Catching the Wave: Connecting East Asia through Soft Power

DATE: Friday-Saturday, October 5-6, 2007

PLACE: Toll Room, Alumni House, UC Berkeley

SPONSORS: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Institute of International Studies, Berkeley China Initiative, Asia Society Northern California, The Japan Society of Northern California
This conference is made possible by the generosity of the Taipei Economic and Cultural Office (TECO)




DESCRIPTION

Description

This conference will explore a number of broad threads under the rubric of "soft power." The overarching goal is to examine some of the important ways in which culture, product branding, export projection of national cultures, athletic events, and global NGOs serve to create a more unified (or divided) Asia. To what extent are cultural and athletic activities used by national governments to project positive images? Do transnational groups such as NGOs operate independently of governments as cross national cultural unifiers? Are cultural products such as films, soap operas, and toys moving more easily across national borders in ways that foster some comprehensive sense of "Asian-ness" or "Asian identity?"

SCHEDULE

Friday, October 5, 2007
9:00 am - Opening Remarks

Wen-hsin Yeh (UC Berkeley)
T.J. Pempel (UC Berkeley)



9:15 am - Panel I: Soft Power and the Conceptualization of Asian Identity

Chair:
T.J. Pempel (UC Berkeley)

Panelists:
Steve Fish (UC Berkeley) — Projecting What We've Not: Sustaining the Cult of Whiteness and Forfeiting Cultural Power in Indonesia
Josh Kurlantzick (Carnegie) — China's Soft Power in Southeast Asia
Chyungly Lee (Institute of International Relations of National Chengchi University)
Richard Madsen (UC San Diego) — The Asian Cultural Cooperation Forum: Hong Kong as a Nexus of Soft Power



10:45 am - Coffee break




11:00 am - Keynote Address: The Conditions for a Security Community in East Asia

Alastair Iain Johnston (Harvard University)



12:30 pm - Lunch break




1:30 pm - Panel II: Image-Making in Asia: Branding, Commercialization & Product Penetration of Popular Products across Asia

Chair:
Laura Nelson (California State University, East Bay)

Panelists:
Anne Allison (Duke University)
Ian Condry (MIT) — Anime, Online Piracy, and the Workings of Soft Power
Roald Maliangkay (Australian National University) — The Myth of Soft Power: Selling Korean Pop Music Abroad



3:00 pm - Coffee break




3:15 pm - Panel III: Governmental & Non-Governmental Export Projection of Culture

Chair and Panelist:
Roger Janelli (Indiana University) — Korea, Soft Power, and the Politics of Culture (paper co-authored by Dawnhee Yim)

Panelists:
Chan E. Park (Ohio State University) — Hungboga, Song of Korean Diaspora
Xiao Qiang (UC Berkeley) — Bloggers as Cultural Ambassadors in Cyberspace
Isao Tsujimoto (Japan Foundation, New York) — How Soft Is Japan?



4:45 pm - Wrap-up/Q&A




5:00 pm - Reception




8:00 pm - Korean Dance Recital


Saturday, October 6, 2007
9:00 am - Panel IV: Sports/Soft Power: National Teams and Regional Competitions

Chair:
Martha Saavedra (UC Berkeley)

Panelists:
Jinxia Dong (Peking University/Beijing Sports University) — Elite Athletes, National Identity and the Olympic Games: Winning Glory for China
John Horne (University of Edinburgh) — Hosting Major Sports Events in East Asia: Connections, Challenges and Contradictions
Wolfram Manzenreiter (University of Vienna) — The Soft Power of Sports in Japan's International Relations
Andrew Morris (California Polytechnic State University) — Kanō Baseball and "Triethnic" Identity in 1930s Taiwan



10:30 am - Coffee break




10:45 am - Panel V: Role of National and Transnational NGOs in Asia

Chair:
Wen-hsin Yeh (UC Berkeley)

Panelists:
Kim Reimann (Georgia State University) — NGOs, Transnational Networks and Regional Governance in East Asia
Jeffrey Wasserstrom (UC Irvine) — NGOs and China: Putting Current Patterns into Historical Perspective
Peter Beck (ICG Seoul/US Committee for Human Rights in North Korea)



12:00 pm - Lunch break




h6>12:30 pm - Panel VI: (Lunch Panel) Inter-Asian Cultural Flows

Chair and Panelist:
Keiko Yamanaka (UC Berkeley) — Civil Activism for Migrant Workers' Rights in Japan, Korea and China

Panelists:
Stanley Rosen
Sang Yeon Sung(Indiana University) — Constructing a New Image - Korean Popular Culture in Taiwan



1:45 pm - Concluding Remarks

PARTICIPANTS

Participants

Anne Allison (Ph.D. University of Chicago 1986) is Professor and Chair of the Department of Cultural Anthropology at Duke University. Her specialties include globalization of culture, sexuality, popular culture, political economy, gender, cultural theory, and Marxism. Professor Allison's current research covers the recent popularization of Japanese children's goods on the global marketplace, and how its trends in cuteness, character merchandise, and high-tech play pals are remaking Japan's place in today's world of millennial capitalism. She is the author of various articles as well as three books, Nightwork: Sexuality, Pleasure, and Corporate Masculinity in a Tokyo Hostess Club (University of Chicago Press, 1994); Permitted and Prohibited Desires: Mothers, Comics, and Censorship in Japan (Westview/HarperCollins, 1996); and Millennial Monsters: Japanese Toys and the Global Imagination (University of California Press, 2006).

Peter Beck is the executive director of the U.S. Committee for Human Rights in North Korea. He is also a columnist for Weekly Chosun and The Korea Herald. Prior to joining the Committee, he directed the International Crisis Group's Northeast Asia Project in Seoul (2004-2007) and was the Director of Research and Academic Affairs at the Korea Economic Institute in Washington, DC (1997-2004). He has served as a member of the Ministry of Unification's Policy Advisory Committee (2005-2007), and as an adjunct faculty member at American, Ewha, Georgetown and Yonsei universities. He was also a columnist for the Korean daily Donga Ilbo (2001-04), an instructor at the University of California at San Diego, a translator for the Korea Foundation, and a staff assistant at Korea's National Assembly and Ministry of Foreign Affairs. He received his B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley, completed the Korean language program at Seoul National University, and conducted his graduate studies at U.C. San Diego's Graduate School of International Relations and Pacific Studies.

Ian CondryHip-Hop Japan: Rap and the Paths of Cultural Globalization (Duke University Press, 2006) is an ethnography of the Japanese rap music scene, exploring issues of race, gender, language, popular music history, and cultural politics primarily through the perspectives of Japanese musicians. His current research project is "Global Anime: The Making of Japan's Transnational Popular Culture." I am interested in the making of global anime cultures, focusing on the creators in Tokyo studios, but also considering wider connections to Asia and the US. Since January 2006, Professor Condry has been organizing the research project "Cool Japan: Media, Culture, Technology" at MIT and Harvard. The project involves colloquia and international conferences to examine the cultural connections, dangerous distortions, and critical potential of popular culture.

Jinxia Dong (Ph.D., University of Strathclyde, 2001) is an Associate Professor at Peking University. Jinxia Dong began judging national and international gymnastic competitions in 1988 and was the coach of the Scottish Women's Gymnastic Team from 1997 to 2001. Professor Dong is the author of numerous articles and of the book, Women, Sport and Society in the New China (Cass Publisher, London, 2003). Her recent research projects include, "Multi-disciplinary Inquiry into Women's Elite Sport in Contemporary China," "Analysis of the Sociological Factors that Will Affect Chinese Women's Performances at the 2008 Olympic Games," and "Study of the Interactive Relationship between the Beijing Olympic Games, Women's Status and Sport."

M. Steven Fish (Ph.D. Stanford 1993) is a Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. His research and teaching interests include post-Soviet politics, democratization and regime change, and general comparative politics. He teaches both undergraduate and graduate courses on these topics. He is the author of Democracy Derailed in Russia: The Failure of Open Politics (Cambridge University Press, 2005), winner of best book prize in the Comparative Democratization section for the American Political Science Association, and, Democracy from Scratch: Opposition and Regime in the New Russian Revolution (Princeton University Press, 1995) and a coauthor of Postcommunism and the Theory of Democracy (Princeton University Press, 2001).

John Horne (Ph.D, The University of Edinburgh, 2002) is Reader in Sociology in the School of Education and the Program Coordinator of the MSc Sport and Recreation Business Management at the University of Edinburgh. John Horne's current research focuses on three topics: sport in consumer culture; the development of sport and leisure, including media and communications, in East Asian societies; and the socio-cultural, political and economic significance of hosting major international sports mega-events. His most recent books are Sport in Consumer Culture (Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, 2006) and Sports Mega-Events (co-editor, Oxford: Blackwell, 2006).

Roger Janelli (Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania, 1975) is a Professor of Folklore and Ethnomusicology in the Department of East Asian Languages and Literature at Indiana University. His research interests include; Korean culture and social organization, East Asian ethnography, Religion, Political Economy, Responses to globalization in East Asia. Professor Janelli's merits include a Research Fellowship at University of Tokyo (2000), serving on the Joint Committee on Korean Studies of the American Council of Learned Societies and the Social Science Research Council, for research on culture and political economy of South Korean business firms, 1987–88, and a Visiting Research Professorship at Yonsei University, 1986–87.

Alastair Iain Johnston (Ph.D. University of Michigan, 1993) is the Governor James Noe and Linda Noe Laine Professor of China in World Affairs in the Department of Government at Harvard University. Professor Johnston's areas of research include, socialization; the 'measurement' of identity; Chinese foreign policy; and East Asian security. Professor Johnston is the author of three books on China; China and Arms Control: Emerging Issues and Interest in the 1980s (Ottawa, Center for Arms Control and Disarmament, Aurora Papers No. 3, 1986); Cultural Realism: Strategic Culture and Grand Strategy in Chinese History (Princeton: Princeton University Press, 1995) (Third edition, paperback, published in 1998); and the forthcoming Social States: China in International Institutions, 1980–2000 (Princeton University Press).

Josh Kurlantzick is a visiting scholar in the Carnegie Endowment's China Program. Also a special correspondent for The New Republic and a senior correspondent for The American Prospect, Kurlantzick is assessing China's relationship with the developing world, including Southeast Asia, Africa, and Latin America. Kurlantzick's new book, Charm Offensive: How China's Soft Power is Transforming the World (Yale University Press), focuses on how China uses its soft power — culture, investment, academia, foreign aid, public diplomacy —to influence other countries in the developing world. Additionally, Kurlantzick is currently a fellow at the USC School of Public Diplomacy and the Pacific Council on International Policy. Kurlantzick was previously foreign editor at The New Republic. Earlier, he covered international economics and trade for U.S. News and World Report. He also reported on Southeast Asia for The Economist as a correspondent based in Bangkok, Thailand. Kurlantzick's articles also have appeared in The New York Times Magazine, The Washington Post, Foreign Affairs, Harper's, The Atlantic Monthly, GQ, The American Prospect, Mother Jones, Current History, and The Washington Quarterly.

Chyungly Lee is an Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of International Relations at National Chengchi University, Taiwan. She obtained her Ph.D. from Department of Politics and Government at the University of Maryland, College Park in 1995. Her current research focus includes; Asia-Pacific security cooperation, economic security, Asian regionalism and human security. She is also the Co-Executive Director for Taiwan's participation in the Council for Security Cooperation in the Asia-Pacific (CSCAP) and she is on the Advisory Committee of the Central Asia-Caucasus Institute & Silk Road Studies Program at the Johns Hopkins University Nitze School of Advanced International Studies.

Richard Madsen (Ph.D., Harvard University, 1977) is a Professor in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, San Diego. Professor Madsen spent time studying in Taiwan and was the former Chair of the Program in Chinese Studies at UCSD. He is the author of four books on China, Chen Village (with Anita Chan and Jonathan Unger), Morality and Power in a Chinese Village, and Unofficial China (with Perry Link and Paul Pickowicz); and The World of God: The Catholic and Civil Society in China. He is a co-author (with Robert Bellah, William Sullivan, Ann Swidler, and Steven Tipton) of Habits of the Heart, and The Good Society. Finally, he is author of China and the American Dream, a work on the cultural dimensions of the US–China relations. In 1986, Professor Madsen was a Jury nominee for the Pulitzer Prize in General Non-Fiction for Habits of the Heart.

Roald Maliangkay (Ph.D., SOAS, London) is Head of the Korean Language Program and lectures on Korean popular culture at The Australian National University. His specialties include Korean music and entertainment industries in the early and mid-twentieth century and he has authored various articles on the subject. His current research focuses on traditional music and the recording industry in colonial Korea, Korean animation, advertisements during Korea's colonial period, and the representation of Korean traditional music in Europe.

Wolfram Manzenreiter (Ph.D., University of Vienna, 1998) is Assistant Professor at the Institute of East Asian Studies, University of Vienna, where he lectures on modern Japanese society. His major research interests are concerned with the social and economic implications of sport and popular culture in contemporary Japan. He is author of several books and articles on popular culture, leisure and sport in Japan. Currently he is working on a new book entitled "Sport and Nation in Japan." In addition to the co-edited volumes with John Horne, Football Goes East (2004) and Japan, Korea and the 2002 World Cup (2002), his recent works include the monographs The Social Construction of Japanese Mountaineering (2000), and Pachinko Monogatari: Japan's Gambling Industry (1998), both published in German.

Andrew Morris (Ph.D., University of San Diego, 1998) is an Associate Professor in the Department of History at California Polytechnic State University. Professor Morris's area of expertise is East Asia with an emphasis on Modern Chinese and Taiwanese history, especially sports and popular culture, nationalism, colonialism and transnational cultural flows. In his book, Marrow of the Nation: A History of Sport and Physical Culture in Republican China (Berkeley: University of California Press, 2004), Morris uses sports to examine Chinese society, culture and politics.

Laura Nelson (Ph.D., Stanford University, 1997) is Assistant Professor and Associate Chair in the Department of Anthropology at California State University–East Bay. Professor Nelson's research interests are focused on two areas. She has published a book, "Measured Excess: Status, Gender, and Consumer Nationalism in South Korea," on economic and social change in South Korea, and continues to look South Korean consumer life. She has two projects in development for this area, one on credit cards and one on changing demographics in South Korea. Her interests also include the anthropology of public policies in this country, particularly from an applied perspective.

Chan E. Park (Ph.D., University of Hawaii, 1995) is currently Associate Professor of Korean language, literature, and performance studies, and Director of Korean Studies Initiative at Ohio State University. Her specialization is research and performance of p'ansori, Korean story-singing, its performance in transnational context in particular, related oral narrative/lyrical/dramatic traditions, and their places in the shaping of modern Korean drama. She has published extensively on the theory and practice of oral narratology and its interdisciplinary connection with arts and humanities as a whole, including her recent monograph, Voices from the Straw Mat: Toward an Ethnography of Korean Story Singing (University of Hawaii Press, 2003). Park has given numerous lectures, seminars, workshops and performances of p'ansori locally, nationally, and internationally.

T.J. Pempel (Ph.D., Columbia, 1972) is a Professor of Political Science at the University of California, Berkeley. He joined Berkeley's Political Science Department in July 2001 and served as director of the Institute of East Asian Studies from 2002 until 2006. Professor Pempel's research and teaching focus on comparative politics, political economy, contemporary Japan, and Asian regionalism. Professor Pempel is Chair of the Working Group on Northeast Asian Security of CSCAP, is on editorial boards of several professional journals, and serves on various committees of the American Political Science Association, the Association for Asian Studies, and the Social Science Research Council. His recent books include Remapping East Asia: The Construction of a Region (Cornell University Press), Beyond Bilateralism: U.S.–Japan Relations in the New Asia–Pacific (Stanford University Press), The Politics of the Asian Economic Crisis, Regime Shift: Comparative Dynamics of the Japanese Political Economy, and Uncommon Democracies: The One-Party Dominant Regimes (all from Cornell University Press).

Xiao Qiang is the Director of Berkeley China Internet Project. A physicist by training, Xiao Qiang received a B.S. from the University of Science and Technology of China and studied as a PhD candidate (1986–1989) in astrophysics at the University of Notre Dame. He became a full time human rights activist after the Tiananmen Massacre in 1989. Xiao was the Executive Director of Human Rights in China (1991–2002), and is currently vice-chair of the Steering Committee of the World Movement for Democracy. Xiao is a recipient of the MacArthur Fellowship in 2001, and is profiled in the book "Soul Purpose: 40 People Who Are Changing the World for the Better," (Melcher Media, 2003). He was also a visiting fellow of the Santa Fe Institute in Spring, 2002.

Kim Reimann (Ph.D. Harvard University, 2001) is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Georgia State University. Between 1988 and 1990, she served as Special Assistant to the Director, Japan Information Center, Consulate General of Japan in New York. And between 1990 and 1991, Professor Reimann was a Counselor on Global Business Relations, also in New York. Her research interests include NGOs and international politics, Japanese politics and political economy, political economy and international relations of East Asia, transnational social movements, the nonprofit sector, and environmental politics. She is the author of several published articles, including, "A View from the Top: International Politics, Norms and the worldwide Growth of NGOs," International Studies Quarterly 50 (1) 45–67; and "Building Networks from the Outside In: International Movements, Japanese NGOs and the Kyoto Climate Change Conference," Mobilization 6 (1): 69–82.

Stanley Rosen (Ph.D., University of California, Los Angeles) is a Professor in the Department of Political Science at the University of Southern California and Director of the East Asian Studies Center. He teaches courses on Chinese politics, East Asian Societies, Chinese Film and Film and Politics. Among his recent and forthcoming books are State and Society in 21st-Century China (co-edited with Peter Hays Gries) and Chinese Cinema at a Hundred: Art, Politics and Commerce (co-edited with Ying Zhu). His most recent work examines the Chinese film industry and its overseas prospects, the prospects for Hollywood film in the Chinese market, and value change among Chinese youth.

Martha Saavedra (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley, 1991) is the Associate Director of the Center for African Studies, an interdisciplinary research center supporting basic research and training of scholars as well as providing resources on Africa to the greater community. Her research has included agrarian politics and ethnic conflict in Sudan, and gender and sports in Senegal and elsewhere in Africa. She has taught at St. Mary's College of California and at UC Berkeley, and her courses have covered a range of topics, including political economy in the third world, women in Africa, women and international development, and gender and sports. Her publications include articles and chapters on various aspects of gender and sport and on ethnic politics in the Nuba Mountains of Sudan. She is currently working on the question of Islam, sport and gender in Africa. She is on the editorial boards of Soccer and Society; Sport in Society; and The Interdisciplinary Journal of Sports in Africa. She serves on the executive board of the West African Research Association.

Sang Yeon Sung (Ph.D. Candidate, Indiana University, May 2002–Present) is studying ethnomusicology at Indiana University. She was a private music teacher in Seoul from 1993 to 1998 including subjects of Western Music Theory, Korean Music Theory, Sight Singing and Ear Training. Sang Yeon Sung has served as a part-time lecturer at Hanyang University since 2003. She worked as a translator and editor of the Asian Pacific Society for Ethnomusicology, as an editor for the annual Hanyang University publication Korean Music, and as a Graduate Assistant in the Indiana University archives of traditional music.

Isao Tsujimoto is the Director-General of the Japan Foundation, New York and concurrently the Acting Director of the Japan Foundation Center for Global Partnership (CGP), New York. Mr. Tsujimoto was appointed Director-General in October 2006 and since then has concentrated on the reorganization of both the New York office’s programs and its staffing. He currently oversees various Japan Foundation programs including Arts, Japanese Studies and CGP programs. Prior to this appointment, Mr. Tsujimoto was Councilor of the Cultural Affairs Department, where he initiated the establishment of a new fund, the "Japan-China Exchange Center," in 2005. Previous positions at the Japan Foundation include Director of the Los Angeles Office and Language Center (1996-2000) and Deputy Director of the New York Office (1989-1992). This is his third assignment in the US. Mr. Tsujimoto was also a Visiting Professor at Ritsumeikan University Graduate School of International Relations in Kyoto during 2005/06. He graduated from Waseda University in Tokyo in 1975 with a major in Japanese Literature.

Jeffrey Wasserstrom (Ph.D., University of California, 1989) is a Professor in the History Department at the University of California, Irvine. Professor Wasserstrom's research and teaching focus is China's recent past. His research interests include global history and comparative gender history. Professor Wasserstrom is the author of Student Protests in Twentieth-Century China: The View from Shanghai (Stanford University Press, 1991) and China's Brave New World—And Other Tales for Global Times (Indiana University Press, 2007). He has edited or co-edited several books, including Human Rights and Revolutions (Rowman and Littlefield, 2000 and 2007 editions) and contributed to newspapers such as the Los Angeles Times and magazines such as Newsweek, the TLS, and the Nation. He is currently completing work on a book for Routledge, "Global Shanghai, 1850-2010."

Keiko Yamanaka (Ph.D., Cornell University, 1987), a sociologist, is a Lecturer in the Department of Ethnic Studies and the International and Area Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. Since 1993, she has studied transnational migration and social transformation in Japan, focusing on two contrasting immigrant populations in central Japan: authorized resident Brazilians of Japanese ancestry and unauthorized Nepalese. In recent years she has investigated feminized migration in Asia, and civil actions by, and on behalf of, migrant workers in East Asian countries: Japan, South Korea, Taiwan, Hong Kong and China. Her recent publication includes: Feminized Migration in East and Southeast Asia: Policies, Actions and Empowerment (Occasional Paper 11, United Nations Research Institute for Social Development, 2005), "Immigrant incorporation and women's community activities in Japan: local NGOs and public education for immigrant children," (Local Citizenship in Recent Countries of Immigration, Lexington, 2006), and "'Bowling Together': social networks and social capital of a Nepali migrant community in Japan," (Manohar, 2007), and "Transnational community activities of undocumented Nepalese in Japan: agency, resistance and governance" (Multiculturalism in the New Japan, Berghahn, in press).

Wen-hsin Yeh (Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley) is Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley she is the Richard H. and Laurie C. Morrison Chair Professor of History. Professor Yeh studies 20th Century Chinese History. She is author or editor of eleven books and numerous articles examining aspects of Republican history, Chinese modernity, the origins of communism and related subjects. Her books include the Berkeley Prize-winning Provincial Passages: Culture, Space, and the Origins of Chinese Communism (University of California Press, 1996). Other publications include The Alienated Academy: Culture and Politics in Republican China, 1919–1937 (Council on East Asian Publications, Harvard University Press, 1990) and "Middle County Radicals: The May Fourth Movement in Zhejiang," The China Quarterly no. 140 (December 1994). A new book — Shanghai Splendor — will be published by UC Press in 2007.

PRESENTATIONS

Video Presentations

View video presentations online at http://www.fora.tv/searchresults.php?keywordsearch=ieas, or go to http://www.fora.tv/ and search for IEAS.

Written Presentations

Anne Allison (Duke University) J-brand: What image of youth is getting sold in Japan's "gross national cool"?

Peter Beck (ICG Seoul/US Committee for Human Rights in North Korea)

Ian Condry (MIT) — Anime, Online Piracy, and the Workings of Soft Power

Jinxia Dong (Peking University/Beijing Sports University) — Elite Athletes, National Identity and the Olympic Games: Winning Glory for China

Steve Fish (UC Berkeley) — Projecting What We've Not: Sustaining the Cult of Whiteness and Forfeiting Cultural Power in Indonesia

John Horne (University of Edinburgh) — Hosting Major Sports Events in East Asia: Connections, Challenges and Contradictions

Roger Janelli (Indiana University) — Korea, Soft Power, and the Politics of Culture (paper co-authored by Dawnhee Yim) and PowerPoint presentation

Alastair Iain Johnston (Harvard University) — Keynote Address: The Conditions for a Security Community in East Asia

Josh Kurlantzick (Carnegie) — China's Soft Power in Southeast Asia

Chyungly Lee (Institute of International Relations of National Chengchi University) Soft Power and Asian Identity: A Taiwanese Perspective

Richard Madsen (UC San Diego) — The Asian Cultural Cooperation Forum: Hong Kong as a Nexus of Soft Power

Roald Maliangkay (Australian National University) — The Myth of Soft Power: Selling Korean Pop Music Abroad

Wolfram Manzenreiter (University of Vienna) — The Soft Power of Sports in Japan's International Relations

Andrew Morris (California Polytechnic State University) — Kanō Baseball and "Triethnic" Identity in 1930s Taiwan

Chan E. Park (Ohio State University) — Storytelling and Human Connectivity: Songs of Korean Diaspora

T.J. Pempel (UC Berkeley) — Concluding Remarks - Catching the Wave: Connecting East Asia Through Soft Power

Xiao Qiang (UC Berkeley) — Bloggers as Cultural Ambassadors in Cyberspace

Kim Reimann (Georgia State University) — NGOs, Transnational Networks and Regional Governance in East Asia

Stanley Rosen (University of Southern California) — Film Markets in China, Japan and Korea and PowerPoint presentation

Sang Yeon Sung (Indiana University) — Constructing a New Image - Korean Popular Culture in Taiwan and PowerPoint presentation

Isao Tsujimoto (Japan Foundation, New York) — How Soft Is Japan?

Jeffrey Wasserstrom (UC Irvine) — NGOs and China: Putting Current Patterns into Historical Perspective

Keiko Yamanaka (UC Berkeley) — Civil Activism for Migrant Workers' Rights in Japan, Korea and China

LOCATION

Venue

The conference — Catching the Wave: Connecting East Asia through Soft Power — will be held in the Alumni House, UC Berkeley.

Campus map
Directions to the Alumni House

The Alumni House is located in the southwest region of campus. Please find the Alumni House in section D3 of this campus map.

By BART

If traveling by BART, exit the Richmond-Fremont line at the Berkeley station (not North Berkeley). When you leave the BART station, walk south down Shattuck Avenue to Bancroft Avenue (two or three blocks depending on which station exit you leave from) and turn left. Walk three blocks to Dana Street and turn left onto campus. The Alumni House will be on your right, across from Haas Pavilion.

From Interstate 80

To reach the site by car from Interstate 80, exit at the University Avenue off-ramp in Berkeley. Take University Avenue east to Oxford Street and turn right. Oxford becomes Fulton Street in a couple of blocks. Turn left onto Durant Avenue, then left onto Telegraph Avenue. Turn left onto Bancroft Avenue. The Alumni House is located on campus, closest to the intersection of Bancroft Avenue and Dana Street. The Alumni House is located across from Hass Pavilion.

From Highways 24/13

To reach us from Highways 24/13, exit 13 at Tunnel Road in Berkeley. Continue on Tunnel Road as it becomes Ashby. Turn right at Telegraph and drive approximately one mile north to Bancroft Way and turn left. The Alumni House is located on campus, closest to the intersection of Bancroft Avenue and Dana Street. The Alumni House is located across from Hass Pavilion.

Directions to campus are also available at www.berkeley.edu/visitors/traveling.html

Parking

There are various public parking lots and facilities near campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

For parking near the Alumni House, we recommend the following lots:

  • MLK Student Union Garage (Bancroft Way, between Telegraph Ave. and Dana St.)
  • Sather Gate Garage (two blocks south from the UC Berkeley Campus. One-half block west of Telegraph Avenue, with entrances on both Durant Avenue and Channing Way).

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.

Hotels

Conference speakers will be housed at the Hotel Durant or the UC Berkeley Women's Faculty Club. Please confirm your travel plans with the conference organizers.

From the Airport

Both San Francisco and Oakland airports are served by Bayporter Shuttle. This service is familiar with both the Hotel Durant and the Women's Faculty Club. Bayporter accepts reservations 48 hours in advance, or can be contacted upon arrival by calling (415) 467-1800. Ask your driver for a receipt.

A full list of transfer options from San Francisco International Airport (SFO) can be found at this website: http://www.flysfo.com/web/page/tofrom/.

A full list of transfer options from Oakland International Airport (OAK) can be found at this website: http://www.oaklandairport.com/ground_transportation.shtml.

Both airports are also served by public transportation via BART.