Tracing the Study of Japanese Buddhism

DATE: Friday-Sunday, September 25-27, 2009

PLACE: Various locations

SPONSORS: Center for Japanese Studies, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai/Numata Foundation, Shinnyo-en Foundation

SUPPORTERS: Institute of Buddhist Studies




DESCRIPTION

Description

International Conference on Japanese Buddhism featuring leading scholars from the U.S. and Japan. Featured speakers include:

Sueki Fumihiko, International Research Center for Japanese Studies, author of Studies in the Formation of Kamakura Buddhism

Shimazono Susumu, University of Tokyo, former President of the Japanese Association for Religious Studies

Ryuichi Abe, Harvard University, author of The Weaving of Mantra

Jacqueline Stone, Princeton University, author of Original Enlightenment and the Transformation of Medieval Japanese Buddhism

Bernard Faure, Columbia University, author of The Rhetoric of Immediacy and Visions of Power

Carl Bielefeldt, Stanford University, Director of the Stanford Center for Buddhist Studies and author of Dogen's Manuals of Zen Meditation

Hoshino Eiki, Taisho University, President of the Japanese Association for Religious Studies

Tamamuro Fumio, Meiji University, author of The History of Japanese Buddhism: Early Modern

SCHEDULE

Friday, September 25
Opening Remarks
Alumni House, Toll Room
8:45 am — 9:00 am

Naoki Murata
Duncan Williams

Keynote Lecture 1
9:00 am — 10:00 am

Ryuichi Abe, The Abhiseka Ritual and Imperial Successions in Early Heian Japan: Toward a Critique of the Chingo Kokka Theory
Chair: Mark Unno
Respondent: Ikuyo Matsumoto

Keynote Lecture 2
10:00 am — 11:00 am

Susumu Shimazono, The Concept of 'True Dharma' in Japanese Buddhism
Chair: Richard Payne
Respondent: Paul Groner

Dialogue 1: New Perspectives on 'Medieval' Buddhism
11:00 am — 12:00 pm

Fumihiko Sueki
Brian Ruppert
Chair: Mark Blum

12:00 pm — 1:00 pm - Lunch Break

Panel Session 1: Buddhism in Medieval Japanese Literature
1:00 pm — 2:45 pm

Hank Glassman, Keepsake Robe/Robe of Liberation: Family Ties and Buddhist Renunciation in Medieval Japanese Literature
Monika Dix, Buddhism and Poetic Borrowings in Medieval Japanese otogizoshi: The Case Study of Amida no honji
R. Keller Kimbrough, Extinguishing the Flame: Tameyo no sôshi and the Boundaries of Horror in Medieval Buddhist Fiction
Chair: Lori Meeks
Respondent: D. Max Moerman

2:45 pm — 3:15 pm - Coffee Break

Panel Session 2: Numinous Materials and Ecological Icons in Premodern Japanese Buddhism
3:15 pm — 5:15 pm

Kensuke Nedachi, Trees and Japanese Buddhist Sculpture: On Historical Shifts in Arboreal Material
Yukio Lippit, Aromatic Icons
Mai Sarai, The Yakushi of the Mountains: Yakushi Worship and Its Images in the Late Nara through Early Heian Periods
Fabio Rambelli, The Buddha-Body, Materiality, and the Environment: A General Look at the Representations of the Sacred in Japanese Buddhism
Chair: Lori Meeks
Respondent: Greg Levine


Saturday, September 26
Keynote Lecture 3
Alumni House, Toll Room
9:00 am — 10:00 am

Bernard Faure, Remapping Japanese Religion: The View from Medieval Japan
Chair: Lisa Grumbach
Respondent: Mark Unno

Dialogue 2: What is 'Kinsei/Early Modern' Buddhism?
10:00 am — 11:30 am

Fumio Tamamuro
Janine Sawada
Chair: Barbara Ambros

Keynote Lecture 4
11:30 am — 12:30 pm

Jacqueline Stone, Buddhism, Nationalism, and the Making of Modern Nichirenist Identity
Chair: Tomoe Moriya
Respondent: Makoto Hayashi

Lunch & Presentation
12:30 am — 1:30 pm

Duncan Williams, The 'Mugen Project' — The Beta-Version of the Online Bibliographical Database of Western-Language Sources on Japanese Buddhism

Panel Session 3
Field Trip and Panel Session at Green Gulch Zen Center
1:30 pm — 4:15 pm

Michel Mohr, Can Zen Studies Break away from Parochialism?
William Bodiford, Zen Windows on Esoteric Buddhism
Chair: Masaki Matsubara
Respondent: Carl Bielefeldt


Sunday, September 27
Panel Session 4: Modernity and Transnational Japanese Buddhism
Alumni House, Toll Room
9:00 am — 11:00 am

Akeshi Kiba, Modern Japanese Buddhism's Move Towards Transnational Asian Buddhism: Regional Connections, Mimicking Europe, and Cultural Initiatives
Naofumi Annaka, Overseas Propagation of Japanese Buddhism: A Comparative Study of the Nichiren Sect in Korea, Taiwan, Hawaii, and California
Tomoe Moriya, The Flow of Japanese Buddhism around the Pacific: Japanese American Buddhists in Pre-war Japan
Takeshi Fujii, Pre and Post-War Transnational Japanese Buddhism
Chair: Andrew Barshay
Respondent: Richard Jaffe

Keynote Lecture 5
11:00 am — 12:00 pm

Eiki Hoshino, Japanese Buddhist Nationalism and Ideology During World War II
Chair: Michihiro Ama
Respondent: Mark Blum

12:00 pm — 1:00 pm - Lunch Break

Film Screening: Okuribito (Departures)
Pacific Film Archive
1:15 PM — 3:25 PM
Panel Session 5: Contemporary Japanese Buddhism
Alumni House, Toll Room
3:45 pm — 5:45 pm

Steve Covell, Marginal or Marginalized: The Teachings of Contemporary Temple Buddhism
Mark Rowe, Temple Orbits: Issues in the Study of Contemporary Japanese Buddhism
John Nelson, Local and Global Forces Shaping Contemporary Japanese Buddhism
Barbara Ambros, Questioning the Boundaries of Religious Activities: Pet Memorial Rituals and the Law in Contemporary Japan
Chair: Duncan Williams
Respondent: Helen Hardacre

Closing Ceremony
5:45 pm — 6:00 pm

PARTICIPANTS

Participants

Ryûichi Abé, Harvard University
Ryûichi Abé is Edwin O. Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religion at Harvard University. He has previously served as Chair of the Department of Religion at Columbia University. His publications include Great Fool: Zen Master Ryōkan (University of Hawai'i Press, 1996), and The Weaving of Mantra: Kūkai and the Construction of Esoteric Buddhist Discourse (Columbia University Press, 1999).

Michihiro Ama, UC Irvine
Michihiro Ama received his Ph.D. in East Asian Languages and Literatures from the University of California, Irvine. He has held positions as a Lecturer in East Asian Studies and Buddhism at UC Irvine and at UC Berkeley. He has a forthcoming monograph entitled "Immigrants to the Pure Land: Modernization, Acculturation, and Globalization of Shin Buddhism in the Formation of Two Nation States, 1898–1941" (University of Hawai'i Press).

Barbara Ambros, University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
Barbara Ambros is Assistant Professor of East Asian Religions at the University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. She is the President of the Society for the Study of Japanese Religions and Co-Chair of the Japanese Religions Group at the American Academy of Religions. Her publications include Emplacing a Pilgrimage: The Oyama Cult and Regional Religion in Early Modern Japan (Harvard Asia Center/Harvard University Press, 2008), and "Bones of Contention: Pet Mortuary Rites in Contemporary Japan" (University of Hawai'i Press, forthcoming).

Naofumi Annaka, Rissho University
Naofumi Annaka is Professor of Buddhist Studies at Rissho University. He is the author of Nichiren no kotoba (Wani Books, 2006) and the co-author of Anata dake no Nichiren Shônin (Shôgakkan, 2001).

Andrew Barshay, UC Berkeley
Andrew Barshay is Professor of History and former Chair of the Center for Japanese Studies at UC Berkeley. His publications include State and Intellectual in Imperial Japan: The Public Man in Crisis (University of California Press, 1988) and The Social Sciences in Modern Japan (University of California Press, 2004).

Carl Bielefeldt, Stanford University
Carl Bielefeldt is the Evans-Wentz Professor of Oriental Philosophies, Religions, and Ethics, and the founder of the Ho Center for Buddhist Studies at Stanford University. He is the editor-in-chief of the Sōtō Zen Text Project. His publications include Dogen's Manuals of Zen Meditation (University of California Press, 1988).

Mark Blum, SUNY, Albany
Mark Blum is Associate Professor of Japanese Studies at the State University of New York, Albany. He serves on the advisory board of the Eastern Buddhist Society and the steering committees of the International Association of Shin Buddhist Studies and the Buddhism Section of the American Academy of Religion. He is the author of The Origins and Development of Pure Land Buddhism: A Study and Translation of Gyōnen's Jodo Homon Genrusho (Oxford University Press, 2002); co-editor of Rennyo and the Roots of Modern Japanese Buddhism (Oxford University Press, 2006); and the author of the "Cultivating Spirituality: A Seishinshugi Anthology" (SUNY Press, forthcoming); and "Think Buddha, Say Buddha: A History of Nenbutsu" (Oxford University Press, forthcoming).

William Bodiford, UCLA
William M. Bodiford is Professor of Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of California, Los Angeles, and has served as the Department's vice-chair. He is the author of Sōtō Zen in Medieval Japan (University of Hawai'i Press, 1993); the editor of Going Forth: Visions of Buddhist Vinaya (University of Hawai'i Press, 2005); and associate editor of Encyclopedia of Buddhism (Macmillan, 2005).

Steve Covell, Western Michigan University
Steve Covell is Mary Meader Associate Professor of Comparative Religion and Director of the Soga Japan Center at Western Michigan University. His publications include Japanese Temple Buddhism (University of Hawai'i Press, 2005).

Monika Dix, University of Colorado
Monika Dix is Visiting Assistant Professor of Japanese Literature at the University of Colorado at Boulder. Her publications include "Seeing and Not Seeing: Visualising the Invisible in Pre-Modern Japanese Culture" (E.J. Brill, forthcoming).

Bernard Faure, Columbia University
Bernard Faure is Kao Professor in Japanese Religion at Columbia University. He has published a numerous books in French and English. His English publications include: The Rhetoric of Immediacy: A Cultural Critique of Chan/Zen Buddhism (Princeton University Press, 1991); Chan Insights and Oversights: An Epistemological Critique of the Chan Tradition (Princeton University Press, 1993); Visions of Power: Imagining Medieval Japanese Buddhism (Princeton University Press, 1996); The Red Thread: Buddhist Approaches to Sexuality (Princeton University Press, 1998), The Power of Denial: Buddhism, Purity, and Gender (Princeton University Press, 2003), and Double Exposure (Stanford University Press, 2004). He is presently working on a book on Japanese gods and demons.

Takeshi Fujii, Gakugei University
Takeshi Fujii is Professor of Education at Tokyo Gakugei University. He serves as a council member of the Japanese Association for Religious Studies. His publications include over twenty articles on the history of modern Japanese religions, especially in diasporic communities such as Taiwan.

Hank Glassman, Haverford College
Hank Glassman is Associate Professor of East Asian Studies at Haverford College. His publications include The Face of Jizō: Image and Cult in Medieval Japanese Buddhism (University of Hawai'i Press, forthcoming).

Paul Groner, University of Virginia
Paul Groner is Professor and Chair of Religious Studies at the University of Virginia. His publications include Saicho: The Establishment of the Japanese Tendai School (Berkeley Buddhist Series/University of Hawai'i Press, 1984/2000) and Ryogen and Mount Hiei: Japanese Tendai in the Tenth Century (University of Hawai'i Press, 2002).

Lisa Grumbach, Institute of Buddhist Studies
Lisa Grumbach is Assistant Professor of Buddhist Studies at the Institute of Buddhist Studies at the Graduate Theological Union. She received her Ph.D. from Stanford University, where she specialized in Japanese Buddhism and Japanese religious history.

Helen Hardacre, Harvard University
Helen Hardacre is Reischauer Institute Professor of Japanese Religions and Society at Harvard University and has served as that Institute's Director. She has served an the Advisory Committee of the Japan Foundation and on the Board of the Japan Society of Boston. Her publications include: Lay Buddhism in Contemporary Japan: Reiyukai Kyodan (Princeton University Press, 1984); Kurozumikyō and the New Religions of Japan (Princeton University Press, 1986); Shintō and the State, 1868–1988 (Princeton University Press, 1989); Marketing the Menacing Fetus in Japan (University of California Press, 1998), which won the Arisawa Hiromichi Prize; and Religion and Society in Nineteenth-Century Japan: A Study of the Southern Kanto Region, Using Late Edo and Early Meiji Gazetteers (University of Michigan Press, 2002). Her current research focuses on the issue of constitutional revision and its effect on religious groups.

Makoto Hayashi, Aichi Gakuin University
Makoto Hayashi is Professor of Religious Studies at Aichi Gakuin University. He is the author of Kinsei Onmyōdo no kenkyū (Yoshikawa Kōbunkan, 2005), and Tenmonkata to Onmyōdo (Yamakawa Shuppansha, 2006), and the co-editor of Ibunka kara mita Nihon shūkyō no sekai (Hōzōkan, 2000), and Onmyōdo no kōgi (Sagano Shoin, 2002).

Eiki Hoshino, Taisho University
Eiki Hoshino is a Professor of Buddhist Studies and former president of Taisho University. He is the President of the Japanese Association for Religious Studies. His publications include Junrei: Sei to zoku no genshōgaku (Kodansha, 1981), and Shikoku henro no shūkyōgaku (Hōzōkan, 2002).

Richard Jaffe, Duke University
Richard Jaffe is Creed C. Black Associate Professor of Religion and Chair of the Department of Religion at Duke University. He was the former president of the Society for the Study of Japanese Religion. He is the author of Neither Monk nor Layman: Clerical Marriage in Modern Japanese Buddhism (Princeton University Press, 2002), and "Seeking Śākyamuni: World Travel and the Creation of Modern Japanese Buddhism, 1868–1945" (University of Chicago Press, forthcoming), and general editor of "Selected Works of D. T. Suzuki" (University of California Press, forthcoming).

Akeshi Kiba, Otani University
Akeshi Kiba is Professor of History at Otani University. He is the co-author of Zusetsu Nihon Bukkyō no rekishi, kindai (Kōsei shuppansha, 1996), and co-editor of Shokuminchiki Manshū no shūkyō: Nitchū ryōkoku no shiten kara kataru (Kashiwa shobō, 2007).

R. Keller Kimbrough, University of Colorado
R. Keller Kimbrough is Associate Professor of Japanese at the University of Colorado at Boulder. His publications include Preachers, Poets, Women, and the Way: Izumi Shikibu and the Buddhist Literature of Medieval Japan (University of Michigan, 2008) and "Wondrous Brutal Fictions: Buddhist Sermon-Ballads and Miracle Plays of Seventeenth-Century Japan" (Columbia University Press, forthcoming).

Greg Levine, UC Berkeley
Gregory Levine is Associate Professor of Japanese Art History at UC Berkeley. He is the author of Daitokuji: The Visual Cultures of a Zen Monastery (University of Washington Press, 2003), a finalist for the Charles Rufus Morey Prize; and co-editor of Awakenings: Zen Figure Painting from Medieval Japan (Japan Society, 2007), and Re-Presenting Emptiness: Essays on Zen and Art (Princeton University Press, forthcoming).

Yukio Lippit, Harvard University
Yukio Lippit is Harris K. Weston Associate Professor in the Humanities at Harvard University. He is the author of Painting of the Realm: The Kanō House of Painters in Seventeenth-Century Japan (University of Washington Press, forthcoming); co-author of Beyond Golden Clouds: Japanese Screens from the Art Institute of Chicago and the Saint Louis Art Museum (Art Institute of Chicago, 2009); and the co-editor of Awakenings: Zen Figure Painting from Medieval Japan (Japan Society, 2007), and "Re-Presenting Emptiness: Essays on Zen and Art" (Princeton University Press, forthcoming).

Masaki Matsubara, UC Berkeley
Masaki Matsubara is a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Buddhist Studies at UC Berkeley. He received his Ph.D. in Asian Religions from Cornell University. His dissertation focused on Hakuin Ekaku's neglected role as a social critic and reformer.

Ikuyo Matsumoto, Yokohama City University
Ikuyo Matsumoto is an Associate Professor at Yokohama City University. She is the author of Chûsei ōken to sokuikanjô: Shôgyô no naka no rekishi jôjutsu (Shinwasha, 2005), and co-editor of Fûzokukaiga no bunkagaku: Toshi wo utsu su media (Shibunkaku Shuppan, 2009).

Lori Meeks, University of Southern California
Lori Meeks is Assistant Professor of Religion and East Asian Languages and Cultures at the University of Southern California. She is serving as the Vice-President of the Society for the Study of Japanese Religions and on the steering committee of the Buddhism Section of the American Academy of Religion. She is the author of "Hokkeiji and the Reemergence of Female Monastic Orders in Premodern Japan" (University of Hawai'i Press, forthcoming) and co-editor of Buddhist Monasticism in East Asia: Places of Practice (Routledge, 2009).

D. Max Moerman, Columbia University
D. Max Moerman is Associate Professor of Asian and Middle Eastern Cultures and Associate Director of the Donald Keene Center for Japanese Culture and the Center for Japanese Religion at Columbia University. His publications include Localizing Paradise: Kumano Pilgrimage and the Religious Landscape of Premodern Japan (Harvard University Asia Center, 2005), and Geographies of the Imagination: "Buddhism and the Japanese World Map, 1364–1865" (Harvard University Asia Center, forthcoming).

Michel Mohr, University of Hawaii
Michel Mohr is Assistant Professor of Religion at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. His publications include Traité sur lnépuisable Lampe du Zen: Torei (1721–1792) et sa vision de l'éveil (Institut Belge des Hautes Etudes Chinoises, 1997), and "Buddhism, Unitarianism, and the Meiji Competition for Universality" (Michigan Monographs in Japanese Studies, forthcoming).

Tomoe Moriya, Hannan University
Tomoe Moriya is a Professor of International Communication of Hannan University. Her publications include Yemyo Imamura: Pioneer American Buddhist (Buddhist Study Center Press, 2000), and America Bukkyō no tanjō: Nijū seiki shotō ni okeru Nikkei shūkyō no bunka henyō (Gendai shiryo shuppansha, 2001).

Naoki Murata, Executive Director, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science

Kensuke Nedachi, Kyoto University
Kensuke Nedachi is Professor of Art History at Kyoto University. His publications include Seshu to busshi (Shibunkaku shuppan, 1990), Kokuzo, Bentaizen zô (Shibundô, 1992), Aizen myôô zô (Shibundô, 1997).

John Nelson, University of San Francisco
John Nelson is Associate Professor of East Asian Religions and the Director of the Asian Studies program at the University of San Francisco. He is the author of A Year in the Life of a Shinto Shrine (University of Washington Press, 1996), and Enduring Identities: The Guise of Shinto in Contemporary Japan (University of Hawai'i Press, 2000), and has produced two documentary videos, "Japan's Rituals of Remembrance: 50 Years after the Pacific War" (1997) and "Spirits of the State: Japan's Yasukuni Shrine" (2005).

Richard Payne, Institute of Buddhist Studies
Richard Payne is the Yehan Numata Professor of Japanese Buddhist Studies and the Dean of the Institute of Buddhist Studies at the Graduate Theological Union. He is the author of Tantric Ritual of Japan: Feeding the Gods, the Shingon Fire Ritual (Aditya Prakashan, 1991), Language Conducive to Awakening: Categories of Language Used in East Asian Buddhism (Iudicium, 1998); and editor or co-editor of Pure Land Buddhism (Berkeley Buddhist Studies Series, 1996), "Re-visioning" Kamakura Buddhism (University of Hawai'i Press, 1998), Approaching the Land of Bliss: Religious Praxis in the Cult of Amitābha (University of Hawai'i Press, 2004), and Tantric Buddhism in East Asia (Wisdom Publications, 2005).

Fabio Rambelli, Sapporo University
Fabio Rambelli is Professor of Comparative Religions and the Semiotics of Culture at Sapporo University. He is the 2007 winner of the Marco Polo Prize. He is the author of Vegetal Buddhas: Ideological Effects of Japanese Buddhist Doctrines on the Salvation of Inanimate Beings (Italian School for East Asian Studies, 2001) and Buddhist Materiality: A Cultural History of Objects in Japanese Buddhism (Stanford University Press, 2007), and the co-editor of Buddhas and Kami in Japan: Honji Suijaku as a Combinatory Paradigm (Routledge/Curzon, 2003).

Mark Rowe, McMaster University
Mark Rowe is Assistant Professor of Religious Studies at McMaster University. His publications include articles on modern and contemporary Japanese religions.

Brian Ruppert, University of Ilinois
Brian Ruppert is Associate Professor of Japanese Religions at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign. He is the author of Jewel in the Ashes: Buddha Relics and Power in Early Medieval Japan (Harvard University Asia Center, 2000) and co-author of "A History of Japanese Buddhism" (Blackwell Publishing, forthcoming).

Mai Sarai, Research Institute for Cultural Properties, Tokyo
Mae Sarai is a Research Fellow at the Tokyo National Research Institute of Cultural Properties. She is the author of numerous articles on Japanese Buddhist sculpture.

Janine Sawada, Brown University
Janine T. A. Sawada is Professor of Religious Studies and East Asian Studies at Brown University. She has served as the President of the Society for the Study of Japanese Religions. Her publications include Confucian Values and Popular Zen: Sekimon Shingaku in Eighteenth-Century Japan (University of Hawai'i Press, 1993), and Practical Pursuits: Religion, Politics, and Personal Cultivation in Nineteenth-Century Japan (University of Hawai'i Press, 2004).

Susumu Shimazono, University of Tokyo
Susumu Shimazono is Professor of Religious Studies at the University of Tokyo. He is a former president of the Japanese Association for Religious Studies. He is the author of Gendai kyûsai shûkyôron (Seikyûsha, 1992), Shinshin shûkyô to shûkyô boom (Iwanami, 1992), Aum Shinrikyô no kiseki (Iwanami, 1995), From Salvation to Spirituality: Popular Religious Movements in Modern Japan (Trans Pacific Press, 2004), Spirituality no kôryû (Iwanami, 2007); and co-editor of Religion and Society in Modern Japan (Asian Humanities Press, 1993).

Jacqueline Stone, Princeton University
Jacqueline I. Stone is Professor of Japanese Religions at Princeton University. She has served as the Buddhism Section Co-Chair of the American Academy of Religion and President of the Society for the Study of Japanese Religion. She is the author of Original Enlightenment and the Transformation of Medieval Japanese Buddhism (University of Hawai'i Press, 1999); and the co-editor of The Buddhist Dead: Practices, Discourses, Representations (University of Hawai'i Press, 2007), Death and the Afterlife in Japanese Buddhism (University of Hawai'i Press, 2008), and Readings of the Lotus Sutra (Columbia University Press, 2009).

Fumihiko Sueki, Nichibunken
Fumihiko Sueki is Professor of Japanese Buddhism at the International Research Center for Japanese Studies [Nichibunken] and formerly Professor of Japanese Buddhism at the University of Tokyo. His publications include Nihon Bukkyō shi (Shinchôsha, 1992), Nihon Bukkyō shisōshi ronko (Daizô shuppan, 1993), Heian shoki Bukkyō shisō no kenkyû (Shunjusha, 1995), Kamakura Bukkyō keisei ron (Hozokan, 1998), and Kamakura Bukkyō tenkairon (Transview, 2008).

Fumio Tamamuro, Meiji University
Fumio Tamamuro is Professor Emeritus of History at Meiji University. He has served as President of the Nihon Fûzokushi Gakkai and the Nihon Kindai Bukkyôshi Gakkai and on the board of the Nihon Sangaku Shugen Gakkai. His publications include Edo bakofu no shukyō tōsei (Hyōronsha, 1971), Shinbutsu bunri (Kyôikusha, 1977), Nihon bukkyoshi: Kinsei (Yoshikawa kōbunkan, 1987), Zusetsu Nihon bukkyô no rekishi: Edo jidai (Kōsei shuppansha, 1996), Sōshiki to danka (Yoshikawa kōbunkan, 1999), Tenkai/Sûden: Nihon no meisô (Yoshikawa kōbunkan, 2004), and Nihonjin no shûkyô to minkan shinkô (Yoshikawa kōbunkan, 2006); and editor of Minkan shinkô no genryû: Jishû to yugyô hijiri (Meicho shuppan, 1982) and Ôyama shinkô (Yûzankaku shuppan, 1992).

Mark Unno, University of Oregon
Mark Unno is Associate Professor of East Asian Religions at the University of Oregon. He has served on the board of the Society for Buddhist-Christian Studies and the steering committee of the Buddhist Critical-Constructive Thought Group at the American Academy of Religions. He is the author of Shingon Refractions: Myôe and the Mantra of Light (Wisdom Publications, 2004); and editor of Buddhism and Psychology Across Cultures (Wisdom Publications, 2006); and co-editor of Kokoro no yamai to shûkyôsei (Hôzôkan, 2008) and "Buddhism and Depth Psychology" (Wisdom Publications, forthcoming).

Duncan Williams, CJS Chair, UC Berkeley
Duncan Williams is Associate Professor of Japanese Buddhism and Chair of the Center for Japanese Studies at UC Berkeley. He is the author of The Other Side of Zen: A Social History of Soto Zen Buddhism in Tokugawa Japan (Princeton University Press, 2005) and "Camp Dharma: Japanese-American Buddhism and the World War Two Incarceration Experience" (University of California Press, forthcoming), and co-editor of American Buddhism (Curzon, 1999), Buddhism and Ecology (Harvard University Press, 1997), and "Issei Buddhism in the Americas" (University of Illinois Press, forthcoming).

DIRECTIONS

Directions

For directions to the Alumni House, see this map.

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Parking in Berkeley

There are various public parking lots and facilities near the Berkeley campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

Other lots:

  • Berkeley Way near Shattuck
  • Center Street near Shattuck
  • Allston Way near Shattuck
  • Kittredge Street near Fulton
  • Durant Street near Telegraph

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.