisis in China. The event will also feature a tour of the exhibition led by exhibition curator Jeff Kelley.

Reservations required. Please contact the Asia Society at 415-421-8707. Tickets are $5 for Members and $10 for Non-Members (including admission to the Lee gallery).

Speakers: William L. Fox (moderator) is a writer, arts consultant, and curator based in Los Angeles. He is the author of numerous essays for exhibition catalogues, fourteen books of poetry, and eight non-fiction books on the intersection of art and environment. His most recent books are Terra Antactica and In the Desert of Desire: The Nature of Culture and the Culture of Nature.

David Gordon is Executive Director of Pacific Environment, a San Francisco-based non-profit that protects the environment of the Pacific Rim by promoting grassroots activism, strengthening communities, and reforming international policies. Well known for his expertise on the Russian environment, Mr. Gordon is increasingly active on Chinese environmental issues today.

Patrick McCully is Executive Director of the Berkeley-based International Rivers Network, established in 1985 to protect rivers and defend the rights of communities that depend on them. A member of the Steering Committee of the UN Environment Program's Dams and Development Project, he is the author of several books, including Silenced Rivers: The Ecology and Politics of Large Dams.

Yu Xiaogang is Founder and Director of Green Watershed, the first Chinese non-governmental organization focused on water management and raising awareness about the destructive impact of large dams. Dr. Yu's work has led the Chinese government to mandate social impact assessments for all proposed major development projects.



Corporate Governance in East Asia: Culture, Psychology, Economics and Law
May 4–5, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy
Psychologists, economists, legal scholars and practitioners will examine from a holistic, multi-disciplinary perspective, what models of corporate governance will best work in modern China and Korea. Is there something "different" about East Asian culture and psychology that means that any attempt to reform corporate governance through the adoption of Western norms is destined to fail? Or is the notion of "difference" simply an excuse for corruption and lack of transparency? And then again, do East Asian culture and psychology hold strengths for corporate governance that wait to be discovered? In a unique but essential dialogue, psychologists, economists, legal scholars and practitioners from the West, China and Korea will debate these questions and propose solutions at "Corporate Governance in East Asia: Culture, Psychology, Economics and Law."

Keynote speakers include a senior advisor to the World Bank and co-founder of the Global Corporate Governance Academic Network, Stijn Claessens, and psychologist Richard Nisbett, author of "The Geography of Thought: How Asians and Westerners think Differently … and Why."

For more information, please visit: http://www.law.berkeley.edu/centers/bclbe/symposia/corporategovernance/



The Birth of Japanese Buddhism: Books, Publishing, and the Awakening of Sectarian Consciousness in Tokugawa-Period Japan
William Bodiford, Professor, Department of Asian Languages and Cultures, UCLA
May 4, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
What was the role of print culture in the creation of the religious teachings that today are universally recognized as being Japanese Buddhism? What can an examination of this topic reveal about Buddhism in Japan?

William M. Bodiford is a Professor in the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at UCLA. His research focuses on medieval and modern religions, especially Buddhism, in Japan and East Asia. He is the associate editor of the Encyclopedia of Buddhism (2004), editor of Going Forth: Visions of Buddhist Vinaya (2005), and author of Soto Zen in Medieval Japan (1989).



Fast Boat to China: Corporate Flight and the Consequences of Free Trade — Lessons from Shanghai
Andrew Ross, Professor, Social and Cultural Analysis, New York University
May 4, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley Labor Center
RSVP. For more information call Anahita Forati at (510) 643-4312 or email her at aforati@berkeley.edu.



Tibetan Religion and State in the 17th and 18th Centuries: Tibetan, Chinese, and Mongolian Perspectives
May 5–7, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
The 17th and 18th centuries were watershed periods in the history of Tibetan religious and political life. It was during this pivotal era that Tibet witnessed the rise to power of the incarnate Dalai Lamas and the establishment of a centralized government in the capital city of Lhasa under the leadership of the Fifth Dalai Lama (1617-1682). In the century following the political ascent of the Fifth Dalai Lama, far-reaching changes unfolded in almost every sphere of Tibetan cultural life and social organization. The central government's efforts to innovate and exert control were felt in areas ranging from administration to commerce, from monastic curriculum to public festival life, from ritual performance to medical and legal practice. At the same time, response and resistance to these changes fostered a vibrant flourishing among groups at the social and geographic margins of Tibet. These changes in the Tibetan polity also involved complex negotiations of Tibet's relations with Mongolian, Manchu, and Chinese neighbors.

In recent years, the increasing availability of Tibetan language documents, the growth of the academic study of Tibet, and productive collaborations with scholars in China and Tibet have inspired vital new research on the specific events of the period and the broad social and political currents that connect them. This conference will highlight original research by many scholars working on diverse topics within the history of 17th and 18th century Tibet and will seek to redefine our understanding of the period through discussion of the connections between them. Confirmed participants include Patricia Berger (UC Berkeley), Benjamin Bogin (UC Berkeley), Timothy Brook (University of British Columbia), Bryan J. Cuevas (UC Berkeley), Jacob Dalton (Yale University), Johan Elverskog (Southern Methodist University), Janet Gyatso (Harvard University), Matthew Kapstein (Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes, Paris/University of Chicago), Nancy Lin (UC Berkeley), Derek Maher (East Carolina University), Irmgard Mengele (UC Santa Barbara), Kurtis R. Schaeffer (University of Virginia), Tsering Shakya (University of British Columbia), E. Gene Smith (New York), Gray Tuttle (Columbia University) and Vesna Wallace (UC Santa Barbara).

http://ieas.berkeley.edu/events/2006.05.05-07.html



Professor Frederic Wakeman in Conversation
May 5, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Professor Frederic Wakeman in conversation, with tributes by Liu Dong and Bei Dao.

3:45 — Sign in

4:00 — David Hollinger, Chair, History Department
Liu Dong, Professor of Comparative Literature and Culture, Peking University
Bei Dao, poet; Professor of Creative Writing, East Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Notre Dame
Frederic Wakeman in conversation with James Sheehan, Professor of History, Stanford University

6:00 — reception



Paradigms and Fallacies: Rethinking Northeast Asian Security
Hun Joo Park, Korean Defense Institute
May 5, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
This talk examines the changing characteristics of the distrustful, conflict-ridden, power and interest-centric Northeast Asian politics and their implications for the region's stability in the post-Cold War era. The power and interest-centric realist paradigm maintains its explanatory dominance in capturing the lack of reconciliation or institutionalization of regional cooperation in post-Cold War Northeast Asia. However, the analytic power of realist perspective assumes the goals, values and preferences as determined by the anarchical international system. Such a realist paradigm has led to a self-fulfilling prophecy: as if inevitably pressured by the system, states pursue their narrow and myopic national interests, further exacerbating security dilemma for all concerned. Strikingly pronounced is the continued primacy of such contending national interests, manifested in the North Korean nuclear deadlock and the integration of Japanese foreign policy with America's global anti-terror war. I will document the ominous changes as well as the problematic consequences of fallacious policy paradigms underlying the concerned state behaviors. To prevent the security dilemma from spiraling into a perilous arms competition requires policymakers to switch their realist assumptions, redefine their self-interests, and embrace international societal norms and perspectives which build on reality.

Hun Joo Park, Ph.D (UC, Berkeley) is Associate Professor of International Relations and Political Economy at KDI School of Public Policy and Management. His publications include "Riding into the Sunset: The Political Economy of Bicycles as a Declining Industry in Korea," (with Yeun-Sook Park), Journal of East Asian Affairs; Recasting Russia in Northeast Asia, (Moscow: MAX Press, 2004), "Between Development and the State: Recasting Korean Dirigisme," Asian Journal of Political Science, June 2004; "Ideas, Interests, and Constructing a Northeast Asian Community," Journal of East Asian Affairs, 18:1, (Spring/Summer 2004). He is completing a book entitled Entangled Embeddedness: The Political Sources of Financial Policy towards Small Business.



Conference in Honor of Frederic Wakeman
May 6, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
9:15 — Coffee and registration
9:30 — Opening remarks
9:45 — Melissa Macauley, Small Time Crooks: Crime, Migration, and Petty Entrepreneurship in China, 1819-1861
10:30 — Mark C. Elliott, The Conquest Dynasties of Twentieth-Century China
11:15 — John Williams, Superstition and Its Enemies: Revolutionizing Heterodoxy in Republican China
12:00 — Jan Kiely, For Whom the Bells Ring and the Drums Beat: Pure Land Buddhist Refugee Relief Activism in Wartime Shanghai, 1937-1945
12:45 — lunch
1:45 — Linda Grove, Chinese Rural History in the Twentieth-Century
2:30 — Jonathan Porter, "The Past is Present": The Construction of Macau's Historical Legacy
3:15 — James Polachek, Film Music in the Early Works of Chen Kaige, Tian Zhuangzhuang, and Zhang Yimou: Song, Sound, and the Creation of Symbolic Space
4:00 — Concluding remarks
4:30 — Adjourn



Frederic Wakeman Retirement: Memories, Reflections, and Tribute with Staff & Students
May 7, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
10:00 — A roundtable on narrative, biography, and history with Fred Wakeman and current graduate students
11:00 — Coffee break
11:15 — Comments from colleagues, staff, and former students
1:15 — Lunch
2:15 — Adjourn



Choking to Death in the 'Clean, Bright Metropolis': New Wave Dissension in 1960s Japan
Michael Raine, East Asian Languages & Civilizations, University of Chicago
May 8, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Film Studies Program




Dynamism in Northeast Asia and U.S.-ROK Relations
Dr. Su-Hoon Lee, Chair, Presidential Committee on Northeast Asian Initiatives, Republic of Korea
May 8, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
Dr. Lee will review various factors of instabilty in Northeast Asia and provide a Korean perspective on dealing with potential and emerging security concerns in the region. He will propose several ideas for promoting peace and prosperity including specific initiatives fostering closer political and economic cooperation among countries in Northeast Asia. In addition, Dr. Lee will talk about the most important issues in US-ROK relations.

Dr. Su-Hoon Lee currently serves as Chair of the Presidential Committee on Northeast Asian Initiatives, one of the key policy advisory organs established by the President of the Republic of Korea, Roh Moo-hyun. Dr. Lee received his Ph.D. in Comparative International Development and Sociology from Johns Hopkins University. In 1986, he joined the faculty of Sociology at Kyungnam University in Korea and simultaneously assumed the position of the Associate Director at its Institute for Far East Asian Studies in Seoul. Since 2000 he has been on the faculty of the School for North Korean Studies in Seoul. His monographs include State-Building in the Contemporary Third World (Westview Press, 1989), World-System Analysis (in Korean, 1993), For a Humane World-System (in Korean, 1999), Crisis and Capitalism of East Asia (in Korean, 2001), and World-System — Northeast Asia — Korean Peninsula (in Korean, 2004). He has also published numerous articles and book chapters on the world order, Northeast Asia, and the Korean peninsula. He is a well-known newspaper columnist in Seoul.




The Elegant Gathering: Art, Politics, and Collecting in China
May 12–13, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, The Asian Art Museum of San Francisco
Throughout Chinese history the collection of art, calligraphy and poetry was a social activity among the culturally refined, providing the framework and the pretext for yaji, the "elegant gatherings" of the literati. Collectors, such as the Yeh Family, have played an important role in gathering, evaluating and disseminating Chinese art. The Asian Art Museum, San Francisco and the Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley are jointly sponsoring a conference on the collection of Chinese art, in conjunction with the exhibit The Elegant Gathering: The Yeh Family Collection. Accumulated over three generations, the Yeh Family Collection is a treasure trove of Chinese painting and calligraphy dating as far back as the seventh century. A selection of works from the Yeh Collection will be on display at the Asian Art Museum in San Francisco between March 24 and September 17, 2006. The conference The Elegant Gathering: Art, Politics and Collecting in China will take place at UC Berkeley on May 12 and 13, 2006.

Confirmed participants include Julia Andrews (Ohio State University), Robert Ashmore (UC Berkeley), Qianshen Bai (Boston University), Patricia Berger (UC Berkeley), Shana Brown (University of Hawaii), Katharine Burnett (UC Davis), Jonathan Hay (NYU), Jeffrey Riegel (UC Berkeley), Kuiyi Shen (UC San Diego), Peter Sturman (UC Santa Barbara), Richard Vinograd (Stanford University), Wen-hsin Yeh (UC Berkeley), and Max Yeh.

http://ieas.berkeley.edu/events/2006.05.12-13.html



The Implementation of "One Country, Two Systems" in Hong Kong
Elsie Leung, Former Secretary for Justice, Hong Kong Special Administrative Region
May 17, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
Ms. Leung will elaborate on the achievements and challenges in the implementation of the "One Country, Two Systems" principle in Hong Kong. Her comments will focus on implications for the rule of law in Hong Kong, human rights, protection of intellectual property rights as well as issues related to international cooperation.

Ms. Elsie Leung was the Secretary for Justice of the Hong Kong Special Administrative Region from 1997 to 2005. She is currently the Deputy Director of the Hong Kong Basic Law Committee of the National People's Congress of China. Ms. Leung is an expert in the Basic Law (the "constitution" of Hong Kong), and is highly praised for her contributions in ensuring the successful implementation of the "One Country, Two Systems" concept in Hong Kong.

Program followed by reception.



China-U.S. Climate Change Forum at UC Berkeley
May 23–24, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Graduate School of Journalism
Leading thinkers from China and the U.S. discuss scientific, technological, business, policy, economic development, and media dimensions of climate change.

May 23–24, 2006
8:30 a.m.-5:15 p.m
Wheeler Hall Auditorium
UC Berkeley Campus

The program is free and open to the public.
Pre-registration is available here.

Full conference program available here.

The China-U.S. Climate Change Forum is being organized by the Berkeley China Initiative, which is forging closer ties between U.C. Berkeley and China by bringing together key experts on important international and bilateral issues. Growing concern over climate change makes this topic an obvious choice for the first of this series of annual events.

The Forum is co-sponsored by Peking University's College of Environmental Sciences, UC Berkeley's Graduate School of Journalism, International and Area Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Energy and Resources Group, and Berkeley Institute of the Environment.
Financial sponsors include the Richard and Rhoda Goldman Fund, the Energy Foundation, and the Hewlett Foundation.



Preparing a Global Workforce: Chinese Language and Culture in California
July 13, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, International & Area Studies — Dean's Office




An Introduction to Peony Pavilion
Kenneth Pai, Professor Emeritus, UC Santa Barbara Lindy Li Mark, Professor Emerita, CSU East Bay
August 8, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies




Regional Integration in East Asia: Reality, Possibility and Feasibility
Motoyoshi Sono, Professor, Economics, Rissho University
August 16, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies




War and Wartime in Visual Representations
August 23–25, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Wednesday, August 23
Location: Faculty Club, O'Neill Room
2:00 — Wen-hsin Yeh & & Christian Henriot, opening remarks
2:30 — Luo Suwen, "Gaolang Qiao: Formation of Workers' Residence Zone of a Cotton Spinning Mill in Eastern Shanghai (1914-1950)"
Discussant: Wen-hsin Yeh

3:30 — Vimalin Rujivacharakul, "Motion in Stillness: Photographs, Architecture, and Demolition"
Discussant: Paul Pickowicz

Location: Wurster Hall, second floor lobby
5:15 — Photo exhibit and reception

Thursday, August 24
Location: 2223 Fulton Street, Institute of East Asian Studies conference room, 6 fl.
9:00 — Coffee
9:15 — Paul Pickowicz, "Never-Ending Controversies: The Case of Chun jiang yi hen (Remorse in Shanghai) and Occupation-era Chinese Filmmaking."
Discussant: Sheldon Lu

10:30 — Poshek Fu, "Revisioning the War: Postwar Hong Kong Exile Cinema"
Discussant: Sheldon Lu

11:45 — lunch

1:00 — Shana Brown, "Wartime photojournalism: picture, print and propaganda in the war against Japan, 1937-1945"
Discussant: William Schaefer

2:15 — Kuiyi Shen, "Visualizing Wartime China: A Case Study of the Journalist and Artist Shen Yiqian"
Discussant: Christian Henriot

3:30 — Coffee Break

3:45 — Edna Tow, "Visual politics, Image-making, and the Nationalist State during the War of Resistance"
Discussant: Christian Henriot

5:00 — Film screening Chun jiang yi hen (Remorse in Shanghai) (1 hr. 15 minutes)

Friday, August 25
Location: 2223 Fulton Street, Institute of East Asian Studies conference room, 6 fl.
9:00 — Sakamoto Hiroko "Where Did the Modern Girls in manhua Magazines Go During the Chinese War of Resistance?"
Discussant: Jerome Bourgon

10:15 — Jin Jiang, "Gender, Popular Entertainment, and Politics in Wartime Shanghai"
Discussant: Shana Brown

11:30 — Coffee break

11:45 — Susan Glosser, "How Women Saved China during the War of Resistance"
Discussant: Vimalin Rujivacharakul

1:00 — lunch

2:00 — Christian Henriot, "Wartime Shanghai Refugees: chaos, exclusion, and indignity: Do images make up for the absence of memory?"
Discussant: Poshek Fu

3:15 — Jerome Bourgon, "http://turandot.ish-lyon.cnrs.fr: an online research website crossing visual with textual resources, and learned comments."
Discussant: Susan Glosser

4:30 — General discussion and wrap-up remarks: Wen-hsin Yeh & Christian Henriot

5:30 — Adjourn

Supported by the France-Berkeley Fund



Industrial Shanghai through a Century of Visual Images: A Photograph Exhibition
August 23 – September 22, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
An exclusive set of photographs of industrial zones in Shanghai from the collection of Professor Luo Suwen of the Institute of Modern History, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, and a set of historical maps from rare-map collections of the University of California at Berkeley. The exhibition covers the period from the late nineteenth to the present day.

Curated by Dr. Vimalin Rujivacharakul (Department of Art History, University of Delaware), with curatorial assistance from Avigail Sachs and Elizabeth Byrne of the Department of Architecture and the Environmental Design Library, UCB.



Traditional Korean Embroidery
August 28 – September 29, 2006
Center for Korean Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
This unique exhibit of Korean embroidery features traditional Korean clothing, scrolls, pouches, spoon cases, and other objects. Created over the past two decades by Korean artist Park, Phil Soon, the collection continues an old art form dating back to the beginning of Korea's Three Kingdom period over 2000 years ago. Park, Phil Soon first started to pursue embroidery in preparation for a traditional wedding ceremony. A reception and slideshow with the artist will be held on Friday, September 15, 2006 following a talk on "The Nightmare Riding Korean Literature" by Yi Munyol.

Park, Phil Soon, born into a traditional family in Yeong Deok, Gyeongbuk Province, learned the art of embroidery when she was very young. Embroidery had been her hobby until she made it into a career in the mid-1980s. Beginning from simple clothes and personal ornaments, Park has embroidered large-scale pieces such as the eightfold screen. Her work is famous for the floridness of its colors as well as the delicateness of its exquisite lines, which demonstrates her time and effort devoted to it over the past decades. Park won the Korean Arts and Crafts Award in 1998. She has created masterpieces ranging from large folding screens to small accessories such as spoon pockets and jewelry cases. She is married to the renowned novelist Yi Munyol, currently visiting the Center for Korean Studies as a distinguished resident writer.

See other IEAS exhibits.



The Role of Education in South Korea's Economic Development: Achievements and Challenges
Jin Pyo Kim, Member, Korean National Assembly
September 5, 2006
Koret Foundation
Despite its lack of natural resources or accumulated capital, Korea has become the world's 12th largest economy in only forty years while developing itself into a liberalized democratic state that respects political rights and the freedom of the press. Education has been a critical building block behind such economic surge and democratization. Korea established a modern education system as early as the 1950s and established policies to extend educational access for all. Korea reached universal secondary education in the 1970s and saw a sharp expansion of higher education enrollment starting the 1990s. Such policies nurtured a pool of well-educated human resources. Good use of private investment has contributed to securing educational finance and learning opportunities. Yet education faces diverse challenges for further improvement. Problems include a relatively low level of public expenditure in higher education and a lack of educational diversity resulting from the equalization policy. The government is introducing strategies to enhance higher education, diversify and strengthen school education, develop education for the gifted, improve vocational education, and promote international cooperation. Demands are increasing for local governments to take an active part in the implementation of such educational policies.



The Emperor's Muslim Servants: Muslim Collaborators and the Establishment of Qing Colonial Regime in Eastern Turkestan (Xinjiang), 1759–1765
Kwangmin Kim, Ph.D. Candidate, History, UC Berkeley
September 6, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies




An Afternoon of Music with Gayageum Virtuoso Aeri Ji
September 6, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
I. "A Story for Gayageum." composed by Hi Kyung Kim (2006)
1. At the Shore
2. Campus in Autumn
3. One Person

II. "Chim Hyang Moo" composed by Byung Ki Hwang (1974)
1. Part I
2. Part II
3. Part III

III. "Poème Lyrique pour Gayageum" composed by Young Ja Lee (2006)
1. Rencontre (Encounter)
2. Adieux (Farewell)
3. Prière de Réincarnation (Prayer of Reincarnation)

IV. "Sanjo" (Trad. Folk Music: Jung Nam Hi-Hwang Byung Ki School)

Gayageum virtuoso AERI JI is one of the most known gayageum performers today. She received her B.A. from Seoul National University and Ph.D. from Ewha Women's University, studied with Masters Hwang Byung-Ju, Ji Mi-Ja, Lee Jae-Suk, and Hwang Byung-Ki, and has been a member of the National Center for Korean Traditional Performing Arts. She teaches at SNU and stages solo recitals every year with many performances throughout Asia, Europe, Middle East, and the Americas, for instance at Kennedy Center, Yen-ching Hall at Harvard University, Henry Crown Hall in Jerusalem, Asian Art Museum in San Francisco and a gayageum concerto with Sinsai Symphony. Ji has won many national performance awards. She is the only one of master Hwang Byung-Ki's students to concertize with him. Aeri Ji gave solo Sanjo recitals in Korea and at the Alter und Neue Musik Aus Korea in Berlin in 2004 with Hwang Byung Ki's janggo accompaniment. The Korean Broadcasting Station featured a special documentary titled The Teacher and the Disciple: Thousand Years of Gayageum Tradition and Hwang Byung-Ki.

Program
"A Story" for Gayageum. Hi Kyung Kim, the composer, says, "Looking back on my life, I remember when I was a student in Seoul. This piece refers to that memory. It is based on popular songs sung by college students at the time. Two were seasonal: one about summer, one about autumn moving to winter, and another song about ordinary life, which I enjoyed singing along with my brother after I graduated from college. I tried not to modify much of the original scale and melody of the gayageum to adapt these melodies. I also tried to stay in the traditional gayageum sound as much as possible. As I was learning gayageum I was so fascinated by Aeri Ji's performance. Virtuoso Ji puts all her heart into the performance, and her inner beauty was the motivation to compose this piece."

"Chim Hyang Moo" (Byung Ki Hwang) breaks new ground in Korean music. Chimhang, an Indian perfume, gives its name to the work (Dance in the Perfume of Aloes). In the work, Hwang surveys the world of Buddhist art in the Shilla period, where sensitivity to beauty was sublimated into religious exultation by the medium of music. Completely new techniques in performance are required for this work. Even the tuning is different, the basis being a scale used for a Buddhist chant. Arpeggios are employed which recall those of the ancient East Asian harp, the Konghu. The Janggo also plays an important part in this composition.

"Poème Lyrique pour Gayageum" (Young Ja Lee). Life is a long voyage embarking upon its journey with different encounters. Encounter with joy, with suffering and agony, with blessing.... And these encounters come to an end with a farewell. One's short stop in life is followed by a long, eternal absence where remaining loved ones cast anchor by offering a prayer of reincarnation. Unlike the textures made by absolute pitch, the microtonal textures of gayageum's twelve strings portray the uncertainty rooted deep in our inner mind. Each performance carries out different fluctuations in intervals and textures, bringing a sense of joy and ecstasy.

"Sanjo" for Gayageum (Traditional Folk Music). Sanjo originated from the shamanist shinawi and recalls the melodies and rhythms of p'ansori. Each section is clearly marked with changing tempo and unique rhythmic pattern (jangdan) so its formal structure is not difficult to hear. It progresses from slow to moderate to fast tempo with additional tempi often inserted. Sanjo form is a flexible framework for the individual performer's virtuosic displays. Master Jung Nam Hi was born in 1905 in South Korea and inherited the performance style of the originator of the gayageum sanjo repertory Kim Chang Jo through An Ki Ok. Subsequently Jung transferred his style of sanjo to Kim Yun Duk in 1947, and after Jung joined the North Korean government during the Korean War in 1950, Hwang Byung Ki mastered the style by years of study with Kim. Hwang studied the recordings of Jungi's performances made in 1934 and 1939 and recordings of Jung which Hwang himself uncovered in North Korea in 1990.

Composers
Hi Kyung Kim is Associate Professor at U.C. Santa Cruz and artistic director of the Pacific Rim Music Festival. She received her B.A. in composition from SNU and Ph.D. from U.C. Berkeley. As a recipient of Berkeley's George C. Ladd Prix de Paris, she worked at Institut de Rechéreche et Coordination Acoustique/Musique and École Normale Supérieure in Paris (1988-90). She has received numerous awards including the Walter Hinrichsen Award from the American Academy and Institute of Arts and Letters, Koussevitzky Commission from the Library of Congress. Her recent pieces include "Rituels" for Korean Choreography, and Korean and Western ensembles, and some were commissioned by Yo-Yo Ma and Chamber Music Society of Minnesota. She just finished a piece for voice and chamber ensemble for the Koussevitzky Foundation and a solo gayageum piece commissioned by Aeri Ji.

Byung Ki Hwang is a leading performer, composer, and scholar of Korean traditional music. Hwang has been Professor of Korean music at Ewha University. He studied gayageum and composition at the National Center for Korean Traditional Performing Arts. He received numerous prizes including the National Traditional Music Competition and the National Music Prize. He was awarded the Order of Culture Silver Medal (2003) and the Korean Traditional Music Award (2003). His best-known works feature the gayageum, on which he is a renowned performer. Hwang has also developed his own unique version of sanjo.

Young Ja Lee studied at Ewha Woman's University, the Paris National Conservatory, the Manhattan School of music in New York City, the Brussels Royal Conservatory, and obtained a D.E.A. degree in musicology from the Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne in Paris. Lee obtained the first prize at the 4th Annual Korean National Music Competition in composition. She was granted numerous awards including the Presidential Award of Korean Culture and Arts Award, the Grand Prize at the 15th annual Korean Composition Award, and the Grand Prix at the Ye Chong Arts and Cultural Award. She founded the Korean Society of Woman composers. Her music is performed in France, the Netherlands, the United States, Japan, China, and Russia.

This event is supported by Koret Foundation Funds.



Recent Archaeological Discoveries in China
Michael Nylan, Professor, History, UC Berkeley
September 6, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Archaeological Research Facility
For more information, contact Sherry Pierce Parrish <parrish@berkeley.edu>, Manager, Archaeological Research Facility, (510)643-5797.



The Riddle of Tabo: The Origin and Fate of a West Tibetan Manuscript Collection
Paul Harrison, Visiting Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Stanford University
September 7, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
The surviving fragments of an enormous manuscript library in the West Tibetan Monastery of Tabo, founded in 996 C.E., confront researchers with many problems and challenges. How and when was this huge collection produced? Who or what was responsible for the unbelievable state of damage and disorder in which it was found at the start of the 20th century? The work of cataloguing these sacred remains, much of it carried out "in the field" at Tabo, casts new light on the development of the Buddhist canon, and on the history of West Tibet, the cradle of the Tibetan Buddhist renaissance in the 10th-11th centuries.

Paul Harrison was until recently Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand. His research interests include the history and literature of Mahayana Bud dhism (especially Mahayana sutras), the study of Sanskrit Buddhist manuscripts, and the development of the Tibetan canon.



Is China shifting its development paradigm?: Central-local relations and the impetus for change
Maria Heimer, Assistant Professor, Political Science, Uppsala University
September 8, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Discussant: Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley



Women in the Ming Dynasty
September 10, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Lindy Li Mark, Professor Emerita, Anthropology, CSU East Bay, Matthew Sommer, Professor, History, Stanford University, with Ming Zeng, master kunqu flutist.

Lecture and demonstration



2006 Fall Reception
September 12, 2006
The Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, and theCenter for Southeast Asia Studies cordially invite you to their joint 2006 Fall Reception on Tuesday, September 12, 2006, 3:00 to 5:00 p.m.

Please join us for this opportunity to meet new faculty, students, and staff. Refreshments will be served. For questtions or further information, please call (510) 642-2809 or 642-3609.



The timeless love and dream in the Peony Pavilion
Kenneth Pai, Professor Emeritus, UCSB
September 13, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley Association of Taiwanese Students
The Peony Pavilion, often compared to Shakespeare's Romeo and Juliet, is one of the landmark works in the history of Chinese literature.

At the crossroads of the traditional Chinese literature and modern theater art, Kenneth Pai, Professor Emeritus at UC Santa Barbara, has established a brand new paradigm for the representation of the ancient Kun Opera, the Peony Pavilion.

Before the performance, the Berkeley Association of Taiwanese Students invites Prof. Pai to share his ideas for the ground-breaking production and his goal to revive Kun Opera, a vanishing traditional cultural treasure, including the casting, preparation and "behind the scenes" of the production.

The presentation will be conducted in Mandarin

For more information contact Lex Kuo <lexkuo@gmail.com>



Making Theater
September 15, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Cal Performances, Department of Theater, Dance, & Performance Studies
Featuring Kenneth Pai (General Artistic Director & Scriptwriter), Hua Wei (Scriptwriter), and Wang Mengchao (Stage Designer)



Cal Performances presents Peony Pavilion
September 15–17, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Cal Performances
http://www.calperfs.berkeley.edu/presents/season/2006/peony_pavilion/peony_pavilion.php



Peony Pavilion in Context: Kun Opera and Cultural Performance from Ming to Modern Times: 牡丹亭及其社會氛圍:從明至今崑曲的時代內涵與文化展示
September 15–17, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Cal Perfmormances
A symposium in conjunction with Kenneth Pai's production of The Peony Pavilion

Friday, September 15
8:15-8:45 am: BREAKFAST


8:45-10:30 am: SESSION I, "THE MUSIC OF KUN OPERA"
Chaired by Bonnie C. Wade, Music, University of California, Berkeley
Joseph Lam, Musicology, University of Michigan — "Kunqu: Civilized/Civilizing (ya) Music Discourses from Late Ming and Early Qing China"
Wu Xinlei, Literature, Nanjing University (emeritus) — "《牡丹亭》昆曲工尺谱全印本的探究 (A Study of the Kunqu Scores for Complete Printed Editions of Mudanting)"
Discussant: Lindy Li Mark, Anthropology, CSU East Bay (emerita)

10:30-10:45 am: COFFEE BREAK

10:45 am-12:30 pm: SESSION II, "KUN OPERA & THE MING-QING TRANSITION"
Chaired by Robert Ashmore, EALC, University of California, Berkeley
Katherine Carlitz, EALL, University of Pittsburgh — "Politics and Emotion in Er Xu Ji"
Catherine Swatek, Asian Studies, University of British Columbia — "Who Put the Dialect in Kunqu? Suzhou Playwrights and Suzhou Dialect"
Discussant: David Johnson, History, University of California, Berkeley

12:30-2:00 pm: LUNCH

Saturday, September 16
8:15-8:45 am: BREAKFAST

8:45-10:30 am: SESSION III, "THE POLITICS OF KUN OPERA IN THE QING"
Chaired by Patricia Berger, History of Art, University of California, Berkeley
Hua Wei, Literature & Philosophy, Academia Sinica — "慾望、性別與華夷的嬉戲 — 清初戲曲家吳震生的另類喜劇 (Desire, Gender, and Chinese/Barbarian Interaction in Comedy from the Early Qing Playwright Wu Zhensheng)"
Wei Shang, EALC, Columbia University — "Caizi Mudanting and the Hermeneutics of Subversion"
Discussant: Sophie Volpp, EALC, University of California, Berkeley

10:30-10:45 am: COFFEE BREAK

10:45 am-12:30 pm: SESSION IV, "KUNQU TRAJECTORIES IN THE 19TH CENTURY"
Chaired by Mary Ann Smart, Music, University of California, Berkeley
Andrea S. Goldman, History, University of Maryland — "The Accidental Death of Kunqu"
David Rolston, Asian Languages & Cultures, University of Michigan — "Porous Boundaries: Kunju and/in Jingju"
Discussant: Matthew Sommer, History, Stanford University

12:30-2:00 pm: LUNCH

Sunday, September 17
8:30-9:00 am: BREAKFAST

9:00-10:45 am: SESSION V, "KUNQU IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT, I"
Chaired by Wen-hsin Yeh, History, University of California, Berkeley
ROUNDTABLE DISCUSSION:
Elizabeth Wichmann-Walczak, Theatre & Dance, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Sheila Melvin, Music Correspondent, Asian Wall Street Journal
Madam Hua Wenyi, master kunqu artist
Susan Pertel Jain, Ph.D., Office of Summer Sessions & Special Programs, UCLA
Haiping Yan, Critical Studies, School of Theatre, Film & Television, UCLA
Sudipto Chatterjee, Theater & Performance Studies, University of California, Berkeley

10:45-11:00 am: COFFEE BREAK

11:00-12:00 am: SESSION VI, "KUNQU IN A GLOBAL CONTEXT, II"
Discussion with Kenneth Pai, panel presenters, and the symposium audience



Reception: Traditional Korean Embroidery
Park, Phil Soon, artist
September 15, 2006
Center for Korean Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Please join us for a reception with the artist, Park, Phil Soon, on Friday, September 15, 2006 following a talk on "The Nightmare Riding Korean Literature" by Yi Munyol (in Korean with English Q&A interpretation). Park, Phil Soon's Traditional Korean Embroidery will be on display in the lobby of the Institute of East Asian Studies until September 29, 2006.

Park, Phil Soon, born into a traditional family in Yeong Deok, Gyeongbuk Province, learned the art of embroidery when she was very young. Embroidery had been her hobby until she made it into a career in the mid-1980s. Beginning from simple clothes and personal ornaments, Park has embroidered large-scale pieces such as the eightfold screen. Her work is famous for the floridness of its colors as well as the delicateness of its exquisite lines, which demonstrates her time and effort devoted to it over the past decades. Park won the Korean Arts and Crafts Award in 1998. She has created masterpieces ranging from large folding screens to small accessories such as spoon pockets and jewelry cases. She is married to the renowned novelist Yi Munyol, currently visiting the Center for Korean Studies as a distinguished writer in residence.



Kunqu Opera Master Class
September 16, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Cal Performances
With Wang Shiyu 汪世瑜 and Zhang Jiqing 張繼青 — movement and vocal directors of the Peony Pavilion production; translation provided.



Maruyama Masao and America the Incomprehensible
Yasuhisa Shimizu, CJS Visiting Scholar, History of Japanese Political Thought, Kyushu University
September 18, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
Maruyama Masao (1914-1996), a distinguished social scientist and historian in postwar Japan, visited the United States four times between 1961 and 1983. America, he confessed after his first stay at Harvard and at Oxford in England, was incomprehensible compared with Europe. This research tries to understand the thought of Maruyama from the viewpoint of his experience of "America the incomprehensible." In this respect, the fact is examined that his visa to the United States was once refused in 1961 and cancelled even in 1973. Possible perception gap between American scholars and Maruyama about the atomic bomb, which he survived in Hiroshima on August 6, 1945, may be important. It is also discussed how his stay at Berkeley in 1976 and 1983 caused him to rethink his conception of America.



  Shutting Out the Sun: How Japan Created Its Own Lost Generation
Michael Zielenziger, Visiting Scholar, Institute of International Studies, UC Berkeley
September 19, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Graduate School of Journalism, Institute of International Studies
In Shutting Out the Sun, Michael Zielenziger argues that Japan's rigid, tradition-steeped society, its aversion to change, and its distrust of individuality and the expression of self are stifling economic revival, political reform, and social evolution. Giving a human face to the country's malaise, Zielenziger explains how these constraints have driven intelligent, creative young men to become modern-day hermits. At the same time, young women, better educated than their mothers and earning high salaries, are rejecting the traditional path to marriage and motherhood, preferring to spend their money on luxury goods and travel. Smart, unconventional, and politically controversial, Shutting Out the Sun is a bold explanation of Japan's stagnation and its implications for the rest of the world.

Program followed by reception.

Other programs in the IEAS Book Series: New Perspectives on East Asia.



The Role of Song in Jin ping mei: Implied Judgment and Narrative Integration
Katherine Carlitz, Adjunct Professor, East Asian Languages and Literatures, University of Pittsburgh
September 20, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies




The "Mathematisation" of "Physics" in Comparative Perspective: Greece and China
Sir Geoffrey Lloyd, Senior Scholar in Residence, Needham Research Institute, University of Cambridge
September 20, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Office for History of Science and Technology, Department of History




From Military Violence to Court Poetry in the Early Tang: Six Poems from the Hanlin Xueshi Ji
Jack Chen, Assistant Professor, Asian Languages and Cultures, UCLA
September 22, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Discussant: Paula Varsano, Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley



Asia by Means of Performance: An Interdisciplinary Symposium on Asian Performance
September 22–23, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Theater, Dance and Performance Studies




Provisional Bodies: Contemporary Literatures of the Chinese Diaspora and Cultural Translation
Serena Fusco, Professor, Comparative Literature, University of Naples
September 28, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies




China's Illiberal Challenge
Naazneen Barma, Ph.D. candidate, Political Science,
Ely Ratner, Ph.D. candidate, Political Science
September 28, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of International Studies
Since the end of the Cold War, democratic liberalism has been the dominant model for national development and international affairs. The rise of China presents the West, for the first time since the fall of the Berlin Wall, with a formidable ideological challenge to that paradigm. The "China model" powerfully combines two components: illiberal capitalism, the practice and promotion of a governance strategy where markets are free but politics are not; and illiberal sovereignty, an approach to international relations that emphasizes the inviolability of national borders in the face of international intervention. These twin ideologies are intertwined in a self-reinforcing cycle, whereby governments in the developing world are embracing Chinese illiberalism and being rewarded for doing so.

The spreading of Chinese illiberalism could set scores of developing nations away from the path of liberal democracy, creating a community of countries that reject Western views of human rights and accepted standards of national governance. In the rise of China, what is really at stake is not American competitiveness or power, but the future of the liberal international order.



East Asia in Transition: Comprehensive Security in the Pacific Rim
September 29, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies
See http://ieas.berkeley.edu/events/2006.09.29w.html for the full conference agenda.



Taiwan Film Festival
September 29 – October 1, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Asia Society Northern California, Chuan Lyu Foundation, TECO-SF
This year the Institute of East Asian Studies is co-presenting the 2006 Taiwan Film Festival. The film festival will showcase eight feature and documentary films from Taiwan. An overview of the films in alphabetical order is included below. Admission to all screenings is free. Seating is limited. Seats are available on a first-come, first-served basis. For further details please visit
http://2006tff.blogspot.com/.

How High is the Mountain
(by Tang Hsiang-chu)
What do family and fatherhood mean in contemporary Taiwan? How do Mainland refugees relate to the families they left behind when they fled to Taiwan in the late 1940s? The director uses his own family to explore the answers to these questions. He not only explores his search for his father's past, but also examines his own recent experience of becoming a father himself. The director and his father return to China to meet relatives and reestablish long-broken ties of kinship through family gatherings, folk rituals and religious ceremonies, and through conversations with family members, teachers, and old friends.
Saturday, September 30, 2006, 4:00 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way, Berkeley

Love Go Go
(by Chen Yu-hsun)
Mismatched love, isolation, and the universal hope of finding one's soulmate are the themes of this poignant film set in contemporary urban Taiwan. The story's various characters each have some connection with the small bakery shop run by Ah Sheng's aunt. Ah Sheng works in the back of the shop baking and designing pastries; his long-lost schoolmate is the woman who comes in to buy lemon pie: his roommate develops a blind love for the owner of an electronic pager she finds; a young salesman who sells defense gadgets tries to rescue a beautiful woman. This award-winning film is marked by a riot of bright colors, a sometimes anarchic spirit, and an always playful sense of fun.
Saturday, September 30, 2006, 9:00 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way, Berkeley

Murmur of Youth
(by Lin Cheng-sheng)
Lin Sheng-cheng's second feature, this film is perhaps the first in Taiwan to broach the subject of lesbian desire. The film offers a cross-section of Taipei society with the story of two teenage girls who share the name Mei-li. One Mei-li inhabits the concrete world of high-rise apartment buildings in the city center with her middle-class family; the other lives with her working-class family living in the lushly green outskirts of the city. The two girls' paths cross when they both take jobs selling movie tickets, and in the cramped space of the ticket booth, their developing friendship takes an amorous turn.
Friday, September 29, 2006, 3:00 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way, Berkeley

Ocean Fever
(by Chen Lung-nan)
This verite portrait of young rock 'n rollers was an audience favorite at the 2004 Taipei Film Festival. Aboriginal Taiwanese director Chen Lung-nan takes a fly-on-the-wall approach to chronicling the experience of five fledgling bands including a raucous rapmetal combo called Stone and the punkish girl trio Hotpink in the heady days before they perform at the Ho-Hai-Yan Rock Festival, a massive beachside talent contest for aspiring pop acts. In classic "rockumentary" fashion, the film captures the hopes and dreams (not to mention the personal doubts and unexpected setbacks) of the competing bands while offering an affectionate look at contemporary youth culture in Taiwan.
Saturday, September 30, 2006, 7:00 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way, Berkeley

Secret Love for the Peach Blossom Spring
(by Sylvia Feng)
Two plays collide, as do the memories and emotions for the past and present. Through a scheduling mistake, two troupes find themselves trapped in the same rehearsal space. One play is a lofty, pretentious take on a soap opera awhile the other is broadly farcical, and yet the plays share common themes. Scenes and dialogues juxtaposed manage to cause offense, create comedy, and point to deeper truths. Based on Stan Lai's famous play of the same name, the film also works as an allegory depicting a mainlander who fled China in 1949. This year marks the 20th anniversary of the original play.
Saturday, September 30, 2006, 2:30 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way, Berkeley

The Strait Story
(by Hsang Yu-Shan)
The year was 1943 and Taiwan was under Japanese rule. After finishing his studies in Japan, famous Taiwanese sculptor and painter Huang Ching-cheng boarded the "Takachiho Maru" ship from Kobe, Japan to return home before heading to China for a teaching job. As the huge vessel approached the Kneelung harbor, it was torpedoed by an American submarine. The Strait Story is the director's attempt to recover a lost page of Taiwanese history. Viewers discover Huang's childhood in rural Taiwan, his maturation as an artist in Tokyo, and his enduring passion for art and love.
Sunday, October 1, 2006, 9:30 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way, Berkeley

Tiger Women Grow Wings
(by Monika Treut)
German director Monika Treut focuses her lens on Taiwan, examining the lives of three women of different generations against the backdrop of the socio-political changes of Taiwan and the 2004 presidential election. Treut offers subtle, moving portraits of the famous Taiwanese opera singer Hsieh Yue-hsia, award winning novelist Li Ang, and up-and-coming filmmaker Chen Ying-rong. Through their eyes and stories, the viewer glimpses the many changes and continuing conflict in Taiwanese society, as well as the raucous campaigning typical of Taiwan elections.
Friday, September 29, 2006, 7:00 pm
Museum Theater, UC Berkeley Art Museum, 2621 Durant Avenue, Berkeley

Viva Tonal — The Dance Age
(by Chien Wei-ssu, Sylvia Feng)
"I'm a cultured woman, traveling about footloose and fancy-free." So begins a lilting tune from Taiwan's "Dance age" of the 1920s and '30s, a paradoxical time when the island's occupation by Japan also brought youth culture and a measure of artistic freedom. Women smoked cigarettes, love scandals were rife, and risqué Taiwanese pop was born. This lively historical documentary mixes engaging interviews with catchy songs, haunting period footage, and reenactments of the unrequited romance between the lovely chanteuse Sun Sun and her songwriter Chen Chun-yu.
Sunday, October, 1, 2006, 7:30 pm
Pacific Film Archive Theater, 2575 Bancroft Way, Berkeley



Women's Struggle for Gender Equality in Korea
Mijeong Lee, Department of Sociology, Stanford University
September 29, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
Under traditional Confucian patriarchy, Korean women had been confined to family and placed at the bottom of social hierarchy. Women's issues had never been recognized seriously until the 1980s. But, from the early 1980s, there have been drastic changes with regard to women status. These changes have been possible through the struggle of women's groups. From the early 1980s, new women's groups have emerged. A coalition of new women's group, KWAU was formed in 1987 and has been enormously successful in promoting gender equality. As democratic political process got back on track in 1987, a political opportunity was created for women's movement. With the rising level of education, women have become more conscious of gender equality. Starting form the enactment of the Equal Employment Opportunity Act in 1987, a series of laws have been enacted to eliminate gender discrimination. Women's groups proposed the drafts for these laws and persuaded law makers. Government has tended to try to work with women's groups to fulfill the obligations imposed by the CEDAW. Ministry of Gender Equality was established in 2001. It can be said that women's movement in Korea has been well institutionalized into the political system. Mijeong Lee received her Ph.D. in Sociology from UCLA and is currently a Fulbright Scholar at Stanford. She is the author of numerous papers on Korean social issues and the book Women's Education, Work, and Marriage in Korea: Women's Lives Under Institutional Conficts (Seoul National University Press, 1998).



Milarepa
September 30, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies, Conservancy for Tibetan Art and Culture
From the producers of The Cup and Travelers and Magicians comes the true story of Tibet's greatest saint, Milarepa. In this account of his early life, we encounter the forces that propelled him onto the path to enlightenment — betrayal, magic, demons, vengeance … and awakening. Directed by Tibetan Lama Neten Chokling Rinpoche, this film is of interest for anyone concerned with the cycle of violence and retribution consuming today's world.

6:30 pm — Screening of Milarepa
8:00 pm — Q&A with the Director, Neten Chokling Rinpoche
9:00 pm — Reception

To order tickets, please call 877-697-2998 or visit http://www.milarepamovie.com/benefit_tickets.htm.



Why Ask "Where" in Infectious Disease Epidemiology?: An Application of GIS in Public Health
Dr. Edmund Seto, Lecturer, School of Public Health
October 2, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Survey Research Center (SRC), Geographic Information Science Center (GISC), IGERT Program in Politics, Economics, Psychology & Public Policy (PEPPP)
Dr. Seto will present his latest research on estimating villagers' exposures to Schistosoma japonicum, a waterborne infectious parasite found in China. Previous studies have estimated the risk of infection by this parasite by quantifying water contact activity. Most of these studies do not ask where water contact occurs. In contrast, Dr. Seto's study is based on a spatially-explicit water contact questionnaire that allowed him to map the locations of water contact activities. In Dr. Seto's study, water contact alone was not found to be associated with infection. Only after adjusting for the location of water contact and accounting for the parasite concentrations at those locations did he find an association.

Dr. Seto specializes in the use of GIS for public health applications at the School of Public Health at UC Berkeley. The "Social Science in Place" (SSIP) seminar series is a joint collaboration between the Survey Research Center (SRC), the Geographic Information Science Center (GISC) and the IGERT Program in Politics, Economics, Psychology & Public Policy (PEPPP) at the University of California, Berkeley. Our mission is to promote the awareness and use of GIS and other spatial techniques in the social sciences. We aim to create an interdisciplinary platform to facilitate dissemination of knowledge and exchange of ideas in integrating spatial concepts and technology in applied social science research.



China Blue: Documentary film followed by panel discussion
October 5, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley China Initiative, Walter H. Shorenstein Fund
FREE — Special sneak preview. BANNED IN CHINA

China Blue takes us on a poignant journey inside a blue-jeans factory, The working conditions Jasmine and her teenage friends must survive are harsh beyond imagination. They are also unlawful by international standards, and tensions in the factory are running high. So when the factory owner strikes a deal with a Western client and demands around-the-clock production to meet the deadline, a confrontation becomes inevitable. Shot clandestinely in China, under difficult conditions, this is a deep-access account of what both China and the international retail companies don't want us to see — how the clothes we buy are actually made.

Winner of the Amnesty International Human Rights Award at the Amsterdam Documentary Film Festival, the film will be followed by a panel discussion with the filmmaker, Micha Peled, and Todd Carrel (Journalism), Katie Quan (Institute of Industrial Relations), moderated by Tom Gold, Director, Berkeley China Initiative.



Do Buddhists Believe? Not Exactly the Same Old Question
Catherine Bell, Professor, Department of Religious Studies, Santa Clara University
October 5, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
Drawing on a larger book project on the issue of belief (using religious studies and anthropology methods), Bell picks up the argument in which Donald Lopez found the concept neither natural nor universal. For Lopez, Buddhism has suffered the effects of a collision with Christian and Western colonial categories like "belief." New work in cognitive theory, even when assessed by anthropologists active in the field, like Maurice Bloch, suggests more nuanced attempts to mediate universality as we need it as scholars and particularity as we experience it in the cultural materials we study.

Catherine Bell is the Bernard J. Hanley Professor of Religious Studies and former chair of the Department of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University. She has written two books on ritual, Ritual Theory, Ritual Practice (1992) and Ritual: Perspectives and Dimensions (1997), with a forthcoming edited volume, Teaching Ritual (Oxford/AAR Series), as well as many articles on manuscript and printed texts in Chinese popular religion. She is currently on leave to complete a book entitled Believing.



The Role of Education in South Korea's Economic Development: Achievements and Challenges
Jin Pyo Kim, Member, Korean National Assembly
October 5, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
Despite its lack of natural resources or accumulated capital, Korea has become the world's 12th largest economy in only forty years while developing itself into a liberalized democratic state that respects political rights and the freedom of the press. Education has been a critical building block behind such economic surge and democratization. Korea established a modern education system as early as the 1950s and established policies to extend educational access for all. Korea reached universal secondary education in the 1970s and saw a sharp expansion of higher education enrollment starting the 1990s. Such policies nurtured a pool of well-educated human resources. Good use of private investment has contributed to securing educational finance and learning opportunities. Yet education faces diverse challenges for further improvement. Problems include a relatively low level of public expenditure in higher education and a lack of educational diversity resulting from the equalization policy. The government is introducing strategies to enhance higher education, diversify and strengthen school education, develop education for the gifted, improve vocational education, and promote international cooperation. Demands are increasing for local governments to take an active part in the implementation of such educational policies. Hon. Jin-Pyo Kim, current member of the National Assembly of the Republic of Korea, has served as Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Education & Human Resources Development, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister of Finance & Economy, Vice Chairman of the Presidential Transition Committee, Minister of the Office for Government Policy Coordination, Senior Secretary of Policy and Planning for the President, Vice Minister of Finance & Economy, Director General for Tax Affairs, Chief Director of the Planning Group for Organizing the ASEM Meeting, Director-General for Banking and Insurance, and General-Director for the National Tax Tribunal. He graduated from SNU School of Law and earned an MA in public administration at the University of Wisconsin. He received an honorary doctoral degree in public administration from the University of the Cumberlands in 2005.



Popular Contention in China
October 6–7, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Department of Political Science, Berkeley China Initiative, Walter H. Shorenstein Fund
Friday, October 6
2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor conference room

8:30 — Coffee and registration

9:00 — Opening remarks and welcome — Kevin O'Brien (University of California, Berkeley)

9:15 — Panel 1: Opportunities
Organization, Mobilization, and Comparative Perspectives on Opportunity — Teresa Wright (California State University, Long Beach)
Rethinking the Concept of Political Opportunity Structure: Lessons from Popular Contention in China — Xi Chen (Louisiana State University)
Discussant: David Meyer (University of California, Irvine)

10:45 — Break

11:00 — Panel 2: Recruitment
Attraction without Networks: Recruitment to Unregistered Protestantism in China — Carsten Vala (University of California, Berkeley) and Kevin O'Brien (University of California, Berkeley)
Discussant: Thomas Gold (University of California, Berkeley)

12:00 — Lunch

1:15 — Panel 3: Frames, Leadership, and Mobilization
The Reality of Perceptions: Structural Roots of Frames in Contentious Politics — William Hurst (Oxford University and University of Texas, Austin)
Framing Contention: The Role of Worker Leaders in Factory-Based Resistance — Chen Feng (Hong Kong Baptist University)
Protest Leadership in the Countryside — Lianjiang Li (Chinese University of Hong Kong) and Kevin O'Brien (University of California, Berkeley)
Discussant: Sidney Tarrow (Cornell University)

3:15 — Break

3:30 — Panel 4: Culture
Theorizing the Role of Culture in Social Movements (Illustrated by Contention in Modern China) — Dingxin Zhao (University of Chicago)
Discussant: David Meyer (University of California, Irvine)

4:30 — Adjourn

Saturday, October 7
2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor conference room

9:00 — Panel 5: Tactics and Their Consequences
Lawful and Unlawful Strategies of Contention in Rural China — Ethan Michelson (Indiana University) and Jennifer Choo (University of California Berkeley)
Disruptive Collective Action and Its Effectiveness in China — Yongshun Cai (University of Science and Technology, Hong Kong)
Discussant: Sidney Tarrow (Cornell University)

10:30 — Break

10:45 — Panel 6: The Media and the Internet
Manufacturing Dissent in Transnational China: Boomerang, Backfire or Spectacle? — Patricia Thornton (Trinity College)
Internet Protests in China: Opportunities and Challenges for Social Movement Theory — Guobin Yang (Barnard College and Columbia University)
Discussant: Rachel Stern (University of California, Berkeley)

12:15 — Lunch

1:30 — Panel 7: Summing Up
Informal Remarks by: Rachel Stern (UC-Berkeley), Sidney Tarrow (Cornell University), David Meyer (UC-Irvine), Kevin O'Brien (UC-Berkeley), followed by open discussion

2:45 — Conference ends



Investing in Emerging Markets: China, India, Russia
October 6, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Clausen Center for International Business & Policy
http://www.haas.berkeley.edu/HaasGlobal/emergingmarketsconference.html



Berkeley Moon Festival Party
$3 with Berkeley student ID, $8 non-students
October 6, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley Chinese Students and Scholars Association (BCSSA)
The traditional Chinese moon festival is coming, and so is the Berkeley Moon Festival Party.

There will be dinner for everyone from 6:30pm to 7:30pm. Nice mooncakes will be served to celebrate Mid Autumn. During the party, 6 to 8 singers will compete for the Berkeley Superstar Prize. We have a pool of very high level contestants this year, and it is going to be a very cool show. All the audience will be able to participate in our relaxing games with a chance to win nice gifts. Tickets are $3 with Berkeley student ID, $8 non-students.



Interpreting Social Change and Reform: The Genealogy of the Danwei
Pierre Miege, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley
October 11, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies




Corporate Conference: China's Financial Markets
Cost: $95 Member, $120 Non-Member
October 11, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley China Initiative, Asia Society Northern California, California-Asia Business Council, Hong Kong Association of Northern California, Hong Kong Economic and Trade Office, U.S.-China Chamber of Commerce




The Construction of Meaning: Commentary in the Chinese Tradition
Daniel Gardner, Professor, History, Smith College
October 13, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, East Asian Languages and Cultures
Discussant: Robert Ashmore, Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley



Responses to Destruction in Japan: A Multi-Disciplinary Symposium
October 13, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, JSPS
9:00 am: Opening Remarks

9:10 am: Keynote Talks
Disaster Culture: Violence, Vulnerability, and Japanese Nature — Gregory Clancey, Department of History, National University of Singapore
Society and Commoners after Disasters: Changes from the Early Modern Period to the Contemporary Era — Itoko Kitahara, Graduate School of History and Folklore Studies, Kanagawa University


10:45 am: Session 1 — Earthquake Reactions
Emergency Response and Relief Activities following Major Earthquakes in Japan — Haruo Hayashi, Kyoto University
Imamura Akitsune and the Great Kantô Earthquake — Kerry Smith, Department of History, Brown University

12:40 pm: Lunch Break

2:00 pm: Session 2 — Restoration Responses
Urban Planning from the Perspective of Disaster Preparedness — Hiroo Ichikawa, Graduate School of Governance Studies , Meiji University
Reconstruction after Catastrophe in Japan: Experiences and Problems — Yoshiteru Murosaki, President, Fire and Disaster National Research Institute, Japan

4:00 pm: Session 3 — Remembering Catastrophe
Remembering the Great Kantô Earthquake while Preparing for Air Defense in Tokyo, 1930-1945 — Cary Karacas, Department of Geography, University of California, Berkeley
The Museumification of Memories: Suffering and Sacrifice on Display in Contemporary Japan — Akiko Takenaka, History of Art, University of Michigan

6:00 pm: Reception



The Analysis of Biz Strategy and Government Policy of "TV to Go" in the U.S. and Korea
Gwang James Han, Howard University
October 13, 2006
Center for Korean Studies




Exhibit — Universal Mountain: The Paintings of Ahn Sahn
October 16, 2006 – January 12, 2007
Institute of East Asian Studies
The opening reception for the Universal Mountain Exhibit will be held on Tuesday, November 28, 2006.

Jung-Moo Ahn (pen name: Ahn Sahn) was born on the mountainous Korean pensinsula. Ahn earned the BFA in Oriental Painting from Hong-Ik University in Seoul. There, he studied brush strokes in the tradition of classical Chinese painting and six principles of Chinese painting set forth by Hsieh Ho in the 5th century. Ahn's work follows primarily the first principle of capturing the resonance of the spirit. For over thirty years, he has continued to work on mastering his techniques, and his paintings have been exhibited throughout the world.

Born in a mountainous country, Ahn lived for several years in the Pacific Northwest where the mountains and lush landscape inspired him. He is now a resident of the Bay Area where Mt. Diablo and Mt. Tamalpais have become subjects in his exploration of "the universal mountain." Says Ahn: "The subject of my painting is nature... [I] try to create a live painting that displays a harmony and rhythm with its strong and weak lines, and also reflects the beauty, goodness and truth of its subject... As an artist, I will continue to breathe through my canvas and brush while surrounded in this ever true and changing nature."



Wild Cursive and Contemporary Chinese Calligraphy
Lin Hwai-min, Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Artistic director
Lampo Leong, calligraphy artist and Associate Professor, University of Missouri-Columbia
Patricia Berger, Chair, History of Art Department, UC Berkeley
October 18, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Cal Performances, Berkeley China Initiative
Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Artistic director Lin Hwai-min discusses the aesthetics of wild cursive calligraphy with artist Lampo Leung, in an illustrated session chaired by Patricia Berger, chair of UC Berkeley's History of Art Department.



中国民族管乐器演示 (An Introduction to Chinese Minority Musical Instruments): Lecture and Demonstration
Ming Zeng (曾明), Professor, Jiangsu Provincial Drama College (教授, 江苏省戏剧学校)
October 18, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Lecture will be conducted in Chinese with English translation.



Wild Cursive Calligraphy Workshop
Lampo Leong, Associate Professor, University of Missouri-Columbia
October 19, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Cal Performances
Through a slide-illustrated lecture and hands-on practice, Professor Lampo Leong will introduce participants to masterpieces that illuminate the unique concepts of Daoism, meditative quality, mark-making, rhythmic strokes, and shifting perspective in composition. Five major scripts of Chinese calligraphy will be the main subjects of study (Seal, Clerical, Standard, Running & Cursive). By the end of the workshop, participants will not only have enriched their artistic vocabularies, but will have expanded their appreciation for Asian aesthetic and philosophy.

This workshop is open to students from all levels; no Chinese language background nor prior experience in calligraphy are necessary.

$10 material fee/class is free. Class size is limited. To reserve a place contact 510.643.6321 or write ccs@berkeley.edu before October 17.



Explorations in Minority Memory: How and why did Ming Taizu become a Muslim
Zvi Ben-Dor Benite, Assistant Professor, History and Middle Eastern & Islamic Studies, New York University
October 20, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
This paper presents a portrayal of Ming Taizu as it is recorded, coded, imagined, and remembered in Chinese Muslim written and oral sources. The paper traces the roots of the various strands of Ming Taizu's "Muslim" image back to the early Ming period. The paper suggests that from the early Ming through the late 20th century, Muslim elites manipulated the image of Ming Taizu as a response to pressing political and cultural needs.

Discussant: Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, History, UC Berkeley



Geography Lessons: Creating Shinano in the Provincial Press, 1880-1920
Karen Wigen, History, Stanford University
October 20, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
A century ago, the provincial press in Japan was remarkably robust; Nagano Prefecture alone boasted over 50 local newspapers. But out of that crowded field, one gradually emerged as the flagship newspaper for the region: the Shinano Mainichi Shinbun. This talk introduces a sample of features from this paper, dating from mid Meiji through the Taisho era, to analyze how a mass-circulation newspaper worked to create a cohesive society in a fractious region. Questions to be addressed include: What notion of geography was embodied turn-of-the-century journalism? What vision of "imagined community" comes through in these articles? And how did the provincial press relate regional space to other life-worlds, from the micro to the macro?



Developments and Opportunities at Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Registration required
October 22, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley Chinese Student and Scholar Association (BCSSA), The Hong Kong Polytechnic University
Registration required. Please reply to Chengyu Li (tony_li@berkeley.edu) for registration and further information.

Chung-kwong Poon, President of Hong Kong Polytechnic University (PolyU), will visit San Francisco and hold a two hour meeting with Bay Area talents on the 22nd, October, 2006. As an application-oriented university, PolyU prides itself on its quality application-oriented research and teaching work, and its close ties with business and industry. As the leader of this fast-growing university, Prof. Poon will introducethe exciting latest development of and the recruitment opportunities at PolyU. He looks forward to the interactive discussion with the intellectual elite of Bay Area. Prof. Poon will be accompanied by Vice President (Research Development), Prof. Jan Ming Ko.

Berkeley Chinese Student and Scholar Association (BCSSA) and The Hong Kong Polytechnic University are co-hosting this exciting event. We believe that direct contact of the two senior leaders of PolyU will be an excellent opportunity for the potential faculty candidates in Bay Area. More importantly, this event may open gates toward future career development for many. Further communication and collaboration with PolyU, for example, could be arranged through Prof. Poon and Prof. Ko. We sincerely invite graduate students, postdoc fellows, researchers in Universities and industries, and others who are interested to attend this exciting event. As you can imagine from the internationality of Hong Kong, there is no boundary about where you originally came from.



China's Cutting Edge: New Video from Shanghai
Advance Tickets: (510) 642-5249
October 24, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Pacific Film Archive




Timor-Leste: A Candidate for State Failure?
James Cotton, Professor of Politics, University of New South Wales at the Australian Defence Force Academy
October 25, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies
East Timor's new government, led by José Ramos-Horta, must deliver relief for its citizens and restore international confidence in the country's viability. However, many problems must still be confronted. Gang violence and the exploitation of regional rivalries must be contained. The use of the police force for partisan political ends and then its disintegration during the May troubles has left the country without the immediate guarantors of public order. Deep divisions in the armed forces make it unlikely that a viable military can be reconstructed. An international presence will be required for some time, but past experience indicates that the attention span of the United Nations may be insufficient for the task. Integral to the restoration of order is an accounting for its collapse, which will undoubtedly embroil former Interior Minister Rogerio Lobato and possibly also former Prime Minister Mari Alkatiri, and thus open deep political fissures. Parties, political institutions, the agents of order and social loyalties have all been found wanting in the crisis of 2006. If confidence cannot be restored, state failure may be in prospect.



Pirated Copy
Advance Tickets: (510) 642-5249
October 25, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Pacific Film Archive




Reclaiming Chinese Society: Politics of Redistribution, Recognition, and Representation
October 27–28, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley China Initiative, Walter H. Shorenstein Fund, University of Michigan
Friday Oct 27 — 7:00 pm to 9:00 pm
PANEL 1: Politics of Representation, Media, and Information
Media/Journalism: Pan Zhongdang (UW, Madison)
Internet: Yongming Zhou (UW, Madison)
Film: Seio Nakajima (UC Berkeley)
Intellectuals: Tim Cheek (U of British Columbia)
Discussants: Liu Xin and Wen-hsin Yeh, UC Berkeley

Saturday Oct 28 — 9 am to 12 noon
PANEL 2: Politics of Redistribution, Class Formation, and Active Society
Villages: Ethan Michelson (Indiana)
Workers: Lee Ching Kwan (Michigan)
Home-owners: Li Zhang (UC Davis)
Inner City Protestors: Hsing You-tien (UC Berkeley)
Discussants: Kevin O'Brien and Michael Burawoy, UC Berkeley

Saturday Oct 28 — 2 pm to 5 pm
PANEL 3: Politics of Recognition, Identity, and Community
Religious Revival: Richard Madsen (UC San Diego)
Grass-roots Feminism: Wang Zheng (Michigan)
Environmentalism: Guobin Yang (Barnard)
Ethnic Agitation: Gardner Bovingdon (Indiana)
Discussants: Aihwa Ong, UC Berkeley



Japan's Kamioka Mine: Engineering Human Pain in the Hybrid Environments of the Jinzu River Basin
Brett Walker, Japan, Environmental and Medical History, Montana State University
October 27, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
With the beginning of Meiji wars, miners started extracting silver and lead from the Kamioka shafts of the mountainous regions of Toyama Prefecture. This technological complex, and the engineered environments it birthed, seamlessly connected to the Jinzu River Basin, which also fed downstream paddies that, in their own way, were engineered environments as well. Smelting and ore flotation devices that allowed miners and processors to extract ever higher percentages of their desired metals caused pollution problems in nearby agricultural lands. But these pollution problems, particularly their consequences for human health, represented the product of hybrid causation. Naturally occurring oxidization processes in riparian ecosystems created the toxins that caused human pain; but "it hurts, it hurts" disease, or cadmium poisoning, was also the product of the physiological consequences of Meiji state pronouncements regarding being a "good wife and wise mother." Women who were both productive and reproductive tended to suffer disproportionately from cadmium poisoning: obeying meant sacrifice for the state. Similarly, women who sheltered themselves from the sun, in a culturally ingrained habit to preserve their white complexion, deprived themselves of nutrients that could have protected them from industrial disease. Mining technologies, engineered environments, natural alchemy, state pronouncements, and cultural habits enmeshed and intertwined to create disease and pain downstream from this important wartime mine.



The Making of Multiethnic Society in South Korea: The influx of foreign workers, bride importation, and population aging
Andrew Eungi Kim, Korea University
October 27, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
One aspect of globalization that is the focus of increasing scholarly attention is international migration, especially the transnational migration of workers. International migration has undoubtedly become universalized as practically every country of the world is affected in one way or another as either a sending or receiving country. Currently, there are reportedly more than 500,000 foreigners residing in South Korea, with unskilled transnational migrant workers accounting for about a half of the total. Although the country's reliance on imported foreign labor is likely to continue unabated, the Korean government and the society as a whole have been generally intolerant of foreigners living in Korea as permanent residents. This paper examines various social factors, including the country's record-low fertility rate and rapid aging of the population, that all point to the continuation of labor importation, which will contribute to the making of a multiethnic Korean society. The paper then analyzes the cultural factors that account for the Koreans' low receptivity to foreigners and argues that it is the cultural ideology of ethnic homogeneity based on the "one ancestor myth" that fuels an intense pride and stake in cultural uniqueness, linguistic homogeneity, and historical collectivity — sensibilities government policy reinforces.



Yang Ban Xi: The Eight Model Works
Advance Tickets: (510) 642-5249
October 27, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Pacific Film Archive




The World
Advance Tickets: (510) 642-5249
October 28, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Pacific Film Archive




A Dialogue on Language between a Japanese and Inquirer: Kuki Shuzo's Version
Michael Marra, Japanese Literture and Hermeneutics, UCLA
October 30, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
The talk will focus on the poetry that the Japanese philosopher Kuki Shuzo (1888-1941) wrote during his stay in Paris in 1925-1927. Through the reading of this poetry an attempt will be made to construct Kuki's post-mortem response to the critique that the German philosopher Martin Heidegger (1889-1976) moved to Kuki in his 1959 "A Dialogue between Japanese and an Inquirer."



The Interplay of Buddhism and Law in Pre-communist Mongolia
Vesna Wallace, Associate Professor, Department of Religious Studies, UC Santa Barbara
November 2, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
Since the early 17th century until 1918, religious Buddhist and secular laws in Mongolia frequently and in various degrees fused into a single system of jurisprudence, thus invariably influencing each other. In her presentation, Professor Wallace will discuss the ways in which these influences shaped Mongolian Buddhism and legal consciousness of the Mongols.

Vesna Wallace is an Associate Professor in the Department of Religious Studies at UC Santa Barbara. Her research interests focus on the comparative analysis of the Buddhist traditions of South Asia, Tibet, and Mongolia. Recent publications include The Kalacakratantra: The Chapter on the Individual Together with the Vimalaprabha (2004) and The Inner Kalacakratantra: A Buddhist Tantric View of the Individual (2001). She has also published a series of articles on Indian tantric Buddhism and produced three documentary films on contemporary Mongolia. Her latest book, The Kalacakratantra: The Chapter on Sadhana, is in press at Columbia University.



An Archaeological Approach to the Lolan Kingdom in Xinjiang
Wang Binghua, Professor, History, Renmin University
November 2, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Archaeological Research Facility, Art History, Buddhist Studies, History
The site of Loulan is located at the northern bank of Lop Nor (Lopnur or Luobubo), Xinjiang. At the beginning of the twentieth century, the Swedish explorer Sven Hedin was among the first to visit the lost kingdom that once prospered from the second century BCE to the forth century CE. Much archaeological work has been done in the area since 1949. This talk will try to position Loulan within the longue duree, investigating the local culture developed by the Indo-European population in the context of the transcultural elements introduced from Han China.

Lecture will be conducted in Chinese, with English translation.



An IEAS Shorenstein Seminar: East Asia — Ten Years After the Crisis
November 2, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Walter H. Shorenstein Fund
Benjamin J. Cohen, UC Santa Barbara — After the Fall: East Asian Exchange Rates Since the Crisis
Stephan Haggard, UC San Diego — Democratization, Crisis and the Changing Social Contract in East Asia
Andrew MacIntyre, Australian National University — Beyond Crony Capitalism
Thomas Pepinsky, Yale University — Institutions, Economic Recovery, and Macroeconomic Vulnerability in Indonesia and Malaysia

Chair: T.J. Pempel, UC Berkeley



The Butcher, the Baker, and the Carpenter: Chinese Sojourners in the Spanish Phillippines and their Impact on Southern Fujian (Sixteenth–Eighteenth Centuries)
Lucille Chia, Associate Professor, History, UC Riverside
November 3, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
This talk considers the impact on southern Fujian of the trade with and migration to the Spanish Philippines by examining the links of the Chinese there with their native places, particularly in the half century after the resumption of Chinese maritime trade in 1684. To understand the local history of Minnan, it is necessary to look both at the extensive network of Minnanese in Southeast Asia (Nanyang) and China, and at the important social and economic distinctions between Zhangzhou and Quanzhou prefectures in Fujian.

Discussant: Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, History, UC Berkeley



1895: Kyoto and the Navigation of Japanese Art History
Alice Tseng, Japanese Art & Architecture, Boston University
November 3, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
The year 1895 figures prominently in not only Japan's political history but also its art history. The Fourth National Industrial Exhibition opened on 1 April 1895 in Kyoto in the final days of the nation's victory in the Sino-Japanese war. Seizing national attention from Tokyo, Kyoto took center stage, as the host of the Industrial Exhibition, along with celebrating the 1100th anniversary of its founding by Emperor Kanmu and the completion of two landmark projects — the Heian Shrine and the Imperial Kyoto Museum. This talk will explore the confluence of prominent events and works in 1895 Kyoto and the apparent contestation over the course of art, past and future.



Labor NGOs in US and China
Katie Quan, Associate Chair, Center for Labor Research and Education
November 3, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Cal Corps Public Service Center
Join CalCorps for a talk about the Labor Non-Government Organizations (NGOs) in China and the US! We will talk about topics such as Global Labor Strategies, Immigrant Workers Rights, and Race, Class and Gender. This seminar will be a great way for you to learn more about China, and to meet great people who are interested in the Chinese culture.

Lunch will be provided.

Please email your name, major, and school year to vlaw@berkeley.edu by Thursday, November 2nd, to RSVP for this event.

Katie Quan is Associate Chair of the Labor Center, and has worked as a labor specialist at the Labor Center since 1998. Her areas of specialization are labor strategies in the global economy, policies that promote the rights of immigrant workers, and equity issues for women workers. She also heads the Labor Center's education and training activities.

Visit http://laborcenter.berkeley.edu/staff/quan.shtml to learn more about her work.



  Japan Remodeled: How Government and Industry Are Reforming Japanese Capitalism
Steven K. Vogel, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley
November 7, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Walter H. Shorenstein Fund
As the Japanese economy languished in the 1990s Japanese government officials, business executives, and opinion leaders concluded that their economic model had gone terribly wrong. They questioned the very institutions that had been credited with Japan's past success: a powerful bureaucracy guiding the economy, close government-industry ties, "lifetime" employment, the main bank system, and dense interfirm networks. Many of these leaders turned to the U.S. model for lessons, urging the government to liberate the economy and companies to sever long-term ties with workers, banks, suppliers, and other firms.

Despite popular perceptions to the contrary, Japanese government and industry have in fact enacted substantial reforms. Yet Japan never emulated the American model. As government officials and industry leaders scrutinized their options, they selected reforms to modify or reinforce preexisting institutions rather than to abandon them. In Japan Remodeled, Steven Vogel explains the nature and extent of these reforms and why they were enacted.

Vogel demonstrates how government and industry have devised innovative solutions. The cumulative result of many small adjustments is, he argues, an emerging Japan that has a substantially redesigned economic model characterized by more selectivity in business partnerships, more differentiation across sectors and companies, and more openness to foreign players.

Steven K. Vogel is Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He is the author of Freer Markets, More Rules: Regulatory Reform in Advanced Industrial Countries (Cornell University Press), and editor of U.S.-Japan Relations in a Changing World.

Program followed by reception.

Other programs in the IEAS Book Series: New Perspectives on East Asia.



Urban Integration: Midsize Cities in the Lower Yangzi
Xin Zhang, Professor, History, Indiana University at Indianapolis
November 8, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Urban integration — the integration of cities through markets, banks, etc. into a large urban system — in late imperial China has remained one of today's most promising and underdeveloped research topics. Despite the fact that there have been several successful studies in the past few decades, including the works of Susan Mann, Shiba Yoshinobu, and others on native banking, of Wang Yeh-chien on rice prices in the Yangzi delta, of Robert Marks on the distribution of products from Guangdong and of Carol Shiue on transportation costs, little has been done in recent years to address the issue of how cities were integrated. For example, we still do not know much about how cities were impacted by changes in the natural environment and how any combinations of social, economic, and political factors could dramatically alter the way cities were once connected with each other. In other words, there is still room for further research.

In this lecture, I will first discuss national markets to highlight the significance of trade routes (or transportation routes) on linking cities. I will then examine major trade routes in the lower Yangzi region, especially from the perspective of the five mid-size cities of Zhenjiang, Yangzhou, Nantong, Wuhu, and Anqing, which I have chosen because of their similar size and proximity to the river. Finally, I will point out that we still have much to learn about urban integration by focusing on the mid-size (or smaller) cities; urban integration still remains a viable research area.



Memorial ceremony for Frederic Wakeman
November 8, 2006
Institute of East Asian Studies, Department of History
Frederic Wakeman, professor of Chinese history at UC Berkeley from 1965 until his retirement in 2006, holder of the Walter and Elise Haas Chair in Asian Studies from 1989 until 2006, and director of the Institute of East Asian Studies from 1990 until 2001, died at his home in Lake Oswego, Oregon, on September 14, 2006. The memorial ceremony in his honor will feature speeches by colleagues, friends, students, and family members.

A reception will follow the memorial ceremony.



Educating Women Migrant Workers
Huang Shumei, Head of the Guangdong Women's Federation
November 8, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of Industrial Relations, Center for Labor Research and Education
Shumei Huang has a long history of improving the lives of migrant women workers in the Guangdong Province of Southern China. Her dedicated efforts as an official in the Guangdong Women's Federation have given women migrant workers greater access to legal justice in cases involving labor and property disputes, domestic abuse, and factory injuries. Her caseload, which numbered over 50 each year since the beginning of the program, has grown substantially this year with more than 50 cases having already been handled during the first half of 2006. Ms. Huang noted that her work has helped not only individual women, but has both strengthened the legal framework governing legal aid services as well as built increased trust among migrant workers in the local government. Formerly a deputy governor in the town of Sihui, Ms. Huang became the youngest leader in the Guangdong Women's Federation when she was appointed to the post in 1976. Since then, she has witnessed many positive changes in the Guangdong region, commenting that, "We used to talk more about the migrant workers as outsiders and the money they remitted back to their hometown. Now we talk more about the contributions migrant workers have made to the local economy of Guangdong." Going forward, Ms. Huang hopes that through her work, "The migrant women workers of Guangdong will get more respect, will get more protection, and their life will get better and better."

The Guangdong Women's Federation (GWF) is a regional division of the All-China Women's Federation (ACWF). Founded in 1949, the All-China Women's Federation is dedicated to promoting social justice for women in China. To date, over 1000 development projects have been completed across a broad spectrum of needs, including poverty reduction, health, education and women's rights.1 Because of its exemplary work and dedicated success, in 1996 the ACWF was honored to become a member of the Conference on Non-governmental Organizations in Consultative Status with the United Nations (CONGO). In an especially successful partnership with The Asia Foundation, the Guangdong Women's Federation established the Legal Aid Group. This group provides much-needed professional legal representation and consulting services, as well as education/outreach fairs for the region's migrant women workers. Most migrant workers have little or no knowledge of their rights as workers, as women, and as members of Chinese society. Together The Asia Foundation and GWF developed and distributed tens of thousands of copies of Learn to Protect Yourself, a handbook addressing women's basic legal rights. They are currently in the sixth phase of their legal aid and education programs.



Comparing the Buddhisms of East and Southeast Asia: A World Historical Perspective
John R. McRae, Visiting Scholar, The University of Tokyo
November 9, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
In preparing a general survey of East Asian Buddhism, I have avoided telling parallel stories of separate national traditions in favor of an integrated macro-regional perspective. The oral presentation was inspired by a brief stint teaching in Thailand, which led me to compare the Buddhisms of East and Southeast Asia, with attention to geographical, anthropological, and political features, all undertaken with a world historical perspective.

John R. McRae did his Ph.D. under Stanley Weinstein at Yale and has taught at Cornell and Indiana Universities. Currently a visiting scholar at The University of Tokyo, he will be teaching a course on early Chinese Chan at Komazawa University in Tokyo beginning in April 2007.



The Occupation of Japan: Personal Reflections Six Decades Later
Hans Baerwald, Political Science, Emeritus Professor, UCLA
November 13, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies




The Imperial Vision Represented by the First Emperor's Burial
Qingbo Duan, Archaeological Survey Team Leader, First Emperor's Burial Mound, Shaanxi Province Institute of Archaeology
November 15, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
This talk will explore the various ideas and concepts that may underlie the planning and construction of the First Emperor's burial complex. Archaeological evidence will be brought to bear in a discussion of the extent to which concepts of the afterlife, notions of imperial power, and ideas related to the building of an imperial capital played a role in the design and layout of the First Emperor's tomb and the fashioning of its burial goods.

Lecture will be conducted in Chinese with English translation



Rice, Flowers, and Goats: The Politics of Labor and Gender in "post-IMF" South Korea
Jungmin Seo, University of Hawaii, Manoa
November 16, 2006
Center for Korean Studies
This presentation analyzes the intriguing relationship between Korean labor movement and the politics of gender by mapping the discourses around two scandals in 1998 (the Hyundai Automobile Lay-off) and 2001 (the Ulsan Human Rights Film Festival). Throughout the democratic consolidation process since the Kim Dae-Jung government (1997-2002), both labor movement and feminist movement in Korea have shown remarkable successes. In the 2002 general election, the Korean Democratic Labor Party, supported by KFTU, won 10 seats in the Parliament and became the first self-claimed left wing political party successfully entered into the formal politics in South Korea. Under the pressure of the Korean feminist organizations, the Kim Dae-Jung government established the Ministry of Gender Equality (Yosongbu), which, since then, enormously contributed to the various reforms of the patriarchic Korean laws, such as the household Registration Law. In spite of the growth of the two progressive forces, labor and feminism, the problems embedded in the documentary, "Pap, Kkot, Yang (Rice, Flowers, Goats)" remained unsolved. The analyses of the discourses produced by the Korean feminist groups and the labor organizations show that the class-blind Korean feminism and the gender-blind Korean labor left "irregular female workers" excluded from politics of both labor and gender. Jungmin Seo is an assistant professor at University of Hawaii at Manoa, specialized in East Asian politics, nationalism and the political economy of culture. He wrote a dissertation on the relationship between the Chinese cultural industry and popular nationalism at the University of Chicago. He is currently writing a book on contemporary Korean nationalism and completing a SSRC-sponsored research project on Korean migrant communities in Beijing.



Tales of the Broken Family Tree: The Orphaned Imagination in Postwar Chinese-Language Cinema
Zhen Zhang, Associate Professor, Cinema Studies, New York University
November 16, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Film Studies Program, Townsend Working Groups
The orphan figure looms large in the cinemas of the People's Republic of China, Hong Kong and Taiwan of the 1950s-60s. This talk will discuss how the orphan figure offers a new avenue for mapping the disjointed genealogy of Chinese-language cinema in the context of decolonization, modernization and the cold war, as well as for thinking beyond "national cinema."

Zhen Zhang is Associate Professor of Cinema Studies in the Tisch School of the Arts at New York University. She has published articles in Public Culture, Asian Cinema, Postscript, Camera Obscura, Parachute, Art China, and numerous anthologies, readers, and exhibition catalogues. She provided the liner notes on Anna May Wong for Milestone's 2005 DVD of Piccadilly (1929). Her most recent books are An Amorous History of the Silver Screen: Shanghai Cinema 1896-1937 (University of Chicago Press, 2005) and The Urban Generation: Chinese Cinema and Society at the Turn of the 21st Century (Duke University Press, forthcoming)



The Bay Area-China Connection
November 16, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley China Initiative, Bay Area Economic Forum, Asia Society of Northern California, California-Asia Business Council, Committee of 100




The 14th Annual Bakai バークレー大学研究大会
November 17, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
Program
1:15-1:50 — Buffet Lunch

1:50-2:00 — Opening Remarks: Alan Tansman, CJS Chair

2:00-2:20 — Fieldschool and soil sampling at the Jomon period Sannai Maruyama site in Aomori, Japan — Junko Habu, Faculty, Anthropology, UCB

2:20-2:40 — Courtesans and the Shimabara Toad War: Chikamatsu's Retelling of the Shimabara Uprising — Janice Kanemitsu, Grad Student, East Asian Languages & Cultures, UCB

2:40-3:00 — The Role of Women in Otaku Subculture: Research Proposal — Ieva Tretjuka, Grad Student, Group in Asian Studies, UCB

3:00-3:20 — Significance and Acceptance of Otaku within Japanese Society — Hayone Chung, UnderGrad Student, PEIS, UCB

3:20-3:40 — The Impact of Neo-liberal Reforms on Childcare Policies: Why Does Childcare Matter Now? — Yoshiko Konishi, Grad Student Anthropology, UCB

3:40-3:50 — Coffee Break

3:50-4:10 — Increasing Cross-border Marriage in East Asia: Japan, South Korea and Taiwan — Keiko Yamanaka, Faculty, Ethnic Studies, UCB

4:10-4:30 — The Shifting Otherness: Dynamic Boundaries of Japaneseness — Bruce Hsueh, Grad Student, Public Policy/IAS, UCB

4:30-4:50 — Institutionalizing Imagined Toyama: Selling Traditional Images of Medicine Through Science — Kensuke Sumii, Grad Student, Medical Anthropology, UCB/UCSF

4:50-5:10 — Locating the Village and the Village Study in Japan — John Ertl, Grad Student, Anthropology, UCB

5:10-5:30 — Q&A and comments



Family and Labor in US and China
Julia Chuang, PhD Candidate in Sociology
November 17, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Cal Corps Public Service Center
Interested in the feminization of migrant labor in China and how women migrant workers negotiate their family roles with their roles as workers? Come to this seminar on family and labor in China, and talk with others interested in these issues and in labor in China at large.

Lunch will be provided.

Please email your name, major, and school year to vlaw@berkeley.edu by Wednesday, November 15th, to RSVP for this event.



Misalignments: Video and Performance Art Documenta from the PRC
Maranatha Ivanova, Ph.D. Candidate, Political Science, UC Berkeley
November 20, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Video screening of works by contemporary artists from the People's Republic of China, including: Cui Xiuwen, Guo Xiaolu, Han Bing, He Yunchang, Hei Yue Ji Shengli, Yu Ji, Ma Yongfeng, Wu Yuren, Zhao Liang



Records of Self-Salvation: Memoirs of Kagero Nkki (蜻蛉日記) and Hanjungrok (閑中録)
Youn-eun Huh, CJS Visiting Scholar, Japanese Language and Literature, Daegu University
November 20, 2006
Center for Japanese Studies
Kagero Nikki, the memoir by Mother of Michitsuna is a lifelong record of a Heian era noblewoman, who wrote about her miserable life: her marriage to one of the most powerful politicians of his time. Hanjungrok, the memoir of Lady Hyegyong, written by the Korean crown princess Hong, is a recollection of her life written when she reached her 60th birthday. The former expresses the agony of a woman who was not allowed to keep affection of her husband all for herself due to the "Kayoi-kon" marital custom. The latter recorded the tears and lifelong regrets of a crown princess whose husband, crown prince Sado, was killed by his father, King Youngcho. Despite their differences in cultural backgrounds, period and genre, these two works share considerable things in common, while their process of self-salvation through writing practices differed in certain respects. By comparing representative diaries of a Korean and Japanese woman, the author will consider the significance of feminist writings in patriarchal societies.



Between Public and Private in the Age of Big Construction: Spaces of Appearance in Han Bing's Art
Maranatha Ivanova, Ph.D. Candidate, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Han Bing (韩冰), Performance Artist
November 21, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
With performance piece by the artist — "Love in the Age of Big Construction"


"Love in the Age of Big Construction" is part of the artist's ongoing performance series entitled "Mating Season," in which he creates performance installations eroticizing ordinary objects, such as tools of manual labor construction materials, to explore themes related to amor mundi (love of the world).

Using red, blue and white woven-plastic material (typically used for barriers and makeshift dwellings in countless construction sites across China) to create a temporary space within which a board bed covered with red bricks is located, the artist "sleeps with" bricks on the bed, enacting an erotic attachment to construction materials. Projected from the ceiling onto both the back wall of the room and the artist's body is video footage of Beijing's demolition and construction, the labor of migrant peasant workers and other images of life in what the artist calls this "age of big construction."

The themes of alienation, estrangement and exclusion, labor, desires, and Eros, against the background of this "age of big construction" in which we are living, are relevant not only because they are a part of the dominant narrative of modernization in contemporary China, but also because they are intimately connected to the pervasive invisibility of those left behind in this mad rush to construct a "modernized" China. "Love in the Age of Big Construction" speaks not only to the dreams of the dominant society, but also the fragile hopes of those left behind, and effectively excluded from both the public sphere and the so-called "Chinese dream" of a xiaokang, "modern" future. Mingong peasant workers are the paradoxical constructors of the new China — a China that no longer valorizes the working class, but instead despises them as icons of the poverty and "backwardness" that China's drive to modernize is trying to overcome. This multimedia performance installation critically engages these questions, reminding us that we invest the inanimate objects in our world with meaning, and in doing so construct a binding structure of values, along with the material edifices in which we live and work, that in large part define who we are and where we belong in the new order of things.



Korean Painting: Aesthetics and Technique
Min Paek, Founder and Executive Director of the Korean American Women Artists and Writers Association (KAWAWA), San Francisco

November 28, 2006
Center for Korean Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Min Paek will examine the aesthetics and technique of Korean painting, as well as the history of Korean art and the influence of Chinese art on Korean art. This talk is in conjunction with the exhibit, "Universal Mountain: The Paintings of Ahn Sahn" on display at the Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley.

Min Paek is the Founder and Executive Director of the Korean American Women Artists and Writers Association (KAWAWA), San Francisco.



Beijing: Construction and Transformation (北京: 营建与改造)
Zhu Yong (祝勇), Writer, CCS Artist-in-Residence (作家, 驻校艺术家)
November 29, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
A prolific and acclaimed author with over 30 publications to date, Zhu Yong will discuss his most recent work "北京: 中轴线上的都城"

Lecture will be conducted in Chinese.



Classical Chinese Combinatorics: Derivation of the Book of Changes Hexagram Sequence
Richard Cook, STEDT Project Manager, Post-Doctoral Researcher, Department of Linguistics
November 30, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, STEDT Project, Department of Linguistics
The first and most enigmatic of the Chinese classics is the Book of Changes, and the reasoning behind its binary hexagram sequence remained an unsolved mystery for some 3,000 years (according to the tradition ascribing it to King Wen of Zhou, d. -11th c.). This lecture resolves the classical enigma through a comprehensive analysis of the hexagram sequence, showing that its classification of binary sequences demonstrates knowledge of the convergence of certain linear recurrence sequences (LRS; Pingala -5th c.?, Fibonacci 1202) to division in extreme and mean ratio (DEMR, the "Golden Section" irrational; Pythagoras -6th c.?, Euclid -4th c.). It is shown that the complex hexagram sequence encapsulates a careful and ingenious demonstration of the LRS/DEMR relation, that this knowledge results from general combinatorial analysis, and is reflected in elements emphasized in ancient Chinese and Western mathematical traditions. This lecture will present an introduction of the classical problem, an overview of the solution, while situating the major findings in larger historical context.



China's Water Warriors: Political Pluralization and Hydropower Policy in China
Andrew Mertha, Assistant Professor, Political Science, Washington University
December 1, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Scholars and policy makers often focus on the more formal and mechanical trappings of democracy to measure a country's political pluralization. In the case of China, this leads to a discussion over whether democratization in China is a top-down, elite-driven process or whether it is best explained by the growth in village-level elections over the past decade. My own research suggests that by focusing on this dichotomy, we may be missing out on an extremely important aspect of political liberalization unfolding before our eyes. I draw on recent changes in hydropower policy making in which there has been a dramatic, substantive shift in the quantitative and qualitative nature of political participation by actors hitherto forbidden from shaping the policy process: NGOs, the media, and disgruntled segments of state and society. I look at three cases, one of which signals a dramatic victory of hydropower dam opponents (Dujiangyan/Yangliuhu), one of which demonstrates the utter failure of the opposition movement (Pubugou, Hanyuan county), and a third, more typical case in which these two forces are entering their fourth year of struggle over the outcome of the policy (the Nu River Project). These three cases help explain what accounts for variation in outcomes: policy entrepreneurship, media framing, and connecting to a larger audience to expand the sphere of conflict.

Discussant: Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley



Sources & Methods: Fieldwork in China
Andrew Mertha, Assistant Professor, Political Science, Washington University
Please RSVP to ccs@berkeley.edu
December 2, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
This special graduate student workshop will allow insights into the process of doing fieldowrk in China — from finding housing and making institutional contacts to collecting data and finding a good noodle shop.

Please RSVP to ccs@berkeley.edu.



The Out of Taiwan hypothesis for Austronesian origins: New archaeological research in Taiwan and the northern Philippines
Peter Bellwood, Professor, Australian National University
December 5, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Archaeological Research Facility
For more information contact: Sherry Pierce Parrish, M.A., Manager, Archaeological Research Facility, (510)643-5797



The Development Paths of Asian Manufacturers in the Era of Global Production: A Comparative Study of the Motorcycle Industry in China, Taiwan, and India
Moriki Ohara, Senior Research Fellow, Institute of Developing Economies, Japan
December 6, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies
Asian indigenous manufacturers that promote their own brands, as major driving forces of their countries' industrial upgrading, have attracted large attention in the recent discussions on global economic development. This presentation explores the similarities and differences in the development paths among Asian indigenous large manufacturers by observing, as the competition with advanced globally-dominant companies increasingly intensifies, the way they integrate and nurture the industrial networks in their home countries, and the manner the existing industrial resources, market conditions, and states' policies of their home countries have influenced their strategies. Concretely, we examine the above by comparing, among China, Taiwan, and India, the inter-firm organization formed by major motorcycle manufactures and parts suppliers, and their strategies for technological capability upgrading.



The Heart of the Buddha's Message?: The Middle Way and Other Disputed Concepts in Early Buddhism
Oliver Freiberger, Assistant Professor, Department of Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin
December 7, 2006
Center for Buddhist Studies
This talk will explore divergent voices and views in early Buddhist literature in order to raise a fundamental question: is there a central core to early Buddhist doctrine, and are we able to identify it? The talk will focus on the pivotal teaching of the Middle Way among other important topics. The Middle Way may be viewed as a rhetorical tool that was used in certain Buddhist circles to attack not only non-Buddhists but also different factions within the Buddhist community.

Oliver Freiberger teaches Asian religions, in particular Buddhism, and method and theory of religious studies at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include the early history of Buddhism in India, asceticism, and comparison in the study of religion. He has published a book on early doctrinal interpretations of the Buddhist monastic order and co-edited three volumes on various topics in the history of Asian religions (a fourth one is in preparation). A volume on Asceticism and Its Critics, edited by Dr. Freiberger, was recently published. His current research focuses on the comparison of ascetic beliefs and practices in India and early Christianity.



China Labor working group fall meeting
Eli Friedman, Grad Student, Sociology
Jia Ching Chen, Grad Student, City & Regional Planning
Shannon May, Grad Student, Anthropology
December 8, 2006
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Labor Research and Education
For all who work on or are interested in labor in China, the China Labor working group will have three presenters presenting their research for us to learn about and provide feedback on: "Labor NGOs in China" — Eli Friedman, Sociology, "Labor Migration in Taiwan" — Jia Cheng Chen, City & Regional Planning, and "Conceptualizing Migration from Rural Liaoning" — Shannon May, Anthropology



Creation and Re-Creation: A Conversation with Ch'oe Yun and Bruce Fulton
Bruce Fulton, Professor
Ch'oe Yun, Professor and Author
December 8, 2006
Center for Korean Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Literary translation is a form of creation or an act of re-creating an existing literary work written in another language. Whether the re-created literary work has a life of its own as an independent creation or is inextricably connected with the original literary work is an open question. What if author and translator read, interpret, and understand the author's original work differently, resulting in a translation that is read, interpreted and understood in ways that differ from the original text? To what extent must the translator be faithful to the author's intent? Join author Ch'oe Yun and translator Bruce Fulton as they discuss these issues in connection with Ch'oe's prize-winning story "Hanak'o nun opta" and the translation of that story by Bruce and Ju-Chan Fulton, "The Last of Hanak'o."

Ch'oe Yun, professor of French literature at Sogang University, is one of the most important living authors in Korea and an award-winning translator of Korean fiction into French. She obtained her Ph.D. from Provence University. Her first published literary work, the novella "Chogi sori opshi han chom kkonnip i chigo" ("There a Petal Silently Falls") appeared in 1988 and she has produced several volumes of fiction and a collection of essays. She is the recipient of South Korea's two most important prizes for short fiction, the Tongin Award for "Hoesaek nunsaram" ("The Gray Snowman") and the Yi Sang Award for "Hanak'o nun opta." These works are available in English and French translations.

Bruce Fulton is the inaugural holder of the Young-Bin Min Chair in Korean Literature and Literary Translation in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of British Columbia. He obtained his Ph.D. in Modern Korean Literature from Seoul National University with a dissertation on the short fiction of Hwang Sun-wôn. He has co-translated several anthologies of modern Korean short fiction, including the prize-winning A Ready-Made Life: Early Masters of Modern Korean Fiction (1998; translated with Kim Chong-un) and (with Youngmin Kwon) Modern Korean Fiction: An Anthology (2005; Columbia University Press), and has edited the Korea sections of the Encyclopedia of Modern Asia and the Columbia Companion to Modern East Asian Literature.