Places at the Table: Asian Women Artists and Gender Dynamics



DESCRIPTION

Description

Note: Registration is free but required. For registration click here.

"Places at the Table: Asian Women Artists and Gender Dynamics," explores issues facing Asian women artists today. Speakers will seek to illuminate factors that foster and inhibit the creativity of Asian women artists from three perspectives: one, women whose art, implicitly or explicitly, serves an activist agenda; two, women who work within the framework of a traditional society and how they adapt to, challenge, or find their inspiration in its structures; and finally, the dynamics of participating in a global network of modern art as women artists.

Participants include Hung Liu, Honghee Kim, Margo Machida, Midori Yoshimoto, Yong Soon Min, Zhang O, Youngna Kim, Mary-Ann Milford-Lutzker, Mayumi Oda, Inson Choy, Hyungmin Chung, Sandra Cate, Joan Kee, Patricia Graham, Junghee Lee, Pamela Blotner, and Charlotte Horlyck.

The symposium, a collaboration between UC Berkeley and Mills College, will include discussions with artists represented in the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive exhibition "Mahjong"; the Mills College Art Museum exhibition, "The Offering Table: Korean Women Activist Artists"; and the solo show "Goddesses" in the Institute of East Asian Studies Gallery.

The afternoon prior to the conference, the Center for Korean Studies will host a special colloquium on Korean women artists at the Institute of East Asian Studies.

Following the symposium, attendees are welcomed to join a reception at the Mills College Art Museum.

ABSTRACTS

Abstracts

Pamela Blotner
Under the Wire: Women Artists in Burma
This paper will focus on five contemporary Burmese artists — Phyu Mon, K.T. Zinn, Nann Nann, Ma Thanegi, and Htay Htay Myint — and the political, and cultural developments that have influenced their work over the past 20 years. Once known as the "Rice Bowl of Asia," Burma has degenerated into an isolated, desperately poor country where 26% of the population lives under the national poverty line. Since August 1988, when military troops crushed a student uprising, the ruling junta has tried to quash what it sees as potential rebellion fermented by artists and activists. Numerous women artists who worked with or befriended opposition leader and Noble Laureate Aung San Suu Kyi have been arrested or forced to flee the country. Upon release, these artists — women and men alike — face numerous restrictions in Burma, including bans on the exhibition of their work. Over the past two years, I have interviewed over 30 artists residing in Mandalay and Rangoon, including the five women artists mentioned above. Their struggles under a repressive regime and worsening economy speak of their resilience, creativity, and, ultimately, their desire to forge connects and share ideas with artists beyond their borders.

Sandra Cate
From Outside the Temple to Inside the Big Tent: How Thai Women Artists (Re)Negotiate their Place
Thai women have always claimed position for themselves in early modern and contemporary art practice, despite roots of an artistic tradition grounded in palace and temple — where male monks and male artisans have dominated sculptural and mural production. In addition, women increasing control Thai curatorial practices and have been prominent in gallery ownership and arts enterprises. Sculptor/painter Misiem Yipintsoi, muralist/painter Phaptawan Suwannakudt, painter/installation artist Pinaree Sanpitak, and video/performance artist Araya Rajdamnearnsook are four Thai women who have attained significant recognition both in Thailand and abroad. Curator-arts producers Klaomard Yipintsoi and Gridthiya Gaweewong provide just two examples of Thai women reorganizing the arts agenda in Thailand. This survey of Thai women in the visual arts examines both structural and practical impediments to their wider participation: restrictions on the position of women in Theravada Buddhist temples, the klum or clique formations established at Silpakorn University and throughout the Thai art world that organize exhibitions and provide mutual support, weak governmental arts infrastructure, and lack of public funding for the arts. I also examine Thai women's strategies for promoting their own work and Thai contemporary art generally — through sly and subversive art that furthers feminist perspectives, events such as Womanifesto, and in structural repositioning, both within Thailand and through global networking, education, and exchange.

Linda Inson Choy
Living the Change as Women Artists and Activists
The subject for my presentation will focus on the exhibition currently on view at the Mills College Art Museum, The Offering Table: Activist Women Artists from Korea. My paper will introduce the seven feminist artists in the exhibition who are activists in Korea. The realities of these artists necessitate negotiating the complexities that exists in a society steeped in Confucian tradition which is further complicated by their active engagement in the struggle to exert femininity into an ancient patriarchal moral system. In my presentation I will discuss the artists' history as a feminist art group and their past work projects as activists for women's issues. Their projects have included identity issues surrounding women as housewives and confronting the patriarchal discrimination against femininity as represented by the women's art festival at Jongmyo ancestral shrine in 2000. The project at the Jongmyo shrine irrevocably and permanently transformed the nature of the artists into an activist group evidenced by the nature of their subsequent collaborative projects. With support from the ubiquitous and iconic Guerilla Girls on Tour in 2004, the artists produced a performance art at the Busan Biennial (South Korea) for the women who survived and escaped from a remote island off the coast of Korea which had been a site of sex trafficking industry. Their more recent work involved reviving the lives of historical and anonymous women by giving voice to the women who had "disappeared" from society through malevolence and indifference. The women artists in the exhibition have participated in many international discourses on feminist art and activism and continue to be invited to various events both in Korea and abroad. My paper will conclude with a discussion on the works on view at the Mills College Art Museum and the importance of their activist work in Korea embroiled in the slow process of cultural evolution.

Hyung-Min Chung
Na Na Hye-sok (1896–1946): Being a Modern Woman-Artist
Na Hye-sok has been cited as the first feminist writer and modern painter who led a tragic life after her divorce, caused by her love affair with her husband's close associate. Her life story, literary works and paintings may be reflective of the time when Korea was witnessing both introduction of Western culture and transformation of traditional values. Na openly protested against the social demand for women, "wise mother and good wife" prevailing at that time, and this presentation will look at Na's writing and painting in the context of the development of modern Asian woman.

Patricia Graham
Eri Sayoko and Nakamura Kokei: Transforming Japanese Buddhist Painting into a Modern Art-Craft
Kirikane, the graphic technique consisting of luminous, minute patterns in cut-gold leaf, often applied in conjunction with mineral colors, is a distinguishing feature of many of the finest Japanese Buddhist paintings and sculpture. This technically challenging art dates back to the seventh century C.E, when it was introduced from China. How two talented and dedicated women — Eri Sayoko (1945–2007) and Nakamura Keiboku (active professionally since 1980) — have been working to preserve and revitalize this tradition in Japan today is the subject of this talk. Their achievements are significant because the art form in which they specialize was formerly dominated by men. Their ability to achieve success in this art hints at monumental changes to Japanese society in the post World War II era. Most well-known contemporary Japanese women artists work in non-traditional art forms and seek international recognition. But, as these two women reveal, women have also made inroads and assumed leadership roles in endangered, conservative craft traditions such as kirikane, from which they were formerly, publicly excluded. Tragically, Eri Sayoko passed away suddenly last year at the peak of her career, five years after being designated as a Living National Treasure.
         Discussion of contemporary Japanese women artists rarely mentions women like Eri and Nakamura because of the structure of artists' organizations in Japan. Although old Japanese Buddhist paintings are considered fine art, the work of makers of Buddhist sculpture and painting today are designated by the Japanese art establishment as "art crafts" (bijutsu kogei). As such, artists who specialize in these art forms gain recognition for showing their work in domestic craft, rather than fine art, exhibitions. Rarely are these arts shown abroad. Furthermore, both Nakamura and Eri work closely together with their husbands (Mukoyoshi Yuboku and Eri Kokei respectively), both Buddhist sculptors, in their own small ateliers (of the sort traditionally headed by men), to create imagery for use by Buddhist institutions and their lay followers as sacred religious icons.
         Yet Eri and Nakamura have themselves been quietly working to reinvigorate this conservative Buddhist painting tradition through their deep study and original conceptualizations of kirikane and Buddhist painting. Eri applied inventive variants of traditional Buddhist kirikane patterns on elegant, secular functional objects that harmonized with modern aesthetic sensibilities, including screens, wall hangings, and small boxes. Her original designs were highly acclaimed. Nakamura is now engaged in an approximately four year project to create a replica of a set of two large, rare, thirteenth century mandala paintings long ago removed from their home temple, which has requested the copy. Collaborating with religious studies scholars, temple priests, and conservators, she is recreating the original appearance of the much-damaged original through meticulous study of historical design motifs and technical analysis of pigments. Her completed mandala and the data she gathered to create it will prove an invaluable source for the understanding of the original appearance of the colors and designs on early Buddhist painting. The work of these two artists reveals a rarely addressed aspect of the contemporary Japanese art scene, namely that following a conservative artistic tradition can foster artistic creativity, offering both a window into the past and a path towards a future that still embraces tradition.

Charlotte Horlyck
The female artist — a pre-modern paradox?
Over the past two decades or so feminist art historians have highlighted the fact that canons on Western art have systematically and effectively excluded references to women artists and their works. Less attention has, however, been directed towards Asia, where references to women's contributions to arts and culture have been neglected in a largely comparable manner. As in Europe and in the States, some Asian women produced significant works of art while others were influential patrons and collectors of the arts. Discourses on pre-modern Korean material culture are a case in point as references to works by and for women are rarely made. Yet, textual and material sources testify to the significant role women played as makers and users of art objects in early Korean society, in particular during the course of the Joseon dynasty (AD 1392–1910). While a small number of women produced paintings, others were poets and musicians. Many were, however, subject to criticism as scholarly pursuits were rarely deemed appropriate for women. In some cases the paradox of the female artist took an extra turn as gisaeng became famous poets and musicians while being looked down upon as entertainers of men. In contrast, sewing, weaving and needleworking were activities which women could engage in without being chastised for it, not least as they were pursued inside the home and required no use of the calligraphic brush. It is the irony of the 20th then that such works are rarely valued as objects d'art and in being demoted to crafts items by 20th century art historians they have been excluded from canons of pre-modern Korean art. In other words, in their failure to fit within firmly established and pre-conceived notions of what art is and how artists should be defined, women artists and works by women have in essence been excluded from discourses on Korean art.
         In focusing on female painters, poets and craftspersons of the Joseon dynasty, this paper aims to explore these issues by questioning how art historians have interpreted pre-modern Korean art and how they have identified the pre-modern Korean artist. It will be argued that the general lack of interest in and recognition of women as active makers and users of art in early Korea lies not so much in the quality of works produced but rather in how such artefacts have been categorised by art historians. Furthermore, the lack of interest in women's art works is not a recent phenomenon but is founded in traditional divisions of gender in much earlier times. Despite the fact that the roles attributed to and played by women did not remain static over time, women were generally seen as being inferior to men and were not granted the same opportunities as them. As for their art, in most cases it did not enter the public sphere and remained within the confines of their homes thus remaining largely anonymous like their makers.

Joan Kee
Closer: What Asian Women's Art Has to Say About Contemporaneity
Why do the works of Asian women artists matter? At stake in this question is not what these works say about the contemporary art field than what they have to say about contemporaneity. This paper explores this question through the idea of a putative "Asian women's art" in the mid-to-late 1990s. Specifically I look at this idea through its relationship to the discursive emergence of a contemporary Asian art field. While the expansion of the latter has often turned on notions of speed and (dystopian) progress, "Asian women’s art" insists upon the centrality of tropes of familiarity and intimacy. In so doing, artists centrally identified with the concept of "Asian women's art" propose contemporaneity not as a function of linear development but as a condition of proximity.

Honghee Kim
Contemporary Korean activist/feminist art
My paper will present the post 1950s Korean feminist/women artists who have engaged in activism and will attempt to diagnose the status and limitations of feminist art. Riding the waves of the 1970s modernism, women artists were engaged in the revival of the feminine subject, content and form in their art which had been taboo subjects and attempted to offer a corresponding femininity in modernism. In 1980s an off-shoot of the Minjoong art movement emerged as a feminist art group that was critical of the foreign influences prevalent in the modernist and male-centrist art. On the other hand, after 1990s a new generation of women artists with postmodern sensibilities focused their work on the issues of body, identity, and gender politics and continued to express their postmodern feminism (art). Through this paper, I will examine how the artists are confronting and reconciling within the mainstream art establishments and what are the meaning and the actual benefits of their aesthetical, political interventions.

Youngna Kim
Four Korean Contemporary Women Artists: Constructing and Deconstructing the Myth
Na Hye-Seok(1896–1951), the first woman artist in Korea during the early twentieth century was the quintessential modern girl of Korea, and was the object of great envy and curiosity. Not only had she graduated from the prestigious Tokyo School of Womens Art in Japan, she had participated in several exhibitions and also toured Europe for two years. However, her scandal with a married man, subsequent divorce, in addition to an unprecedented public declaration of divorce, created an image of herself as tormented female artist who was not able to adjust to the morals and social customs of Korean society. This myth of the woman artist as a lonely social outcast continued to Chun Kyung-Ja (1912–) and Choi Wook-Kyung (1940–85) as the years passed. As female artists who also received the best educations available at the time, Chun Kyung-Ja and Choi Wook-Kyung created their own individual personas through their unique worlds of art and extreme lifestyles, maybe as a way to challenge or to distinguish themselves in the male dominated art world of Korea.
         This myth began to be deconstructed as the number of female artists increased and have taken an active part within the international art scene in the 1990s. Artists such as Kimsooja (1957–) and Nikki S. Lee (1970–) are no longer labeled as female artists. Although they identify themselves as women, rather than being engrossed within this singular identity, they show greater interest in experiencing other cultures and other people's lives as Asian women with multifaceted identities.
         In this paper, I would like to focus on the transformations in the personal and social perception of the modern Korean female artist through the lives and art of Chun Kyung-Ja, Choi Wook-Kyung, Kimsooja and Nikki Lee.

Junghee Lee
Refined Sexual Expression by Women Artists of the Choson Dynasty
Upper class Korean women during the pre-modern Choson period (1392–1910) had little freedom to express their desire and sexuality. This is because the government imposed a rigid Neo-Confucian ideology that espoused strict separation of men and women and obedience of women to men. Chastity was an important value, so upper class women were not allowed to remarry and their sexuality was considered a non-negotiable or non-tradable item, to be guarded at the risk of one's life. Women were not allowed to read and study, and were instead encouraged to take charge of the household and do sewing and embroidery. In essence, they were discouraged from independent thought, and from interests beyond family concerns.
         Women of less status enjoyed more freedom than upper class women. Most other women artists were professional entertainers trained to paint, write poems and play musical instruments in order to attract the company of upper class gentlemen clients. They enjoyed freedom meeting men, but their lives were always shadowed with the sadness of low social status.
         Flower and insect painting was a popular genre for female artists in the sixteenth century. An important artist working in this category was versatile painter Lady Sin Saimdang (1504–1551). Lady Sin is regarded as a virtuous woman par excellence and a successful mother who raised Yi I, one of the best Neo-Confucian philosophers of the Choson period. Lady Sin painted numerous close-up images of nature with sensitive observation, celebrating the life and beauty of ordinary plants, weeds, insects and animals shown in delicate movement and harmony. Examining works attributed to her in a social and cultural context makes me think that hidden within this harmony the law of nature is suggested through symbols of fertility that imply the erotic as insects and animals pursue the lush organic forms of flowers, fruit and dangling vegetables. She seems to have incorporated a Chinese tradition of erotic nature symbolism in art and poetry dating back to the Book of Songs. Lady Sin may have expressed her feeling about sexuality quietly in paintings such as Mice Nibbling Watermelon. The motif of mice nibbling seeds in the ripe opened melon might have symbolized family happiness and the natural phenomenon of reproduction resulting from sexuality.

Hung Liu
Women Warriors
While I have depicted Chinese and Asian women as the victims of violence of war, famine, social upheaval, and natural chaos, I have recently portrayed them as heroines who dared to challenge the old cannon and fight the vicious enemies of humanity — who willingly sacrifice themselves for a higher cause. Therefore in my work, women are not just victims, but also a fighting force.

Margo Machida
Engaged Acts: Art of Asian American and Native Hawaiian Women
Using gender as a pivot point, this paper considers some of the ways in which Asian American and Native Hawaiian women conceptualize their lives and position themselves as social, political, cultural, sexual, and historical subjects through the mediation of visual art. Articulating a sense of both an individual and collective presence, their work embodies polycentric sensibilities and complex contemporary identifications forged amid the convergence of the local, the global, the indigenous, and the diasporic, in a world where cultural and national cultural boundaries are becoming ever more fluid. In drawing out connections between gender relations, female labor, expanding capitalist economies, colonialism, Western imperialism, and militarism in Asia and in the Pacific, among others, their work underscores the historical and ongoing impact of globalization on women.
         Based on research that I conducted between 1990 and the present, close attention is paid to the contexts and particularities of these artist's subjectivities, experiences, and locations as a grounded source of knowledge, and to the meanings they attribute to the works they produce. Taking a broad view of what constitutes "art that serves an activist agenda," this discussion touches upon work ranging from explicit expressions of social critique and resistance, to the more private, idiosyncratic, and oblique manifestations of an activist consciousness. The six artists I will briefly discuss — Tomie Arai, Genara Banzon, Trisha Lagaso Goldberg, Puni Kukahiko, Hanh Thi Pham, and Lynne Yamamoto — are of different generational and ethnic backgrounds (Japanese, Filipino, Native Hawaiian, and Vietnamese). Even as these women all continue to assert their presence as participants in and witnesses to their times, there has also been, in the wake of insights gleaned from ethnic and feminist studies and critical theory, a palpable shift away from the more overt approaches to visual representation born of earlier activist struggles associated with "identity politics" and U.S. multiculturalism, toward strategies that often point away from or complicate such issues. While no single master narrative could possibly encompass the breadth of these Asian American and Native Hawaiian women's concerns, and despite differences in their backgrounds and orientations, important thematic continuities and common impulses can nevertheless be traced among artists who address the historical, political, and economic conditions, regimes of representation, cultural mores, and institutions that continue to shape and circumscribe women's lives.

Yong Soon Min
Migrating Epistomologies
Yong Soon Min will present a discussion on the works of four artists: Tiffany Chung, Sowon Kwon, Lin + Lam, Song Sanghee. These are four of the 16 artists included in the exhibition, transPOP: Korea Vietnam Remix who are variously situated in Vietnam, Korea and the United States. She will present a comparative exploration of their means of address and integration of aspects of history and female subjectivity.

Midori Yoshimoto
Gazing Back: Women Artists' Critique of the Japanese Cute
It is astounding to recognize the worldwide pervasion of the Japanese cute or kawaii culture, represented by female or animal characters in Japanese anime and manga and commercial goodies such as Hello Kitty. The problematic underlying such a rapid and vast cultural consumption is the seeming equation of the cuteness with femininity. While most of these characters appear to be innocent prepubescent girls, their sexuality is often revealed in fetishistic ways, through the often perverted imagination of the male otaku creators. Girls of the otaku fantasy world have become the subject of contemporary artists including Takashi Murakami and Makoto Aida. By furthering otaku-resque perversions to extremes, however, these male artists tend to reconfirm the sadistic tendency toward women among otaku men rather than critiquing it.
         Overshadowed by these daring male artists are the female creators of about the same generation or younger who emerged in the late 1990s and early 2000s. This paper examines various ways in which contemporary Japanese women artists critique their own cultural construction of the cute femininity. It will discuss works of Minako Nishiyama, Emiko Kasahara, Tomoko Sawada, and Tabaimo.

O Zhang
Being a Young Chinese Female Artist in a "New China" Era
O Zhang will talk about what it is like to be a young woman artist in China today. How is developing a career as a Chinese woman changing and what are some of the barriers they face that might not apply to men? O Zhang will also talk about her own experience of growing up as a female artist in China and her vision of how the eastern culture is encountering the west based on her own experience of studying and living abroad.

SCHEDULE

Saturday, September 13, 2008
Opening Remarks
9:00 am

Caverlee Cary, Assistant Director for Program Planning, Institute of East Asian Studies
Clare You, Chair, Center for Korean Studies; Korean Language Program Coordinator, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Mary-Ann Milford-Lutzker, Provost; Carver Professor in Far Eastern Studies; Professor of Art History, Mills College

Setting the Table: Women's Art in Korea
9:10-10:40

Chair:
Mary-Ann Milford-Lutzker

Presenters:
Inson Choy — Living the Change as Women Artists and Activists
Honghee Kim — Contemporary Korean Activist-Feminist Art
Youngna Kim — Four Korean Contemporary Women Artists: Constructing and Deconstructing the Myth
Joan Kee — Closer: What Asian Women's Art Has to Say About Contemporaneity

10:30-10:40 - Discussion

10:40-10:55 - Break

Players at the Table: Women Artists in Asia
10:55-12:30

Chair:
Penny Edwards

Presenters:
Patricia Graham — Eri Sayoko and Nakamura Kokei: Transforming Japanese Buddhist Painting into a Modern Art-Craft
Pamela Blotner — Under the Wire: Women Artists in Burma
Sandra Cate — From Outside the Temple to Inside the Big Tent: How Thai Women Artists (Re)Negotiate Their Place
Yong Soon Min — Migrating Epistomologies

12:15-12:25 - Discussion

Artists At the Table
12:25-1:00

Chair:
Mary-Ann Milford-Lutzker

Presenters:
Brenda Louie
Mayumi Oda
Kim Myungjin
Rhu Junhwa
Yoon Heesu
Je Miran
Jung Jungyeob

1:00-2:00 - Lunch

Seeking a Place at the Table: Korean Artists
2:00-3:10

Chair:
Clare You

Presenters:
Junghee Lee — Refinement and Sexuality: Women Artists of the Choson Dynasty
Charlotte Horlyck — The Female Artist: A Pre-Modern Paradox?
Hyung-Min Chung — Na Na Hye-sok (1896–1946): Being a Modern Woman-Artist

3:00-3:10 - Discussion

3:10-3:20 - Break

Resetting the Table: Asian American, Chinese and Japanese Artists Today
3:20-4:50

Chair:
Patricia Berger

Presenters:
Margo Machida — Engaged Acts: Art of Asian American and Native Hawaiian Women
Midori Yoshimoto — Gazing Back: Women Artists' Critique of the Japanese Cute
O Zhang — Being a Young Chinese Female Artist in a "New China" Era
Hung Liu — Women Warriors

4:40-4:50 - Discussion

Closing Remarks
4:50-5:00
Mary-Ann Milford-Lutzker

Reception at Mills College Art Museum to view the exhibition: The Offering Table: Activist Women Artists from Korea
5:30-7:00

PARTICIPANTS

Participants

Patricia Berger
Patricia Berger is Associate Professor of Chinese Art and Chair of the Department of the History of Art at UC Berkeley. Before joining the Berkeley faculty in 1997, she served as Curator of Chinese Art at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco and taught at Oberlin College and the University of Southern California. Her most recent book, Empire of Emptiness: Buddhist Art and Political Authority in Qing China (University of Hawaii, 2003) deals with the 18th-century Qing court's use of Buddhist art in their relationship with Mongolia and Tibet. Her current research focuses on Buddhist painting and photographic portraiture in early 20th-century China and Inner Asia.

Pamela Blotner
While a Professor at the University of San Francisco, artist and writer/curator Pamela Blotner founded the Sculpture Program of the Department of Visual Art. Over the last 25 years, her work has been informed by her experiences as an Illustrator/Mission Specialist on missions for Human Rights Watch, Physicians for Human Rights, and the UC Berkeley Human Rights Center. She examines the survival strategies used by artists, the works they create in response to violence or war, and the power of art to serve as a touchstone that shapes a culture and ensures its continued survival. In December 2007 Blotner completed the first phase of her ongoing project, "The Burmese-American Art Exchange."

Sandra Cate
Anthropologist and folklorist Sandra Cate explores the material and expressive culture of Southeast Asia, in such diverse manifestations as Buddhist temple murals, contemporary art, tourism and silk weaving, Mien/Yao embroidery, festival scrolls, and traffic jams in Bangkok. Her publications include Making Merit, Making Art: A Thai Temple in Wimbledon and Converging Interests: Travelers, Traders, and Tourists in Southeast Asia. She teaches anthropology at San Jose State University and, in Spring, 2008, contemporary Thai art at Mills College.

Linda Inson Choy
L. Inson Choy is a Guest Curator for Mills College Art Museum's fall exhibition, The Offering Table: Women Activists Artists from Korea. She is an independent art historian based in the San Francisco Bay Area. Her research has focused on the burgeoning feminist art/artists movement in Korea. In the spring of 2001, she curated Reconciling Femininity and Confucianism: Expressions of Contemporary Korean Women Artists, featuring six emerging feminist artists from Korea. As an independent curator and writer, she has authored several articles and essays that appear in publications including Art Asia Pacific Magazine, Rain and Thunder: A Radical Feminist Art Journal of Discussion and Activism, and Artwomen.org.

Hyung-Min Chung
Hyung-Min Chung is Professor of Art History at Seoul National University and the Director of the Museum of Art, Seoul National University (MoA). Chung received her B.A. from Wellesley College in art history, and an M.A. from the University of Michigan, and her Ph.D. from Columbia University.

Penny Edwards
Penny Edwards is the Chair of the Center for Southeast Asia Studies at UC Berkeley. A member of the department of South and Southeast Asian Studies, she specialises in the modern cultural and political history of Cambodia and Burma, with a focus on textual, material and visual narratives of national, religious, gender and racial identity. Her book Cambodge: The Cultivation of a Nation, 1860 -1945 (Hawaii University Press, 2007) explores the crystallisation of concepts of nation in and between Khmer and French secular and religious intellectual milieux.

Patricia Graham
Patricia Graham is an independent scholar affiliated with the University of Kansas Center for East Asian Studies as a Research Associate. She also works as a consultant and appraiser of Asian art to museums, individuals, and businesses throughout the United States . She received a Ph.D. in Japanese art history from the University of Kansas and subsequently taught Japanese art and culture at several universities, including Cornell, Hobart & Wm Smith Colleges, and the University of Kansas, served as a curator of Asian art at the St. Louis Art Museum, and Consultant for Japanese Art for the Nelson-Atkins Museum of Art in Kansas City. She has been the recipient of many research grants including a Fulbright Fellowship and a National Endowment for the Humanities Senior Research Fellowship. Her numerous publications include Tea of the Sages, the Art of Sencha (University of Hawai'i Press, 1998), Faith and Power in Japanese Buddhist Art, 1600-2005 (University of Hawai'i Press, 2007), essays in exhibition catalogues, journals, including Orientations and Artibus Asiae, and encyclopedias, including the Grove Dictionary of Art and Encarta Encyclopedia. Her current research is for a book, Buddhist-Inspired Art in Contemporary Japan: Intersections of Tradition and Imagination. Additional information on her can be found on her web site: http://patriciagraham.net.

Charlotte Horlyck
Dr Charlotte Horlyck is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Art and Archaeology at the School of Oriental and African Studies (SOAS), University of London where she lectures on Korean art and archaeology, and on theories related to the study of material culture. Prior to taking up her post at SOAS, she spent six months at the Academy of Korean Studies near Seoul as a visiting professor. She formerly curated the Korean collection at the Victoria and Albert Museum in London. Her research interests include arts of the Goryeo period, in particular bronze mirrors, Goryeo funerary material and theoretical issues relating to the study of space and material culture. She has authored several articles on Korean art and culture, and is currently co-editing a volume on Korean burial practices and perceptions of death.

Joan Kee
Joan Kee is an Assistant Professor at the University of Michigan at Ann Arbor focusing on modern and contemporary art in East Asia. Currently on research leave at the Center for Advanced Study in the Visual Arts at the National Gallery of Art in Washington D.C., Joan is working on a book project that examines painting in 1970s Korea as a crucible through which to examine the idea of a discrete contemporary Korean art. Recent writings include catalogue essays for the exhibition catalogues "Global Feminisms" (Brooklyn Museum, 2007) and "Your Bright Future," (Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, 2009).

Honghee Kim
Honghee Kim is the Director of Gyeonggido Museum of Art and Adjunct Professor, Hong-ik University. She received her Ph.D. in Western Art History from Hong-Ik University Graduate School, Seoul, and M.A. in Art History from Concordia University Graduate School, Montreal. She has organized numerous exhibitions in Korea and abroad, and is the recipient of the 1996 Presidential Award for the Gwangju Biennale.

Youngna Kim
Dr. Youngna Kim is a professor of Art History in the Dept. of Archaeology and Art History, Seoul National University. Before turning to research in modern and contemporary Korean art, she was trained at Ohio state University in Modern European Art. Her essays have been published in Korea, Japan and Australia. Her latest book publications are Tradition, Modernity and Identity: Modern and Contemporary Art in Korea (Hollym, 2005) and Twentieth Century Korean Art (Laurence King,London, 2005). Youngna Kim also served as the director of the Seoul National University Museum, and curated several exhibitions, including "Picasso Prints: His Art and His Love" at Samsung Museum. Currently, she is organizing a contemporary Korean art exhibition at Central House of Artists in Moscow, which will open on September 25, 2008.

Junghee Lee
Junghee Lee is Full Professor of Asian Art History in the Portland State University Department of Art, as well as a faculty member in International Studies. Her specialties are Korean art and Chinese and Korean Buddhist art. She works to introduce Korean art to the United States by presenting scholarly papers and curating contempory Korean art exhibitions across the country. After majoring in Aesthetics at Seoul National University, Junghee Lee earned her MA in Modern and Western Art History at UCLA as well as a PhD in Buddhist art. She has taught at Portland State since 1994 and worked as Consulting Curator of Korean art from 1994-1997, curating a Korean museum gallery and the special exhibition. For more information, please visit http://www.art.pdx.edu/faculty.

Hung Liu
Born in Chang Chun, China, in 1948, Hung Liu was sent to the countryside for "proletarian reeducation" for four years during the Cultural Revolution. After receiving a graduate degree and teaching at the Central Academy of Fine Art in Beijing, she was accepted into the Graduate Program in Visual Arts at the University of California, San Diego, but waited four years for the Chinese government to issue her a passport. She finally arrived in the United States in 1984 and took her MFA in 1986. Since 1990, Hung Liu has been teaching in the Art Department at Mills College, where she is presently Full Professor. Hung Liu is a two-time recipient of a National Endowment for the Arts Painting Fellowship, in 1989 and 1991, as well as a Society for the Encouragement of Contemporary Art (SECA) Award in 1992, a Eureka Fellowship in 1993, and a Joan Mitchell Painting Fellowship in 1998. In 2000 Liu also received the "Outstanding Alumna Award," University of California, San Diego, California. She has exhibited widely throughout the United States and Asia. She is represented in New York by the Nancy Hoffman Gallery, in Miami by the Bernice Steinbaum Gallery, and in San Francisco by the Rena Bransten Gallery. For a full CV, please visit her website, http://www.hungliu.com.

Brenda Louie
Louie is a painter and an art installation artist; her art fuses Western and Eastern visual cultures beginning with Chinese calligraphic practices and American Abstract Expressionism. As her work evolved it increasingly engaged her Chinese diasporic experiences in art that recalls, for example, memories of the social and political turmoil that was the backdrop of her youth. Brenda Louie was born Lei Yanwen in 1953 in southern China and grew up in Hong Kong. Louie immigrated to the United States in 1972. After earning a degree in Economics, Louie returned to school to study art, receiving her Master of Arts degree in painting from California State University, Sacramento (CSUS) in 1991 and her Master of Fine Arts degree in painting, drawing and art installation from Stanford University in 1993. Louie has been teaching drawing and painting at CSUS since 1996. Louie's work has been exhibited in China and the United States. For more information, please visit her website at http://www.brenda-louie.net.

Margo Machida
Dr. Margo Machida is Associate Professor of Art History and Asian American Studies at the University of Connecticut. She received her Ph.D. in American Studies from SUNY Buffalo (2002). A scholar, independent curator, and cultural critic specializing in Asian American art and visual culture, her most recent book is the co-edited volume Fresh Talk/Daring Gazes: Conversations on Asian American Art (University of California Press, 2003). This volume received the 2005 Cultural Studies Book Award from the Association for Asian American Studies. Among her current publications is "Reframing Asian America" in the exhibition catalogue, One Way or Another: Asian American Art Now (New York: Asia Society, 2006). Forthcoming and recent books and articles include: Unsettled Visions: Contemporary Asian American Artists and the Social Imaginary (Duke University Press, February 2009); "Into the Jungle: The Art of Ming Fay" in the exhibition catalogue Jungle Tango (Eight Modern Gallery, Santa Fe, New Mexico, August 2008); "Object Lessons: Materiality and Dialogism in the Art of Flo Oy Wong" in the exhibition catalogue Seventy/Thirty-Seventy Years of Living, Thirty Years of Art (Asian Pacific Islander Cultural Center, San Francisco, May 2008); and "Diasporas in Motion: The Visual Arts and Communities of Affinity," in Alexandra Chang, Envisioning Diaspora: Asian American Visual Art Collectives from Godzilla, Godzookie, to the Barnstormers (Timezone 8 Art Books, Beijing, China, 2008).

Mary-Ann Milford-Lutzker
Professor Milford-Lutzger is the Carver Professor of Asian Art History as well as the Provost of Mills College. She has written extensively on the art of South and Southeast Asia and has curated exhibitions of Indian, Indonesian, Chinese, and Japanese art. Her current research is on contemporary Indian women artists.

Yong Soon Min
Yong Soon Min's artistic practice, inclusive of curatorial projects, incorporates diverse media and interdisciplinary processes that engage issues of representation and cultural identities, the intersection of history and memory, and the role of the artist and the arts as agents of social change. Her recent international exhibitions include: 09 Havana Bienal, 08 Gwangju Biennale, 08 Guangzhou Triennale, Gyeongiddo Museum, Cultural Center of Philippines, and Foundation for Culture and Civil Society, Kabul and Kunsthalle Darmstadt. Recent curatorial projects include transPOP: Korea Vietnam Remix (with venues in Seoul, Sai Gon, Los Angeles and San Francisco); Exquisite Crisis and Encounters (Asian/Pacific/American Studies Institute of New York University); and THERE: Sites of Korean Diaspora (Fourth Gwangju Biennale). She is Professor of Studio Art at University of California, Irvine.

Mayumi Oda
Mayumi Oda was born into a Buddhist family in Tokyo. A practitioner of Soto Zen, she teaches Every Day Zen. She is a graduate of Tokyo University of Art, and she has been creating Goddesses, strong images of the feminine, for decades, exhibiting internationally. She founded Plutonium Free Future in Berkeley and Tokyo, and works for peace and environmental justice worldwide. Mayumi lives on the Big Island of Hawai'i, where she is establishing an organic farm.

Midori Yoshimoto
Midori Yoshimoto is associate professor of art history and gallery director at New Jersey City University, who specializes in Japanese avant-garde art of the 1960s. Her publications include: Into Performance: Japanese Women Artists in New York (2005); an essay in Zen'ei no Josei 1950-1975 (2005); and entries in Yes Yoko Ono (2000). She is currently editing an issue of Women and Performance on "Women and Fluxus" and co-editing a volume of Positions on "Collectivism in the 20th century Japanese art." Yoshimoto serves as the Chair of CAA's Committee of Women in the Arts. For further information, see http://www.njcu.edu/dept/art/galleries/.

Clare You
Clare You is the Chair of the Center for Korean Studies at UC Berkeley. She has taught in and coordinated Korean language program for more than 25 years. In addition to teaching Korean, as Chair of the Center for Korean Studies, she directs the Center's activities. She is the recipient of the Korean Silver Medal of Culture (2003), awarded by the President of Korea in recognition of her contributions to Korean education abroad and cultural exchanges between Korea and the United States.

O Zhang
O Zhang is a Chinese artist working in photography and mix media. A graduate of Royal College of Art in London and Central Academy of Art in Beijing, she moved to New York in 2004. Her work has been included in shows throughout Europe, America and China, including Kunsthalle Museum (Hamburg), Miro Museum (Barcelona) and is in the collections of Guggenheim Museum (NY), Santa Barbara Museum (CA), etc. O Zhang was the recipient of The Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Center Artist Fellowship and has been invited to give lecture in Oxford University. She will have a solo show in New York CRG gallery and artist residency at the Queen's Museum this fall. Website: http://www.ozhang.com.

DIRECTIONS

Directions
Berkeley Art Museum

The Berkeley Art Museum is located at 2621 Durant Avenue, Berkeley. Enter through the sculpture garden. See section E5 on this large campus map.

Berkeley Art Museum

Mills College Art Museum

The Mills College Art Museum is located at building 12 on this map. See an overview on this large campus map.

Mills College Art Museum

Parking at UC Berkeley

There are various public parking lots and facilities near the Berkeley campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

Other lots:

  • Berkeley Way near Shattuck
  • Center Street near Shattuck
  • Allston Way near Shattuck
  • Kittredge Street near Milvia

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.

Parking at Mills College

Parking lots at Mills College are indicated by a circled P on the Mills College campus map. Participants will be going to Building 12 and/or Building 13. As noted on the campus map, there are several possible parking lots close by and many further away, including the largest parking lot near the entrance to campus.