Berkeley Summer Research Institute

DATE: August 2-12, 2011

PLACE: 2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor

SPONSOR: Institute of East Asian Studies




AGENDA

Agenda
Tuesday, August 2

6:30 pm
Opening dinner for BSRI participants and Berkeley faculty at the Faculty Club


Wednesday, August 3

9:30 am – 10:00 am
Welcome remarks

10:00 am – 12:00 pm
Opening introductions

12:00 pm – 1:00 pm
Lunch

Working Papers Panel 1
Alexander C. Cook, Chair
1:00 pm – 2:00 pm: Mingzheng Shi, Director, NYU in Shanghai
"From Central Axis to Riverfront Bund: Comparing Beijing and Shanghai's Urban Morphology through History"
Luca Gabbiani, Discussant

2:10 pm – 3:10 pm: Elizabeth LaCouture, Assistant Professor, History, Colby College
"Modern Homes for Modern Families in Tianjin, (1860-1956)"
Ning Jennifer Chang, Discussant

Tour of C.V. Starr East Asian Library
3:25 pm: Depart IEAS for walk to CV Starr East Asian Library
3:45 pm – 4:30 pm: Tour of CV Starr East Asian Library with Bruce Williams, Reference Services Coordinator, Information and Public Services, and Western Language Selector


Thursday, August 4

Working Papers Panel 2
Christian Henriot, Chair
10:00 am – 11:00 am: Huei-Min Sun, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
"The Right to be Urbanites: Housing Crises and Legal Reform in Republican Shanghai"
Xavier Paulès, Discussant

11:10 am – 12:10 pm: Pierre F. Landry, Associate Professor, Political Science, University of Pittsburgh
"Urbanization and Bureaucratic Instability at the County Level (1980-2005)"
Ling-Ling Lien, Discussant)

12:10 pm – 1:30 pm
Lunch

Working Papers Panel 3
Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm: Hsi-yuan Chen, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica
"Summoning the Wandering Ghosts of the City: The Li Sacrifice in the State Cult and the Popular Festival in Suzhou"
Zuanyou Song, Discussant

2:40 pm – 3:40 pm: Dorothée Rihal, Research Engineer, History, Lyon Institute of East Asian Studies
"A Lone Islet in Central China: The French Concession in Hankou at the Beginning of the Japanese Occupation"
Kristin Stapleton, Discussant

Contextualizing Lecture 1
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Maureen Miller, Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
"The Urban Topography of Public Authority: Religion and Power in Italian Cities, 1000-1600"

6:00 pm: Reception


Friday, August, 5

Working Papers Panel 4
Max Ko-Wu Huang, Chair
10:00 am – 11:00 am: Xavier Paulès, Assistant Professor, History, Centre d'etudes sur la Chine Moderne et Contemporaine, EHESS
"News Items under Scrutiny: Yuehuabao and Canton Daily Life (1927-1938)"
Iris Tuan, Discussant

11:10 am – 12:10 pm: Tao Xu, Assistant Professor, History, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences
"Bicycles and Chinese Urban Life in Modern China"
Elizabeth LaCouture, Discussant

12:10 pm – 1:30 pm
Lunch

Working Papers Panel 5
Christian Henriot, Chair
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm: Luca Gabbiani, Associate Professor, History, EFEO Paris / Taipei
"'Of Boats and Men': Economic Activity and Urban Life in Market Towns along the Northern Reaches of the Grand Canal in Qing China"
Pierre F. Landry, Discussant

2:40 pm – 3:40 pm: Ning Jennifer Chang, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
"'Three Races' and Cultural Translation in China's Treaty Ports"
Tao Xu, Discussant

Contextualizing Lecture 2
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Jeff Cody, Senior Project Specialist, Education, Getty Conservation Institute
"Design DNA from Paris and the U.S.A.: Architectural Transplantations and Urban Morphology in Twentieth Century China"

6:00 pm: Reception


Saturday, August 6: Open to the Public
Doctoral Projects: Built Environment — Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair
12:001:15: pm
  • Jennifer Choo, Sociology, University of California, Berkeley
    "Going Global and Yet Remaining Local: An Analysis of China's Real Estate Industry"
  • Ceclia Chu, Architecture, University of California, Berkeley
    "Speculative Urbanism: The Garden City Movement and Suburban Development in Colonial Hong Kong, 1912-1925"
  • Corey Byrnes, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
    "The Aesthetics of Demolition in the Three Gorges Work of Jia Zhangke and Yun-fei Ji"

On Space and People — Kevin O'Brien, Chair
1:30 pm – 2:45 pm
  • Nicolas Tackett, Assistant Professor, History, Berkeley, University of California, Berkeley
    "Urban-based Marriage Networks in the Late Tang Capital Cities"
  • Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science, University of California. Berkeley
    "Local People's Congresses and Governance"
  • Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor History, University of California Berkeley
    "The Printer, the Camera, and the City"

Emerging Research at the Academia Sinica — Max Ko-Wu Huang, Chair
3:00 pm – 4:15 pm
  • Max Ko-Wu Huang, Director, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica,
  • Hsi-yuan Chen, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica
  • Huei-min Sun, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica

Keynote Address
4:30 pm – 6:00 pm
Sherman Cochran, Professor, History, Cornell University
"Making Comparisons in Chinese Urban Studies"

6:30 pm
Mid-session banquet at Hotel Shattuck Plaza


Sunday, August 7

9:15 am – 5:30 pm
Napa Tour


Monday, August 8

Working Papers Panel 6
Alexander C. Cook, Chair
10:00 am – 11:00 am: Kristin Stapleton, Director of Asian Studies and Associate Professor, History, State University of New York at Buffalo
"Turbulent Stream: Family City and Revolution in Ba Jin's Trilogy"
Huei-min Sun, Discussant

11:10 am – 12:10 pm: Iris Tuan, Associate Professor, Department of Humanities, National Chiao Tong University
"Bond: Shakespeare's Merchant of Venice in Taiwan"
Mingzheng Shi, Discussant

12:10 pm – 1:30 pm
Lunch

Working Papers Panel 7
Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm: Ling-Ling Lien, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
"Promoting the Foreign: Advertising of Department Stores in Republican Shanghai"
Dorothée Rihal, Discussant

2:40 pm – 3:40 pm: Zuanyou Song, Research Fellow, History, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences
"Wing On Store and the Fashion of Life in the Modern Times of Shanghai"
Hsi-yuan Chen, Discussant

Contextualizing Lecture 3
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Yuming He, Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, The University of Chicago
"Wonder and Order: On China's Early Modern Global Geography"

6:00 pm: Reception


Tuesday, August 9

Reading Session 1
Christian Henriot, Chair
10:00 am – 11:00 am: Huei-min Sun
11:10 am – 12:10 pm: Tao Xu

12:10 pm – 1:30 pm
Lunch

Reading Session 2
Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair
1:30 pm – 2:30 pm: Mingzheng Shi
2:40 pm – 3:40 pm: Luca Gabbiani

Contextualizing Lecture 4
4:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Andrew F. Jones, Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
"Circuit Listening: Grace Chang and the Dawn of the Chinese 1960s"

6:00 pm: Reception


Wednesday, August 10

Reading Session 3:
Alexander C. Cook, Chair
10:00 am – 11:00 am: Xavier Paulès
11:10 am – 12:10 pm: Hsi-yuan Chen

12:10 pm – 1:00 pm
Lunch

Contextualizing Lecture 5
1:30 pm – 3:30 pm
Christian Henriot, Professor, History, Institut d'Asie Orientale, Université Lumière-Lyon 2
"Chinese Urban History and the Digital Divide"

4:00 pm
Drinks and pizza at Jupiter


Thursday, August 11

Reading Session 4
Christian Henriot, Chair
10:00 am – 11:00 am: Zuanyou Song
11:10 am – 12:10 pm: Ning Jennifer Chang

12:10 pm – 1:10 pm
Lunch

Reading Session 5
Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair
1:10 pm – 2:10 pm: Pierre F. Landry
2:20 pm – 3:20 pm: Kristin Stapleton
3:30 pm – 4:30 pm: Ling-ling Lien


Friday, August 12

Reading Session 6
Christian Henriot, Chair
9:00 am – 10:00 am: Dorothée Rihal
10:10 am – 11:10 am: Elizabeth LaCouture

Contextualizing Lecture 6: Lunchtime lecture
11:30 am – 1:30 pm
You-Tien Hsing, Associate Professor, Georgraphy, University of California, Berkeley
"China's Great Urban Transformation: 1980-2010"

2:00 pm – 6:00 pm
Wrap Up Sessions

6:30 pm
Final Banquet at the Women's Faculty Club Board Room


Saturday, August 13

Departure

PARTICIPANTS

Participants
Conference Chairs

Christian Henriot, Professor, History, Institut d'Asie Orientale, Université Lumière-Lyon 2
Christian Henriot is Professor of Chinese History at the Lumière-Lyon 2 University and currently a Senior Research Fellow at the Institut Universitaire de France. He is the author and editor of several books on modern Chinese history, including Prostitution and Sexuality in Shanghai. A Social History, 1849–1949 (Cambridge, 2001) and In the Shadow of the Rising Sun: Shanghai under Japanese Occupation (Cambridge, 2004). His latest project is an online research and resource platform on Shanghai history (http://virtualshanghai.net).

Wen-hsin Yeh, Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, and Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
Wen-hsin Yeh is Walter and Elise Haas Chair Professor in Asian Studies and Richard H. and Laurie C. Morrison Chair in History. She is also an Honorary Professor of History at Peking University. She has served as Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies since January 2007. A leading authority on twentieth century Chinese history, Yeh is author or editor of eleven books and numerous articles examining aspects of Republican history, Chinese modernity, the origins of communism and related subjects. Her books include the Berkeley Prize-winning Provincial Passages: Culture, Space, and the Origins of Chinese Communism (University of California Press, 1996) and The Alienated Academy: Culture and Politics in Republican China, 1919–1937 (Harvard University Press, 1990). Her most recent publication, Shanghai Splendor (University of California Press, 2007) is an urban history of Shanghai that considers the nature of Chinese capitalism and middle-class society in a century of contestation between colonial power and nationalistic mobilization.

Conference Participants

Ning Jennifer Chang, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
Ning Jennifer Chang is Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica. She is interested in people, things, and events understood in cross-cultural terms. For the past ten years, her research has dealt with the interactions between China and the West, both economically and culturally, from 1850 to 1950. Her research focuses on three main historical issues: trade between Britain and China, Chinese urban culture formed by foreign-imported leisure, and the impact of Western medicine on China. Overall, she hopes the results of her research will further our understanding on the formation of Chinese modernity and on the changes that have influenced Chinese lives today.

Hsi-yuan Chen, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica
Hsi-yuan Chen is Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of History and Philology at the Academia Sinica. Chen received his Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1999. His current research interests include cultural and intellectual history in late imperial and early Republican China. Chen's most recent publications include Power and Culture in the Ming-Qing Legal System which he co-edited with Qiu Pengsheng in 2009. He has written numerous articles on topics ranging from the re-orientation of the Confucian tradition, the interstices of religion and regulation, and dragon boat festival celebrations in Ming-Qing China. He is editor-in-chief of Disquisitions on the Past and Present (Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica).

Sherman Cochran, Professor, History, Cornell University
Sherman Cochran is the Hu Shih Professor of Chinese History at Cornell University. He has edited two books in Chinese urban history: Inventing Nanjing Road (1999); and, with coeditors David Strand and Wen-hsin Yeh, Cities in Motion (2007). His research has been on Chinese cities with a focus on business history. He is the author of Big Business in China (1980), which has an economic emphasis; Encountering Chinese Networks (2000), which has a sociological orientation; and Chinese Medicine Men (2006), which discusses cultural change. He has a book in press on a Chinese business family, and he is currently planning a project in comparative history on compradors in Shanghai, Hong Kong, and Singapore.

Jeff Cody, Senior Project Specialist, Education, Getty Conservation Institute
Jeffrey W. Cody, Ph.D., has been a Senior Project Specialist in the Education Department at the Getty Conservation Institute since 2004, when he began coordinating a series of ongoing educational and training activities for Southeast Asian conservation professionals. From 1995 to 2004 Cody was a Professor in the Department of Architecture at the Chinese University of Hong Kong, where he taught architectural history and specialized in architectural and urban research about late-Qing and Republican China, and where — from 2000 to 2004 — he served on the Hong Kong Government's Antiquities Advisory Board. He is the author of Building in China: Henry K. Murphy's "Adaptive Architecture," 1914–1935 (Chinese University Press and University of Washington Press, 2001) and Exporting American Architecture, 1870–2000 (Routledge, 2003); and the co-editor of Chinese Architecture and the Beaux-Arts (University of Hawai'i Press, 2011) and Brush & Shutter: Early Photography in China (Getty Research Institute, 2011).

Alexander C. Cook, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
Alexander C. Cook is Assistant Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley, specializing in twentieth-century China. He is completing a book called "The Cultural Revolution on Trial" and beginning a new project on Maoist conceptions of the Third World. He has published several shorter pieces, most recently a chapter on "Third World Maoism" for Timothy Cheek's Critical Introduction to Mao (2010). In October 2011, he will host a conference on the global history of the Little Red Book (Quotations from Chairman Mao).

Luca Gabiani, Associate Professor, History, EFEO Paris/Taipei
Dr. Luca Gabbiani received his bachelor's degree from the University of Geneva, Switzerland in Chinese Language and Culture and in History. He did his graduate and doctoral work in Paris, at the Ecole des Hautes Etudes en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), and received his Ph.D. in 2004, in History. His dissertation discussed Beijing's local urban government under the Qing dynasty and was recently published in France by the Editions de l'EHESS. Gabbiani held a post-doc at Tokyo University's Institute of Oriental Culture (2004–2005) and taught at the Institute of Political Sciences of Strasbourg, France, Strasbourg's Institute for Higher European Studies, and the French School for East Asian Studies (Ecole française d'Extrême-Orient, EFEO). He is currently head of the EFEO's Taipei Centre and will soon be posted at the Beijing Center. He is currently working on two new projects: one on the rise and development of Western Shandong's urban network, along the reaches of the Grand Canal, in the Ming and the Qing, and the second on Chinese urban centers as seen through the lens of traditional late imperial law.

Yuming He, Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, The University of Chicago
Yuming He received her B.A. and M.A. from Peking University and Ph.D. from University of California, Berkeley. He's current work focuses on the book market of late-Ming China, particularly newly popularized publication genres of that period (encyclopedias, literary miscellanies, collections of games, jokes, and other entertainment literature). She is working on a book that attempts to situate these woodblock publications within their contexts of transmission and circulation in China — and even to East Asia and beyond — and to examine the rise of a new form of book literacy in conjunction with the new linguistic, visual, material properties of these woodblock books. Other interests include spatial imagination and the production of geographical knowledge in late-imperial China, trans-regional culture, manuscript novels from the Qing, as well as occasional ventures into twentieth-century intellectual history.

You-tien Hsing, Associate Professor, Geography, University of California, Berkeley
Professor Hsing received her Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley, in 1993. Her research and teaching has been focused on the political economy of development in East Asia, especially China. She is interested in the question of power and space. Hsing's first book, Making Captialism in China: The Taiwan Connection (Oxford University Press, 1998) focuses on the role of culture in inter-regional capital flows. Her second book, The Great Urban Tansformation: Politics of Land and Property in China (Oxford University Press, 2010) examines the issue of territorality, looking at how the transformation of the state and the society shapes and is shaped by land battles in Chinese cities and villages. The co-edited volume, Reclaiming Chinese Society, (Taylor and Francis, 2009) looks at China's emerging social activism in the struggles over distribution, recognition, and representation. Hsing's current project concerns the cultural and environmental politics in Northwestern China.

Max Ko-Wu Huang, Director, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
Max Ko-Wu Huang has been the director of the Institute of Modern History at Academia Sinica since 2009. He received his Ph.D. in History from Stanford University (2001) and his M.A. in Chinese Studies from Oxford University (1989). His principal publications include: The Rejected Path: A Study of Liang Qichao's Accommodative Thinking (Taipei: 1994, Beijing, 2006, Chinese); The Raison d'être of Freedom: Yan Fu's Understanding and Critique of John Stuart Mill's Liberalism [Yunchen wenhua shiye gufen youxian gongsi] (Taipei: 1998, Shanghai, 2000); and The Meaning of Freedom: Yan Fu and the Origins of Chinese Liberalism (Hong Kong, 2008).

Andrew F. Jones, Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
Andrew F. Jones received his Ph.D. from the University of California, Berkeley in 1997. Jones teaches modern and vernacular Chinese literature and popular culture. His research interests include music, cinema, and media technology, modern and contemporary fiction, children's literature, and the cultural history of the global 1960s. He is the author of Like a Knife: Ideology and Genre in Contemporary Chinese Popular Music (Cornell East Asia Series, 1992) and Yellow Music: Media Culture and Colonial Modernity in the Chinese Jazz Age (Duke University Press, 2001), co-editor of a special issue of positions: east asia cultures critique entitled The Afro-Asian Century, and translator of literary fiction by Yu Hua as well as Eileen Chang's Written on Water (Columbia University Press, 2005). His latest book is Developmental Fairytales: Evolutionary Thinking and Modern Chinese Culture (Harvard University Press, 2011).

Elizabeth LaCouture, Assistant Professor, History, Colby College
Elizabeth LaCouture is a historian of late nineteenth- and early twentieth-century China with research interests in women and gender, urban history, architectural history, and visual and material culture. She defended her doctoral dissertation "Modern Homes for Modern Families in Tianjin, China, 1860–1949" in 2010 at Columbia University, and is currently an Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies and History at Colby College. This September, she will take leave from teaching at Colby to join an Academy of Korean Studies funded research project on the Korean family in comparative perspective at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign where she will begin her second project on East Asia at home.

Pierre F. Landry , Associate Professor, Political Science, University of Pittsburgh
Pierre F. Landry will join the department of Political Science at the University of Pittsburgh in the Summer of 2011. He is also a Research Fellow at the Research Center for the Study of Contemporary China at Peking University and an outside consultant on projects related to governance and rule of law with the United Nations Development Program in Hanoi, Vietnam. Landry graduated in Economics and Law at Sciences Po in Paris, has an M.A. in Foreign Affairs from the University of Virginia, and received his Ph.D. in Political Science at the University of Michigan. He is also an alumnus of the Hopkins-Nanjing program and taught in the Yale-Peking University joint undergraduate program in 2007. His research interests focus on Asian and Chinese politics, comparative local government, quantitative comparative analysis, and survey research. His recent articles have appeared in Political Analysis, The China Quarterly and Comparative Political Studies. He is the author of Authoritarianism and Decentralization: The Party and Local Elites in Post-Deng China (Cambridge, 2008). He is currently researching a book manuscript on the development of legal institutions in China, tentatively titled Nurturing Fragile Institutions.

Ling-Ling Lien, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
Ling-Ling Lien is Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica, and the editor-in-chief of the Chinese journal, Research on Women in Modern Chinese History. Her current project is about how "new type businesses" such as department stores reshaped urban culture and everyday life in Republican Shanghai.

Maureen Miller, Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
Maureen Miller recieved her Ph.D. from Harvard University in 1989. Her most recent book is Power and the Holy in the Age of the Investiture Conflict: A Brief Documentary History (Bedford/St. Martin's, 2005). Miller's research and teaching explores the extraordinary capacity of individuals and societies for change, using the rapid transformation of Europe over the eleventh and twelfth centuries as a lens to interrogate contemporary understandings of life choices and the social, economic, political, and cultural forces conditioning them. Medieval religious beliefs and practices figure centrally in her work: she is interested in the radical claims made for human efficacy on the basis of otherworldly premises and the paradoxical results of attempts to realize religious ideals in this world. Another longstanding fascination is with medieval Italian cities: the development of their institutions, social relations, their urban landscapes, and cultures.

Kevin O'Brien, Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
Kevin O'Brien is the Alann P. Bedford Professor of Asian Studies and Professor of Political Science. He is currently serving as Interim Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies (Fall 2011). A student of Chinese politics in the reform era, he has written articles on topics such as legislative politics, local elections, fieldwork strategies, popular protest, policy implementation, and village-level political reform. He is the author of Reform Without Liberalization: China's National People's Congress and the Politics of Institutional Change (Cambridge, 1990) and the co-author of Rightful Resistance in Rural China (Cambridge, 2006). He is the co-editor of Engaging the Law in China: State, Society and Possibilities for Justice (Stanford University Press, 2005) and Grassroots Elections in China (Routledge, 2010) and the editor of Popular Protest in China (Harvard University Press, 2008). His most recent work centers on the Chinese state and theories of popular contention, particularly the origins, dynamics and outcomes of "rightful resistance" in rural China.

Xavier Paulès, Assistant Professor, History, Centre d'etudes sur la chine moderne et contemporaine, EHESS
Xavier Paulès earned a M.A. in History from École Normale Supérieure de Cachan. His Ph.D., from Lyon 2 University, was on opium in Canton,1912–1937, and came out as his first book in 2010, Histoire d'Une Drogue en Sursis. L'opium Canton, 1906–1936, by éditions de l'EHESS. His second book, a global history of opium in China from 1750 to 1950, will come out this year. Paulès is now conducting research about the social and intellectual significance of gambling in South China, especially the fantan. In English, his most recent article was "Gambling in China Reconsidered: Fantan in South China during the Early Twentieth Century" International Journal of Asian Studies, vol. 7, n° 2 (July 2010). Paulès was the 2004 winner of the Young Scholar Award of the European Association of Chinese Studies, as well as the recipient two other awards in 2006.

Dorothée Rihal, Research Engineer, Lyon Institute of East Asian Studies
Dorothée Rihal is a historian specializing in Chinese urban history. She currently works as sources analyst at the Lyon Institute of East Asian Studies. She defended a Ph.D. in Contemporary History in 2007 at the SEDET research center, University Paris VII, where her topic was: "The French Hankow Concession (1896–1943): From Condemnation to the Appropriation of Heritage." She also holds an M.A. in Chinese Language and Civilisation from the LCAO Faculty of Paris VII. Her training and her research have led her to spend much time in China, Hong Kong, and Taiwan, including two years at the Nanjing University and two years doing her field research in the city of Wuhan. Rihal first joined the IAO as a postdoctoral fellow on the Virtual Shanghai project. She continues to work on the development of research platforms for the Institute. She also teaches Chinese history and Chinese language.

Mingzheng Shi, Director, NYU in Shanghai
Mingzheng Shi joined New York University in 2006 as the Founding Director of NYU's Global Academic Center in Shanghai. Born and raised in Beijing, he earned his B.A. in Cross-cultural Studies from Peking University, M.A. in American Studies from the University of Connecticut, and M.Phil. and Ph.D. in Chinese history from Columbia University. From 1992 to 1997 he taught Asian history at the University of Houston, and from 1997 to 2000 taught modern Chinese history at the University of Hawai'i at Manoa. His academic research interest centers on the modern transformation of Chinese cities. Author of a number of works in both English and Chinese exploring the dynamics of culture and modernity in Chinese urban history, he is currently working on a book-length study comparing Beijing and Shanghai, two of China's most important cities.

Zuanyou Song, Research Fellow, History, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences
Zuanyou Song is a professor affiliated with the History Institute at the Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences. Song is a graduate of Shanghai University. Song's representative works include Cantonese in Modern Shanghai (2007) and The Adaptation of Fellow Townsmen Group and the Urban Shanghai Life,1843–1949 (2009). His current research focuses on commercial and social history in modern Shanghai.

Kristin Stapleton, Director of East Asian Studies and Associate Professor, History, SUNY Buffalo
Kristin Stapleton is Director of Asian Studies and Associate Professor of History at the University at Buffalo, SUNY, and serves on the executive board of the New York Conference on Asian Studies and the editorial advisory board of Education About Asia, the teaching journal of the Association for Asian Studies. In spring 2010 she became the first director of the Confucius Institute at the University at Buffalo. She has degrees in Asian Studies and History from the University of Michigan and Harvard, and has studied in Taiwan and in Sichuan. She teaches Chinese history, Asian history, and world history, and is a frequent presenter at teacher workshops. Her research interests include urban politics and administration in China, the history of Chinese family life, humor in history, and the place of non-U.S. history in American intellectual life. She is the author of Civilizing Chengdu: Chinese Urban Reform, 1895–1937 (Harvard Asia Center, 2000) and co-editor of The Human Tradition in Modern China (Rowman & Littlefield, 2007). Her current major project, titled "Turbulent Stream: Family, City, and Revolution in Ba Jin's Trilogy," examines the historical background of the most widely read novels of the May Fourth period.

Huei-Min Sun, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
Sun Huei-min is Assistant Research Fellow at the Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica. Her academic career has centered on the study of the legal profession in Republican-era Shanghai. Based on long-term research on legal archives and news reports, she has been tracing the impact of housing problems on the lives of Shanghai's urban populace, especially in terms of public order and legal system attempts to regulate rights pertaining to urban properties. She is currently undertaking a two-year project to examine how the great migration caused by the Sino- Japanese War reshaped the urban space and society of Shanghai. This project also features experimental methodologies on how GIS technology and spatial information can benefit the study of Chinese urban history.

Nicolas Tacket, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
Nicolas Tackett obtained his Ph.D. from Columbia University in 2006. After postdoctoral fellowships at Stanford and at the Getty Research Institute, he is now Assistant Professor at the University of California, Berkeley. He specializes in Tang-Song history, with research interests in urban history, elites and their social networks, and in pre-modern developments in notions of Chineseness.

Iris Tuan, Associate Professor, Department of Humanities, National Chiao Tung University
Iris Tuan, Associate Professor, Department of Humanities, National Chiao Tung University Iris Hsin-chun Tuan received her Ph.D. in Theater at University of California, Los Angeles. Tuan, is currently Associate Professor at National Chiao Tung University. She teaches courses on theatre, literature, film, and art. Tuan's specialties are modern Taiwanese theatre, Western drama and theatre, performance studies, feminism, Shakespearean studies, and intercultural theater. She has done research projects commissioned by the National Science Council and Council for Hakka Affairs, Executive Yuan, in Taiwan.

Tao Xu, Assistant Professor, History, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences
Tao Xu has worked as a researcher at the Institute of History, Shanghai Academy of Social Sciences, since September 2006 and is now an assistant professor there. Xu is interested in Chinese urban history, especially Shanghai history. Xu's first book, "Study on Sun Yat-sen and Shanghai" will be published at the end of this year. Xu's current work focuses on "Popular Mobilities," such as the bicycle in modern China. Through studying bicycles as a cultural symbol, Xu focuses on the changes in aesthetic taste, life habits and consumer orientation of communities in modern China. Xu's work aims to reveal the complexity of daily life and the meaning of bicycles to different Chinese people, so as to analyze how "the kingdom of bicycles" was constructed.

WORKING PAPERS

Working Papers

Ning Jennifer Chang: "Three Races" and Cultural Translation in China's Treaty Ports

Chen Hsi-yuan: Summoning the Wandering Ghosts of the City: The Li Sacrifice in the State Cult and the Popular Festival in Suzhou

Luca Gabbiani: "Of boats and men": Economic activity and urban life in market towns along the northern reaches of the Grand Canal in Qing China

Elizabeth LaCouture: Modern Homes for Modern Families: everyday life and the politics of housing in Tianjin China (1860-1956)

Pierre Landry: Urbanization and Bureaucratic Instability at the County Level (1980-2005)

Ling-ling Lien: Promoting the Foreign: Advertising of Department Stores in Republican Shanghai

Xavier Paulès: News items under scrutiny: Yuehuabao 越華報 and Canton daily life (1927-1938)

Dorothée Rihal: A lone islet in central China: the French Concession in Hankou at the beginning of the Japanese Occupation

Mingzheng Shi: From Central Axis to Riverfront Bund: Comparing Beijing and Shanghai's Urban Morphology through History

Song Zuanyou: Wing On Store and the Fashion of Life in the Modern Times of Shanghai

Sun Huei-Min: The Right to be Urbanites: Housing Crises and Legal Reform in Republican Shanghai

Kristin Stapleton: Turbulent Stream: Family, City, and Revolution in Ba Jin's Trilogy

Iris Tuan: Asian American Drama and Performance: David Henry Hwang's Six Plays and East West Players

Xu Tao: 骑车人:自行车与近代中国城市生活

TEXTS

Texts

Ning Jennifer Chang: Text for the Second Presentation

Chen Hsi-yuan: Zhu Jianming The Three Patrols in Shanghai

Luca Gabbiani: What Made Foshan a Town? The Evolution of Rural-Urban Identities in Ming-Qing China, by David Faure

Elizabeth LaCouture: 近代天津的住宅 Housing in Treaty-port Tianjin

Pierre Landry: Evolving rank-size distributions of intra-metropolitan urban clusters in South China

Pierre Landry: 当前中国的城镇人口统计问题及其 对经济分析的影响

Ling-ling Lien: Maintaining Cultural Boundaries in Retailing: How Japanese Department Stores Domesticate "Things Foreign," by Millie R. Creighton

Ling-ling Lien: Selling China: Class, Gender and Orientalism at the Department Store, by Sarah Cheang

Xavier Paulès: 拒毒月刊 n°91 (August 1935), p 19–26

Dorothée Rihal: British concessions and Chinese cities, 1910s-1930s, by Robert Bickers

Mingzheng Shi: Selection from Beijing Record: A Physical and Political History of Planning Modern Beijing

Kristin Stapleton: Selected readings

Song Zuanyou: Selected text

Sun Huei-Min: Selected text

Xu Tao: Selected text by Frank Dikötter