Past Events

2011 Events

Echoes of the Past: Qing Dynasty Chinese Painting
January 5 – June 26, 2011
Berkeley Art Museum
During the last half of the seventeenth century, a group of artists known as the Four Wangs came to dominate the Chinese painting scene. These artists looked back to the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries, drawing inspiration from ink masterpieces of the Song and Yuan dynasties, yet transforming and reinterpreting the past. Over the past two years, BAM/PFA's collection of works by Ming and Qing dynasty artists working in traditional formats, including the Four Wangs, has been enriched through purchase and gifts of key works. Echoes of the Past: Qing Dynasty Chinese Painting presents a selection of these new acquisitions, which exemplify the great tradition of Chinese ink painting.

Among the most celebrated artists of the seventeenth century, Wang Hui (1632–1717) is credited with establishing the stylistic foundations of Qing dynasty painting, which was firmly rooted in ancient traditions stretching back to the eleventh-century Northern Song period.

The youngest member of the group, Wang Yuanqi (1642–1715), painted at such a high level as to be commissioned by the Emperor. Following in the footsteps of his famous grandfather, Wang Shimin (1592–1680), he emphasized his debt to the Yuan period in BAM/PFA's newly acquired 1702 landscape painting by referencing in his inscription and his brushwork the fourteenth-century painter Huang Gongwang (1269–1334).

Works by Wang Hui and Wang Yuanqi are joined by those of Wang Shimin and Wang Jian, making up a full complement of Four Wangs.

Tickets required: $10 Adults (18–64), $7 Non-UC Berkeley students, senior citizens (65 & over), disabled persons, and young adults (13–17) and after 5 p.m. selected Fridays, free BAM/PFA members, UC Berkeley students, faculty, and staff, and children (12 & under)

Ticket info: Purchase tickets at front desk.

Contact the Berkeley Art Museum (bampfa@berkeley.edu, 510-642-0808) for more information.



Weaving Local Stories into Epic Theatre: On "The Village" and the Preservation of Collective Memory
Stan Lai, Playwright, and an Alumnus of UC Berkeley
January 18, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image "The Village" (Chinese Baodao Yicun) is one of the most celebrated plays of the recent Chinese Theatre. After finishing a West coast tour of the play, Writer-Director Stan Lai will be on campus to talk about the unique process he used to create this work, weaving personal stories and using improvisation as a creative tool. In a changing national and cultural context, he will also discuss the role of theatre, film and other cultural forms as vehicles for preserving fragile collective memories. Stan Lai is a unique cultural figure in the modern history of Taiwan, lauded by many as the father of modern Taiwanese theater. He is also a key player in and commentator upon the current "cultural turn" of contemporary China. Lai will share thoughts and entertain questions about his unique career, which has helped create a new theatre culture in Taiwan and China.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



  Asian Biotech: Ethics and Communities of Fate
Aihwa Ong, Anthropology, UC Berkeley
January 19, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Asian Biotech Providing the first overview of Asia's emerging biosciences landscape, this collection brings together ethnographic case studies on biotech endeavors such as genetically modified foods in China, clinical trials in India, blood collection in Singapore and China, and stem-cell research in Singapore, South Korea, and Taiwan. While biotech policies and projects vary by country, the contributors identify a significant trend toward state entrepreneurialism in biotechnology, and they highlight the ways that political thinking and ethical reasoning are converging around the biosciences. Asian Biotech explores the interplay among biotechnologies, economic growth, biosecurity, and ethical practices in Asia. Introduced by Larissa N. Heinrich, Literature, UC San Diego.

This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Unwilling to Become "The Poor": Laid-off Workers in China's Urban Periphery
Mun Young Cho, Postdoctoral Fellow 2010–2011, Center for Chinese Studies
January 20, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image From poverty relief to affordable housing, governmental programs for urban poverty in post-reform China are predicated upon and actively shape the expectations of what the poor are – and should be – like. However, ethnographic research (2006–2008) in a decaying neighborhood of Harbin, a city in Northeast China, brings to my attention the unwillingness of urban laid-off workers to conform these expectations. In this presentation, the speaker will examine the experiential condition of impoverishment of China's urban workers, once considered representatives of "the people" in the People's Republic of China. Ethnographic findings demonstrate how their struggle is played out in governmental interventions that seek to make them legible as "the poor." As she will detail, the specter of "the people" haunts the management of urban poverty. Impoverished workers are not merely subjected to but continuously struggle with the new gazes and techniques directed toward them.

Open to all audiences.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



The Politics of Privacy in Japan: Global Policy Convergence and the Personal Information Protection Act
Eiji Kawabata, Visiting Scholar, Center for Japanese Studies
January 25, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
image The protection of privacy is integral to democracy but the development of digital network technology heightens the risk of exposing citizens' private lives to the public. To deal with this problem, governments in advanced industrial democracies have been implementing privacy protection policies since the early 1970s. In contrast, the Japanese government has been slow in developing privacy regulations, until the enactment of the Personal Information Protection Act in the early 2000s which has made Japan's privacy regulation comparable to other industrial democracies'.

What explains this slow but radical transformation of Japan's privacy regulation? The talk will address this question by examining the impact of global forces, such as international rules, market competition, and neoliberal ideology, based on discussions in international political economy.

Eiji Kawabata is an Associate Professor of Political Science and Law Enforcement at Minnesota State University, Mankato. He is currently a Visiting Scholar at CJS for the 2010–11 academic year.

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156) for more information.



Ethics and Literature: Chinese Experimental Fiction in the 1980s
Lin Zou, Visiting Scholar, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University
January 26, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image This talk asks an old question that still confronts literary critics today, and that is important to contemporary Chinese literature: how do we understand the relation between literature's ethical concerns and its pursuit of creativity not confined by ethical values? The speaker engages this question by looking into Chinese experimental fiction in the 1980s that reflects on the violence of the Chinese Cultural Revolution, and by further exploring the dilemma facing experimental fiction in an era of global commercialization. Focusing on the fiction of Yu Hua and Ge Fei, she suggest that the earlier experimental fiction of these writers puts humanistic concerns into what she calls an ironic relation with the exploration of a destructive and unfathomable human spirit. This ironic structure enables literature to bring humanistic concerns and creative energy into mutual critique, while allowing literature to explore both. She will discuss how the dilemma facing Chinese experimental fiction is specifically about the relation between ethics and literature in an age of consumerism and postmodern dissolution of meaning.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Ryukyu and Taiwan on the East Asian Seas
Man-houng Lin, Academia Sinica, Taiwan
January 26, 2010
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
Man-houng Lin interrogates the origins of nationhood in the maritime histories of Taiwan and the trading networks of the Ryukyu islands. The emergence of large-scale political systems, issues of natural resources, and the dynamics of 14th to 21st century Asian maritime history are explored in explaining the eclipse of the Ryukyus and ascendance of Taiwan.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



The Holloway Series in Poetry Presents Arthur Sze with Javier O. Huerta
January 26, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Department of English
image Arthur Sze is the author of eight books of poetry, including The Ginkgo Light, Quipu, The Redshifting Web: Poems 1970–1998, Archipelago, and one book of translations, The Silk Dragon: Translations from the Chinese. He is also the editor of Chinese Writers on Writing. A professor emeritus at the Institute of American Indian Arts, Arthur Sze is a UC Berkeley graduate and lives in Santa Fe, New Mexico.

Javier O. Huerta's book of poetry titled Some Clarifications y otros poemas (Arte Publico 2007) received the Chicano/Latino Literary Prize from UC Irvine. He studies the laughter of poetry in the English PhD Program at UC Berkeley. He is currently at work on his second poetry manuscript, American Copia, a book-length poem "about" going to the grocery store. On certain days, Javier can be seen skipping his way down International Avenue in Oakland, California.



The Critical Power in Taiwan: The Role of the Legislative Yuan in National Development
Wang Jin-Pyng, President of the Legislative Yuan of the Republic of China
January 28, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image President Wang will deliver a keynote speech at entitled "The Critical Power in Taiwan: The Role of the Legislative Yuan in National Development" at 10 AM on January 28, 2011. He will discuss the role of the Legislative Yuan in Taiwan's economic development, democratization, US-Taiwan relations and cross-strait relations, with a Q&A session to follow. This will mark the first time a Legislative Speaker from Taiwan has ever delivered a speech at Berkeley.

Wang Jin-pyng was first elected as a legislator of the Republic of China (Taiwan) in 1975 and was subsequently re-elected for another ten terms. Following his stint as Vice President (Deputy Speaker) of the Legislative Yuan from 1993 to 1999, he became the President (Speaker) in 1999. Over the years, President Wang Jin-pyng has witnessed Taiwan's gradual transformation to a democracy. During his tenure as the Legislative Yuan President, Taiwan has undergone two ruling party transitions. His views are expected to provide insights on recent US-Taiwan relations and Taiwan's political and economic development.



The Politics of "Post-Minjung": A Quiet Revolution in Contemporary Korean Visual Arts
Sohl Lee, University of Rochester
January 28, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
image Exploring a range of South Korean visual artworks of the past decade, this talk situates today's political art within the dynamic relationship between aesthetics and politics that prevail in post-democratic Korea. The socially-engaging art projects of Back Seung Woo and Park Chan-kyong (photography), Mixrice (installation), Lim Minouk and Kim Sangdon (performance and video), and Bae Young-whan (publication) spur social critique and utopian visions around such issues as the North-South division, migrant workers, gender inequality, urban poverty, and redevelopment. How then do we conceptualize the social imagination at work here? The existing discourse, which began in the late 1990s, posits this so-called "post-minjung art," or posutu-minjung misul, as merely emulating and succeeding 1980s minjung art ("people's art"), thereby imposing a linear temporality onto the multi-faceted histories of art and politics in the country. A nuanced redefinition of "post-minjung" cultural logic is therefore urgently needed—one that rearticulates the complexity of visual language in relation to the sociopolitical particularities of locale that the artists demonstrate in their visual productions. Through detailed visual analyses and inter-textual readings, this talk will attempt such a redefinition, and thereby complicate the relationship between minjung and "post-minjung" in the realm of visual culture. Moreover, this talk will explore contemporary Korean visual arts as a site in which we can re-conceptualize the notion of citizenship and democracy, contest Korean society's direction towards neoliberalism, and imagine a more socially just and ethically responsible society.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



A Culture of Resonance: Intermedial Spectatorship and the Forgotten Futures of Chinese Cinema
Weihong Bao, Chinese Film and Media Culture, Columbia University
Discussant: Cindy Menghsin Horng, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
January 28, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image In 1920s China, just as the institution of cinema was solidifying, the boundary of cinema was by no means hard-edged. This presentation looks at Chinese cinema in the late 1920s, when circulated news of invented new media and popular scientific imaginations of the diverse future of cinema incited a new conception of film-audience relationship, namely, a spectatorial mode of resonance (gongming). This resonance was predicated on a spectator as a medium of sympathetic vibration and on the possibilities of televisuality, where hypnotism and distant communication technologies intersect. This notion of spectatorship was also enmeshed in a broader culture of resonance, where psychology, physiology, and vitalist philosophy cross fertilize each other as competing technologies of perception. By investigating the historical formation of an intermedial spectatorship, my inquiry exercises a radical de-centering of cinema as a singular, fixed medium. Bringing the forgotten futures of cinema in view, we challenge the teleology of Chinese film history.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



  The Sdok Kok Thom Inscription: Window into the Lost Angkorian Past
John Burgess, Journalist
January 31, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies
image The founding of an empire atop a holy mountain, a king's gifting of golden pitchers to a priest — these and other intriguing accounts come down to us in the Sdok Kok Thom Inscription, one of the world's most important ancient testaments. Carved into a sandstone monolith at an 11th Century temple, it describes the early events, ritual and personalities of the Khmer Empire, builder of Cambodia's Angkor Wat. Introduced by Penny Edwards, Chair, Center for Southeast Asia Studies.

This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.
 




Beyond Ideology: Changing Public Opinion and the 2012 South Korean Presidential Elections
WOO Jung-Yeop, Research Fellow, Asan Institute for Policy Studies; KIM Jiyoon, Research Fellow, Asan Institute for Policy Studies; HAHM Chaibong, Director, Asan Institute for Policy Studies; GO Myong-hyun, Research Fellow, Asan Institute for Policy Studies; BONG Youngshik, Senior Research Fellow, Asan Institute for Policy Studies; Discussant: Hong Yung Lee, Professor of Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
January 31, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Department of Political Science, Asan Institute for Policy Studies
image I. Shifting Political Grounds in South Korea: Results of the 2010 AIPS Korean Public Opinion Survey
WOO Jung-Yeop, Asan Institute Research Fellow
KIM Jiyoon, Asan Institute Research Fellow

II. Information Heuristics and the Politics of Mass Protest in South Korea: The Case of the Anti-U.S. Beef Protests
HAHM Chaibong, Director, Asan Institute for Policy Studies
GO Myong-hyun, Asan Institute Research Fellow

III. Politics of National Security in South Korea: Evolving Public Perception of the ROK-US Alliance
HAHM Chaibong, Director, Asan Institute
BONG Youngshik, Asan Institute Senior Research Fellow

Discussant: Hong Yung Lee, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley

This seminar is organized by the Asan Institute for Policy Studies and co-hosted by the Center for Korean Studies and the Department of Political Science at UC Berkeley. The Asan Institute for Policy Studies was founded with a mission to become an independent think tank that provides effective policy solutions to issues which are critical to Korea, East Asia and the rest of the world. The Institute not only supplies in-depth policy analysis but also endeavors to promote a global and regional environment favorable for peace, stability and prosperity on the Korean peninsula. In addition to policy analysis and research, the Institute undertakes the training of specialists in public diplomacy and related areas in an effort to contribute to Korea's ability to creatively shape its own future.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



清代《说文解字》古文和籀文研究: A Study of Guwen and Zhouwen on "ShuoWenJieZi" in the Qing dynasty
Oh Jae Joong, Konkuk University, Dept of Chinese Language and Literature
February 1, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
《说文》里面,除了小篆以外,附录了篆文、古文、籀文、俗字、奇字等重文。其中对古文字研究最重要的字形之一就是古文。西汉时代孔壁中发见的经书,汉代人称它为古文。于是许慎认为他收入《说文》的古文比籀文更早。据《说文》叙许慎所说的古文还包括商周青铜器铭文,也就是金文。以后经过清代学者吴大澂和王国维等人的研究,证明《说文》中的古文其实是战国时代东方六国的文字,以及其来源是孔子旧宅壁中书等。但是当时段玉裁、潘祖荫等有些学者仍然以为古文的来源是商周金文,这可能是因为受到推崇许慎的影响。结论地说,在吴大澂等清代学者的研究基础上,王国维等人可以证明《说文》古文的真面目。

中国历史上最早的字书是《史籀篇》,它是周宣王时代太史籀所编的,其中收录的文字就是籀文。石鼓文因为它的形状像鼓而得名,中国最早的石刻遗文之一。石鼓文从唐代发现以来,关于它的年代,历代众说纷纭。到了清代,仍多被认为是西周的器物。这是它的字形和籀文很接近而产生误解。其实石鼓文是东周春秋时代秦国的刻石。其中收录的文字,和籀文或大篆有相关,宋代以来到清代吴大澂等人,正确指出其年代,现在已经成为学界的定说。要之,石鼓文是上承金文等古文字,下启秦朝小篆的,在中国文字形体的发展上,具有重要意义。

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Symposium and Concert: Mongolian Harmony
February 2, 2011
Center for Buddhist Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, International House, Department of Music
Mongolia, an emerging democracy asserting its unique identity on the world stage, is featured in a day of academic discussion intended for a general audience, displays of Mongolian crafts and games, and a Mongolian dinner.

The event culminates with the concert "Mongolian Harmony" featuring a gift of old and new: Sengedorj, a "throat singer" whose art extends back centuries and now teters on the verge of extinction; and the jazz ensemble "Boerte," at the cutting edge of new Mongolian music. Boerte takes throat singing into the modern age, and reinterprets traditional Mongolian instruments in twenty-first century colors. Their music combines improvisations on folk music and familiar Mongolian melodies, as well as their own new compositions. This dazzling performance exemplifies the vitality of musical culture in the New Mongolia.

On Thurday, February 3, a master class with Mongolian throat singers will be held at the Institute of East Asian Studies. Enrollment required. See separate event listing for details.

"Mongolian Harmony" Schedule

Symposium: "Religion and the Arts in Mongolia"
1:00 – 5:00 pm, Home Room, International House

1:00: Welcome

1:10: Panel: Mongolian Buddhism
Chair: Jacob Dalton, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

Speakers:
Vesna Wallace, Religious Studies, UC Santa Barbara
Venerable Lama Damchaabazar Gurjav, Zanabazar Center of Buddhism

Matthew King, University of Toronto
Uranchimeg Tsultem, History of Art, UC Berkeley

2:30: Keynote Address: Battulga Luvsan, General Consul from Mongolia to the United States

3:00: Panel: Traditional Arts of Mongolia
Chair: Pat Berger, History of Art, UC Berkeley

Speakers:
G. Mend-Ooyo, Poet and President of Mongolia Academy of Culture and Poetry
Byambasuren Sharav, Composer
Peter Marsh, Mongolian Music Specialist, California State University-East Bay
O. Enkhtaivan, Artist

5:00 – 7:30 pm: Display of Mongolian craft and customs, International House

6:00: Mongolian Dinner, International House — $10 fee

Concert: "Mongolian Harmony"
7:30–9:30 pm, Chevron Auditorium, International House

Music plays a special role in the lives of the nomadic Mongolian people. Music brings communities together, signing is shared on the move and as people gather in camp. There are even songs to soothe the animals upon whom all depends. This concert features the extraordinary "khuumii," or throat singing and the striking horse-head fiddle, and culminates with an ethno-jazz ensemble Boerte, showcasing the vibrant creativity of the new Mongolia.

Musicians:
Nanjid Sengedorj, virtuoso throat singer
Urtaa Gantulga, horse-head fiddle master
Shijirmaa, Mongolian long song singer
Boerte, Jazz Ensemble

Following the Master Class held Thursday morning at the Institute of East Asian Studies, events continue at Stanford University February 2–5. See http://ceas.stanford.edu/docs/Mongolian_Harmony.pdf for full details.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Meeting Again After 60 Years: A Conversation with Ho-taik Shim and Young-ja Lee
February 2, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
image This unique event is organized in conjunction with San Francisco Old First Concerts, which will present a concert in honor of composer Young-ja Lee's 80th birthday on February 6. The concert will feature her songs, piano works, and the premiere of a koto ensemble piece.

In 1950, when Young-ja Lee was a college freshman, the Korean war broke out and she was suddenly separated from her family. She was given shelter by a Mr. Ho-taik Shim and his wife, an act that literally saved her life, as she was without food or a place to live. After the war ended, they went their own separate ways and there was no more contact. Now, finally, after 60 years, Ms. Lee will reunite with Mr. Shim, who lives in San Francisco.

Young-ja Lee and Hotaik Shim will discuss their experiences in the chaos of the Korean War and the path that brought them to this dramatic reunion.

Old First Concerts: http://www.oldfirstconcerts.org/performances/353/

Young Ja Lee was born in Wonju, Kangwon province, located on the east coast of Korea, in a region surrounded by high hills and mountains. She is one of the most prominent Korean women composers of her time. She studied at the Ewha Woman's University, in Seoul and then in France at the Paris National Conservatory. She then extended her musical studies at the Manhattan School of music in New York City and the Brussels Royal Conservatory in Belgium. Most recently, she obtained a D.E.A. degree in musicology from the Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne in Paris, France.

From 1961 to 1983, she was professor and director of the composition department at Ewha University. As the former chairman of the Korean National Committee for the Asian Composer's League (ACL), the vice-president of Korean Composers' Association, and the vice-chairman of the board of directors of the Korean Music Association, she has attended numerous international conferences and seminars held in and out of the country. In early 1981, she co-founded, along with five other members, the first official women composers gathering in Korea, the Korean Women Composers' Association, which elected her as its first president. She is currently appointed as its honorary president.

While a graduate student at Ewha, Lee obtained the 1st prize at the 4th annual Korean National Music Competition in Composition Division, sponsored by the Korean Ministry of Education (1956). In 1986, she was granted the 8th annual Korean Composition Award, followed by the Korean Musician Award (1994), the Shin Sa Im Dang Award, also known as the Korean Woman of the Year Award (1994), the Presidential Award at the 27th annual Korean Culture and Arts Award (1995), the Grand Prize at the 15th annual Korean Composition Award (1996), the Grand Prix at the Ye Chong Arts and Cultural Award (2000), the City of Seoul Cultural Award (2008) and the 3 o 1 Cultural Award (2009).

Lee has given countless concerts, many of them for charity purposes. In 1984, she gave a charity concert sponsored by the Rotary club at Jakarta, Indonesia. Few years later, in 1993, her concert was held in Paris, France, sponsored this time by the Zonta-Paris Club for the "Children suffering from AIDS" at the Armand Trousseau Hospital in France. From 1998 to 2000, she was elected the Chairman of Seoul Club 1, of Zonta, an internationally acknowledged philanthropic organization.

Young Ja Lee is one of the few Korean women composers named in the Grove Dictionary of Women Composers (1994) and in the New Grove Dictionary of Music and Musicians. Outside her homeland, her music is performed in numerous countries including France, the Netherlands, the United States, Mexico, Indonesia, Australia, Japan, mainland China, Taiwan, and Russia. She is also the author of two books on counterpoint and a thesis on Olivier Messiaen's orchestral works.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Mongolian Throat-Singing: A Master Class
Nanjid Sengedorj, Urtaa Gantulga, Shijirmaa Dorjnyam
Moderator: Robert Beahrs, Graduate Student, Department of Music, UC Berkeley
February 3, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies
Mongolian throat singers, part of "A Mongolia Celebration" (February 2; see separate listing) will be available to discuss their art with members of the Berkeley community.

Registration required; enrollment limited.



Korean Society and Welfare State Theory
Sim Sangjeung
February 3, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Committee for Korea Studies
Sim Sangjeung is a leading progressive politician in South Korea. Sim led an anti-authoritarian and pro-democratization movement against the dictatorship of Park Chung Hee in the late 1970s and, after graduating from university, became involved in the labor movement, first working as a seamstress and then as a labor union organizer.

Sim was one of the organizers of the famous general strike in the Kuro Industrial Districts of 1985, the very first labor strike since the Korean War which also raised political demands, for which she spent 10 years on the run from the state authority. She has played a critical role in the creation of the labor organizations such as the National Council of Trade Unions (NCTU), Korean Confederation of Trade Unions (KCTU), and Korea Metal Workers' Union (KMWU) — South Korea's first industrial union since 1950. Sim served as the General Secretary of the KMWU from 1996–2003.

In 2000, Sim co-founded the first progressive political party in the history of South Korea to have won seats in the National Assembly — the Democratic Labor Party, and was elected to the 17th Congress in 2004. As a member of the Finance and Economy Committee and the Budget and Accounts Committee, Sim received accolades for her critical articulation of the issues related to the South Korea-US Free Trade Agreement, Korean conglomerates such as Samsung, and "irregular" (part-time) employment. She was also selected as the Best Congressperson of the 17th Congress. In 2008, she became a co-chair of the New Progressive Party of Korea (NPPK) and has since focused her energy on formulating progressive agenda for Korean society, especially on issues of education and labor, and is currently pursuing activities to elevate the impact of progressive politics in Korean society and beyond.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Kodo
February 3 – 4, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies, Cal Performances
Kodo In Japan, "Kodo" can mean either "heartbeat" or "children of the drum," and while these versatile performers play a variety of instruments — some huge, some extraordinarily delicate-it is their awesome drums (the massive o-daiko weighs 900 pounds!) that mesmerize the audience. Perfectly in unison, they wield their sticks like expert swordsmen, evoking thrilling images of ancient and modern Japan. Witnessing a performance by Kodo calls up something primal-like plugging in to the pulse of the universe itself.

Tickets required: $22/$30/$38/$46/$52 Available through the Cal Performances Ticket Office at Zellerbach Hall; at (510) 642-9988 to charge by phone; online at www.calperformances.org; and at the door.

Ticket info: Half-price tickets are available for purchase by UC Berkeley students for all performances. Tickets go on sale August 9. Buy tickets online, or by calling Cal Performances Ticket Office at 510-642-9988.



Bonnie C. Wade – An Afternoon with Contemporary Music of Japan: Spring 2011 Colloquia in the Musicologies Series
February 4, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies, Department of Music
Schedule
3:00 — Colloquium in the Musicologies
Professor Bonnie C. Wade
"Agents for the creation of new music for Japanese traditional instruments"

Prof. Wade has been conducting research with Japanese composers for over a decade. This paper is a piece of a larger project on indigenization of Western music in Japanese musical modernity.

4:20 — Coffee break

4:30 — Ko Ishikawa — A performer of traditional and contemporary music for Shô
"Shô, small organ beyond the time"
Ko Ishikawa is a composer and performer on the sho, an instrument of the ancient gagaku ensemble of Japan. He will introduce the instrument and present on contemporary composition for it by both Japanese and Non-Japanese composers.

A wine reception in the Faculty Lounge follows.

Tickets not required



The Activities of Technocrats under Political Party Rule in Japan (1924–32): Why the Cabinet Collapsed in 8 Years in Pre-War Japan
Tsuyoshi Wakatsuki, Postdoctoral Scholar, CJS
Panelist/Discussant: Andrew Barshay, Professor of History, UC Berkeley
February 8, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
政党内閣期 (1924–1932年) における技術官僚
~ なぜ戦前日本の政党内閣は8年間で崩壊したのか ~
Please note that this lecture will be presented in Japanese.
For a detailed description of the talk in Japanese, click on the PDF document below.
To attend, please RSVP to cjs@berkeley.edu to reserve a seat.

RSVP required

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156) for more information.

Download the summary here.



  Coming to Terms with the Nation: Ethnic Classification in Modern China
Thomas S. Mullaney, History, Stanford University
February 9, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image China is a vast nation comprised of hundreds of distinct ethnic communities, each with its own language, history, and culture. Today the government of China recognizes just 56 ethnic nationalities, or minzu, as groups entitled to representation. This controversial new book recounts the history of the most sweeping attempt to sort and categorize the nation's enormous population: the 1954 Ethnic Classification project (minzu shibie). Thomas S. Mullaney draws on recently declassified material and extensive oral histories to describe how the communist government, in power less than a decade, launched this process in ethnically diverse Yunnan. Mullaney shows how the government drew on Republican-era scholarship for conceptual and methodological inspiration as it developed a strategy for identifying minzu and how non-Party-member Chinese ethnologists produced a "scientific" survey that would become the basis for a policy on nationalities. Introduced by Wen-hsin Yeh, Director, Institute of East Asian Studies.

This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Evaluation of Undergraduate Teaching at Higher Education Institutions in China: A Micro Exploration
Jinlin PAN, Visiting Scholar — Center for Studies in Higher Education & Assistant Professor, Changzhou Institute of Technology
February 10, 2011
Center for Studies in H5igher Education, Institute of East Asian Studies
The rapid expansion of higher education in China in the past decade has aroused much concern from the government and the public for the quality of higher education. Under these circumstances, the MOE has initiated series of assessments and evaluations, among which the Evaluation of Undergraduate Teaching is the most influential one. As much has been covered about the evaluation from different macro aspects, this talk will provide a micro view of the evaluation: first, what makes up the system of indicators and what do the indicators indicate? Second, what do institutions do in preparing for the evaluation and how is each institution evaluated? What lessons have the institutions learned from the evaluation? As a full witness of such an evaluation, the lecturer will share his personal experience with the audience.



Acupuncture and Burn Treatment: The Need for Cooperation between Western and Oriental Medicine
Nam-soo Kim
February 10, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
Nam-soo Kim, 96, is an acupuncturist who has opened 42 charity clinics in Korea, China, Japan, Vietnam, and elsewhere. In his long career, he has published 16 books, including Theory and Practice of Moxibustion and Acupuncture. Besides being an authentic acupuncturist who has taught at the Beijing University of Chinese Medicine, he is the only medical professional who practices traditional moxibustion, which is not well known in the West.

He concluded experimental treatment for cancer patients at the General Hospital in Atlanta last year, with outstanding results suggesting the need for both Western and Oriental medicine in fighting cancer.

He is currently seeking to raise awareness of traditional techniques for treating severe burns. He will show how rapidly acupuncture can cure burn damage and reduce scarring.

This talk will be in Korean with English translation.

Several articles and videos about Nam-soo Kim's approach to burn treatment, many with English translations, can be found at http://blog.naver.com/mbcleesangho.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



"Just Sitting"? Dogen's Take on Sutra Reading and Other Conventional Buddhist Practices
T. Griffith Foulk, Sarah Lawrence College
February 10, 2011
Center for Buddhist Studies
Dōgen, founder of the Sōtō School of Zen in Japan, has often been described by modern scholars as a purist who stressed — quoting his teacher Rujing — "just sitting" in meditation, with "no recourse to burning incense prostrations, buddha-mindfulness, repentances, or sutra reading." This statement appears in a number of Dōgen's extant writings, but it is also a fact that his works contain detailed instructions for the very practices that he seems to dismiss as unnecessary. The question is: how to resolve the apparent contradiction in Dōgen 's own stated position on conventional Buddhist practices?

T. Griffith Foulk is Professor of Religion at Sarah Lawrence College and Co-Editor-in-Chief of the Soto Zen Text Project

Contact the Center for Buddhist Studies (buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104) for more information.



Ambivalent Allies: China, Cambodia, and the Politics of Mutual Resistance
Andrew Mertha, Government, Cornell University
February 11, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Southeast Asia Studies, Center for
image In this talk the speaker sketches the relationship between the China and Democratic Kampuchea (DK) between 1975 and 1979, focusing on Chinese foreign aid, infrastructure assistance, and trade. He argues that the Sino-DK relationship was complex and contradictory, reflecting the domestic convulsions of the two countries as it evolved. It was not simply a response to the downturn in Sino-Vietnamese relations; nor was it a function of revolutionary solidarity. Beijing's support for the regime in Phnom Penh was based on international commercial and strategic interests which suggest important continuities with Chinese external aid, assistance, and investment today.

Open to all audiences.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Impressed Dead on Kenzaburo Oe: Short Notes on the Introduction to the Political Study of Constitutions
Jun Watanabe, Visiting Scholar, CJS
Panelist/Discussant: Andrew Barshay, Professor of History, UC Berkeley
February 15, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
大江健三郎における死者 の刻印ー憲法の政治学序説のための覚え書き

Kenzaburo Oe, Nobel Prize winner, is one of the most important intellectuals after World War II in Japan, not only because of his literature, but also because of his political thought as a leading Après-Guerre Democrat. Oe has claimed to defend the ideal of the Japanese Constitution and criticized Japanese politics from this view point since the 1950's.

The Japanese Constitution was established under the occupation of the United States and Allied powers in 1946, and the interpretation of the articles has been a serious political issue in Japanese politics. The most famous example is Article 9, which declares the renunciation of war. Oe especially defends the peace philosophy of this article.

I would like to show three points of his political thought about the Constitution in this lecture.

  1. His core of literature and political thought are built on the impression and interpretation of the War Dead of WWII.
  2. His political thought is representative of public memory about WWII in Japan.
  3. This type of memory and its narrative of WWII has influenced the Japanese policy making process.

Please note that this lecture will be presented in Japanese. RSVP to cjs@berkeley.edu to reserve a seat.

Jun Watanabe, Ph. D is an Associate Professor of Japanese Politics at Mejigakuin University in Tokyo, Japan. He has written two books on Japanese politics. One is an empirical case study of Japanese political system, The Logic of Entrepreneurs and the Structure of the System; Organization and Mobilization as seen in the Process of the Taxation System (Tokyo, Bokutaku-sha, 2000). Another is a theoretical study about Masao Maruyama, the most important Japanese political scientist and political theorist after WW II: Friction and Resonance between Two Paradigms of Political Studies: Masao Maruyama and History of Japanese Political Science since 1945 (Tokyo, Keiso-shobo, 2010).

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156) for more information.



Law, Policy, and Practice on China's Periphery: Minority Areas and Implications for Hong Kong and Taiwan
Pitman Potter, University of British Columbia
February 15, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy
Professor Potter's talk will focus on his recently published book "Law, Policy, and Practice on China's Periphery: Selective Adaptation and Institutional Capacity." He will examine the Chinese government's policies and practices in relationship to the Inner Periphery areas, defined as Tibet, Xinjiang, and Inner Mongolia, and the Outer Periphery areas of Hong Kong and Taiwan, focusing on political authority, socio-cultural relations, and economic development. Successive imperial, republican, and communist governments have struggled to maintain sovereignty over the regions surrounding the great river valleys of China. The peripheries remain very important today, with challenges over national security, access to natural resources, and long-held concerns about relations between ethnic groups continuing to dominate Chinese law, policy and practice in these regions. Prof. Potter's study seeks to build understanding about the current status of China's rule along its continental and maritime peripheries.



China on the Rise: Perspectives on the Future Development of the Mainland, Taiwan and Hong Kong
Otto Lin, Professor, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
February 15, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Studies in Higher Education, Regional Oral History Office
The Chinese Mainland, Hong Kong and Taiwan are distinctly different in size, population, government structure, and social and economic developments. However, all have achieved remarkable economic success in the last thirty years, each becoming significant players in the global community. What are the underlying factors in their achievements? Is the "rise" sustainable in the future? What are the crucial issues of re-unification between Mainland China and Taiwan? The speaker will address these questions by comparing the different economic performances, innovation capacities, innovation systems, systems of higher education, rule of law and cultural and environmental factors. The key issues of future integration will be discussed. The talk will suggest the development of "soft power", based on common cultural values, as a deciding factor.



Otto C.C. Lin: Promoting Education, Innovation, and Chinese Culture in the Era of Globalization
Otto Lin, Professor, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
February 15, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Regional Oral History Office, Center for Studies in Higher Education
The Regional Oral History Office and the Center for Studies of Higher Education invite the campus and community to a reception celebrating the release of "Otto C.C. Lin: Promoting Education, Innovation, and Chinese Culture in the Era of Globalization." Through the generous support of the Kauffman Foundation, the Regional Oral History Office conducted more than forty hours of interviews with Professor Lin over three years, documenting the motivations, strategies, and struggles of the "Taiwan miracle" and Taiwan's transformation from an agricultural economy to a leader in the world of technology innovation. Professor Lin will be present to talk about the interview, and a short video presentation of interview highlights will be shown.

Professor Otto Lin was born in China, and educated in Hong Kong, Taiwan and the USA. He has pursued a career in technology, innovation and education in the Asia Pacific Region. He was President of the Industrial Technology Research Institute (ITRI) in Taiwan and later, Vice President for Research and Development of the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology (HKUST), active contributors to the economic development of the region. His industrial experience included Du Pont and other technology companies in the Region. He also led the development of the Nansha IT Park in Guangzhou to enhance technology cooperation between Hong Kong and the Pearl River Delta. He has received many honors including the Technology Award of the Third World Academy of Science. He is the author of the book "China on the rise: competition of soft power in the globalization era", text in Chinese, by the Hong Kong University Press in 2010. http://www.hkupress.org



Traversing the Historical Resonances of Taiwanese Opera
Tsai Hsin Hsin, Chinese Literature, Taiwan Chengchi University; Fulbright scholar-in-residence, Harvard University
February 16, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
In Mandarin without interpretation.

This talk discusses the influence of Taiwanese opera in various media — radio broadcasts, television, and film — on the evolution of Taiwanese politics, economics, society and culture. Tsai Hsin Hsin has engaged in oral histories of performers, researched playbills, records, and advertisements, and combed through newspapers, gazetteers and other historical documents to develop a multi-faceted picture of the evolution of Taiwanese opera over the past century.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



GeoEngineering Noon Seminar: Landslides induced by 5/12 Wenchuan Earthquake in China: Distribution, Mechanism, and Mitigation Strategies
Runqiu Huang, Professor, Chengdu University of Technology
February 16, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Civil and Environmental Engineering
On May 12, 2008, a devastating M8 earthquake occurred in Wenchuan Province, China. The event affected an area of more than 100,000 square miles and about 30 million people causing more than 70,000 deaths and injuring several hundred thousand more. The earthquake originated in the Longmenshan fault, a northeastern striking thrust fault and resulted in a rupture length of over 180 miles. One of the significant consequences of this event was the extent of extent and scale of landslide events that was induced by the earthquake. This lecture presents a summary of the significant work conducted by researchers from the State key Laboratory for Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment Protection at the Chengdu University of technology under the leadership of Professor Runqiu Huang both immediately after the event as well as subsequent to the initial field studies to study the distribution and mechanisms of the wide-spread large-scale ground movements. Measures to minimize similar consequences following future similar events will also be described.

Professor Runqiu Huang received the Ph.D. degree in Engineering Geology from Chengdu University of Technology in 1988, China. Then he joined the engineering geology group in the university and was engaged in high rock slope stability and landslide research. He has wide research interests including landslide inventory, mechanisms of large scale landslides, risk assessment and risk control of geohazards, and rock mechanics properties in high geo-stress. In recent years he has focused on the high rock slope stability research and the mechanism of large-scale catastrophic landslides, especially the study of landslides induced by 5/12 Wenchuan earthquake in China. He is currently director of the State Key Laboratory of Geohazard Prevention and Geoenvironment Protection, the Vice-President of Chengdu University of Technology, and the Vice-President of International Association of Engineering Geology and the Environment (IAEG), the President of the Chinese Engineering Geology Society, and the council member of the Chinese Society for Rock Mechanics and Engineering. In his professional career he received a number of important academic awards from governments and organizations, including the Fork Yin-Tong Award in 1998, the Outstanding Youth Research Foundation Award of China in 1995, China Distinguished Talent Award in 2002, the highest Science and Technology Award of Sichuan Province in 2003, the First Class Award of National Science and Technology Achievements in 2005, Li Si-Guang Geological Scientific Award and the He-Liang-He-Li Science and Technology Progress Award in 2007. He has authored/co-authored more than 200 research articles in referenced journals and international conference proceedings, book chapters and textbooks.



  Family and State in Modern China
Joseph W. Esherick, UCSD and Director, University of California EAP Beijing Study Center, Peking University
February 16, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image In his new book, "Ancestral Leaves," Joseph W. Esherick tells the story of one family through a tumultuous period of Chinese history. Through the lives of the Ye ("leaves" in Chinese) family members, we see the human dimensions of the grand narrative of modern China: the vast and destructive rebellions of the nineteenth century, the economic growth and social change of the Republican Era, the Japanese invasion in World War II, and the Cultural Revolution under the Chinese Communists. This is a story of social and political change told through family history, and the implications for our understanding of the relationship between the family and the state in modern Chinese history. Introduced by Alex Cook, History, UC Berkeley. This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Buddhism, Medicine and the Everyday World: Issues around Religion and Science in Tibetan Intellectual History: 3rd Annual Khyentse Lecture
Janet Gyatso, Harvard Divinity School
February 17, 2011
Center for Buddhist Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
By the 12th century A.D. academically based medical science in Tibet had already developed an intellectual and institutional trajectory that was separate from that of Buddhism, even though it was frequently taught at schools that were part of Buddhist monasteries. Looking at the sites of disjuncture — as well as the overlap — between Buddhist systems of knowledge and those of medicine helps us to appreciate the ways that religion interacted with the everyday world of people in traditional Tibet. While on the one hand medicine posed an epistemic challenge to Buddhism, the relation between the two systems was close enough for it also to serve as the principal example of Buddhist influence in human culture more generally in Tibet. This talk will look closely at several moments in Tibetan history when the two came into conflict, and how such conflicts were resolved.

Janet Gyatso is a specialist in Buddhist studies with concentration on Tibetan and South Asian cultural history. Her books include Apparitions of the Self: The Secret Autobiographies of a Tibetan Visionary; In the Mirror of Memory: Reflections on Mindfulness and Remembrance in Indian and Tibetan Buddhism; and Women of Tibet. Her current book project is an intellectual history of traditional medical science in Tibet, and raises questions about early modernity and disjunctures between religious and scientific epistemologies. She has also been writing on conceptions of sex and gender in Buddhist monasticism, and on the current female ordination movement in Buddhism. Previous topics of her scholarship have included visionary revelation in Buddhism; issues concerning lineage, memory, and authorship; philosophical questions on the status of experience; and autobiographical writing in Tibet. Gyatso was president of the International Association of Tibetan Studies from 2000 to 2006, and is now co-chair of the Buddhism Section of the American Academy of Religion.

Contact the Center for Buddhist Studies (buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104) for more information.



Conference: Tourism Imaginaries/Imaginaires touristiques
February 18–20, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Tourism Studies Working Group, UC Berkeley, Institut de Recherche et d'Études Supérieures du Tourisme, Université Paris 1 Panthéon-Sorbonne
Imaginaries of place, destination, and travel are increasingly produced/consumed by diverse populations around the globe through expanding forms of media and opportunities for travel. A range of players collaboratively produces spatial imaginaries (the potential power of place as a tourist destination) in touristic systems.

The tourist imaginary, as a nexus of social practices through which individuals and groups intersect to establish a place as a credible destination, has yet to be fully explored or defined. We have organized this conference with the goal of deepening knowledge of, and advancing research methods and scholarship towards a more complete understanding of the tourist imaginary.

Conference papers not only conceive the imaginary to be a fixed space at an exact location, but also take into account the multiplicity of articulations which exist in all directions (as well as before and after) in the production of these representations, taking into account both cultural/institutional and personal perspectives.

Open to all audiences.



Symposium on Modern Korean History
Todd Henry, UC San Diego; Kyung Moon Hwang, University of Southern California; Namhee Lee, UCLA; Yumi Moon, Stanford University; Hwasook Nam, University of Washington; Albert Park, Claremont McKenna; Serk Bae Suh, UC Irvine; Ken Wells, UC Berkeley
February 18–19, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Department of History
The Center for Korean Studies presents a two-day symposium on modern Korean history, co-sponsored by the Department of History and the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures. This event brings together scholars of modern Korea based in the western U.S. to share papers and discussion on the research they are engaged in, particularly in relation to historiographical or methodological challenges. Presentations focus on various political, social, cultural, and literary topics spanning the entire twentieth century.

Friday, February 18
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall

9:15 am — Kyung Moon Hwang (University of Southern California): "Developmentalism and the Korean State in the Early 20th Centu
10:00 am — Response by Namhee Lee

10:40 am — Morning Break

11:00 am — Todd Henry (UC San Diego): "Rethinking the Late Colonial Period: Time-Space Compression in Wartime Korea"
11:45 am — Response by Hwasook Nam

12:30 pm — Lunch

1:45 pm — Serk Bae Suh (UC Irvine): "Translation and its Postcolonial Discontents: The Postwar Controversy over Tôma Seita's Reading of Kim Soun's Japanese Translations of Korean Poetry"
2:30 pm — Response by Kyung Moon Hwang

3:15 pm — Afternoon Break

3:30 pm — Yumi Moon (Stanford University): "Hollywood, Utopia, and Hypocrisy: Perceptions of America in Wartime Colonial Korea"
4:15 pm — Response by Albert Park

5:00 pm — Concluding Discussion

Saturday, February 19
Location: IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor

9:15 am — Albert Park (Claremont McKenna): "Overcoming the Rage of Modernity: Space, Trust and Danish Cooperative Living in 1920s and 1930s Colonial Korea"
10:00 am — Response by Ken Wells

10:45 am — Morning Break

11:00 am — Hwasook Nam (University of Washington): "Progressives and Labor: A Forgotten Alliance in 1960s South Korea"
11:45 am — Response by Serk Bae Suh

12:30 pm — Lunch

1:45 pm — Namhee Lee (UCLA): "Turning Past to History: Nostalgia and Redemption in the 'Park Chung Hee Syndrome'"
2:30 pm — Response by Todd Henry

3:15 pm — Afternoon Break

3:30 pm — Ken Wells (UC Berkeley): "Representation or Event? A Family History in Modern Korea"
4:15 pm — Response by Yumi Moon

5:00 pm — Concluding Discussion

Abstracts
Todd Henry: "Rethinking the Late Colonial Period: Time-Space Compression in Wartime Korea"
This paper will assess the position of Korea and Koreans in Japan's wartime empire (1937–45) – a period examined in terms of its dramatic transformations in the geopolitical, cultural, and ethnic boundaries of the empire itself. The paper uses the numerous celebrations of 1940 (commemorating the 2600th anniversary of the mythical founding of the Imperial house) as the focal point for demonstrating the milieu of "time-space compression." Rather than analyzing this milieu in terms of the universalizing logic of capitalism, I will, instead, suggest that time-space compression proceeded under the culturalist, if no less modern, rubric of "imperialization" (K: hwangminhwa; J: kôminka) – the late colonial project aimed at transforming the subjectivities of colonized Koreans into ones approximating those of their "loyal" Japanese counterparts. As performative exercises in co-production, these trans-imperial celebrations – Shintô festivities, a commemorative exposition, and educational tours, for example – brought together the governmentality of the wartime state and the everyday lives of Koreans in unprecedented ways, thereby redrawing the imagined boundaries of late colonial selfhood and collective affiliations.

Kyung Moon Hwang: "Developmentalism and the Korean State in the Early 20th Century"

Namhee Lee: "Turning Past to History: Nostalgia and Redemption in the 'Park Chung Hee Syndrome'"

Yumi Moon: "Hollywood, Utopia, and Hypocrisy: Perceptions of America in Wartime Colonial Korea"

Hwasook Nam: "Progressives and Labor: A Forgotten Alliance in 1960s South Korea"
Using an unusual case of a democratic and militant shipbuilding union in 1960s South Korea as a window on society, this paper explores the politics and ethos of the first decade of Park Chung Hee's rule. What made it possible for workers at the Korea Shipbuilding and Engineering Corporation (KSEC) in Pusan to build a powerful trade union under authoritarian rule following the military coup d'état of May 1961? Pronounced public support for the union in the region, dense links between the unionists and local progressives, and the surprisingly optimistic and positive expectations of the military government that shipyard workers exhibited in this period all call our attention to the still quite fluid and open terrain of South Korean politics before the advent of the full-blown authoritarianism of the Yushin period of the 1970s. These dynamic aspects of the 1960s, when elements of both elites and non-elites engaged themselves in an energetic search for the best answers to major postcolonial questions of democracy, development, and unification, is mostly hidden from view today, overwhelmed by the power of the minju (democratic) discourse of the democracy movement that became dominant in social movements and academia over the 1980s and 1990s. Excavating the forgotten alliance between an important union and the progressives surrounding it thus opens a space for an alternative imagining of South Korean development and democratization.

Albert Park: "Overcoming the Rage of Modernity: Space, Trust and Danish Cooperative Living in 1920s and 1930s Colonial Korea"
This article examines the history of the construction of utopian agrarian communities through Danish-style cooperatives in Korea during the Japanese colonial period. Believing that the cooperative system played a pivotal role in turning Denmark into a model agrarian nation-state, the Young Men's Christian Association (YMCA) prominently featured a foreign socio-economic mode, the Danish Cooperative Model, in their campaign to reconstruct peasant livelihoods that had been devastated by capitalist modernity, especially after the start of the Great Depression. They saw the cooperative as a powerful organizing mechanism that collectively pooled peasant labor and resources in order to strengthen their economic power and cultivate a community based on trusting relationships. By fostering economic stability and social solidarity, they thought cooperatives at the local level cultivated the material and ideological security needed to survive in the modern world and could provide the "ontological security" peasants needed to enjoy living in a changing present.

Serk Bae Suh: "Translation and its Postcolonial Discontents: The Postwar Controversy over Tôma Seita's Reading of Kim Soun's Japanese Translations of Korean Poetry"

Ken Wells: "Representation or Event? A Family History in Modern Korea"
In this paper, I will examine the records of a Korean family, whose members were implicated in and to some degree contributed to some of the major historical developments and phenomena that we associate with the Korean peninsula in the 20th century. This family's experience not only reflects both the domestic strands of the nation's division and the global tensions that framed it, but is also an example of the complex and highly particular consequences fleshed out in individual lives of a wide-ranging sea of change that affected the world from the middle of the 20th century. The records include court records, two biographies, and one autobiography, as well as many hours of taped interviews of family members. These records are difficult to fit within precise boundaries. Indeed, they transgress boundaries not only of event and representation but also of individual experience and world-historical significance, and compel us to consider whether our appreciation of history is the poorer for putting such records in the shadows or distant background of our historical narratives.

Open to all audiences.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Lenovo's Successful Acquisition of IBM PC: The First of Its Kind among Chinese Companies
Chairman LIU Chuanzhi, Lenovo
February 18, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image In 2005, Lenovo, China's leading computer manufacturer, purchased IBM PC for $1.75 billion and is currently the world's fourth-largest computer company by sales. The acquisition marked China's entry into the realm of multinational firms with a global presence. LIU Chuanzhi, Chairman and Founder of Lenovo and one of Business Week's "Top 40 Most Powerful People in China" (2009), will visit campus to discuss Lenovo's globalization through this acquisition, the challenges it posed and Lenovo's solutions. Liu will also share his vision for Lenovo moving forward. Most recently, Liu was one of four Chinese entrepreneurs who accompanied Chinese President Hu Jintao during his recent visit to the United States.

Open to all audiences.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Center for Chinese Studies Chinese New Year Banquet
February 18, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
The Faculty and Staff of the Center for Chinese Studies invite you to join us for a Chinese New Year Banquet, celebrating the Year of the Rabbit. Fun and friends! Fabulous door prizes! Delicious food!

$15 students & staff/$30 all others

RSVP and payment required by February 10.
Specify vegetarian / non-vegetarian.
Friends / Spouses / Children welcome.

Checks, made payable to UC Regents, can be sent to:
Center for Chinese Studies
2223 Fulton St. Room 503
Berkeley, CA 94720-2328

Make reservations by February 12 by calling or emailing the Center for Chinese Studies at 510-643-6322, or ccs@berkeley.edu.



  Red Lights: The Lives of Sex Workers in Postsocialist China
Tiantian Zheng, Anthropology, SUNY-Cortland
February 23, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image In China today, sex work cannot be untangled from the phenomenon of rural–urban migration, the entertainment industry, and state power. In her book, Red Lights, Tiantian Zheng highlights the urban karaoke bar as the locus at which these three factors intersect and provides a rich account of the lives of karaoke hostesses—a career whose name disguises the sex work and minimizes the surprising influence these women often have as power brokers.

Zheng embarked on two years of intensely embedded ethnographic fieldwork in her birthplace, Dalian, a large northeastern Chinese seaport of over six million people. During this time, Zheng lived and worked with a group of hostesses in a karaoke bar, facing many of the same dangers that they did and forming strong, intimate bonds with them. The result is an especially engaging, moving story of young, rural women struggling to find meaning, develop a modern and autonomous identity, and, ultimately, survive within an oppressively patriarchal state system.

Moving from her case studies to broader theories of sex, gender, and power, Zheng connects a growth in capitalist entrepreneurialism to the emergence of an urban sex industry, brilliantly illuminating the ways in which hostesses, their clients, and the state are mutually created in postsocialist China. Introduced by Xin Liu, Professor of Anthropology, UC Berkeley.

This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Education, Work, and Marriage among Japanese Youth
Hiroshi Ishida, Professor of Sociology, University of Tokyo
February 24, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
This presentation will provide a macro picture of changes and continuities in three domains affecting the life chances of Japanese youth: education, work, and marriage. In particular, it focuses on two critical transitions experienced by the young people: the transition from school to work and the transition from single to married life.

By examining the process of job search and of partner search, the presentation highlights that Japanese youth do not possess equal chances of access to entry into prestigious jobs and solid marriage prospects. The unequal access to resources and rewards at earlier life stages tends to affect their later life chances, and this presentation examines how the cumulative effects of unequal access shape opportunities for Japanese over the longer life course.

Hiroshi Ishida is Professor of Sociology at the Institute of Social Sciences, University of Tokyo. He received his Ph.D. in sociology from Harvard University. After conducting post-doctoral research at Nuffield College and St. Antony's College, University of Oxford, he held teaching positions at Columbia University before joining the University of Tokyo. He was also a Visiting Professor of Sociology and a Visiting Research Scientist at the University of Michigan.

His research interests include comparative social stratification, school-to-work transition, and health inequality. He is the author of Social Mobility in Contemporary Japan (Macmillan Press and Stanford University Press) and the co-editor of Social Class in Contemporary Japan (Routledge). He served as the editor-in-chief of Social Science Japan Journal, published by Oxford University Press, and is the president-elect of the Japanese Association for Mathematical Sociology. He currently directs the Japanese Life Course Panel Survey funded by the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and examines the life-course transition among the Japanese youth.

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415) for more information.



Panel Discussion: Central Asia and China: Perspectives on Xinjiang
February 25, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Silk Road Initiative
This panel seeks to highlight the cross-border and global transnational forces having an impact on the current political, cultural, and social landscape in Xinjiang.

Participants:
Dru C. Gladney, Ph.D, Pomona State University
Sanjyot Mehendale, Ph.D, UC Berkeley
Haiyun Ma, Ph.D, Xinjiang Review
Nury Turkel, J.D, Former President Uyghur American Association
Dolkun Kamberi, Ph.D, Radio Free Asia



World Craft: The Business and Culture of Gaming in East Asia
Graham Candy, University of Toronto; Jenova Chen, Thatgamecompany; Michael Craig, UC Berkeley; Mia Consalvo, MIT; Charles Huang, Guitar Hero Corp.; Rachael Hutchinson, University of Delaware; Holin Lin, National Taiwan University; Petrus Liu, Cornell University; Yongjae Min, Nexon; Bonnie Nardi, UC Irvine; Lisa Nakamura, University of Illinois; Haruki Satomi, SEGA; Teri Silvio, Academia Sinica; Constance Steinkuehler, University of Wisconsin, Madison; Xiao Qiang, UC Berkeley
February, 25–26, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Berkeley Center for New Media, Cultural Division, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in San Francisco, The Shorenstein Foundation
This conference will examine how video games and video gaming, online and offline, are reconfiguring media landscapes and transforming social space throughout East Asia. Each panel will bring together developers and scholars working in multiple disciplines to address East Asia's role in the global division of labor of the gaming world. How can we account for the phenomenon and negative perceptions of "Chinese gold-farming" in the MMORPG community, or the distinctive place of Korea in the economy of game production? What of distinctively East Asian cultures of gaming, from proprietary game consoles, to the prevalence of the internet café and other mediated urban spaces, as well as the transregional circulation of the otaku/ zhainan figure in popular culture? What are the politics of gaming in East Asia, and how might they differ from other locations?

By the same token, how might culture, race, and geography be seen as a component of game design and game play, both within and outside of East Asia? How do globally popular games such as the Civilization series or Ages of Empire place Asia in the world? How are East Asian cultures, fantasmic or not, evoked by way of spatial renderings, movement, music and sound, or narrative and discursive elements drawn from other, sometimes older, media, such as landscape painting, martial arts cinema, manga, and Chinese opera? How do players negotiate these spaces, and what possibilities exist for the crafting of alternative worlds?

Timed to coincide with the 2011 Game Developer's Conference across the Bay in San Francisco, this much more intimately scaled meeting will not only showcase the vital significance of Asian markets and modalities, but also provide a space in which gaming theory can grapple with the complexities of East Asian game worlds.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.

See http://ieas.berkeley.edu/events/2011.02.25w.html for the full conference agenda.



The Cinematographic Principles and the Ideogram: Chinese Concepts in the Early Modernist Cinema
Zoran Skrobanovic, Oriental Languages, University of Belgrade
Wednesday, March 2, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image This talk discusses the Chinese influences that underlie some of the approaches in the early Modernist cinema at the time when film was becoming true art. Some authors, like S.M. Eisenstein, compared the principles of structuring the abstract meanings in Chinese ideogram with combining of depictive cadres into intellectual contexts and sequences in a film. The inspiration Eisenstein found in Chinese written language enabled him to create his theories of progressive, associative montage, and intellectual film. It is a sort of "affective film-thinking", a very form of communication of movement in images, from the image to thought, from the percept to the concept. These early cinematographic interpretations of Chinese characters continue to be a constant source of inspiration not only for the film-thinkers and authors, but for some philosophers and media interpreters as well. Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



  Paths to Development in Asia: South Korea, Vietnam, China, and Indonesia
Tuong Vu, Political Science, University of Oregon Lecture
March 2, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies
image Why have some states in the developing world been more successful at facilitating industrialization than others? Challenging theories that privilege industrial policy and colonial legacies, this comparison of six Asian cases focuses on state structure and the politics of state formation, arguing that a cohesive state structure is as important to developmental success as effective industrial policy. Introduced by Peter Zinoman, Associate Professor, History, UC Berkeley.

This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.
 




Formation and Reformation of War Memory Inside and Outside Japan: Reconsidering "Memory" as a Critical Tool
Mitsuhiro Fujimaki, Center for Global Studies, University of Shizuoka
Takahito Sawada, Center for Global Studies, University of Shizuoka
Charles Burress, Journalist
Kerry Shannon, Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
Keiko Yamanaka, Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley
Thursday, March 3, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Global Studies, University of Shizuoka
Memory has been a critical term for criticism and cultural studies/postcolonialism the past twenty years. Some memory has transgressed borders inciting controversy between nations and peoples, while others remain insulated in their places of origin. Why has this happened?

These days, history is often conflated with memory, though these two related phenomena are far from synonymous. At centers of memory, such as museums and monuments, personal memoirs and other documents inform the production of history. This trend is as if history almost takes over memory in the name of history.

Further, the construction of popular memory often results from the selective amalgamation of a number of diverse histories. In this context, this workshop pays attention to the ongoing trend at places of memory and reconsiders possibilities of "memory" as a recalcitrant agency to seamless historical orchestration.

PROGRAM

Keiko Yamanaka, Ethnic Studies, University of California, Berkeley, Moderator

Introduction
Steven Vogel, Director, Center for Japanese Studies, University of California, Berkeley
Keiko Nakayama, Chair, Center for Global Studies, University of Shizuoka

Presentations
Mitsuhiro Fujimaki, Center for Global Studies, University of Shizuoka, On Visibility of National Trauma at Pearl Harbor: Film Representation of Sinking Vessels and Bombs at the New Visitor Center Museum.

Takahito Sawada, Center for Global Studies, University of Shizuoka, A Frontline for War Memory in Northern Australia: Expanding Traumatic Surveillance over Imaginary Enemies and Transforming National History after the Pacific War

Charles Burress, Journalist, Can the Messenger Be Trusted? The Press and East Asia's Memory Wars

Kerry Shannon, Asian Studies, University of California, Berkeley, Discussant

Open to all audiences.

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156) for more information.



Mobile Horizons: Interactions Across the Taiwan Strait
Su Chi, Presidential Advisor
Tien Hung-mao, National Institute for Policy Research
Yan Xuetong, Tsinghua University, Beijing
Nancy Bernkopf Tucker, Georgetown University
March 4 – 5, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies
With the recent overtures between China and Taiwan, we see the fruition of developments long in the making, as business, familial, religious, and cultural ties have developed between the two despite official posturing. The culmination of a three-year research project, this conference explores these networks, their development, and assesses the future for Taiwan and China.

Speakers include Lowell Dittmer (UC Berkeley), Penny Edwards (UC Berkeley), Sara Friedman (University of Indiana), Tom Gold (UC Berkeley), Micah Muscolino (Georgetown University), Shelley Rigger (Davidson College), Michael Szonyi (Harvard University), Robert Weller (Boston University), Timothy Weston (University of Colorado), Yu-shan Wu (Academia Sinica), and Wen-hsin Yeh (UC Berkeley).

Download the "Mobile Horizons" Conference Program here.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Reassessing Financial Reform in South Korea: Politics of the Credit Card Crisis in 2003 and Its Aftermath
Heon Joo Jung, Indiana University, Bloomington
March 4, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
Conventional wisdom suggests that South Korea's financial reform, following the acute economic crisis in 1997, was successful due to its swift implementation: strong political leadership and international pressure from the IMF that broke a deadlock over reform. As finance, or state control of financial flows, had been the key to understanding of South Korean development, post-1997 financial reform, if successful, was expected to bring fundamental changes in "Korea, Inc." Despite this initial success, the credit card boom and bust in the early 2000s that created millions of credit delinquents clearly demonstrate that post-reform financial regulatory system failed to achieve its primary goal. Why did South Korea experience another financial crisis in 2003 despite initial success of financial reform?

This paper investigates how newly-adopted international best practices that had initially increased competition and economic performance of credit card industry failed to function properly eventually. More specifically, it examines the political logic of the credit card crisis in 2003 by taking seriously how the short presidential cycle in Korea due to five-year single-term presidency, combined with a strong bureaucracy, created a cyclical process of presidential reform initiatives followed by their reliance on bureaucratic ideas and capacities to manage challenges in the implementation phase. This pattern of bargaining between political leadership and bureaucrats shows how initial success in recovering from the crisis lost its momentum for deeper and sustained reforms. This political logic of credit card boom and bust sheds light on the nature and consequence of neo-liberal reforms since the 1997 crisis in Korea.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Encountering Sexual Aliens: State Sovereignty and the Heteronormative Principle on the Margins of Taiwan
Antonia Chao, Sociology, Tunghai University, Taiwan
March 7, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies: Institute of East Asian Studies
As many scholars of migration studies have shown in their works, the increasingly complicated patterns of border-crossing activities in the contemporary age of globalization have posed a grave challenge to the feasibility of the nation-state model conventionally held by both the sending and receiving countries. Some have also highlighted the fact that gender politics plays a significant, while often hidden, role in shaping the phenomenon that is recognized generally as "the feminization of globalization."

Based on ethnographic research conducted on Taiwan's three crucial sites of national borders, this talk mines the intersections between border control, state sovereignty, national belonging and "perverted sexualities". Three forms of subjects whose trans-migratory acts violate the principle of biological and heterosexual reproduction that upholds the meanings, practices and institutions of border control. The normalizing regulations imposed upon these subjects, be they "lived" or "imaginary," highlight three corresponding sites of bio-political governance at once outside of, within, and right along the borders of Taiwan's geographical territories.

While all are in keeping with the agenda of heteronormativity, these sites are situated in a distinct circuit of transnational traffic of sexualities and thus requires different modes of governance. Intentionally or coincidentally, these modes of governance coordinate with each other in helping construct a nation whose sovereignty has been in perpetual crisis within the international political community.

Introduced by Pheng Cheah, Professor of Rhetoric.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



American Economic Policy toward Japan After the 1990s: Its Influence on Japanese Society
1990年代以降におけるアメリカの対日政策―その日本社会への影響―
Mitsuyoshi Arai, Visiting Scholar, CJS
Steve Vogel, Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley
March 8, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
image Most observers consider Japan-U.S. economic friction to have been settled after the middle of the 1990's. But this is because the U.S. has deliberately changed its economic strategy toward Japan from hard-line policies to smart effective policies.

Due to the swelling trade deficit and falling into debtor nation status, the U.S. changed its target from voluntary export restraint on individual items to market liberalization, currency strategy and internal structural reforms. Japan changed its social economic structure drastically under pressure from the U.S. As a result, Japan, in addition to economic decline, has fallen into a crisis where it might lose even finance, insurance, health care (universal health insurance), and its unique culture. Accordingly, I reexamine influences and meanings of the U.S. strategy toward Japan.

一般に日米経済摩擦は1990年代半ば以降には沈静化したと見なされている。しかし、それはアメリカが対日経済戦略を強硬な政策から巧妙で効果的な政策に変更するに至ったからである。貿易赤字の膨張と債務国への転落によって、米国の対日経済戦略は個別品目の輸出自主規制から市場開放、通貨戦略、日本社会の構造改革を駆使したものへと洗練されていった。日本は米国のなすがままにその社会経済構造を破壊することになった。その結果、経済的衰退に加えて、日本は金融、保険、医療(皆保険)や固有の文化さえも失いかねない危機に陥っている。そこで、私は米国の対日戦略の影響と意味を再検討したい。

*Please note that this lecture will be presented in Japanese. RSVP to cjs@berkeley.edu or 510-642-3156 to attend.

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156) for more information.



The Daxue: What's So "Great" about It? And the Zhongyong: What Does It Mean? – A Reconsideration of the Core Arguments of the Latter Two Formulations of the "Four Books" Vision
Andrew Plaks, Professor Emeritus, Chinese Literature, Princeton University
March 9, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image The texts of the Daxue and the Zhongyong are so central to the articulation of 'classical' Confucian teachings that they have been expounded and memorized — and subjected to very extensive exegetical readings — for centuries, as virtually sacred scripture. But aside from inexhaustible disputation regarding the meaning of key terms and concepts in the works, and debates regarding their authorship and intellectual lineage in late-imperial and modern scholarship, they have not often been analysed as self-contained, integral philosophical treatises in their own right. In this talk, the speaker will contend that these canonic formulations of the 'Four Books' vision do not reflect an inconsistent melange of Warring States and early Han thought, but rather constitute a carefully constructed set of interlocking arguments on the practical and theoretical core of Confucian self-realization.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Current Issues and Events in Hong Kong
David O'Rear, Chief Economist, Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce
March 10, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image Asia's financial centers largely ignored the global financial crisis, but felt the full brunt of the worst collapse in global trade since the war. Yet, pressure from the OECD and other multilateral organizations to impose greater regulation on the Special Administrative Region's traditionally free-wheeling business and financial milieu, and rising demands for greater popular representation in politics are raising concerns about Hong Kong's competitiveness.

David O'Rear, Chief Economist of the Hong Kong General Chamber of Commerce, will review the post-Handover era and recent developments in politics, economics and the business environment. A Cal grad (Political Science BA, '80 and Asian Studies MA '83), Mr. O'Rear has spent nearly 30 years in the Far East, including the past 27 in Hong Kong.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Deployment, Bases, and the US Military in Movement: Imagining Japan and the Self through Race and Sex
Mitzi Uehara Carter, Anthropology
Fredrick Cloyd, California Institute of Integral Studies, Anthropology
March 10, 2011
Center for Race and Gender, Center for Chinese Studies
My paper will explore how U.S. military personnel and their families, currently or formerly based in Okinawa (re)create and circulate narratives of Okinawa within military communities both in and outside Okinawa. I will focus on how those narratives are shaped against their own identities as US soldiers, veterans, racialized/gendered citizens, spouses, and tourists within Okinawa. Michael Taussig described the cultural productions of fear and the processes of sustaining Otherness in his work on colonial Colombia as a mix of "Indian understandings of white understandings of Indians to white understandings of Indian understandings of whites." Likewise, I argue that Okinawan militarized and transnational space is a mix of military understandings of Okinawan understandings of US/mainland Japanese understandings to Okinawan understandings of military understandings of Okinawans.

By paying close ethnographic and archival attention to how narratives of Okinawa circulate within military circles online, in military memoirs, through interviews with various generations of soldiers and their families in transnational spaces, I argue that one can begin to make sense of the patterns and ruptures in the narratives (repeating and singular) about Okinawa as a racialized and gendered space. Many of the anthropological texts on contemporary Okinawa usually address structural violence and capitalist-driven globalization but they also tend to leave out fieldwork of the military within Okinawa itself, ignoring how very complex maneuverings of race, gender, class, and other factors get imbricated into the local, national and global imaginings of Okinawan identity politics. The contemporary U.S. military has been categorized under the rubric of colonialism but conceptualizing it and the spaces they occupy within other epistemic framworks as well (such as transnational studies, performance studies, and new racial studies) can produce a more textured understanding of how the routes of various types of Orientalisms and the uneven sustenance of Nihonjinron within Okinawa are paved.

My dissertation research focuses on how these moving narratives are projected and how they are embedded and mapped onto discourses of modernity and the fluctuating understandings of national security. This presentation will point to some of my general findings thus far, focusing on the framing of Okinawan difference. For instance, I argue that local Okinawan difference from mainland Japan is emphasized and celebrated within military literature and welcome videos/blogs about Okinawa for military newcomers to Okinawa, a long used political and cultural tactic that was so effectively encouraged and orchestrated by US military administrators directly following WWII to try to quiet Okinawan dissent and slow the popular momentum to revert to mainland Japan. However, when military and Okinawan relations are enflamed, the framing of difference is erased and the discourse shifts to a more global scale and fits in more with the US-Japan power bloc configuration of power.

Being a Black MP in Postwar Japan: Memory and Identity through Resistance and Accommodation as a Subaltern Occupier
Fredrick Cloyd, California Institute of Integral Studies, Anthropology

The positioning of the US as a victorious occupier over the subordinate and pliant people of Japan as the defeated was a carefully choreographed affair after WWII with its precursors in imperialism, colonialism, and neo-liberal capitalist expansionisms. In Japan and Okinawa, during and following the official occupation, steady anti-US violence by the Japanese was barred from being reported in the strictly controlled military and civilian media while the different racial groups in the Allied and US military were also living in violent relations with one another on and off bases in Japan, Okinawa and Korea. In this atmosphere of the occupation, my father re-imagined himself from poor African-American man to occupying military police. My mother wanted desperately to escape the ruins of Japan, both imaginatively and literally. In researching for a book on my family's life and legacies, in thinking/writing nation, culture and race — colliding together through war and re(de)-construction, how has my father viewed himself through the lens of race and nation/husband and father? What becomes prioritized? What becomes linked with frames and thoughts previously unrelated? What becomes new forms of dominance and resistance that continue or resist certain forms of justice and survival?



Jizō's Many Japanese Faces: Two Apocryphal Sutras and Their Influence
Sarah Horton, Bukkyō Dendō Kyōkai
March 10, 2011
Center for Buddhist Studies
Jizō bodhisattva is everywhere in modern Japan: the edge of town, the street corner, the playground, next to the rice field, and of course in temples. He is the most commonly depicted deity, his images outnumbering those of even Kannon bodhisattva. Jizō has played a central role in Japanese religion since the eleventh century. Closely associated with both life and death, his duties include guarding children at play as well as rescuing living beings who have fallen into hell. Although many aspects of the Japanese forms of Jizō find their origin directly in China, the Enmei Jizō kyō (Longevity Jizō Sutra) and the Jizōbosatsu hosshin in'en jūō kyō (Sutra on the Bodhisattva Jizō's Aspiration for Enlightment and on the Ten Kings), two apocryphal sutras that were produced in Japan around the twelfth century, contain ideas that form the basis for many of the unique features of Jizō worship in Japan today. Such features include the Six Jizōs Pilgrimage that is undertaken every August in Kyoto, the Enmei Jizō statues that are found throughout the country on the grounds of countless temples, and the funereal belief in the thirteen buddhas who care for the deceased. These two sutras successfully granted scriptural authority to nascent Japanese ideas concerning Jizō's multiple and complex roles and laid the groundwork for their future development.

Sarah Horton received her Ph.D. from Yale and has taught at the University of Colorado, Macalester College, and Sarah Lawrence College. She is the author of Living Buddhist Statues in Early Medieval and Modern Japan, and "Mukaeko, Rehearsals for the Deathbed," in Death and the Afterlife in Japanese Buddhism, as well as several scholarly articles. She has conducted research as a visiting scholar at Ryūkoku University and ōtani University in Kyoto, and currently works for the Bukkyō Dendō Kyōkai. Her research interests include Tendai Pure Land Buddhism, religion and material culture, and Japanese Buddhist poetry.

Contact the Center for Buddhist Studies (buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104) for more information.



Beijing Besieged: Wang Jiuliang's Urban Ecology Unhinged
March 10 – June 10, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Department of Geography, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center of Global Metropolitan Studies
While China's rise, and its immense challenges, commands world attention, less light has been shed upon the colossal problem of waste generated by a burgeoning population, expanding industry, and rapacious urban growth. Photographer Wang Jiuliang turns his lens upon the grim spectacle of garbage, excrement, refuse, and wreckage heaped upon the landscape that surrounds China's mega-metropolis, Beijing. Eking out a precarious and hazardous living within are the scavengers, mostly rural migrants, who struggle to maintain familial and cultural structures amid the bleakest of occupations. In this exhibit we see the desecration of once-vital farmlands and rivers in the shadow of the new China's gleaming cities and planes and super-trains; the unholy cycle of construction's consumption and waste, and poignant images of the daily lives of the scavengers who toil at their own peril.

A symposium in conjunction with this exhibit, "The City Besieged by Garbage: Politics of Waste Production and Distribution in Beijing," and screening of Wang Jiuliang's documentary film "Beijing Besieged by Waste," will be held on Monday, April 11. An Artist's Talk with photographer Wang Jiuliang will be held on Tuesday, April 12, at 4 p.m.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.

See an interview with Wang Jiuliang in a video in guardian.co.uk about the on the growing problem of domestic waste on the edge of China's capital.

Click here to go to the event website.



Ryukoku Symposium — Buddhism and Culture in Japan
March 11–12, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies, Ryukoku University
Schedule

March 11, 2011

1pm 開会の言葉 桂 紹隆 (龍谷大学アジア仏教文化センター長)

[研究発表]

1:15pm 那須英勝 (龍谷大学)「藤原信実編『今物語』に語られる日本中世の僧侶の暮らし」

2:15pm 平田厚志 (龍谷大学)「近世仏教史研究の現状と課題」

March 12, 2011

10am 日下幸男「説教と釈教和歌集」(龍谷大学)

11am Michael Como 「夢と聖徳太子信仰」 (コロンビア大学)

12–2pm Lunch Break

2pm 日野拓也「密教儀礼と本覚思想」(コロンビア大学)

3pm Regan Murphy 「近世仏教と国学の関係を見直す」 (CJS)

- 閉会の言葉

*Please note that this conference will be in Japanese. RSVP to cjs@berkeley.edu to attend.

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415) for more information.



Conjoined Histories: Race, Disability, and Popular Performance in the 19th Century
Peter Glazer, Professor, Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, UC Berkeley
Philip Kan Gotanda, Visiting Scholar, Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, UC Berkeley
Eric Hayot, Professor, Comparative Literature, Penn State
Shannon Jackson, Professor, Arts Research Center and Theater, Dance, Performance Studies, Berkeley; Amma Ghartey-Tagoe Kootin, Post-Doctoral Scholar, Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, UCB Samuel Otter, Professor, English, UC Berkeley
Lena Reynosa, Doctoral Candidate, UC Berkeley
Ellen Samuels, Professor, English and Women's Studies, UW Madison
Shannon Steen, Professor, Theater, Dance & Performance Studies, UC Berkeley
Cynthia Wu, Professor, SUNY Buffalo
March 11, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Arts Research Center, Disability Studies Program, East Asian Languages & Cultures, Center for Race and Gender, American Cultures Program
Eng and Chang Organized by the Arts Research Center and the Disability Studies Program, in conjunction with the premier of Philip Kan Gotanda's play "I Dream of Chang and Eng" in the Department of Theater, Dance, and Perormance Studies, this symposium will use the astonishing story of Chang and Eng Bunker — the original "Siamese twins" — as a starting-point to explore issues of race, disability, and popular performance in the United States in the 19th century.

Open to all audiences.
 




San Francisco International Asian American film festival: A Presentation of the Center for Asian American Media
March 11 – 19, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Pacific Film Archive
image Each year, the Center for Asian American Media brings you the best in contemporary cinema from Asia and the Asian diaspora.

Visit http://bampfa.berkeley.edu and http://festival.asianamericanmedia.org/ for screening updates and ticket info.

Tickets required: $12 General Admission, $10 (limit 2 tickets per person per program) CAAM and BAM/PFA members, UC Berkeley students:, $11 (limit 1 ticket per person per program) Non-UC Berkeley students, seniors, and disabled persons

Ticket info: Advance tickets for festival programs at the PFA Theater are available at the PFA Theater box office and BAM/PFA admissions desk, online at bampfa.berkeley.edu, or by phone at (510) 642-5249.



Anyuan: Mining China's Revolutionary Tradition
Elizabeth Perry, Government, Harvard University
March 14, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image How do we explain the unexpected longevity of the Chinese Communist political system? One answer, Elizabeth Perry suggests, lies in the Chinese Communists' creative development and deployment of cultural resources – during their revolutionary rise to power and afterwards. Skillful "cultural positioning" and "cultural patronage," on the part of Mao Zedong, his comrades and successors, helped construct a polity in which a once alien Communist system came to be accepted as essentially "Chinese." Perry traces this process through a case study of the Anyuan coal mine, a place where Mao and other early leaders of the Chinese Communist Party mobilized an influential labor movement at the beginning of their revolution, and whose history later became a contested touchstone of "political correctness" in the People's Republic of China.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Panel Discussion: The Many Faces of Inter-Country Adoption
March 16, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Beatrice Bain Research Group, Ethnic Studies, Sociology
Presenters:
Catherine Ceniza Choy, Associate Professor, Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley
Riitta Hoegbacka, Scholar-in-Residence, Beatrice Bain Research Group, UC Berkeley
Sarah D. Macdonald, PhD Candidate, Department of Sociology, UC Berkeley

The numbers of inter-country adoptions increased rapidly towards the end of the 1990s and in the 21st century, the flow of children being from the global south to the global north. The United States still figures as numerically the biggest country of destination, although relative to population size, some Scandinavian and Southern European countries have even higher numbers. Whereas a lot of scholarly attention has been directed at the Western adoptive family and at the psychological and linguistic adjustment of adoptees, it is increasingly acknowledged that the scope of focus needs to be widened. This panel addresses 'the other sides' of Western adoptions from abroad. Catherine Ceniza Choy analyzes the factors at play when the United States became the biggest destination of Asian adoptees from the 1950s onwards. Riitta Hoegbacka presents the perspectives of birth mothers from South Africa, and Sarah Macdonald investigates the role of adoption agencies in facilitating the growing number of transnational adoptions to the United States.

Individual abstracts:
Catherine Ceniza Choy: "The Hong Kong Project": Race and Rescue in Early Chinese International Adoption History
This presentation features an earlier history of Chinese international adoption from Hong Kong in the 1950s and 1960s, which has been overshadowed by the more recent phenomenon of Chinese international adoption that began in the 1990s. It also links this earlier history of Asian international adoption to the discourses about and the policies related to the resettlement of refugees. While, at first glance, the pairing of adoptees and refugees may appear odd, the histories of Asian international adoption and Asian refugee resettlement in the United States share several similarities. These include the emergence of these phenomena primarily from the historical contexts of the chaotic aftermath of war, the migration of Asian adoptees to the United States under the auspices of refugee policies, and several discursive similarities such as the objectification of Asian adoptees and refugees by scholarly studies and the mainstream media as objects in need of rescue by the United States. As an increasing number of white Americans expressed interest in international and transracial adoption, their adoption of "full-blooded" Chinese children presented social workers with another problem of race: assessing racial tolerance among potential adoptive parents and their communities.

Riitta Hoegbacka: Maternal Thinking in the Context of Stratified Reproduction: Perspectives of Birth Mothers from South Africa
Although research has established that most children in intercountry adoption have birth mothers or other kin, they have remained 'invisible'. Drawing on interview data with 32 black birth mothers, this presentation analyzes the circumstances of giving a child up for adoption as well as the sentiments and beliefs of the mothers. It investigates the cruel tradeoffs between the survival of the mothers themselves or their other children and the luxury of investing in the lastborn infant. However, contrary to research showing lowered levels of maternal commitment in such circumstances, most of the birth mothers remain emotionally involved, would want information on the children and expect them to return later. The presentation concludes by analyzing some possible reasons for this and its significance for adoption practices.

Sarah D. Macdonald: Altruism and Professionalism: Agency Promotion in Materials for Prospective Parents
While the majority of transnational adoptions to the United States are completed with the assistance of adoption agencies, there is a marked absence of attention to agencies within existing adoption research. This presentation investigates the important role that adoption agencies play in the transnational adoption market and offers an analysis of the ways that agencies frame their involvement in transnational adoption to prospective parents. Drawing on textual analysis of over 250 websites for private, non-profit adoption agencies and promotional materials from a small subset of these agencies, this presentation will demonstrate how agencies invoke ideas of both altruism and professionalism in defining their purpose and attracting prospective parents.

Short biographies:
Catherine Ceniza Choy is Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies at the University of California, Berkeley and a former director of the Beatrice Bain Research Group on Gender. She is the author of Empire of Care: Nursing and Migration in Filipino American History, published by Duke University Press and co-published by Ateneo de Manila University Press in 2003. Empire of Care explored how and why the Philippines became the world's leading exporter of professional nurses. Her current book project, Global Families, on the history of Asian international adoption in the U.S., is under contract with New York University Press. She has published essays on international adoption in the Journal of American-East Asian Relations, International Korean Adoption: A Fifty Year History of Policy and Practice, The American Child: A Cultural Studies Reader and Outsiders Within: Writing on Transracial Adoption. She earned her Ph.D. in History from UCLA.

Riitta Hoegbacka has a Ph.D. in Sociology from the University of Helsinki, where she also held a post as a Lecturer at the Department of Social Research. She is currently a scholar-in-residence at the Beatrice Bain Research Group at UC Berkeley. She has published in Finnish on the topics of rural gender studies and family and adoption. Her recent publications in English on inter-country adoption include articles in the Journal of Comparative Family Studies (2008) and in the following books: Families and Kinship in Contemporary Europe: Rules and Practices of Relatedness, Jallinoja R. & Widmer E. (Eds.) (Palgrave MacMillan 2011) and Intercountry adoption: Policies, practices, and outcomes, Gibbons J. & Rotabi K. S. (Eds.) (forthcoming Ashgate 2011).

Sarah D. Macdonald is a Ph.D. Candidate in the Department of Sociology at the University of California, Berkeley. Her dissertation research focuses on the role that United States adoption agencies play as institutional actors within the transnational market for adoptable children. Specifically, she is interested in understanding how U.S. adoption agencies structure the market for foreign-born children, as well as the ways in which this market reciprocally structures agency practices and discourses. She holds a B.A. in Sociology and Russian Civilization from Smith College and an M.A. in Sociology from UC Berkeley.

Panel organized by: Beatrice Bain Research Group.

Co-sponsored by: Ethnic Studies and Department of Sociology



  The Rise and fall of Japan's LDP
Ellis S. Krauss, International Relations and Pacific Studies, UC San Diego
March 16, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
After holding power continuously from its inception in 1955 (with the exception of a ten-month hiatus in 1993–1994), Japan's Liberal Democratic Party (LDP) lost control of the national government decisively in September 2009. Despite its defeat, the LDP remains the most successful political party in a democracy in the post–World War II period. In The Rise and Fall of Japan's LDP, Ellis S. Krauss and Robert J. Pekkanen pursue questions about institutional change in party politics. What incentives do different electoral systems provide? How do politicians adapt to new incentives? How much does structure determine behavior, and how much opportunity does structure give politicians to influence outcomes? How adaptable are established political organizations? Their findings shed light on the puzzle of the LDP's long dominance and abrupt defeat.

Introduced by Steven Vogel, Political Science, UC Berkeley.

This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Japan's Aftermath: An Initial Assessment of the Nuclear Disaster in Japan
Bozidar Stojadinovic, Professor, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Jasmina Vujic, Professor and former chair, Department of Nuclear Engineering
Shinya Nagasaki, Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo
Peter Hosemann, Assistant professor, Department of Nuclear Engineering
Dana Buntrock, Associate professor of Architecture
Joonhong Ahn, Professor, Department of Nuclear Engineering
Cathryn Carson, Professor of History and Associate Dean of Social Sciences
March 16, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies, Science, Technology, and Society Center (STSC), Nuclear Engineering (NE), Civil and Environmental Engineering (CEE), Architecture, Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of International Studies
A roundtable of experts discuss the recent events in Japan, provide context, and assessments at this point in time.

Open to all audiences.

Contact Caverlee Cary (ccary@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6492) for more information.



Japan In Crisis
Joonhong Ahn, Nuclear Engineering, UC Berkeley
Steven Vogel, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Chuji Ando, Japan's Self Defense Forces
Thursday, March 24, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies, Asia Society of Northern California, Give2Asia, Japan Policy Research Institute, Japan Society of Northern California, Mechanics Institute, Nautilus Institute, USF Center for the Pacific Rim
Experts will discuss Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami, the ongoing nuclear crisis, Japan's political leadership, and implications for Asia and the US. The issues at hand are complex and fast moving and analysis and media coverage widely diverge. The program will highlight relief efforts and what the public can do to support them.

Registration required: $20 (member, student, senior discounts available.

Registration info: Register online, or by calling 415-421-8707.



IRLE Spring 2011 Colloquia: Architecture, Product Development Organizations, and HRM of Engineers: Comparing Japanese, Korean, and Chinese Firms
Tsuyoshi Tsuru, Institute of Economic Research, Hitotsubashi University
March 28, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of Research on Labor & Employment




China-US Relations Following President Hu Jintao's State Visit
MA Zhengang, former Chinese Ambassador to the UK
March 29, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Ma Zhengang, former Chinese Ambassador to the United Kingdom, is currently the President of the China Institute of International Studies (CIIS). Amb. Ma has served as the Director-General of the Department of North American and Oceanian Affairs of MFA and Vice-Minister of the Foreign Office of the State Council. His speech will focus on how to build a cooperative China-US partnership based on mutual respect and mutual benefit, particularly, how the two countries should further advance their strategic, economic and trade partnership.

Contact Melissa Dale (mdale@berkeley.edu) for more information.



Asian Studies Study Abroad Student Panel
March 31, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, IAS Teaching Program
Please join us for a study-abroad panel of panelists who will be talking about their study-abroad experiences and a Q&A afterwards. There's nothing like hearing it from someone who's been there and done it!

The panelists will include: Ian Cipperly (studied at Sophia University, Japan), Emily Chang (Doshisha Univ, Japan), Elizabeth Fein (Beijing Normal Univ, China, summer), Victoria Wu (Peking Univ, China) and Josephine Chan (Kansai Gaidai Univ, Japan, non-EAP program).

Contact Sharmila Shinde (shinde@berkeley.edu for more information.



China's Growth and Sustainability Challenges: Global Implications
David Roland-Holst, Society of Hong Kong and Chinese Affairs
March 31, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, ASUC (Associated Students of the University of California), Institute of East Asian Studies




From Jean-Paul Sartre to Teresa Teng: Contemporary Cantonese Art in the 1980s: Film Screening with Director Jane DeBevoise
Jane DeBevoise, Filmmaker
April 6, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
image Though the 1980s was a seminal period in the the history of contemporary art in China, contribution and experimentalism of the art scene in South China, particularly in Guangzhou and Shenzhen, have thus far been overlooked. Based on primary research, rare footage and personal interviews with key artists, this documentary film bears witness not only to the "Reading Fever" that gripped the Chinese art world in the 1980s, but also to the influx of popular culture such as Canto pop that flooded over the border to Guangdong from Hong Kong at the end of the Cultural Revolution.

From Jean-Paul Sartre to Teresa Teng highlights the experimentalism and vitality of artists, critics, and curators in South China during this time, including Hou Hanru, Wang Huangsheng, Chen Tong, Yang Jiechang, Wang Du, and members of the Big Tailed Elephant Group, including Chen Shaoxiong, Lin Yilin and Xu Tan, whose contributions to the development of contemporary art have been long lasting and deep.

Director Jane DeBevoise will present and discuss her film. Introduced by Julia White, Senior Curator for Asian Art, UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Land Rights and Economic Development in China: A Long-term Perspective
Kenneth Pomeranz, UCI Chancellor's Professor of History, University of California, Irvine
April 6, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, IAS Teaching Program (IASTP)




Of Storms, Frontiers, and Master Plans: Claims for the Future of Higher Education
Pauline Yu, President, American Council of Learned Societies
April 6, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities
image As part of the Forum on the Humanities & the Public World, the Townsend Center hosts Pauline Yu. Pauline Yu has been President of the American Council of Learned Societies since July 2003. She has previously served as Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures and Dean of Humanities in the College of Letters and Science at the University of California, Los Angeles. Professor Yu has written numerous books and articles on classical Chinese poetry, comparative literature, and issues in the humanities.
 




China Watcher: Confessions of a Peking Tom
Richard Baum, Political Science, UCLA
April 7, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
Richard Baum, a senior China scholar and sometime policy advisor, reflects on forty years of learning about and interacting with the People's Republic of China, from the height of Maoism during the author's UC Berkeley student days in the volatile 1960s through globalization. Anecdotes from Baum's professional life illustrate the alternately peculiar, frustrating, fascinating, and risky activity of China watching — the process by which outsiders gather and decipher official and unofficial information to figure out what's really going on behind China's veil of political secrecy and propaganda. Baum writes entertainingly, telling his narrative with witty stories about people, places, and eras, descriptions of the personalities and political forces that shaped the modern field of China studies.

Introduced by Tom Gold, Sociology, UC Berkeley.

This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Strait Talk Berkeley 2011 Symposium: Perspectives on Cross Strait Relations
David Lynch, Professor of International Relations, USC
April 7, 2011
Strait Talk Berkeley, Institute of East Asian Studies, USF Center for the Pacific Rim, Boalt School of Law
The Strait Talk symposium is dedicated to creating open channels of dialogue on the relationship between the United States and both sides of the Taiwan Strait, with a focus on conflict resolution and representation from all sides. It is a student-led, student-focused event.

In search of truly open dialogue, the symposium will preserve freedom of speech while seeking the fullest possible representation of the diverse range of opinions and politics involved in this discordant and emotional issue. The symposium is dedicated to the stimulation of dialogue and exchange of viewpoints. It is an open forum without a political agenda.

This series of speaker events is a way for our delegates and the general Bay Area community to be updated and informed on cross-Strait relations by academics, policy makers, and business leaders.



Hapa Japan Conference
Friday-Saturday, April 8–9, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
Hapa is a Hawaiian term that is now widely used to describe someone of mixed racial or ethnic heritage. A New York Times article cites that just within the United States, one in seven marriages are now between people from different racial/ethnic backgrounds.

The Center for Japanese Studies, along with the Hapa Japan Database Project and All Nippon Airways, will host the Hapa Japan Conference on April 8th and 9th, featuring specialists in the study of mixed-race Japanese history, identity, and representation. Topics range from the history of mixed-race Japanese in the 1500s, part-Japanese communities in Australia, to the exploration of identity and representation through story-telling, films, and a photo-exhibit.

Schedule

Session I — Global History and Mixed-Race Japanese
Gary Leupp: Part-Japanese in Japan and the World, 1543–1859
Velina Hasu Houston: Japanese Hybridity and Meiji/Showa Influence
Yuriko Yamanouchi: "I Identify All the Cultures Equally": Japanese-Indigenous and Other Mixed Heritage Australians in Northern Australia
Discussant: Duncan Ryûken Williams

Session II — The Celtic Samurai: Storytelling of a Transnational/Transracial Family Life
Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu
Discussant: Keiko Yamanaka

Session III — World War Two, Occupation-Period Japan, and Racial Mixing
Walter Hamilton: Enemies in Miniature: Recovering the Lives of the Mixed-Race Children of Occupied Japan
Lily Anne Yumi Welty: Multiraciality and Migration: Mixed Race American Japanese in Okinawa 1945–1972
Annmaria Shimabuku: Kant, Miscegenation, and the Biopolitics of the US-Japan Transpacific: Through an Intellectual History of Okinawa's 'All Island Struggle'
Discussant: Paul Spickard

Session IV — Okinawa and Racial Spaces
Ariko Ikehara: Black-Okinawa: Historical Development and Expression of Mixed Space/Race
Mitzi Uehara Carter: Nappy Routes and Tangled Tales of Blackness in Militarized Okinawa
Discussant: Wei Ming Dariotis

Session V — A Changing Japanese-American Community
Teresa Williams-León: Re-imagining Multiple Identities: Race, Culture, Language among Japanese-descent Multiracials
Cynthia Nakashima: The New Nikkei: Towards a Modern Meaning of 'Japanese American'
Christine Iijima Hall: We Are No Longer Forced to 'Please Choose One'...Or Are We?
Discussant: Michael Omi

Session VI — "Representing" and "Representations" of Mixed-Race Japanese in the U.S. and Japan
Rebecca Chiyoko King O'Riain: Cherry Blossom Dreams: Racial Eligibility Rules, Hapas and Japanese American Beauty Pageants

Screening of the Trailer for the Documentary Film Hafu: A Film about the Experiences of Mixed-Japanese Living in Japan
Marcia Yumi Lise
Natalie Maya Willer

Participants:
Gary Leupp, Professor of History, Tufts University
Velina Hasu Houston, Professor and Associate Dean of Faculty, School of Theater, USC
Stephen Murphy-Shigematsu, Consulting Professor, School of Medicine, Stanford University
Conference/Symposium: Center for Japanese Studies
Walter Hamilton, Author of Lest We Beget: The Mixed-Race Legacy of Occupied Japan
Lily Anne Yumi Welty, Ph.D. Candidate, UC Santa Barbara
Annmaria Shimabuku, Assistant Professor of Comparative Literature and Foreign Languages, UC Riverside
Ariko Ikehara, Ph.D. Student, UC Berkeley
Mitzi Uehara Carter, Ph.D. Candidate, UC Berkeley
Teresa Williams-Leon, Professor of Asian American Studies, Cal State Northridge
Cynthia Nakashima, Ph.D. Candidate, UC Berkeley
Christine Iijima Hall, Office of Equity, Opportunity and Engagement, Maricopa Community College
Rebecca Chiyoko King O'Riain, Faculty of Sociology, National University of Ireland
Marcia Yumi Lise, Social Researcher, Hafu Project
Natalie Maya Willer, Photographer, Hafu Project
Jeff Chiba Stearns, Film Director, Meditating Bunny Studio
Duncan Ryuken Williams, UC Berkeley, Center for Japanese Studies
Keiko Yamanaka, Lecturer, Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley
Paul Spickard, Professor of History, UC Santa Barbara
Wei Ming Dariotis, Assistant Professor of Asian American Studies, San Francisco State University
Michael Omi, Associate Professor of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley
John Lie, Professor of Sociology, UC Berkeley
Kip Fulbeck, Professor of Art, UC Santa Barbara
Discussant: John Lie

Registration required. Registration opens March 1. Register by calling 510-642-3415, or by emailing cjs-events@berkeley.edu.

See http://ieas.berkeley.edu/cjs/hapajapan.html for the full conference agenda.

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415) for more information.



Fiction in Late Qing and Early Republican China: The Ecology of Genre
John Christopher Hamm, Asian Languages and Literature, University of Washington
April 8, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image The late Qing "Revolution in Fiction" saw a proliferation of fiction genres and, more fundamentally, a new concern with the very notion of genre. This nascent discourse on genre was both descriptive and prescriptive; even as it sought to taxonomize and evaluate new varieties of fiction, it simultaneously promoted their creation. In fruitful interaction with the discursive ferment were developments in the publishing industry, which marketed a new form of fiction periodical to newly discovered readerships. This talk explores the functioning of genre in the world of early 20th-century Chinese fiction through an examination of the institutional and discursive interaction between what was arguably the most successful of "imported" fiction genres—the detective story—and an iconically "native form"—martial arts fiction.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Strait Talk Berkeley 2011 Symposium: Exploring Opportunities in Conflict Transformation
Robert Berring, Professor of Politics, UC Berkeley, Boalt, School of Law
Lanchih Po, Visiting Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Culture
Darren Zook, Professor of Politics, UC Berkeley
April 8, 2011
Strait Talk Berkeley, Institute of East Asian Studies, USF Center for the Pacific Rim, Boalt School of Law
The Strait Talk symposium is dedicated to creating open channels of dialogue on the relationship between the United States and both sides of the Taiwan Strait, with a focus on conflict resolution and representation from all sides. It is a student-led, student-focused event.

In search of truly open dialogue, the symposium will preserve freedom of speech while seeking the fullest possible representation of the diverse range of opinions and politics involved in this discordant and emotional issue. The symposium is dedicated to the stimulation of dialogue and exchange of viewpoints. It is an open forum without a political agenda.

This series of speaker events is a way for our delegates and the general Bay Area community to be updated and informed on cross-Strait relations by academics, policy makers, and business leaders.



"The Intruder"; Claire Denis (France/S. Korea, 2004): Under the Skin: The Films of Claire Denis
April 8, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Berkeley Art Museum
image Under the Skin: The Films of Claire Denis
The Intruder
Claire Denis (France/S. Korea, 2004)

(L'intrus). Inspired by philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy's short autobiographical reflection on his heart transplant and building around the eloquently brooding presence of Michel Subor, Denis doesn't so much tell the story of Subor's Louis as she feels and hacks her way around its contours and tunnels into its core. This is a film about longing on the deepest level imaginable—for a son on the other side of the world and for a life that is always elsewhere. As Denis follows Louis from the French Alps to Geneva to Pusan to Polynesia in search of the child who has grown up without him, she maintains an extremely delicate if not precarious balance between presence and absence: the sheer presence of the physical world, of mountains, lakes, forests, beaches, and oceans; and the absence of completeness, the feeling that for Louis, wholeness will always be a continent away.—Kent Jones, SFIFF 2005

The Intruder is repeated on Saturday, April 9.

Written by Denis, Jean-Pol Fargeau. Photographed by Agnès Godard. With Michel Subor, Grégoire Colin, Katia Golubeva, Bambou. (130 mins, In French with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Pyramide International)

Tickets required: $9.50 Adults (18–64), $5.50 BAM/PFA members UC Berkeley students, $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty and staff Non-UC Berkeley students Senior citizens (65 & over) Disabled persons Youth (17 & under)

Buy tickets by calling 510-642-5249.

Contact the Berkeley Art Museum (bampfa@berkeley.edu, 510-643-2197) for more information.



JERO, A Conversation and Mini-Concert: Berkeley Japan New Vision Award
April 8, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
image The Berkeley Japan New Vision Award is a prize the Center for Japanese Studies awards to an individual who has, in recent times, dramatically transformed our vision of Japan.

Part Japanese and part African American, Jero (born Jerome Charles White) is enka's rising star ever since his hit single Umiyuki burst onto the charts in 2008. His albums, Yakusoku (2009), Covers (2008), Covers 2 (2009), and Covers 3 (2010) have been widely acclaimed as he has revived interest in this music genre.

Winner of the 2008 Best New Artist Award at the Japan Record Awards and the 2011 Berkeley Japan New Vision Award, he has also regularly appeared on Japanese TV and commercials as well as performing at the prestigious New Year's Eve Kôhaku Utagassen concert twice.

Jero will be performing on-campus after receiving the Berkeley Japan New Vision Award at a private ceremony. Tickets to the concert are free and open to the public, but registration is required.

Tickets are general admission.

Tickets are SOLD OUT. If you would like to be placed on the standby list, please contact cjs-events@berkeley.edu or 510-642-3415 with the following information:
  • Name
  • Email address
  • Phone number
  • # of tickets (Maximum of 4 tickets per customer)

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415) for more information.



ITASA West Coast Conference 2011 — Keynote: David Chiu
David Chiu, President of San Francisco Board of Supervisors
April 9, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Taiwanese American Student Association
The 2011 Intercollegiate Taiwanese American Student Association conference, themed "Next Stop: Taiwan," invites Taiwanese American students to explore their identity through series of top-quality events and hands-on activities. "Next Stop: Taiwan" alludes to our vision of inspiring the future generation of Taiwanese American leaders to strengthen their ties and understanding of their unique Taiwanese heritage. The conference will create a platform for Taiwanese American students to discuss, explore, and learn what it means to be a Taiwanese American today and what the future has in store for them. This forum will encourage college students to develop a tighter bond with the Taiwanese American community.

Mr. Chiu was elected in November 2008 to represent San Francisco's District 3. District 3 is home to many diverse and vibrant neighborhoods, including North Beach, Chinatown, Telegraph Hill, Russian Hill, Polk Street, Nob Hill, Union Square, Financial District, Barbary Coast and Fisherman's Wharf. In January 2009, David was elected President of the Board of Supervisors.

Before joining the Board, David was a founder and Chief Operating Officer of Grassroots Enterprise, an online communications technology company. Prior to Grassroots, he worked as a criminal prosecutor at the San Francisco District Attorney's Office and as a civil rights attorney at the Lawyers' Committee for Civil Rights. In the mid-1990s, David served as Democratic Counsel to the U.S. Senate Constitution Subcommittee and as Senator Paul Simon's aide to the Senate Budget Committee. The eldest child of immigrant parents, David Chiu grew up in Boston and received his undergraduate degree, law degree, and master's degree in public policy from Harvard University.

David Chiu has lived in District 3 for over a dozen years, in the Russian Hill and Polk Street neighborhoods. Before taking office, David was a hands-on leader in San Francisco and in District 3, as a Small Business Commissioner, chair of Lower Polk Neighbors, board president of the Youth Leadership Institute, board chair of the Chinatown Community Development Center, judge-arbitrator for the Polk Street Community Court, and president of the Asian American Bar Association of the Greater Bay Area. David was previously elected to the San Francisco Democratic County Central Committee and chaired California's 13th Assembly District Democratic Committee.



Strait Talk Berkeley 2011 Symposium: Forging Networks of Cross Strait Commerce
David Roland-Holst, Professor of Economics, UC Berkeley
Dan J. McClory, Managing Dirctor, Hunter Wise
Lilly Chung, Chairman, Monte Jade
April 9, 2011
Strait Talk Berkeley, Institute of East Asian Studies, USF Center for the Pacific Rim, Boalt School of Law
The Strait Talk symposium is dedicated to creating open channels of dialogue on the relationship between the United States and both sides of the Taiwan Strait, with a focus on conflict resolution and representation from all sides. It is a student-led, student-focused event.

In search of truly open dialogue, the symposium will preserve freedom of speech while seeking the fullest possible representation of the diverse range of opinions and politics involved in this discordant and emotional issue. The symposium is dedicated to the stimulation of dialogue and exchange of viewpoints. It is an open forum without a political agenda.

This series of speaker events is a way for our delegates and the general Bay Area community to be updated and informed on cross-Strait relations by academics, policy makers, and business leaders.



"The Intruder"; Claire Denis (France/S. Korea, 2004): Under the Skin: The Films of Claire Denis
April 9, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Berkeley Art Museum
Under the Skin: The Films of Claire Denis
The Intruder
Claire Denis (France/S. Korea, 2004)

(L'intrus). Inspired by philosopher Jean-Luc Nancy's short autobiographical reflection on his heart transplant and building around the eloquently brooding presence of Michel Subor, Denis doesn't so much tell the story of Subor's Louis as she feels and hacks her way around its contours and tunnels into its core. This is a film about longing on the deepest level imaginable—for a son on the other side of the world and for a life that is always elsewhere. As Denis follows Louis from the French Alps to Geneva to Pusan to Polynesia in search of the child who has grown up without him, she maintains an extremely delicate if not precarious balance between presence and absence: the sheer presence of the physical world, of mountains, lakes, forests, beaches, and oceans; and the absence of completeness, the feeling that for Louis, wholeness will always be a continent away.—Kent Jones, SFIFF 2005

Written by Denis, Jean-Pol Fargeau. Photographed by Agnès Godard. With Michel Subor, Grégoire Colin, Katia Golubeva, Bambou. (130 mins, In French with English subtitles, Color, 35mm, From Pyramide International)

Tickets required: $9.50 Adults (18–64), $5.50 BAM/PFA members UC Berkeley students, $6.50 UC Berkeley faculty and staff Non-UC Berkeley students Senior citizens (65 & over) Disabled persons Youth (17 & under)

Buy tickets by calling 510-642-5249.

Contact the Berkeley Art Museum (bampfa@berkeley.edu, 510-643-2197) for more information.



Strait Talk Berkeley 2011 Symposium: Building Cultural Bridges to Sustainable Peace
Andrew Jones, Professor of EALC, UC Berkeley, Chair of Center for Chinese Studies; Tom Gold, Professor of Sociology, UC Berkeley
April 10, 2011
Strait Talk Berkeley, Institute of East Asian Studies, USF Center for the Pacific Rim, Boalt School of Law
The Strait Talk symposium is dedicated to creating open channels of dialogue on the relationship between the United States and both sides of the Taiwan Strait, with a focus on conflict resolution and representation from all sides. It is a student-led, student-focused event.

In search of truly open dialogue, the symposium will preserve freedom of speech while seeking the fullest possible representation of the diverse range of opinions and politics involved in this discordant and emotional issue. The symposium is dedicated to the stimulation of dialogue and exchange of viewpoints. It is an open forum without a political agenda.

This series of speaker events is a way for our delegates and the general Bay Area community to be updated and informed on cross-Strait relations by academics, policy makers, and business leaders.



Andrew Imbrie Festival—A Concert of Andrew Imbrie's Music: Eco Ensemble, David Milnes, conductor
Eco Ensemble, David Milnes, director, with members of the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota, the University Chamber Chorus, and Aeri Ji, gayageum.
April 10, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Department of Music
image Andrew Imbrie Piano Quartet (1999); Spring Fever (1996), Sextet for Six Friends (2006), Choral Selections (1965), and Melody for Gayageum (2006) Cindy Cox new work in memory of Andrew Imbrie

Eco Ensemble, David Milnes, director, members of the Chamber Music Society of Minnesota, and the Chamber Chorus of the University of California, with special guest Aeri Ji, gayageum.

The events of the Andrew Imbrie Festival coincide with the University of California Music Library's opening of a new special collection of books, scores, manuscripts, and archival material from Andrew Imbrie's personal collection, donated to the library by the Imbrie family.

To mark the ninetieth anniversary of Andrew Imbrie's birth a series of concerts and a symposium are schedule to take place around the Bay Area in March and April of 2011. A renowned composer, Imbrie (1921–2007) was a member of the Berkeley music faculty from 1947 to 1991.

The events of the Andrew Imbrie Festival coincide with the University of California Music Library's opening of a new special collection of books, scores, manuscripts, and archival material from Andrew Imbrie's personal collection, donated to the library by the Imbrie family.

Open to all audiences.



The City Besieged by Garbage: Politics of Waste Production and Distribution in Beijing
April 11, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Department of Geography, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Global Metropolitan Studies
image One of many of China's overwhelming challenges is that posed by waste management. The vast refuse deposits near Beijing will be discussed, including the dangers these pose, and the lives of people who have found an uncertain occupational niche therein.

This symposium is in conjunction with the exhibit "Beijing Besieged: Wang Jiuliang's Urban Ecology Unhinged" on view at the IEAS Gallery March 10 – June 10, 2011.

Click here to go to the event website.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Beijing Besieged by Waste
Wang Jiuliang, Photographer, filmmaker
April 11, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Department of Geography, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center of Global Metropolitan Studies
image In this documentary film, director Wang Jiuliang uses garbage dumps in Beijing as a critical lens to reflect upon the cost of economic development in contemporary China. It shows, on the one hand, how the city of Beijing has been "besieged" by the garbage that it produces. On the other hand, it offers a vivid illustration for the impacts of rapid urbanization on the environment.

Followed by discussion with the filmmaker.

This film screening is in conjunction with the exhibit "Beijing Besieged: Wang Jiuliang's Urban Ecology Unhinged" on view at the IEAS Gallery March 10 – June 10, 2011.

Click here to go to the event website.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



The Artist as Environmental Activist
An Artist Talk with Photographer and Filmmaker Wang Jiuliang.
April 12, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Department of Geography, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center of Global Metropolitan Studies
image Photographer Wang Jiuliang, whose work is featured in the exhibit "Beijing Besieged: Wang Jiuliang's Urban Ecology Unhinged," will give a talk on his work capturing images of the overwhelming problems created by waste in China today, and on the role of the artist in environmental activism in China today.

This talk is in conjunction with the exhibit "Beijing Besieged: Wang Jiuliang's Urban Ecology Unhinged" on view at the IEAS Gallery March 10 – June 10, 2011.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



The Quest for the Oldest: Who "Discovered" the Foguang Temple?
Vimalin Rujivacharakul, Art History, University of Delaware
April 13, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
In 1937, a group of researchers from the Society for Research in Chinese Architecture traveled to Shanxi Province. Their purpose was to search for a Tang wooden temple in the renowned Buddhist sacred site of Mount Wutai. In the month of June, they reached the Foguang temple and subsequently identified its East Hall (857 CE) as the oldest wooden building at the time of their discovery. Liang published his account of the journey, first in English in 1941, and later in Chinese in 1944. His story was full of exciting moments and unexpected clues leading to the identification of the site. Today, Liang's discovery of the Foguang temple is a legendary tale about the pioneering generation of Chinese architectural historians.

There have been rumors and speculations about how Liang came to know about the existence of the Foguang temple. This presentation examines those tales and the backgrounds of Liang's "discovery," by cross-referencing Liang's writings with materials from Japan and France. Were Liang and his team really the first to arrive at the temple? A discovery requires an act of uncovering. How, then, did Liang Sicheng "uncover" a structure that has been standing on Mount Wutai for centuries?

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Meanwhile, Back At Home: Preliminary Findings on the Impact of the 'Export Labor' Policy on Vietnamese Migrant Workers and their Families
Angie Ngoc Tran, Professor of Political Economy, CSU Monterey Bay
April 13, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies
Since 2000, the government of Vietnam has promoted labor export as a commodity, sending over 500,000 Vietnamese workers to work in over 40 countries, including the Middle East, North Africa, East and Southeast Asia. Since 2003, the state has instituted laws to govern mostly state-owned recruitment companies that send Vietnamese nationals to work overseas. In 2007, the state enacted a labor contract law — managed by state-owned recruitment companies for a fee — to govern overseas migrant workers. In 2009, they introduced several policies to provide temporary assistance to early returnees, who were laid off before their contracts' completion due to the global economic crisis. With this background, this talk focuses on the impact of Prime Minister Decision 71/CP aimed at "eradicating hunger and minimizing poverty" for 62 poor rural districts and ethnic minorities throughout Vietnam by promoting an export labor policy. Interestingly, the Vietnamese media — especially the two main labor newspapers — have courageously exposed fraud by many recruitment companies as well as tried to ensure that migrant workers' rights and benefits are protected overseas and when returning home.

From recent fieldwork, Prof. Tran showcases the voices of workers, their families and neighboring households in poor rural communes in Ha Tinh province, Quang Ngai province and Cu Chi district in Ho Chi Minh City. Preliminary findings here show that the labor export policy does not address the root cause of poverty in those areas, yet exacerbates the gap between the rich and the poor. Only in a few cases, migrant workers with higher skills and better-paid jobs in Korea and Japan were able to remit money, save and invest in some productive ventures back at home. For the majority of migrant workers working in low-skilled, low-paid jobs especially in Malaysia, their earned wages barely cover enough to repay their debts and so they cannot break out of the vicious circle of poverty back home.

Angie Ngoc Tran (Ph.D., USC) focuses on issues concerning labor-management relations, strikes, migrant workers, and the gendered division of labor, with a specific interest in Vietnam. Her publications include the chapter, "Corporate Social Responsibility in Socialist Vietnam: Implementation, Challenges, and Local Solutions," just published in Labour in Vietnam, edited by Anita Chan (ISEAS, 2011); a chapter on class and resistance by Vietnamese workers in Taking Southeast Asia to Market (Cornell, 2008), edited by Nancy Peluso and Joseph Nevins, and, as co-editor and author, Reaching for the Dream: Challenges of Sustainable Development in Vietnam (NIAS, 2004).



What is Sinophone Studies?
Shu-mei Shih, Asian Languages and Cultures and Asian American Studies, UCLA
April 13, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
This talk will introduce to the audience the emerging field of Sinophone studies, which is the study of Sinitic-language cultures and communities around the world. Sinophone communities are formed via three distinct and overlapping historical processes of the continental colonialism of Qing empire, the settler colonialism of Chinese settlers in Southeast Asia and Taiwan, and the global diaspora of peoples out of China to become racialized minorities in their adopted countries. Diaspora conceived as history, not as value, this talk will interrogate conventional and often ideological conceptions of "the Chinese diaspora" and explore how the Sinophone offers opportunities for comparison with other postcolonial studies fields such as Francophone studies and Anglophone studies.

Introduced by Andrew F. Jones, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Strait Talk Berkeley 2011 Symposium: Actions to Ensure Peaceful Cross Strait Relations
April 13, 2011
Strait Talk Berkeley, Institute of East Asian Studies, USF Center for the Pacific Rim, Boalt School of Law
The Strait Talk symposium is dedicated to creating open channels of dialogue on the relationship between the United States and both sides of the Taiwan Strait, with a focus on conflict resolution and representation from all sides. It is a student-led, student-focused event.

In search of truly open dialogue, the symposium will preserve freedom of speech while seeking the fullest possible representation of the diverse range of opinions and politics involved in this discordant and emotional issue. The symposium is dedicated to the stimulation of dialogue and exchange of viewpoints. It is an open forum without a political agenda.

This series of speaker events is a way for our delegates and the general Bay Area community to be updated and informed on cross-Strait relations by academics, policy makers, and business leaders.

The 15 delegates will be presenting their Consensus Document, a document with action steps for civil society, governmental officials, and academics to examine and adopt that will lead to further cross- Strait peace. This document is approved by ALL 15 delegates. It is hoped that such a breakthrough document will be a positive influence on policy through publication, or at the very least, provide an innovation in the thinking of both participants and people around them.



The Dragon in the Room: China and the Future of Latin American Industrialization
Kevin Gallagher, Associate Professor, Boston University
April 13, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Latin American Studies
In the eyes of many, China's unprecedented economic rise has brought nothing but good news to the countries of Latin America and the Caribbean. Indeed, China's growing appetite for primary products, and the ability of Latin America to supply that demand, has played a role in restoring growth in Latin America. However, China is simultaneously out-competing Latin American manufacturers in world markets — so much so that it may threaten the region's ability to generate long-term economic growth.

Kevin P. Gallagher is an associate professor of International Relations at Boston University and a senior researcher at the Global Development and Environment Institute at Tufts University. He is the co-author of The Dragon in the Room: China and the Future of Latin American Industrialization.

Open to all audiences.



Story Hour in the Library featuring Maxine Hong Kingston
Maxine Hong Kingston
April 14, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image Maxine Hong Kingston is the author of The Woman Warrior, China Men, Tripmaster Monkey, and The Fifth Book of Peace, among other works. She is the recipient of numerous awards, including the National Book Award, the National Book Critics Circle Award, the presidentially conferred National Humanities Medal, and the Medal for Distinguished Contribution to American Letters from the National Book Foundation. An emeritus faculty member at UC Berkeley, she lives in California.

Free and open to the public.
 




China Rising: EU and US Responses to a Changing World Order
April 15, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, European Union Center, Clausen Center for International Business and Policy, Institute of East Asian Studies, Berkeley APEC Study Center




Journal of Asian Studies: The Berkeley Student Research Symposium
Alessandro Tiberio, M.A. candidate in Asian Studies
Andrea Horbinski, Ph.D candidate in History
James Lin, Ph.D candidate in History
Paul Martin (keynote speaker), M.A. candidate in Asian Studies, former museum assistant at the British Museum
April 15, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies
Program
"Becoming Taiwanese" — Alessandro Tiberio, M.A. candidate in Asian Studies
"The Tokyo Tribunal" — Andrea Horbinski, Ph.D candidate in History
"Soviet Internationalism, Chinese Nationalism, and Early Kuomintang Struggles" — James Lin, Ph.D candidate in History
"Japanese Swords" — Paul Martin (keynote speaker). M.A. candidate in Asian Studies, former museum assistant at the British Museum

The Berkeley Student Journal of Asian Studies Research Symposium is an event where students will present their published papers. The goal of this event is to encourage leadership and scholarship of Asia across disciplines. It is our hope that symposium attendees will be able to exchange ideas and build bridges with colleagues and different departments. This event is open to the public. Students and faculty are encouraged to attend.



Development of a Developmental State in South Korea: A Reexamination of the Park Chung-hee Myth
Jong-sung You, UC San Diego
April 15, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
Studies of South Korea's successful economic development have focused on the role of state in industrialization. The developmental state explanation of Korea's economic miracle has centered on the strong state capacity of Korea, with its autonomous and meritocratic bureaucracy. The literature was almost unanimous in crediting Park Chung-hee for establishing a developmental state in Korea, who ruled Korea for nineteen years from 1961–1979, presiding over the transition to export-oriented industrialization in the 1960s and the heavy and chemical industrialization drive in the 1970s. Most scholars contrasted poor economic performance under Syngman Rhee (1948–1960) with robust economic growth under Park. They claimed that Park's establishment of meritocratic and competent bureaucracy was instrumental in promoting export-led economic growth. It was often argued that meritocratic civil service exam was largely bypassed under the corrupt Syngman Rhee regime, while the relatively uncorrupt Park Chung-hee regime reduced patronage and established meritocratic and professional bureaucracy.

I examine whether the Korean developmental state was suddenly established by Park or gradually developed and what made the establishment or development of a developmental state possible. I find that the contrast between predatory Rhee regime and developmental Park regime has been unduly exaggerated. Most importantly, I find that meritocratic bureaucracy developed gradually over time for several decades, from early Rhee to late Rhee period to the short-lived Chang Myon government (1960–61) to early Park to late Park period and to post-Park period. There is evidence that control of bureaucratic corruption improved gradually over time. It is notable that Park's focus on economy was preceded by the "Economy First Policy" of the Chang government. Much of the institutional and policy frameworks of Park regime such as creation of the Economic Planning Board and the launch of five-year economic development plans had been designed and prepared during the late Rhee and Chang regimes.

In order to find plausible explanations for the successful development of a developmental state with meritocratic bureaucracy in Korea, I look at how political and economic variables affected the patronage and meritocracy in Korea and then compare the Korean case with another successful case of Taiwan and a failed case of the Philippines. First, I find that land reform in early Rhee period laid important foundations for the development of meritocratic and autonomous bureaucracy. Land reform abolished landed class and dramatically equalized the distribution of wealth and income. In the Philippines, the landed oligarchs not only preserved their privilege but diversified into commerce, finance, industry, and politics, and their strong political and economic power not only increased pressures for patronage jobs in the bureaucracy but also influenced economic policy-making. However, in Korea and Taiwan, land reform abolished landed class and pressures for patronage and influence in economic policy-making process were not great.

Secondly, "April student revolution" of 1960, which overthrew Syngman Rhee's authoritarian and corrupt government, played a critical role in developing a developmental state with meritocratic bureaucracy in Korea. The student revolution forced the political leadership of the Chang government as well as the military junta led by Park Chung-hee to focus on economic development and to curtail corruption. The university community also exerted pressures to expand meritocratic recruitment of civil servants through competitive civil service examinations. Thus, the "April student revolution" of 1960 was as much, if not more, responsible for the development of a developmental state as the "May military coup" of 1961.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Exhibit: Opening of Western Han Dynasty: Archaeology@Reality
April 15, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, CITRIS (Center for Info Technology Research in the Interest of Society)
At 4:00pm, we will officially open the new exhibit, Western Han Dynasty: Archaeology@Reality, in the CITRIS Tech Museum.

The new exhibit is virtual, 3D and interactive: virtual tombs and artifacts, digital landscapes, and hands-on experiences show a new dimension of the archaeology of the future. Showcasing the work of professor Maurizio Forte, the exhibit is organized by UC Merced in collaboration with CITRIS.

Background: The Western Han Dynasty (206 BCE – 220 CE) was the first unified and powerful empire in Chinese history and one of the greatest of the world history. The extension of its empire was three times larger than the Roman Empire. Still today, around its ancient capital city Chang'An, the modern Xi'an laid the sacred lands of emperors where the landscape is shaped by imperial mounds of the ancient mausoleums.

American, Italian and Chinese Institutions are coordinating a multidisciplinary international research project concerning the reconstruction of this period using advanced technologies, such as laser scanning, virtual reality, remote sensing and 3D modeling. The first outcomes of the project are shown in this exhibit, which constitutes an overview of digital applications and virtual simulations: 3D tombs, artifacts, landscape's reconstructions and architectural models will be interactively accessible for the first time. Two monumental Han tombs no longer accessible after the excavation are scientifically and virtually reconstructed in this exhibit through an immersive and collaborative system.



China's Rise: Lessons for the West
David Kang, University of Southern California
Sun Jisheng, China Foreign Affairs University
Oystein Tunsjo, Norwegian Institute for Defence Studies
Vinod Aggarwal, UC Berkeley
April 15, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Berkeley APEC Study Center
For the first time in a century, a set of large, populous and increasingly wealthy states — China, India and Russia — are on the cusp of achieving great-power status. These powers are entering an international system still governed by a "Western" conception of legal and political order and based on the primacy of post-World War II rules, drawn from liberal models of capitalism and democracy practiced in the U.S. and in Western Europe.

Three scholars from China will discuss the outlook for the US and EU vis a vis the changing dynamics in Asia. This panel is offered in conjunction with the Berkeley APEC Study Center conference "China Rising: EU and US Responses to a Changing World Order" (see http://basc.berkeley.edu/ for further information on the conference).

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Exhibit: Western Han Dynasty: Archaeology@Reality
April 16 – 22, 2011
Maurizio Forte, UC Merced
Center for Chinese Studies, CITRIS (Ctr for Info Technology Research in the Interest of Society)
image The CITRIS Tech Museum on the third floor of Sutardja Dai Hall will display a new exhibit that is virtual, 3D and interactive: virtual tombs and artifacts, digital landscapes, and hands-on experiences show a new dimension of the archaeology of the future. Showcasing the work of professor Maurizio Forte, the exhibit is organized by UC Merced in collaboration with CITRIS




The Human Rights Issues of Social Minorities in Korea
Todd A. Henry, UC San Diego; Darren Zook, UC Berkeley; Steph Eunha Lee, KEEP-ROK, HOBAK April 17, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Commitee for Korea Studies
The Committee for Korea Studies (CKS) was established in 1986, as an attempt to create a modern Korean history course at UC Berkeley. Since its inception, CKS has focused on increasing awareness and knowledge of Korean culture, history, and issues not only at Cal but also in the bay area by studying and examining Korean and Korean-American history. CKS has also actively researched various political issues and has engaged in political activities around campus. We choose a theme each year and study it throughout the year in our weekly general meetings and hold a series of events (PoY) at the end of the year.

Last year's PoY was on 5.18 Gwangju Democratic Uprising's 30th anniversary. This year's PoY is scheduled on April 17th from 2–6PM on the 6th floor of the Institute of East Asian Studies of UC Berkeley (2223 Fulton Street #2318, Berkeley, CA 94720) with the theme of "The Human Rights Issues of Social Minorities in Korea." We have covered the issues of the rights of the disabled, unwed mothers, North Korean refugees in South Korea, non-regular and foreign workers, foreign brides, and LGBT populations.

We have three guest speakers:

Professor Todd A. Henry is an Assistant Professor in Residence at University of California, San Diego. He is a specialist of modern Korea with a focus on the period of Japanese rule. Dr. Henry works on the comparative and transnational study of imperialism/colonialism, gender/sexuality, and critical urban studies. He will be showing two short films, Uncle "Bar" at Barbershop and Auld Lang Syne as part of his talk on "Toward a Queer Past: The Historical Imagination of LGBT Films in Contemporary South Korea."

Professor Darren Zook teaches in Political Science and International Area Studies Departments at University of California, Berkeley. His areas of interests include international law, human rights, security studies, corruption, comparative Asian politics, the proliferation of weapons of mass destruction, and the politics of music. His talk will be on "Unsettling Korea: Human Rights, Foreignness, and the Challenges of Globalization."

Mr. Steph Eunha Lee is a delegation member of KEEP-ROK 2010, a political education program designed to learn about the movements of democracy, liberation, and self-determination in the Republic of Korea and a member of HOBAK (Hella Organized Bay Area Koreans), an organization of Koreans in the diaspora concerned with peace and justice on the peninsula and abroad. He will giving a presentation on "Bridging the Gap: Building Solidarity through Marginalized Communities in Korea & the US."

This is a public event and CKS would love to have you present. Let us know if you have any concerns or questions. You can email us at cks.staff@gmail.com.

Please Note: The Committee for Korea Studies should not be confused with the Center for Korean Studies, which is co-sponsoring this event. Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks.staff@gmail.com, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Qingli 情理: The Exercise of 'Reasonableness and Good Sense' in Chinese Jurisprudence
Daniel Xi Lin, Fudan University
April 20, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
Qingli—tentatively translated "reasonableness and good sense" for the purposes of my paper—has deep roots in the history of Chinese ethics as well as in Chinese legal literature. In this paper I will discuss how qingli is deployed and works in a legal setting. The different mechanisms I have included are intended as illustrations that help to explain how qingli operates in real situations. I do not mean to characterise qingli as something of solely instrumental value. In its stead, I wish emphasise the moral content of qingli, and to demonstrate that, by virtue of that content, qingli embeds law in society and can make law socially interactive.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Coping with the Crisis: Implications for Japan's Future
April 20, 2011
Panel Discussion
Steven Vogel, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Dana Buntrock, Architecure, UC Berkeley
Duncan Williams, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Peter Hayes, Nautilus Institute, USF
T.J. Pempel, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Joonhong Ahn, Nuclear Engineering, UC Berkeley
Mary Comerio, Architecture, UC Berkeley
Cathryn Carson, Professor, History and Associate Dean of Social Sciences
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Science, Technology, Medicine, and Society, Center for Japanese Studies, Department of Architecture, Department of Political Science, Department of Nuclear Engineering
Observers' attention has been riveted by Japan's devastating earthquake and tsunami of March 11 and the ensuing events at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant. How should we analyze the disaster? What do the continuing crisis and Japan's responses reveal? What are the possible social and political consequences? A panel of experts offer their assessments.

Open to all audiences.

Contact Caverlee Cary at the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas.berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



History of Chinese Contemporary Art
Panel Discussion
April 20, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, History of Art
image Panel discussion with two world-renowned Chinese artists, Yue Minjun, and Zhou Chunya, and two Chinese art critics, Lu Peng and Liu Chun, who will gather to talk about Chinese art today. In conjunction with a special installation at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Selecting Leaders: The Chinese National People's Congress
Chun-Chih Chang, Ph.D. Candidate, National Chengchi University, Taiwan & Visiting Student Researcher
April 21, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies
Studies of authoritarian regime congresses have been marginalized in the comparative legislature literature for a long time, and few scholars try to delineate the comparability of congresses between authoritarian and democratic regimes. The most frequently given response for a lack of inquiry into authoritarian congresses is that they are "rubber stamps" and that party-state logic pervades every congressional action. However, the party should not be the only factor used to explain functions of authoritarian congresses. In China, a functional legal environment is needed to incubate China's vibrant capitalistic market economy and multiple interests have been incorporated into lawmaking as decentralization and fragmented authoritarianism have come into practice since 1980s. In this regard, the Chinese National People's Congress might have a chance to evolve into a modern congress and shed its "rubber stamp" reputation. How is committee leadership selected in authoritarian congresses such as the Chinese National People's Congress? How can comparative legislative theories, which draw primarily on experiences of democratic parliaments, be applied to explain functions of authoritarian congresses? Relying on comparative committee theories, in particular majority-party cartel theory, informational efficiency theory, and distributive benefits theory, Chang will examine the selection of committee members in the People's Congress. Chang argues that party domination, on the one hand, may be the most important factor in the selection of committee members, but it does not reveal everything about the composition of congressional committee leadership. Informational efficiency theory and distributive benefits theory must also be considered in order to fully understand the recruitment of leadership for the Chinese National People's Congress.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas.berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Japanese Women Settlers and the Civilization of Empire in Taiwan During the 1910s
Evan Dawley, History and Humanities, Reed College
April 21, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image As Japanese women began to settle in Taiwan in greater numbers, they contributed in significant ways to the changing face of Japanese colonialism. Through one organization in particular, the Taiwan branch of the Patriotic Ladies Association (Aikoku fujinkai), they both supported the military suppression of Taiwan's aborigines and promoted cultural and social reform programs that marked the turn toward civilian rule in Taiwan. This presentation will explore the organization's activities, and the experience of Japanese women in colonial Taiwan.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Heartless Wet Nurse, Helpless Baby, and Compulsive Father: Mid-Nineteenth Century Korea through Inquest Records
Sun Joo Kim, Harvard University
April 21, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
Historical understanding of nineteenth-century Korea has been largely affected by contention between two major perspectives—nationalist and colonialist—and has tended to remain a larger structural analysis relying on official sources, although some recent studies based on unofficial sources have enriched our knowledge of local history and life. This paper aims to have a close look at "everyday" in mid-nineteenth-century Korea using an unconventional primary source—inquest records. Homicide investigation records from local magistrates' courts contain a great deal of valuable evidence of an ethnographic nature, making possible a social history of previously invisible aspects of illiterate people's lives. By closely reading one murder case that took place in the 1866 in Chunghwa County in P'yŏngan Province, this paper examines quotidian lives of ordinary men and women as well as their moral values that often contrasted sharply with the Confucian rationales that permeated Korean legal proceedings and adjudication at the time.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Debates and Controversies During Chengdi's Reign and Beyond
Michael Loewe, Professor Emeritus, Chinese Studies, Cambridge University
April 22, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
A talk on the late Han court, for a scholarly audience. See also April 26 for a talk geared to a general audience.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Beyond Kokugaku: Buddhist Thoughts on Time, Writing and the Ancient in 18th Century Japan
Regan Murphy, Shinjo Ito Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Japanese Studies
April 25, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
The issue of whether writing functioned as vehicle for ideas despite vast spans of time between the writer and the reader was central to 18th century Buddhist and non-Buddhist philological studies of ancient texts. This presentation will explore Buddhist ideas of temporal passing and the recording of human acts, providing a fresh look at one answer to this question in the late 18th century.

It examines in particular at one piece written by a 18th century nun that envisions the act of recording historical events as a way of both transmitting ideas over time and as pointing toward an exit from temporal cycles. The Juzenkai Hogo no Engi provides a history of the text, the Sermons on the Ten Precepts, by the esoteric Buddhist monk, Jiun Sonja (1718–1804). A close examination of this Engi sheds light not only on early modern Buddhist conceptions of time and historical writing, but also gives an unusual glimpse into the role of the imperial women at a time of crisis.

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156) for more information.



Chinese Universities and Global Leadership in the 21st Century
William C. Kirby, T. M. Chang Professor of China Studies and Spangler Family Professor of Business Administration, Harvard University
April 26, 2011
Center for Studies in Higher Education, Institute of East Asian Studies
European universities defined international standards in the 19th century. American universities rose to positions of global eminence in the 20th century. What are the prospects that Chinese universities will assume international leadership in the 21st century?



Debates and Controversies at a Late Western Han Court: (a talk for a general audience)
Michael Loewe, Professor Emeritus, Chinese Studies, Cambridge University
April 26, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
Some of those in public life during Chengdi's reign (33 to7 BCE) may have doubted whether the Han dynasty would be able to maintain a stable rule for very much longer. Chengdi's predecessor, Yuandi (r. 48 to 33 BCE), had shown little interest in ruling.According to some, the eighteen year old who had succeeded him was blessed with a serious enough cast of mind to deal with the problems that were inevitably mounting. Chengdi in his reign confronted a number of controversies, including religious issues (e.g., How much of the imperial budget should be devoted to maintaining shrines dedicated to the memory of deceased emperors? and Which cults should be worshiped and how?). Other topics of debate included the management of salt and iron mines and the distribution of these commodities, the conscription of labor, and the value of the Han expeditions in the outlying regions on the frontiers. See also Friday, April 22 for a more academic talk.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Introduction to a Translation of the Mozi
Jeffrey Riegel, School of Languages and Cultures, University of Sydney
April 27, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
The text of the Mozi is one of the most important early Chinese philosophical sources, particularly for its influential formulation of arguments in favor of altruism, frugality, and government by the worthy and qualified. Riegel's work translating the Mozi led to a consideration not only of the basic problems that the text presents—such as the dates, native place, and historical activities of its purported "author" Mo Di—but also of the complex relationships among the book's chapters—particularly the so-called "core chapters"—and the assessment of Mo Di and the teachings of the Mojia or "Mohist School" by later thinkers and scholars.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



From A Pure and Remote View to Gazing Into the Past: Exploring a New Medium
James Cahill, UC Berkeley Professor Emeritus, History of Art
April 27, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
UC Berkeley Professor Emeritus James Cahill has recently completed a digital lecture series introducing early Chinese painting, now available from the Institute of East Asian Studies Publications. In this talk, Cahill discusses the next phase of this project, and what he has learned from his experience.

In this talk, Cahill discusses the next phases of this project, two additional series: one featuring selected later Chinese paintings that lend themselves especially to the video-lecture form, titled Gazing Into the Past: Scenes From Later Chinese Painting, and the other, discussing large matters such as how to determine authenticity and dating in Chinese paintings, but also offering reminiscences from his experiences as an historian of Chinese art, titled Pages From My Notebooks: Issues, Arguments, and Reminiscences. He will offer previews of some of these.

Introduced by Katherine Lawn Chouta, Managing Editor of Publications, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas.berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Digital Research and Japanese History Symposium
April 29, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies
Presentation I: "Another Heian, The City in Fujiwara Akihira's Shinsarugakuki
Speaker: Joan Piggott, Professor, Department of History, University of Southern California

In the 1050s or 1060s a scholar-official at the court of Go-Reizei Tennô (r. 1045–68) named Fujiwara no Akihira (989?-1066) brushed a lively description of street carnival that he called, "the new monkey music" (shinsarugaku). Perhaps he intended to distinguish what he witnessed in the city streets of his day from the more refined singing and dancing formerly performed at court (sangaku, sarugaku). Written in several hundreds of lines of four or six Chinese characters and modeled on the so-called "rhyme-prose" works (fu) anthologized in the sixth-century Chinese encyclopedic anthology Wen Hsuan (J. Monsen), Akihira's text is known today simply as "An Account of the New Monkey Music," Shinsarugakuki. In previous work on Monkey Music I have discussed issues of mid-Heian marriage and family life suggested by this richly revealing text. Recently however I have been focusing on Fujiwara Akihira's life and times, including issues of urban development in the 11th-century city of Heiankyô as reflected in Shinsarugakuki. I am also trying to suggest an answer for the inevitable and confounding question, why did Akihira write this unusual piece? Today I will consider the cityscape of Monkey Music while reflecting on Akihira's possible objectives in composing this important text.

Presentation II: "Seppuku: A Methodological Problem"
Speaker: Hitomi Tonomura, Professor, Department of History, University of Michigan

In 1868, after witnessing seppuku, Algernon Bertram Freeman-Mitford, or Lord Redesdale, of the British Foreign Service legation was "filled with admiration of the firm and manly bearing of the sufferer." M. Petit Thouras, a French captain, who had ordered punishment of twenty Japanese on a separate occasion, sked that the "ceremony" be halted after eleven had disemboweled themselves, claiming his anxiety over the possible glorification of these anti-Western criminals. Doubtless, he understood that seppuku, unlike the medieval English form of execution in cases of treason, "hanged, drawn, and quartered," was considered a style of self-execution that raised the samurai's own and possibly his descendants' self-worth and dignity. Thereafter, the Japanese strove to raise the country's international status by promoting "civilization and enlightenment," a program that also embraced the reconstituted notion of bushido, with seppuku serving as its visible core value. Today, the iconic image of seppuku perpetuates and boosts the so-called legacy of "uniquely Japanese and enduring samurai traditions." A powerful nationalistic trope, this reductionist view is an ideological roadblock to reconstructing the history of premodern fighting men and their place in the larger social order. As medievalists, how do we historicize the practice of seppuku and reveal the complex and changing meanings that underlie it? How do we peal away its many layers and folds, and demystify this supposedly "quintessentially Japanese" act? I suggest that we identify the imaginary and distinguish it from the real by reexamining literary and visual representations of seppuku not only in medieval sources but also in later recalls. A good place to start is the ironically titled text, The Record of Grand Peace (Taiheiki), which challenges the reader with its rich panoply of metaphors and allusions.

Contact the Center for Japanese Studies (cjs@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156) for more information.



Race Matters: Children and the Shifting Engagement with Racial-Ethnic Identity/Culture among Inter-racially Married Asian Americans
Kelly H. Chong, University of Kansas
April 29, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
Based on in-depth, life-history interviews of inter-racially married, professional Asian Americans and their spouses in Chicago, this talk explores the dynamics of the making and negotiation of ethnic-racial identity/ culture among second-generation Asian Americans. In the classic assimilationist perspective, intermarriage has been seen as a barometer of assimilation. Through a detailed examination of how ethnic-racial identities evolve and come to matter for these Asian American "boundary crossers" as they marry and begin to raise children, this study shows that intermarriage, far from being an unproblematic indicator of assimilation, is a terrain in which complex subjective negotiations over ethnic/racial identity are waged. A central finding of this article is that even given their embeddeness within current multicultural and color-blind discourses, particularly as members of a "model minority" group, race matters; not only are the selfhoods, intimate desires, and marital choices of the participants shaped centrally by their location within the system of racial stratification, but their long-standing ambivalence toward their ethnic identity/culture on the one hand, and toward their desire for white privilege on the other, becomes projected onto their mixed-raced children who, in their bi-raciality, come to embody and symbolize this tension, as well as hopes for overcoming such tension. Furthermore, this paper contributes to research on the interrelationship between Asian American intermarriage, identity development, and race by comparing the perspectives and feelings of Asian Americans and their non-Asian spouses, which helps to illuminate the distinctiveness of the Asian-American experience.

Kelly H. Chong (PhD University of Chicago) specializes in the areas of gender, religion, race and ethnicity, East Asian studies, Asian American studies, and social theory. For the past several years, her research has focused on the politics of gender and conversion in contemporary South Korean evangelicalism; her book Deliverance and Submission: Evangelical Women and the Negotiation of Patriarchy in South Korea has been published by Harvard University Press in 2008 (2009 Distinguished Book Award,Sociology of Religion Section, American Sociological Association; 2010 Distinguished Book Award, Midwest Sociological Society). Her current and future research includethe production and construction of gender and ethnic culture in the Asian and American contexts, the transformation and global circulation of religion, and cultural change in contemporary South Korea. Her publications include articles in Gender and Society, Sociology of Religion, The Journal of Women's History, Qualitative Sociology as well as chapters in collected volumes. She was awarded the Best Article Awards from the Sociology of Religion section and the Asia/Asian-America section of the American Sociological Association in 2008. She is also a recipient of numerous fellowships and grants, including the Fulbright Fellowship and most recently, the Korea Foundation Advanced Research Fellowship and the Franklin Research Grant from the American Philosophical Society. She was a former Research Associate/Visiting Lecturerat the Women's Studies in Religion Program of the Harvard Divinity School and a Research Fellow at the Institute for the Advanced Study of Religion at Yale University.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



"Hospitalité," Koji Fukada (Japan, 2010)
San Francisco International Film Festival 2011
April 30, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies, Pacific Film Archive
(Kantai). Home invasion was never so droll as in this black comedy from writer/director Koji Fukada, which pokes a stick in the eye of xenophobia. Into the lives of a too-mild-mannered Tokyo printer, his very young wife, and their family comes a man with a story—actually a couple of stories, take your pick. With one foot in the door, the stranger is hired on as a live-in printer. The ancestral family home is tiny and crowded, tucked away behind the printing machines, so when this man of admittedly bizarre affect moves in with his Brazilian wife, the strain is on. Still, the polite printer and his wife say nothing. Meanwhile, the unofficial neighborhood watch committee can't help noticing that the Brazilian likes to stand in the window naked—as if playing on their fears of the homeless, criminals, and foreigners, she seems to be all three. If the strange couple are pulling a scam, however, their motive is unclear; if they are liars, it turns out that their hosts have much to hide as well. Through the strangers' machinations, all that is inside comes out, and all that is outside comes in, like so many Gullivers into this Lilliputian home. A fine ensemble cast plays brilliantly to an everyday tension in Japanese life, between a culture of hospitality and the fear of intruders.
—Judy Bloch

Written by Fukada. Photographed by Kenichi Negishi. With Kiki Sugino, Kenji Yamauchi, Kanji Furutachi. (95 mins)

Tickets required: $13 General Admission, $11 BAM/PFA and San Francisco Film Society Members/UC Berkeley Students, $12 Seniors/Disabled/Other Students

Ticket info: BAM/PFA's second feature discount does not apply to these programs. Tickets are nonrefundable and may not be exchanged. CineVoucher 10-Packs may not be redeemed at the PFA Theater. Buy tickets online, or by calling 510-642-5249.

Contact the Berkeley Art Museum (bampfa@berkeley.edu, 510-643-2197) for more information.



Looking to Prosperity from within the Ruins: Korea in Korean Literature
Wu Chan-Je, Professor, Sogang University
Jung Young-moon, Novelist
Kim Joo-youn, President, Korea Literature Translation Institute
John Lie, Chair, Center for Korean Studies
Kenneth M. Wells, Professor, UC Berkeley
Kijoo Ko, Korean Language Program Coordinator, UC Berkeley
Clare You, Former Chair, UC Berkeley Center for Korean Studies
May 2, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
The Center for Korean Studies (CKS) is happy to host this major event abroad on behalf of the Korean Literature Translation Institute (LTI Korea) for Year 2011. As the fourth event in a series on Korean literature co-sponsored by KLTI and CKS, the Berkeley forum will feature a prominent Korean author and a critic: Jung Young-moon and Wu Chan-je. The writers' presentations of their work will be followed by discussion and critiques by scholars. Most presentations will be in English, while summary interpretations for the presenters who speak in Korean will be provided along with the full transcriptions of the presentations both in English and in Korean. During the question-answer session, an interpretation will be available. This event is free and open to the public.

Program

Moderated by Ms. Clare You (Former Chair of the Center for Korean Studies, UC Berkeley)

Greetings

2:00 – 2:10 — Welcoming Remarks
by Dr. Kim, Joo-youn (President, Korea Literature Translation Institute)

2:10 – 2:20 — Congratulatory Remarks
by Dr. John Lie (Chair, Center for Korean Studies, UC Berkeley)

Session 1: "Looking to Prosperity from within the Ruins: Korea in Korean Literature — On the Paradox of 'Hidden Father'"
2:20 – 2:50 — Dr. Wu, Chan-Je (Literary Critic & Professor of Korean Literature, Sogang University)

Coffee Break ( 2:50 – 3:10 )

Session 2: "The Current of Experimental Fiction in Korea"
3:10 – 3:30 — Mr. Jung, Young-moon (Novelist)

Discussion and Q&A

3:30 – 4:30
Prof. Kenneth M. Wells (Visiting Professor of Korean History, UC Berkeley)
Prof. Ko, Kijoo (Korean Language Program Coordinator, UC Berkeley)

Clare You taught and coordinated Korean language program as well as serving as Chair of the Center for Korean Studies. She is the recipient of the Korean Silver Medal of Culture in recognition of her contributions to Korean education abroad and cultural exchanges between Korea and the United States. Clare You has co-authored Korean textbooks, and she has been translating modern Korean poetry and fiction into English. Many of her translations of poems, short stories, essays, and research articles have appeared in magazines and journals in the U.S. and in Korea.

Mr. Chan Je Wu is currently a Professor of Korean Literature at Sogang University in Seoul, Korea teaching Rhetoric and Literary Criticism. Professor Wu received his Bachelor's degree in Economics and Master's degree in Korean Literature from Sogang University. He made his debut as a writer in 1987 after receiving the Sinchun Literary Arts Award in literary criticism. Since then he served as the editor for such Korean publications as Culture and Society, World Literature, Novels of Today, Age of Criticism, Poetica, and HITEL Culture Hall. He has also garnered awards such as Palbong Literary Criticism Award, Socheon Yi Heon-gu Literary Criticism Award, and Kim Hwan-tae Literary Criticism Award. Professor Wu served as the President of ASLE-Korea (Association for the Study of Literature & Environment-Korea). As an author he published Poetry of Desire (1993), Wound and Symbol (1994), Voice of the Other—Temporality at the End of the Century and Literature of the Otherness (1996), The Lonely Coexistence (2003), The Rhetoric of Text (2005), and The Flight of Proteus—the Imagination in the Age of Internet (2010).

Jung, Young-Moon was born in 1965 and made his debut in 1997 with the publication of The Man That Barely Exists. He rejects ordinary form of plot development and utilizes liberated language, the Beckettian theater of absurd, appearance of anonymous character, discontinuity of time, play of language, deconstruction of meaning and affinity toward death. He has published so far The Chain of Dark Tales (1998), Seditious Story About a Devil Who Stands By Me (2000), An Afternoon of Satyre (2000), A Most Ambiguous Sunday (2001), Dream (2003), A Clown Possessed by the Moon (2004) — six collections of short stories and The Man That Barely Exists (1997), Yawn (1999), A Pale Soliloquy (2000), Murmuring (2002) and his most recent work Vaseline Buddha (2010) — the novels.

Kenneth Wells earned his MA in History and Japanese at University of Canterbury in Christchurch, New Zealand, and his PhD in Korean History at The Australian National University in Canberra. He established and led the Korean program at Indiana University, Bloomington from 1986 to 1993, and founded and directed the Center for Korean Studies at The Australian National University from 1994 to 2008, before moving to Berkeley as the Il Han New Visiting Professor of Korean History. His research focuses on nationalism, religion, gender, and social change in modern Korea. He has also engaged in translations of Korean into English, including the bulk of the writings in Maite Diez & Jennifer Mathews (eds), Daughters of the Bear: An Anthology of Korean Women's Stories (Maryland, University Press of America, 2004).

Kijoo Ko received a Ph.D in Linguistics from the University of Illinois (Urbana-Champaign) in 1997, specializing in bilingual language processing. She then taught Korean at the University of Chicago as a senior lecturer, and also worked as the Korean Program Director during 1999–2001. In 2002, she joined UC Berkeley and has been teaching Korean ever since. Currently, she also serves as the Korean Language Program Coordinator. Her research interests include bilingual language organization, second language acquisition, teaching Korean as a foreign language, and Computer-aided language learning.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Documenting the Western Desert: Liu Xiangchen's Films of Xinjiang
Liu Xiangchen, Filmmaker and Writer
May 2, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image Filmmaker, scholar, and writer Liu Xiangchen has spent many years recording the daily life of ethnic minority groups from China's periphery, particularly in Xinjiang Province. His award-winning films have been screen internationally and aired on the National Geographic channel. Liu Xiangchen will bring a selection of his major works to Berkeley on May 2 and 9.

Monday, May 2:
3:00 pm — Taiyang Buzu [The Sun Tribe] (60 minute, 1996)
4:15 pm — Da Heyan [Beside the River] (60 minutes, 2005)
5:15 pm — Q&A with the director, Liu Xiangchen

Monday, May 9:
3:00 pm — Ashiq: the Last Troubador (120 minutes, 2010)
5:15 pm — Q&A with the director, Liu Xiangchen

Film details for Monday, May 2:
3:00 pm — Taiyang Buzu [The Sun Tribe] (60 minutes)
The seven household Lescamu Village is situated on the eastern edge of the Pamir Plateau. To travel to the nearest county seat to buy matches or salt takes five to six days. Old Hozha and his wife have eleven children. One son and his family herd sheep, another leads the camel for foreign mountaineering groups, and one is the schoolteacher of the village's primary school. The old couple farm with their remaining children. This film depicts the daily life of the Tajiks living on the Pamir Plauteau and the changes currently underway in the region.

4:15 — Da Heyan [Beside the River] (60 minutes)
The Keriyans are the people who have lived in the Taklamakan Desert for generations. 85-year-old Saderoz has lived here by the banks of the river for four generations. This film shows what happens when Rabiehan, his granddaughter, is about to birth to a baby whose father is a married truck driver. After the baby is born, Saderoz invites his relatives and acquaintances to attend a naming ceremony, but the baby's father does not show up.

5:15 — Q&A with the director, Liu Xiangchen

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



The Future of Taiwan: How to Face the Impact of a Rising China
Huan-Chih Su, Former Legislator and Magistrate, Taiwan, ROC
May 3, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies
China's rise is currently a topic of concern for the world. In the new global reality that is currently emerging, the US, Europe, Russia, Japan, India and other large countries are paying close attention to China's rise, busily forming coalitions and engaging in balancing counter measures. As for Taiwan, separated from China by only the one hundred kilometer-wide Taiwan Strait, China's rise constitutes a direct influence on Taiwan's economic and national security. Despite the close historical, cultural, and blood ties that connect Taiwan and China, Taiwan's fifty years of Japanese colonial rule and the separation of Taiwan and China into different sides of the democratic and Communist camps after World War II, at present each is independent. Powerful China maintains, however, that Taiwan is a part of China and demands reunification.

How should Taiwan deal with the rise of China? How should Taiwan find the core values for its existence? Should Taiwan accept the One-China policy? If Taiwan were to accept, would it be forced to accept the fate of reunification? In accepting the One-China policy, is there room for democratic freedom? If Taiwan does not accept the One-China policy, would it be possible to preserve the possibility of dialogue across the Taiwan Strait? Could it preserve peace across the Strait? How should Taiwan, itself having experienced the struggle for democracy, in keeping an attitude of universal love, view the successes of China's rise? How should Taiwan regard its Chinese brethren who have come to where they are as a result of economic growth, but labor under great hardship in the pursuit of democratic freedom? Let us hope to bring a greater outlook of kindness and compassion, and help establish the foundation of peace in East Asia and in our global village.

In Chinese with English translation

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



  Adopted Territory: Transnational Korean Adoptees and the Politics of Belonging
Eleana J. Kim, Anthropology, University of Rochester
May 4, 2011
Center for Korean Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Since the end of the Korean War, an estimated 200,000 children from South Korea have been adopted into white families in North America, Europe, and Australia. While these transnational adoptions were initiated as an emergency measure to find homes for mixed-race children born in the aftermath of the war, the practice grew exponentially from the 1960s through the 1980s. At the height of South Korea's "economic miracle," adoption became an institutionalized way of dealing with poor and illegitimate children. Most of the adoptees were raised with little exposure to Koreans or other Korean adoptees, but as adults, through global flows of communication, media, and travel, they have come into increasing contact with each other, Korean culture, and the South Korean state. Since the 1990s, as children have continued to leave the country for adoption to the West, a growing number of adult adoptees have been returning to Korea to seek their cultural and biological origins. In this fascinating ethnography, Eleana J. Kim examines the history of Korean adoption, the emergence of a distinctive adoptee collective identity, and adoptee returns to Korea in relation to South Korean modernity and globalization. Kim draws on interviews with adult adoptees, social workers, NGO volunteers, adoptee activists, scholars, and journalists in the U.S., Europe, and South Korea, as well as on observations at international adoptee conferences, regional organization meetings, and government-sponsored motherland tours.

Introduced by Ken Wells, History, UC Berkeley.

This event is part of the IEAS Book Series "New Perspectives on Asia."

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Chinese Buddhism in the Tangut State
Kirill Solonin, St. Petersburg State University, Russia
May 5, 2011
Center for Buddhist Studies
Since their discovery in the early years of the 20th century, both texts and material objects from Khara-Khoto have been the focus of considerable scholarly attention. Scholars generally agree that Tangut Buddhism evolved from Chinese and Tibetan source traditions; however the exact nature of Chinese and Tibetan influence on Tangut Buddhism remains obscure. In this talk Professor Solonin will present his recent research on the nature of Chinese Buddhist schools in Xixia, focusing on possible Liao influence.

Kirill Solonin holds a doctorate from St. Petersburg State University (Russia), and is currently on the faculty in both St. Petersburg State University and Foguang Buddhist University (Taiwan). His research is connected with the study of Khara-Khoto materials both in Chinese and Tangut. He is the author of Appropriation of the Teaching: Huayan Chan Buddhism in the Tangut State (St.Petersburg: St. Petersburg University Press 2007) and a number of papers.

Contact the Center for Buddhist Studies (buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104) for more information.



Urbanization, Hukou Reform and China's 12th Five-Year Plan
Kam Wing Chan, Geography, University of Washington
May 6, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.
 




Documenting the Western Desert: Liu Xiangchen's Films of Xinjiang
Liu Xiangchen, Filmmaker and Writer
May 9, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Silk Road Initiative
image Filmmaker, scholar, and writer Liu Xiangchen has spent many years recording the daily life of ethnic minority groups from China's periphery, particularly in Xinjiang Province. His award-winning films have been screen internationally and aired on the National Geographic channel. Liu Xiangchen will bring a selection of his major works to Berkeley on May 2 and 9.

Monday, May 2:
3:00 pm — Taiyang Buzu [The Sun Tribe] (60 minute, 1996)
4:15 pm — Da Heyan [Beside the River] (60 minutes, 2005)
5:15 pm — Q&A with the director, Liu Xiangchen

Monday, May 9:
3:00 pm — Ashiq: the Last Troubador (120 minutes, 2010)
5:15 pm — Q&A with the director, Liu Xiangchen

Film details for Monday, May 9:

Ashiq: The Last Troubador (2010/120 minutes)

This film, which took five years to complete, shows all aspects of the daily life of Uighur private wandering entertainers who live in the border area of Takla Makan Desert in Xinjiang, China. The film includes footage of their religious services, which combine local, ancient Shamanism and a unique Sufeiyah style of singing.

5:15 — Q&A with the director, Liu Xiangchen.



Korean Migration to the Wealthy West
Daniel J. Schwekendiek, Visiting Scholar, UC Berkeley Center for Korean Studies
May 11, 2011
Center for Korean Studies
At the end of the 20th century, Korea had the fifth largest population living overseas while 1 in every 3 intercountry adoptees in the world came from Korea alone. Korea has developed itself from a "hermit kingdom" to one of the world's most significant emigration nations of the 20th century, a time where Koreans mostly relocated to the wealthy Western Hemisphere after the Korean War (1950–1953). This book represents the first meta-analysis of living standards of Koreans in the West by primarily drawing from a number of comprehensive statistical and ethnographic surveys recently conducted among Korean migrants and Korean adoptees. Major aspects of life for Korean diaspora in the wealthy West are compellingly explored, including its demographic, social, economic, political, religious, educational, linguistic, physical, psychological, and cultural states. The two primary destinations in the Western Hemisphere used for reference are the United States and Germany. A substantial amount of data have been assessed, however, the work is not mathematically presented as it limits itself to simple percentages and ratios shown in the text.

Daniel Schwekendiek is a scholar with interests in the economic, social and medical history of the two Koreas and their diasporas. He holds a doctoral degree in economics from the University of Tuebingen, one of Germany's oldest universities, where he has also been serving as a lecturer in Korean studies. He researched at the University of Oxford, Seoul National University, and is currently on leave to the University of California at Berkeley. He contributed external research to the United Nations, the International Economic History Association, and he served as a research coordinator for the Korean Ministry of Health and Welfare. He was also a co-founding member or coordinator of several overseas Korean associations such as Dogil Hodori and Kyopo-BW. He received many interview requests from the media, including the Wall Street Journal, the Voice of America or the BBC. He is author of almost three dozens of academic works, and is one of the few scholars in Korean Studies who published in journals listed in the highly-influential Science Citation Index, Arts & Humanities Citation Index and Social Science Citation Index. His articles appeared in prestigious journals such as the Economic History Review or Social Science and Medicine — the latter ranked as the leading journal in the Social Science Citation Index over the last decade. Korean Migration to the Wealthy West is his fourth monograph.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



新治理?新侍從?台塑六輕建廠後地方治理結構之變遷: New Governance or New Clientelism: The Case of Local Governance Transition Caused by Environmental Compensation
Yu Yi-Wen, Center for Chinese Studies Visiting Scholar
May 12, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
80 年代,30340;反公害運動,迫使政府與鄰避型 (not in my backyard) 企業開始建立回饋機制,以消解地方居民的抗議; 甚或以「回饋地方」 的許諾,搏得地方政府與居民對污染企業建廠的支持。然而,值得進一步 探究的 是,當這些回饋機制從一次性的補償演變成為常態性的社區福利、公共服務、財政 貢獻時,是否對傳統的地方治理結構造成影響及改變?

本次座談,除前述案例研究報告,亦將放映作者所拍攝之短片〈他們的選擇:六 輕、七輕紀實〉,並邀請前台南縣長蘇煥智先生做為與談人,進一步 探討、比 較:拒絕七輕建廠的台南縣七股鄉與歡迎六輕建廠的雲林縣麥寮鄉,兩者地方治理 結構變遷的異同。

In Chinese with no interpretation

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6322) for more information.



Conference: China: Space Production and Territoriality
May 13–14, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Production of space, defined as the spatial dynamism in the politics of accumulation and legitimation, is one of the most productive yet under-appreciated conceptualizations in the studies of social transformation. Territoriality, defined as spatial strategies to consolidate power and secure autonomy, is one of the most fundamental yet much neglected agenda in the literature on China's contemporary development. This workshop focuses on these twin concepts in order to examine the decisive role of space and territoriality in the restructuring of state power and the reconfiguration of the relationship between the state and society in China today.

Continues Saturday from 8:30–5:30.

See http://ieas.berkeley.edu/ccs/events/2011.05.13.html for a full conference agenda.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



A Pure and Remote View: Visualizing Early Chinese Landscape Painting: James Cahill in Conversation with Czeslaw Jan Grycz
James Cahill, Professor Emeritus, UC Berkeley
May 13, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
A sample viewing and discussion of a moving-image lecture series, conceived by Berkeley Professor Emeritus James Cahill. This is a legacy of his life's work in the history of the visual arts of China. Composed of short introductions and several thousand detailed high-resolution images of selected Chinese paintings and works of pictorial art from the earliest period up to the end of the Song dynasty in the late thirteenth century, the series was written and narrated entirely by Professor Cahill. The lectures are now posted on the website of the Institute of East Asian Studies at Berkeley (ieas.berkeley.edu), the sponsoring organization, and on Cahill's: jamescahill.info; they will later be made available, with higher-resolution images, on sets of disks, both Blu-ray and standard DVDs. Lecture notes, with suggested readings and Chinese characters, will be posted on the IEAS site and Cahill's. When complete, the series will comprise about 35 hours of multimedia lecture-style presentations.

The first six lectures (in seven files), each lasting one to two hours, are now accessible for viewing and listening; two more, taking the series through the Northern Song period, will be posted within a few days, and the remaining four within several months. Two more series are planned to follow.

A sampling of the free series will be viewed at UPB on our new Apple 27-inch LED Cinema Display unit, which we are acquiring to enhance visual presentations at UPB events.

Czeslaw Jan Grycz is host and producer of the PBS series Great Libraries of the World.

Free UPB Conversation followed by a no-host supper in the Musical Offering Café.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



International Conference: Russia and Russian Civilization in the North Pacific
Yuri Slezkine, Professor of History and Director of ISEEES
Andrew Barshay, Professor of History, UC Berkeley
Tamara Troyakova, Associate Professor and Head of International Relations Department, Far Eastern National University
Bathsheba Demuth, Ph.D. Candidate, Department of History, UC Berkeley
Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, UC Berkeley, Center for Korean Studies
Alexei Starichkov, Dean of the Korean Studies College and Director of the International Affairs Department, Far Eastern National University
Darren Zook, Lecturer, Department of Political Science and International and Area Studies, UC Berkeley
Artyom Lukin, Associate Professor of International Relations, Far Eastern National University
Tsuneo Akaha, Professor of Political Science and Director of the Center for East Asian Studies, Monterey Institute of International Studies
Kirill Kolesnichenko, Assistant Professor of Sociology, Far Eastern National University Alexei Starichkov, Dean of the Korean Studies College and Director of the International Affairs Department, Far Eastern National University
May 19, 2011
Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Center for Korean Studies
Open to the general public.



合作运动与运动合作 — 山东革命根据地农业互助合作运动中的革命动员 (Cooperative Movement and Motivating Cooperation — The Revolutionary Mobilization of Agricultural Mutual Aid and Cooperative Movement in Shandong Revolutionary Base Areas (1938–1949)
Wei Benquan, Linyi Normal University
June 1, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
This is a preliminary report of studies carried out at UCB. These studies focus on the revolutionary mobilization in the course of CCP's mutual aid and cooperative movement. The cooperative movements in modern China provided a special path to change the peasant economy—this path not only differs from market economy order based on competition and efficiency, but also differs from the traditional economy order. However, the CCP's mutual aid and cooperative movement developed under the circumstance of war and revolution. Unlike descriptive and critical studies, this study tries to analysis the mobilization strategy, methods, styles and so on. And analyzes how to succeed in mobilizing human resources and economic resources.

In Chinese with no interpretation.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6322) for more information.



The Looming Problem of Local Debt in China
Victor Shih, Northwestern University
June 7, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
Did China achieve the impossible by chalking up nearly 9 per cent GDP growth while maintaining deficit at a low level? The reality: only a small share of the 26 trillion yuan or so in central and local stimulus projects is financed out of Chinese government budget. To raise money for these stimulus projects, local governments set up some 8,000 local investment companies, which issued equity and bonds,and borrowed from banks.

I estimate that local government investment companies have borrowed US$1.68 trillion dollars (11 trillion yuan). Local investment companies continue to take on more debt to finance projects. This debt is onerous for local governments, most of which run perennial deficits. Besides being a financial risk, this debt burden has other broader implications. For one, because most of this debt is collateralized with land, in the years to come, millions more urban residents will be forced to relocate so that land can be sold — to repay banks.

Contact the Center for Chinese Studies (ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321) for more information.



Speak of Good Things: Nianhua and Chinese Folk Tradition
Exhibit
June 22 – September 15, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies: Institute of East Asian Studies
image The Institute of East Asian Studies presents an exhibit of nianhua, or "New Year's pictures." Historically nianhua was one of the most ubiquitous forms of Chinese traditional popular culture. Though the upper classes, even the Imperial Household, might acquire nianhua, it was primarily the peasantry throughout China that purchased, and sometimes produced, them. These woodblock prints, occasionally hand-colored, were sold in their millions all across China. The examples on display provide a taste of this bold and lively graphic art. Some nianhua changed little over the generations; their images can be said to collectively constitute a "primer of Chinese iconography."*

The nianhua in this exhibit were produced in the 1980s and 1990s, but they are part of a much older tradition. While similarities between nianhua images and Yuan (1271–1368) iconography have been identified, it was in the late Ming (1368–1644) and especially the Qing (1644–1911) dynasties that nianhua began to appear everywhere in China. Prints are still being made from woodblocks carved in the Qing dynasty, a testament to the entrenched iconography and sustained popularity of nianhua.

In late imperial China, an estimated 85% of the population was illiterate. The colorful, readily available, and inexpensive nianhua appealed to this vast peasant population. Even the poorest peasant family could beautify their home with woodblock prints of gods, heroes, auspicious symbols, and popular narratives. Though New Year's was a time of adorning the house afresh, nianhua could be found in homes all year long. Door guardian prints flanked the entry, while images of gods would be hung over small altars to receive offerings. The image of the ancient Stove God, protector and monitor of the home, would each year be freed by ritual burning to ascend to heaven and relate the family's activities during the past year. Each year, the Stove God would be exhorted to "speak of good things" in his report.

Good things such as prosperity, fertility, longevity, and protection are the core subjects of nianhua. Animals and deities, chubby babies and distinguished officials, folk tales and moral lessons, were all depicted in vivid, colorful, dynamic compositions. Nianhua were produced across the country with remarkable similarity in iconography. Several areas particularly associated with nianhua production are represented in this exhibit.

Though nianhua provided a visual delight for the illiterate, and could cross barriers of speech and dialect, nonetheless language plays a significant role in them. Not only are written characters often included in the compositions for identification and explanation, but visual-verbal puns and allusions are part of the language of nianhua. Bats are auspicious by virtue of their name, fu, which is also the reading of the character for "good luck." Not only does Buddhism lend an auspicious aura to the lotus, but the reading of its name, lian, is also that of the character for "in succession," hence an allusion to a wish for many sons. Shared understandings of words and images formed a coherent discourse from one end of China to the other, encouraging cultural integration of the vast country.

The Institute of East Asian Studies gratefully acknowledges Sally Yu Leung for the generous loan of this collection of nianhua, as well as information in English and Chinese included in the captions. The exhibit is cosponsored by the Center for Chinese Studies.

* Po, Sung-nien and David Johnson eds., Domesticated Deities and Auspicious Emblems: An Iconography of Everyday Life in Village China (Berkeley, Chinese Popular Culture Project, 1992), p. 9.

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



Cross-Currents Forum: Movement, Migration, and Mobility in East Asia
Wednesday, June 22–24, 2011
Institute of East Asian Studies Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
image The second biennial Forum co-sponsored by the Institute of East Asian Studies at UC Berkeley (IEAS) and the Research Institute for Korean Studies at Korea University (RIKS) will provide East Asia scholars and interested others with the opportunity to explore the potential breadth and depth of "cross-currents" as a metaphor for the multi-directional flow of people, goods, and ideas across time and space in East Asia. In keeping with the mission of Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review, the new IEAS-RIKS online and print journal, the 2nd Forum will feature peer-reviewed presentations from a range of disciplines in cultural and historical studies.

Contact Cross-currents (crosscurrents@berkeley.edu, 510-643-0704) for more information.



Fluid Spaces, Mobile Media: Visions of the Ocean on Japanese Maps, 1600–1900
Kären Wigen, History Department, Stanford University
June 22, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Research Institute of Korean Studies, Korea University
Japanese maritime maps testify eloquently to the inter-cultural exchange that marked the first age of globalization. While highlighting the ships and sea-lanes that were the primeimage vectors of mobility in the early modern era, these diverse maps also gestured toward cultural exchange through hybrid iconography, translated toponyms, and stylistic pastiche. The talk will probe the colorful cartography of the Edo period for evidence of how trans-national influences were assimilated to produce a range of depictions of the sea.

Professor Wigen's lecture is the Keynote Speech for the 2011 Forum co-sponsored by the Institute of East Asian Studies (UC Berkeley) and the Research Institute of Korean Studies (Korea University). In keeping with the mission of "Cross-Currents: East Asian History and Culture Review," the new IEAS-RIKS online and print journal, the Forum brings East Asia scholars from around the world together to explore the potential breadth and depth of "cross-currents" as a metaphor for the multi-directional flow of people, goods, and ideas across time and space in East Asia.

Kären Wigen is Professor of History and Director of the Center for East Asian Studies at Stanford University, where she teaches courses on early modernity in Japan and the history of cartography. Co-author with Martin Lewis of The Myth of Continents: A Critique of Meta-Geography (1997), she recently edited a collection of essays on the theme of Seascapes: Maritime Histories, Littoral Cultures, and Trans-Oceanic Exchanges (2007). Her latest book is A Malleable Map: Geographies of Restoration in Central Japan, 1600–1912 (2010).

Open to all audiences. Contact Cross-currents (crosscurrents@berkeley.edu, 510-643-0704) for more information.



A Reading and Conversation with Chang Dae Soung
July 22, 2011
Chang Dae Soung, Daesan Foundation Writer-in-Residence, Center for Korean Studies
Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Poet Chang Dae Soung, the sixth Daesan Foundation Writer-in-Residence at the Center for Korean Studies, will read from and discuss his poems. Readings will be in both Korean and English.

Contact the Center for Korean Studies (cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674) for more information.



Urban Chinese Living, 1600 – Present
August 6, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
Doctoral Projects: Built Environment
Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair
12:00–1:15pm

Jennifer Choo, Sociology, University of California, Berkeley
"Going Global and Yet Remaining Local: An Analysis of China's Real Estate Industry"

Cecilia Chu, Architecture, University of California, Berkeley
"Speculative Urbanism: The Garden City Movement and Suburban Development in Colonial Hong Kong, 1912–1925"

Corey Byrnes, East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
"The Aesthetics of Demolition in the Three Gorges Work of Jia Zhangke and Yun-fei Ji"

On Space and People
Kevin O'Brien, Chair
1:30–2:45 pm

Nicolas Tackett, Assistant Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
"Urban-based Marriage Networks in the Late Tang Capital Cities"

Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science, University of California, Berkeley
"Local People's Congresses and Governance"

Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
"The Printer, the Camera, and the City"

Emerging Research at the Academia Sinica
Max Ko-Wu Huang, Chair
3:00–4:15 pm

Max Ko-Wu Huang, Director, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica
Hsi-yuan Chen, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica
Huei-min Sun, Assistant Research Fellow, Institute of Modern History, Academia Sinica

Keynote Address:
4:30–6:00 pm
Sherman Cochran, Professor, History, Cornell University
"Making Comparisons in Chinese Urban Studies"

Contact the Institute of East Asian Studies (ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809) for more information.



China Digital Times: Measuring the Political Pulse of Chinese Cyberspace
Xiao Qiang, Director, Counter-Power Lab at UC Berkeley
September 7, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image The complete schedule for the fall semester is online at http://citris-uc.org/news/RE_fall_2011. All talks may be viewed on our YouTube channel

China Digital Times aims to contribute to the ongoing debate over the Internet's political impact by moving beyond anecdotal evidence and creating the world's first systematic and comprehensive social media aggregator of political contents in Chinese cyberspace. It also explores innovative approaches to make its content accessible by netizens behind of the Great Firewall of China, focusing particularly on the use of new, sophisticated counter-censorship technologies.

In recent years, the issue of censorship in China has been well exposed through numerous media reports and research projects, including my own work. However, the expanding online political discourse and its impact have not yet been systematically documented, and so remain poorly understood. The government's efforts to control online information, the implications and limitations of such control, and the capacity of Chinese netizens to advance free speech and facilitate political mobilization, remain crucial issues in our understanding of both China's political prospects and the role of the Internet under an authoritarian regime.

Developing a deeper understanding of the role of the Internet in Chinese politics based on empirical data has been a considerable challenge. In my previous research, I have observed a remarkable phenomenon that many of the most influential bloggers appear to hold in common values supporting democracy, human rights and freedom of expression. These bloggers, with their growing numbers, expanding social networks, political resilience, and increasing influence, seem to be evolving from "voices under domination" to "networked agents of change." I believe bloggers are becoming one of the most dynamic forces in setting the media agenda and fostering a public sphere in China, despite the government's control efforts. My research will document this process and test these premises by analyzing patterns of discourse and influence of both prominent, "top" bloggers and the lesser-known, "long-tail" bloggers, while also providing an aggregator platform where their voices can be better heard by the world, including behind of the Great Firewall of China.



Developmental Fairy Tales: Evolutionary Thinking and Modern Chinese Culture
Andrew F. Jones, Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures; Chair, Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley
Moderator: Ian Duncan, Professor, English Department, UC Berkeley
September 7, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies: Institute of East Asian Studies
image In 1992 Deng Xiaoping famously declared, "Development is the only hard imperative." What ensued was the transformation of China from a socialist state to a capitalist market economy. The spirit of development has since become the prevailing creed of the People's Republic, helping to bring about unprecedented modern prosperity, but also creating new forms of poverty, staggering social upheaval, physical dislocation, and environmental destruction.

In Developmental Fairy Tales, Andrew Jones asserts that the groundwork for this recent transformation was laid in the late nineteenth century, with the translation of the evolutionary works of Lamarck, Darwin, and Spencer into Chinese letters. He traces the ways that the evolutionary narrative itself evolved into a form of vernacular knowledge which dissolved the boundaries between beast and man and reframed childhood development as a recapitulation of civilizational ascent, through which a beleaguered China might struggle for existence and claim a place in the modern world-system.

This narrative left an indelible imprint on China's literature and popular media, from children's primers to print culture, from fairy tales to filmmaking. Jones's analysis offers an innovative and interdisciplinary angle of vision on China's cultural evolution. He focuses especially on China's foremost modern writer and public intellectual, Lu Xun, in whose work the fierce contradictions of his generation's developmentalist aspirations became the stuff of pedagogical parable. Developmental Fairy Tales revises our understanding of literature's role in the making of modern China by revising our understanding of developmentalism's role in modern Chinese literature.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Whither China? Revisiting the Dangers of Nationalism and Democratization
Jessica Chen Weiss, Political Science, Yale University
Panelist/Discussant: Peter Lorentzen, Political Science, UC Berkeley
September 9, 2011
Center for Chinese Studies
image Would a democratic China be more or less nationalistic and aggressive in its foreign policy? According to an influential argument by Mansfield and Snyder, democratization often increases the risk of external conflict as political elites search for new bases of political legitimacy and fan the flames of nationalist sentiment. However, the conventional wisdom overlooks the fact that nationalist movements often precede a move toward democracy, suggesting that the relationship between democratization and conflict may be partially spurious. The speaker suggests that the conflict propensity of democratizing states depends on the character of the grassroots nationalist movement that preceded democratization. To shed light on whether political liberalization in China is likely to increase or decrease the likelihood of external conflict, the speaker examines the relationship between popular nationalism and democratic mobilization in China. A case study of the 1985 anti-Japanese protests and the 1986 and 1989 pro-democracy demonstrations illustrates the role of nationalism as a mobilizing force for grassroots democratic activism. Key writings by contemporary nationalists and democratic dissidents illuminate the overlap and differences in their preferences over foreign policy and domestic governance. Her findings are consistent with the concern that a move toward democratization in China could bring increased conflict, but not for the conventional reasons.

Open to all audiences

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



The Sumidagawa Project — Noh Screening: JETAANC Kabuki Club Special Event
September 11, 2011 — 200–4:30 p.m.
Moderator: JETAANC Kabuki Club, Japan Exchange & Teaching Program Alumni Association of Northern California
Center for Japanese Studies, JETAANC Kabuki Club
image Three versions. One haunting tale.

A mother searches for her lost son. Driven half-mad with worry, she meets a ferryman on the Sumida River who may know something. But is she prepared to learn the truth?

The tragic story of Sumidagawa has haunted Japanese and Western artists for hundreds of years. Join JETAANC as we explore three very different versions of the story: Noh theatre, Kabuki theatre, and chamber opera. Don't miss this chance to see these rarely-screened masterpieces.

  • 9/11 Noh theatre version (CJS)
  • 9/18 Kabuki theatre version (Oakland Asian Cultural Center)
  • 10/16 Chamber opera version (CJS)
September 11, 2011, 2:00 pm
Center for Japanese Studies
Sumidagawa (Noh version)
First performed in medieval Japan, the Noh version of Sumidagawa has moved audiences for centuries with its particular blend of mystery and pathos. A master work in the kyôjomono category of Noh play - dramas of madwomen.

80 mins. In Japanese with English and Japanese subtitles.



September 18, 2011, 2:00 pm
Oakland Asian Cultural Center
Sumidagawa (Kabuki version)
Inspired by Russian ballet, the Kabuki actor Ichikawa Ennosuke II adapted the Noh version to the Kabuki stage. The result is one of the great modern masterpieces of Kabuki. The famed onnagata actor Nakamura Utaemon VI plays the mother, in a role that became his signature.

45 mins. In Japanese with English translation.



October 16, 2011, 2:00 pm
Center for Japanese Studies
Curlew River (chamber opera version)
Benjamin Britten was a world-renowned composer when he saw the Noh version of Sumidagawa in Japan in 1956. Intensely moved by the experience, he vowed to write a chamber opera version of the story. Transposing the setting to the Curlew River in medieval England, Britten composed a powerful and touching parable for our times.

70 mins. In English with English subtitles.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415

Additional location info: Doors will be open from 1:45-2:15pm ONLY.



Leaving China's Farm: Off-farm Occupational Choice of Rural Migrants
Speaker: Wen Wang, Visiting Scholar, CCS
September 14, 2011, 2:00-3:30 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies
Rural-to-urban migration has acted as an important way for China's abundant rural surplus labors to access to off-farm employment and walk out of poverty since the mid-1980s. After the two-decade economic reform, the Chinese rural workers enjoy much more freedom of choosing their off-farm occupations. Nevertheless, many doubts have been raised about the role of China's labor market is playing when rural workers' off-farm occupational engagement is concerned.

The talk is based upon a recent study on the determinants of off-farm occupational choice among rural migrants in China. Using data from a 2010 household survey in Shaanxi Province, a multinomial logistic model has been estimated. The main finding supports the argument that China's labor market has improved in a positive manner that give rural individuals who have higher human capital more access to skilled white-collar and blue-collar occupations. Formal education attainment acts as one of the main factors that facilitate rural people's upward mobility to white-collar jobs, while post-school training such as apprenticeship, self-paid vocational training serve as the main channels for rural people to be engaged in skilled blue-collar occupations and self-employment. From another viewpoint, the result also indicates that rural labor force who is failed to pursue formal higher education can hardly move up to white-collar jobs through post-school training programs. The result also finds that political endowment such as being a party member or village official continues to impact individual's off-farm occupational engagement in different ways. Finally, father's advantage with respect to political status and occupational achievement does not have significant effect on rural people's occupational engagement.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6322



An Introduction to Nianhua
David Johnson, Professor, History, UC Berkeley
Moderator: Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley
September 14, 2011, 4 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
image In conjunction with the exhibition of Chinese prints at the Institute of East Asian Studies, Professor David Johnson will present a slide lecture on this centuries-old tradition, called Nianhua. Nianhua, popular with the agrarian classes across China, are visual expressions of shared beliefs, aspirations, and culture. The exhibition, entitled "Speak of Good Things: Nianhua and the Chinese Folk Tradition" is on view through September 15.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Forces of Change in Urban China: Geography and the "New" Chinese City
Piper Rae Gaubatz, Geography, University of Massachusetts
Panelist/Discussant: You-tien Hsing, Geography, UC Berkeley
September 16, 2011, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies
"Change" is a common theme in the analysis of contemporary Chinese cities. From rural-to-urban migration to urban sprawl, the destruction of old neighborhoods to the construction of gleaming highrises, China scholars have focused on the changes wrought by the economic reforms implemented from the early 1980s onward. This paper focuses on several key themes in understanding contemporary urban change in China with an emphasis on the differing regional and spatial dimensions of urban change and urban planning. It analyzes the ways in which different conceptualizations of change alter interpretations of China's urban future, especially in the contexts of urban environmental management and urban form. Case studies will be drawn from both the booming cities of the east, especially Beijing and Shanghai, and hinterland cities including Xining and Hohhot.

Open to all audiences.



"There is Exactly Enough Time Starting Now": Rural China's Health, Nutrition and Education Crisis and Future Growth and Instability
Featured Speaker: Scott Rozelle, Helen C. Farnsworth Professor in International Agricultural Policy
Panelist/Discussant: Peter Lorentzen, Political Science, UCB
September 19, 2011 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image Despite the recent robust growth, there is increasing concern (supported by recent events and trends in Egypt, Tunisia and Mexico) that as China moves up the income ladder that its high level of inequality may be a breeding ground for future instability. China's leaders have recently become extremely interested in understanding if anything in the nature of its economy is setting up the country to be headed on a road that could end up in a middle income growth trap.

The recent research of Rozelle and his colleagues address some of these issues—focusing mainly on the human capital (education and health) crisis that is emerging in rural China. Widespread malnutrition and hidden/neglected diseases are undermining government investments in better elementary school facilities and teachers. Rising wages are leading to soaring rates of drop out in junior high school. High tuition and fees for academic high schools and the poor quality of vocational secondary school have reduced the demand for upper secondary education at the very time when the children of this generation should be investing in the skills they are going to need in the next generation (that is, after China's low-wage industries relocate to other parts of the world as they inevitably will). The talk will also try to put China's past and present income/human capital inequalities into the perspective of other countries that have attained (and have failed to attain) successfully middle income status.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



No Exit: North Korea, Nuclear Weapons, and International Security
Jonathan Pollack, Senior Fellow, Foreign Policy, John L. Thornton China Center, Brookings Institution
Moderator: T.J. Pempel, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley
September 21, 2011, 4:00 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies
image How has North Korea (despite its economic dysfunction and isolation) stymied or circumvented the efforts of the United States and others to prevent its nuclear weapons development for decades? In a new book, No Exit: North Korea, Nuclear Weapons and International Security, Jonathan Pollack, a Senior Fellow at the Brookings Institution, chronicles the political-military evolution of the Korean peninsula since 1945. Unlike most extant literature that focuses on US policy debate, Pollack's study concentrates on the history of the peninsula itself, in particular the role of adversarial nationalism in building and sustaining the North Korean system. Drawing on Cold War archives, extensive interviews in East Asia, Russia, and Europe, reliance on North Korean media and several visits to the DPRK, he chronicles North Korea's pursuit of nuclear technology and nuclear weapons; how it has shaped Northeast Asian security and non-proliferation policy; and influenced the strategic choices of the United States and the regional powers. Pollack also provides unique insights into North Koreas leadership, institutions and political history, without which any effort to understand the nuclear question is not possible.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Ikebana as Industry and Diplomacy: Budding Fortunes in Postwar Japan
Nancy K. Stalker, University of Texas, Austin
September 26, 2011, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Center for Japanese Studies
image Despite a five hundred year history, ikebana, the art of Japanese flower arrangement, was not practiced on a massive scale until the twentieth century, especially after the Second World War. During the Edo period the largest school claimed tens of thousands of students, overwhelmingly male. In contrast, in the late 1960s, the top three schools had over a million students each and twenty more schools had over 200,000 followers, with 98% of the total population female. The number of schools multiplied from five hundred in 1930 to over three thousand by the late 1960s, when the headmasters of the largest schools were among the wealthiest people in Japan.

This presentation focuses on the three largest schools of ikebana during the 1950s and 60s (i.e. Ikenobo, Ohara and Sogetsu) to investigate the organizational and competitive strategies behind the transformation of an elite traditional art to a massive popular phenomenon with ten million practitioners and international appeal.

Nancy K. Stalker is an Associate Professor in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of Texas, Austin. Professor Stalker's scholarship examines the relationship between cultural and religious practice and national identity in modern Japan.

Her first book, on new religious movements in the 1920s-30s, is entitled Prophet Motive: Deguchi Onisaburo, Oomoto and the Rise of New Religions in Imperial Japan. Her next monographic project will examine the role of ikebana, the art of flower arrangement, in constructing national and international Japanese identity in the twentieth century, especially focusing on its rapid expansion in postwar Japan from the 1950s-70s.

Other research interests include the conception of traditional Japanese cuisine and gender ideology.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



Getting out of a Long Slump: What Japan could tell the United States
Tetsuro Sugiura, Vice Chairman, Mizuho Research Institute
September 27, 2011, 4:00-6:00 p.m.
Center for Japanese Studies
image The US economy is struggling to land on a sustainable trajectory of growth, with persistent unemployment and huge government debt. It seems the US has been following a similar path, before and after the bubble burst, which Japan has traced in the past 20 years. We now know the process of adjustment is far more complex and difficult than has been anticipated.

Japan's failure to get back to a sustainable recovery could tell the US what you should do and shouldn't do.

Mizuho Research Institute is a research firm that offers economic and financial research, project research, consulting services, human resources development services, and corporate membership services.

Within economic and financial research, the firm provides research and analysis on macro economy, capital and money markets, foreign exchange markets, financial systems, and public policy.

Within project research, it provides research services to industries and governments on social systems and regional development. The firm offers consulting services on business management, corporate pension plans, and private finance initiatives and also provides privatization support services.

(Information from Bloomberg.com)

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



Occupational Choice of Returned Students in Late Qing Dynasty and Early Republic of China and the Social Transformation of Modern China
Xiaoqin Liu, Visiting Scholar, Center for Chinese Studies
September 28, 2011, 2-3:30 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies
image **This lecture will be conducted in Chinese.

As the social and cultural elites, returned Chinese students in Modern China are indispensable forces of social transformation. The situation of returned students' occupational choice not only reflected their value orientation and plight when they made their choice of careers, but also reflected the extent of social acceptance in Modern China to them, especially when they were faced with the disintegration of traditional social structures (Simin, i.e.Four Occupations, Shi, Nong, Gong, Shang.) in the early of the twentieth century.

Meanwhile, after they returned to their homeland, lots of students lived and worked in the metropolitans, especially the Capital, the provincial capitals and the major economic central cities.

The talk is based upon a recent study on the Northern China cities — Beijing and Tianjin, in Early Republic of China. And research materials contain five parts:

  1. Government ministries officials and staff records in the late Qing Dynasty and the Beiyang Government stored in the First Historical Archives, the Second Historical Archives of China;
  2. Archives of all industries in Beijing Archives and Tianjin Archives;
  3. "(Beijing) Eastern Western members record (北京)东西洋会员录",published in 1916. This member's record contained information about 1,055 members of returned students in Beijing. Lots of the members worked in government ministries, and majority of them were technical bureaucracies. The rest of the members mainly worked in institutions of education, railway, bank, newspaper office, publication house, hospital, custom, etc.
  4. Universities history, newspapers, periodicals, etc.
  5. Chinese students' information during studying abroad.

Making use of the information noted above, I will carefully analysis returned students' occupational situation and they suffered restrictions in Beijing-Tianjin area around the 1910s. I will observe how did their birthplaces, countries studying abroad, professions and cities' difference impact upon their occupational choices. I also noticed that social conditions in Modern China also restricted the students' choices.

In my opinion, there was always an interaction between returned students' occupational choice and society transformation. With the increasing number of returned students and the expanding scope of occupational choice, the society made more progress than before. Overall, returned students played a pivotal role in the social transformation in Modern China.

Open to all audiences.

Event contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6322



Protest with Chinese Characteristics, Past and Present
Ho-fung Hung, Associate Professor of Sociology, Johns Hopkins University
September 28, 2011, 4 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies: Institute of East Asian Studies
image The origin of political modernity has long been tied to the Western history of protest and revolution, the currents of which many believe sparked popular dissent worldwide. Reviewing nearly one thousand instances of protest in China from the eighteenth to the early-nineteenth centuries, Ho-fung Hung charts an evolution of Chinese dissent that stands apart from Western trends.

Hung shows how the centralization of political power and an expanding market, coupled with a persistent Confucianist orthodoxy, shaped protesters' strategies and appeals in Qing China. This unique form of mid-Qing protest combined a quest for justice and autonomy with a filial-loyal respect for the imperial center, and Hung's careful research ties this distinct characteristic to popular protest in China today. As Hung makes clear, the nature of these protests prove late imperial China was anything but a stagnant and tranquil empire before the West cracked it open. In fact, the origins of modern popular politics in China predate the 1911 Revolution.

Ho-fung Hung is Associate Professor of Sociology at the Johns Hopkins University. Hung is the author of Protest with Chinese Characteristics (Columbia University Press, 2011; winner of President's Book Award, Social Science History Association) and editor of China and the Transformation of Global Capitalism (Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009). His works focus on the distinct historical trajectory of contention and state-building in China, as well as how the contemporary rise of China and other developing countries is reshaping global capitalism. His articles appeared in New Left Review, American Journal of Sociology, American Sociological Review, Social Science History, among others.

Introduced by Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science, and Interim Director, Institute of East Asian Studies.

Event contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Re-building Local Sovereignty in Late-Qing China: Li Hongzhang, Christianity, and the Disestablishment of Religion at the Village Level
Roger Thompson, History, Western Washington University
Albert Wu, History, UC Berkeley
September 30, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies
image The speaker will examine China's effort to control Western influence in rural China from 1860 to 1911. Drawing on archival and published sources, and using a comparative historical framework, he will trace the Chinese effort to disestablish Christianity in rural China. This effort, which continued after the Boxer Uprising, was joined with the Qing government's attempt to disassociate the state from local religiosity.

Open to all audiences.

Event contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321
 




Shang Archeology — Achievements, Directions, and Dead-ends: A Festtag for David Keightley in celebration of 80 sui
Panelist/Discussants: Zev Handel, Asian Languages and Literature, University of Washington; Li Liu, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University; Xueshun Liu, Asian Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Kenichi Takashima, Asian Studies, University of British Columbia, Vancouver; Xiaoneng Yang, Stanford University
October 1, 2011, 9:30 a.m.-12 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies: Institute of East Asian Studies
image In honor of Professor David Keightley's magnificent achievements, this workshop brings together four of the most respected scholars of ancient China to discuss the state of the field of Shang and Western Zhou archeology, history, and gender studies.

Open to all audiences.

Event contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321
 




Performing Taiwan: From Ethnography to Practice
Wendy Hsu, Mellon Digital Scholarship Postdoctoral Fellow, Center of Digital Learning and Research, Occidental College
Discussant: Cindy Horng, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
October 3, 2011, 4-5:30 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies: Institute of East Asian Studies
image The speaker will talk about her ethnographic engagement with the erhu-rock band the Hsu-nami and the New-York-based transnational Taiwanese American scene.

The talk will be followed by a panel discussion on the soft power diplomacy of Taiwan's pop culture with the members of the Taiwanese band, A Moving Sound. In the decade since A Moving Sound (AMS) was formed in Taipei by Mia Hsieh and Scott Prairie, the group has released three albums in their native Taiwan. They were featured artists in a special program on Taipei presented by the Lonely Planet television series. Tom Pryor, supervisor of National Geographic World Music, described AMS as "one of the most original outfits working in the world music arena today."

Event contact: 510-642-2809



Of Power and Profit: American Seamen in Asian Waters
Exhibit - Photography
October 5, 2011 – January 25, 2012 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image "Of Power and Profit: American Seamen in Asian Waters" is an exhibit of prints made from photographs by a nineteenth century American naval officer, Asa Mattice. In the 1880s, he was assigned to the USS Juniata, which undertook a three-year survey expedition, calling at ports from Suez to Sapporo. The photographs in this exhibit are the voyages relics of encounter.

As the nineteenth century moved into the era of high colonialism, ships journeyed forth from the metropoles on voyages of power and profit. The USS Juniata rode the wave of America's post-Civil War international expansion. Unlike the whaler or slaver privateers of earlier generations, now the fleets served national agendas. The US "opening of Japan" at mid-century signaled a new conception of America's relation to Asia.

With missions from the ice fields to the tropics, the Juniata was a part of the US effort to explore, engage, and extract. On board the USS Juniata was military engineer turned naval instructor Asa Mattice. He turned his camera on the sights around him, capturing images of Asia in the last century, and capturing too the sensibilities of his place and time. The photographs from the voyage shown in this exhibit include photographs of Korea, China, Japan, and Southeast Asia. The categories of these visions — the "views," the "everyday life," the "coolie," — consolidated all through the generations of occidental gaze. The shadows captured on these plates, rescued from oblivion by photographer John Dowling, document a moment in America's trajectory toward being a contender in the Pacific.

Event contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Buddhists and the Raj in South and Southeast Asia
Anne Blackburn, Professor, Department of Asian Studies, Cornell University
October 6, 2011, 5-6:30 p.m.
Center for Buddhist Studies
image Moving across a spatial scale — from the city of Colombo (Lanka) to a wider regional Buddhist world including Lanka, India, and Southeast Asia — Anne Blackburn explores the 19th- and early 20th-century interaction between Buddhists and the Raj. In doing so, she focuses particularly on the crystallization of expressions of collective identification that developed thanks to intersecting forms of knowledge, new technologies, and colonial urban growth.

Anne Blackburn received her Ph.D. in History of Religions in 1996 from The University of Chicago Divinity School. She was trained to study Buddhism as an historian of religions (in a program greatly influenced by approaches to historical sociology and hermeneutics) rather than as a philologist. She approaches Buddhist texts with attention to the contexts in which they were composed and used. It has also led her to substantial work in the history of devotional practices and intellectual history, topics first broached in undergraduate days at Swarthmore College. She approaches this work with the assumption that the history of Buddhist texts and practices should not be divorced from the history of other forms of life with which they are closely connected, and through which they have been constituted.

Event contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104

Download the event flyer here.



Asian Horror Cinema and Beyond
October 7 – 8, 2011
Center for Japanese Studies, Department of East Asian Languages & Cultures, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for New Media
image This conference features contemporary works of horror cinema that explore issues of memory, desire, and media in East Asian and Southeast Asian cinema. Symposium lectures and discussions will offer alternative reading strategies and theoretical positions with which to assess the sprawling commercial, political and aesthetic ambitions of Asian horror cinema.

Organizers: Miri Nakamura, Assistant Professor of Asian Languages and Literatures at Wesleyan University and Dan O'Neill, Associate Professor of Japanese at UC Berkeley.

Symposium lectures, discussions and film screenings are free and open to the public. All films are subtitled in English.

Film screening seating is on a first-come-first-served basis. The theater is ADA accessible. For wheelchair seating, please contact cjs-events@berkeley.edu by October 5th to reserve.

Schedule

Friday, October 7
12:45 p.m.
Welcome: Miri Nakamura and Dan O'Neill

1:00-2:30 p.m.
Panel: "Memory and Horror"

Lan Duong (UC Riverside)
"The Ghosts of War and the Vietnamese Horror Film"

Jinsoo An (UC Berkeley)
"Fraught with Remembrance and Erasure: Spectral Terror in Epitaph"

2:30-4:00 p.m.
Panel: "Desire and Horror"

Arnika Fuhrmann (University of Hong Kong)
"Tropical Malady: Queer Haunting in Contemporary Thai Cinema"

Jonathan Hall (Pomona College)
"The Horror of Attachment: Depopulating Recent Japanese Film"

4:00-4:30 p.m.
Coffee Break

4:30-6:00 p.m.
Panel: "Media and Horror"

Steve Brown (University of Oregon)
"The Sound of Horror in the Cinema of Kurosawa Kiyoshi"

Kristen Whissel (UC Berkeley)
"Vital Figures: The Life and Death of Digital Creatures"

7:30-9:00 p.m.
Film: "Epitaph" (2007) directed by Jeong Beom-sik and Jeong Sik
(Doors open at 7 PM)


Saturday, Oct. 8th
10:00-11:30 p.m.
Special Session: "Rethinking Horror"

Lalitha Gopalan (University of Texas at Austin)
"Cruel Cinema: Tamil New Wave Cinema"***

Akira Lippit (University of Southern California)
"Modes of Pleasure: Ultraviolence and Extreme Loneliness"

1:00-3:00 p.m.
Keynote Address: Bliss Lim (UC Irvine)
"Monstrous Intimacies: Aswang Fragments in Filipino Transmedia"

3:00-3:15 p.m.
Coffee Break

3:15-5:30 p.m.
Film: "Uncle Boonmee Who Can Recall His Past Lives" (2010)
directed by Apichatpong Weerasethakul

5:30-7:00 p.m.
Working roundtable with scholars and audience

The Yerba Buena Center for the Arts (YBCA, from 10/6-10/9) will be screening two films from "Cruel Cinema," a collection curated by Lalitha Gopalan and Anuj Vaidya. For details, see http://www.ybca.org/cruel-cinema

Open to all audiences.

Event contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



Writing Sex, Food and Politics
Li Ang, author
October 10, 2011, 4-5:30 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image Author of the acclaimed novel, The Butcher's Wife, Taiwanese feminist writer Li Ang will talk about her writing today.

There is an old Chinese saying: Food and sex are human nature. (食色性也). The freedom and democracy in Taiwan today are the best among Chinese-speaking societies. Li Ang has been known as a controversial Taiwanese woman writer for years. Are there still taboos that she can attack in her writing?

Open to all audiences.

Event contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321
 




Early Tang Dynasty Chuanqi Fiction: An Interdisciplinary Perspective
Jue Chen, Chinese Literature and History, National Tsing Hua University
October 11, 2011 4-6 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies
image The early Tang chuanqi 傳奇 fiction, despite its small number of texts extant, is regarded by many scholars as the fountainhead in the history of pre-modern Chinese fiction. It is generally believed that this genre has only three pieces that are still available to us, namely, Gujing ji 古鏡記 (Record of an Ancient Mirror), Bu Jiang Zong baiyuan zhuan 補江總白猿傳 (Supplement to Jiang Zong's Biography of a White Ape), and Youxianku 遊仙窟(Dalliance in the Immortal's Den). The speaker has explored these through an interdisciplinary perspective from history, religion, art and archaeology. His analysis shows that they share a common set of compositional methods: the method of calculated anachronism, of intertextuality, and of circumstantial details. These methods form a unique mode of representation not seen in previous dynasties. In addition, they provide us with a new understanding of the function of the genre in medieval Chinese cultural history.

Event contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



The Politics of Nuclear Energy in China
Yi-Chong Xu, Professor, Centre for Governance and Public Policy, Griffith University
October 12, 2011, 4 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image With 14 nuclear reactors in operation and another 27 under construction, China is rushing to increase its nuclear generation capacity as a step to secure its rising energy demand, meet its rising electricity demand, and mitigate climate change threats. Is nuclear energy indeed the future? It depends: the IAEA, IEA and the Chinese government would like to emphasise that nuclear power is efficient, reliable, clean, safe and large enough to be used as base-load to, if not solve, at least, alleviate the pressures. Some see the current move as mere 'nuclear amnesia' because nuclear power will not be able to meet the growing demand or cut carbon emission sufficiently to make a dent in the two main problems, especially in China. Some would say, 'nuclear power alone won't get us to where we need to be, but we won't get there without it.' Others, especially against the background of the Fukushima nuclear accident and a high-speed train accident in China, argue it is too dangerous and too irresponsible to push nuclear energy program construction.

Can China do it? Does the country have the political, economic, technical and human capacity to make nuclear power a viable option? Economy, energy and environment challenges are pressing for a very large developing country; they are inextricably linked. These challenges are not just technical or economic; nor are they unique to any single country. Energy is a political issue and pits one group of interests against another.

The book is about the politics of nuclear energy development in China and seeks to understand the constellation of political forces in China that shaped its nuclear energy development. It is organised around five topics: who decides (politics); who pays (economics); whose technology; how to fuel it; and who cares (environment). It concludes in agreement with an observation of a Western reporter in 1981, 'a final cause of China's energy crisis is poor coordination, planning, and management'. Even in the nuclear industry, 'fragmented institutions' in the central government, competing interests of ministries, bureaucracies and provinces, 'unbalanced influence' between the weak government agencies and powerful corporations, and a weak central government vs. rich provinces characterises its politics. The response to the Fukushima nuclear accident provides public evidence of the fragmented and warring politics that make the rush into a nuclear age so unpredictable.

Xu Yi-chong is a research professor of politics and public policy at Griffith University. Before joining Griffith University in January 2007, Xu was professor of political science at St Francis Xavier University in Nova Scotia, Canada. She is author of The Politics of Nuclear Energy in China (2010); Electricity Reform in China, India and Russia: The World Bank Template and the Politics of Power (2004); Powering China: Reforming the electric power industry in China (2002); co-author of Inside the World Bank: Exploding the Myth of the Monolithic Bank (with Patrick Weller 2009) and The Governance of World Trade: International Civil Servants and the GATT/WTO, (with Patrick Weller 2004); and editor of Nuclear Energy Development in Asia (2011) and The Political Economy of Sovereign Wealth Funds (2010). All these projects were supported by the research grants from either Social Sciences and Humanities Research Council of Canada (SSHRC) or Australian Research Council.

Event contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Taivalu (Chen mo chih tao)br /> Huang Hsin-yao, director
Documentary film
October 13, 2011, 5-7 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
image The island nation of Tuvalu is the first country expected to be eradicated by rising sea levels associated with climate change. This winner of the Grand Prize and Best Documentary Prize at the Taipei Film Festival examines the situation in Tuvalu and draws parallels to flooding in the Taiwanese town of Tainan, pointing to systematic ecological neglect as the common denominator between Tuvalu's problems and those of Taiwan.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



The Sumidagawa Project — Chamber Opera Screening
October 16, 2011, 2-4:30 p.m.
Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), JETAANC Kabuki Club
image Three versions. One haunting tale.

A mother searches for her lost son. Driven half-mad with worry, she meets a ferryman on the Sumida River who may know something. But is she prepared to learn the truth?

The tragic story of Sumidagawa has haunted Japanese and Western artists for hundreds of years. Join JETAANC as we explore three very different versions of the story: Noh theatre, Kabuki theatre, and chamber opera. Don't miss this chance to see these rarely-screened masterpieces.

  • 9/11 Noh theatre version (CJS)
  • 9/18 Kabuki theatre version (Oakland Asian Cultural Center)
  • 10/16 Chamber opera version (CJS)
October 16, 2pm
Center for Japanese Studies
Curlew River (chamber opera version)

Benjamin Britten was a world-renowned composer when he saw the Noh version of Sumidagawa in Japan in 1956. Intensely moved by the experience, he vowed to write a chamber opera version of the story. Transposing the setting to the Curlew River in medieval England, Britten composed a powerful and touching parable for our times.

70 mins. In English with English subtitles.

September 11, 2pm
Center for Japanese Studies
Sumidagawa (Noh version)

First performed in medieval Japan, the Noh version of Sumidagawa has moved audiences for centuries with its particular blend of mystery and pathos. A master work in the kyojomono category of Noh play - dramas of madwomen.

80 mins. In Japanese with English and Japanese subtitles.

September 18, 2pm
Oakland Asian Cultural Center
Sumidagawa (Kabuki version)

Inspired by Russian ballet, the Kabuki actor Ichikawa Ennosuke II adapted the Noh version to the Kabuki stage. The result is one of the great modern masterpieces of Kabuki. The famed onnagata actor Nakamura Utaemon VI plays the mother, in a role that became his signature.

45 mins. In Japanese with English translation.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415

Additional location info: **Doors will be open from 1:45-2:15pm ONLY.



River of Smoke: A reading by Amitav Ghosh from the second book in his Ibis Trilogy
Amitav Ghosh
October 19, 2011, 12-2 p.m.
Center for South Asia Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Department of English
image Amitav Ghosh reading from his latest book, River of Smoke, book 2 in his Ibis trilogy. The event will be followed by a book-signing and a light reception.

Amitav Ghosh's exceptional Sea of Poppies garnered international praise for the scope of its tale and the beauty of its language. River of Smoke, the second book in Ghosh's Ibis trilogy, is equally expansive and mesmerizing.

Thrown into turmoil by a cyclone in the Bay of Bengal, three ships fight their way toward Canton's Fanqui-town: the Ibis, whose fateful journey began in Sea of Poppies; the Redruth, a nursery ship carrying horticulturist Frederick "Fitcher" Penrose and the French orphan Paulette, who are determined to track down the priceless natural wonders of China; and the Anahita, a clipper ship owned by Bahram Modi, an opium trader intricately involved in the roiling politics of Canton. Into this mix comes Neel, the raja convicted of embezzlement who becomes Bahram's secretary, and the painter Robin Chinnery, a friend of Paulette's, along with a plentiful cast of Indian, British, American, and Chinese traders, artists, dockworkers, and smugglers. Together, they populate a world on the brink of exploding into the Opium Wars.

Fierce and tender, River of Smoke shows Amitav Ghosh at the height of his storytelling abilities, creating an indelible page-turner that burns brightly in the reader's imagination.

Amitav Ghosh is the internationally bestselling author of many works of fiction and nonfiction, including The Glass Palace, and is the recipient of numerous prizes and awards. Ghosh divides his time among Kolkata and Goa, India, and Brooklyn, New York.

Praise for RIVER OF SMOKE
"Ghosh sets the second volume of his Ibis trilogy in 1838, appropriately enough, because at heart he's a 19th-century novelist with a sweeping vision of character and culture . . . As with Dickens, Ghosh gives us an anatomy of the social world from the highest levels to the lowest, from the emperor of China to the river rats haunting the harbor of Canton, and his amazing ear finds a language—from pidgin English to Cornish dialect—appropriate for each character . . . Ghosh triumphs both through the clarity of his style and the sweep of his vision." –Kirkus Reviews

"Amitav Ghosh conjures plotlines out of trading routes, which, in his supple and compulsive imagination, come magically alive as the conduits for human history; they effect the exchange not just of silk and silver but of language and love and enmity." –Tim Adams, The Observer (London)

"This vast book has a Dickensian sweep of characters, high- and low-life intermingling . . . Ghosh conjures up a thrilling sense of place." –The Economist

"The accumulation of minutiae puts the reader so firmly in the time and place that the whole thing becomes as hypnotic as an opium dream." –John Harding, Daily Mail

"The novel's strength lies in how thoroughly Ghosh fills out his research with his novelistic fantasy, seduced by each new situation that presents itself and each new character, so that at their best the scenes read with a sensual freshness as if they were happening now." —Tessa Hadley, The Guardian

Event Contact: 510-642-3608



Nation-Building and Nature in the Mekong Delta: Vietnamese History Through an Environmental Lens
David Biggs, Associate Professor of History, University of California, Riverside
October 19, 2011, 4 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies
image Since Vietnamese settlers first colonized the Mekong Delta in the 1600s, its winding rivers and alluvial banks have given rise to an alluring myth of a "riverine civilization," a frontier that promises rich harvests and open land for Vietnamese migrants willing to move to what locals call "the West." As with other modern frontiers, the delta has played host to frequent episodes of state and community-centered violence, from displacement and conquest of Khmer inhabitants to civil wars, French colonial conquest and the Indochina Wars. It figured centrally in colonial campaigns to build up an "agricultural machine" in Cochinchina, and sixty years later it was an important labscape for American modernization and counterinsurgency efforts. While much attention has been paid to these political events and their legacies, comparatively little attention has been paid to the role of the spaces and ecologies that shaped them. Such factors as floods, tides, sedimentation, aquatic plants, and waterborne bacteria played important roles in determining where such schemes succeeded and where they failed. This talk examines the complex role of nature in nation-building by focusing on specific moments and places in the Mekong Delta's environmental past; and it addresses larger questions about the possibility for new interpretations of Vietnamese history through a spatial or environmental lens.

Introduced by Nancy Peluso, Henry J. Vaux Distinguished Professor of Forest Policy, Department of Environmental Science, Policy, and Management, UC Berkeley.

David Biggs is an Associate Professor in the History Department at the University of California, Riverside. He is the author of Quagmire: Nation-Building and Nature in the Mekong Delta (Washington, 2011). His articles have appeared in such journals as the Journal of Vietnamese Studies (2009), the Journal of Southeast Asian Studies (2003), BioScience (2011), Technology and Culture (2008) and in a number of edited volumes. His video tour of the Mekong Delta can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YFiBLmWvsv4, and a video trailer for his book can be found at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gp1-UItZqsk.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Little Red Book: A Global History of Quotations from Chairman Mao
October 21, 2011, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
October 22, 2011, 9:30 a.m - noon
Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Institute of East Asian Studies
image This conference takes up the global history of Quotations from Chairman Mao—perhaps the most visible, ubiquitous, and enduring symbol of twentieth-century radicalism. Conference participants will examine the production and adaptation of the "little red book" in China, as well as its circulation, appropriation, and impact around the globe. The pocket-sized Quotations from Chairman Mao was probably the most printed non-religious book of the twentieth century and by the late 1960s became the must-have accessory for red guards and revolutionaries from Berkeley to Bamako. The little red book's worldwide circulation, in dozens of languages, is a testament to its historical importance, yet there has been no serious scholarly effort to understand the Quotations as a global historical phenomenon.

Click here for the conference web site. Open to all audiences

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



The Google China Standoff
Ying Zhu, producer
Documentary film
October 24, 2011, 4-5:30 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Modern China Studies at the College of Staten Island, the City University of New York
image Information is key to the new global geopolitical and geoeconomic frontier. In a fight to regulate information flow, the Chinese government has blocked Facebook, YouTube, Twitter, and censored information that it deems detrimental in the name of "Chinese national interest." Last year Google refused to comply with Chinese censorship laws and moved its search engine servers to the relatively free Hong Kong, leaving room for Chinese homegrown search engine Baidu to expand significantly. The Google China Standoff calls attention to the restricted nature of cyberspace and the visibility of the state in regulating, virtually, national borders. As political interest is imbued with economic interest, the long-fought global trade war is now on information. Meanwhile, unfiltered information is becoming a precious good for netizens. Followed by Q&A with the producer, Ying Zhu.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Homeless in the World: War, Narrative, and Historical Consciousness in Eileen Chang, Gyorgy Lukacs and Leo Tolstoy
Roy Chan, Modern Languages and Literatures, The College of William and Mary
October 26, 2011, 12:10-1:10 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)
image This talk explores the ways in which Leo Tolstoy is cited nearly contemporaneously by Gyorgy Lukacs and Eileen Chang: according to Lukacs, Tolstoy embodied the quintessence of realist narrative's ability to capture the mass experience of history. For Chang, defending herself against charges of being a trivial and uncommitted pulp writer, Tolstoy's work exemplified the value of a narrative process marked by the very serendipity and contingency mirrored in reality. I will explore the common resonances of war, narrative and history that run through Lukacs' and Chang's appropriations of Tolstoy, as well as suggest ways in which all three writers are trying to grapple with world-historical consciousness through literary form. Noting Lukacs' and Chang's common citation of Tolstoy as a monument to their own writing, I also plan to articulate how all these writers engage in a special kind of "world literature" indelibly marked by modern warfare and mass-produced suffering.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Yu Hua, speaking about his new book, China in Ten Words
October 26, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)
image Yu Hua is one of China's best-known novelists. Author of Brothers, To Live, and Chronicle of a Blood Merchant, he will talk about his most recent work. In Chinese with English interpretation.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321
 




Toward a Sustainable Energy Policy after Fukushima: Voices for Reform
Hideaki Takabe, Osaka University, San Francisco Center; Yasuo Goto, Fukushima University; Nobuyo Goto, Fukushima Medical University
Panelist/Discussant: Steve Vogel, UC Berkeley
October 27, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Center for Japanese Studies, Osaka University, San Francisco Center
image This special symposium features three Japanese experts on nuclear power, Fukushima Prefecture, and national and local politics. They will report on the situation in Fukushima, present bold proposals for change in government policy, and discuss the political dynamics in Japan since the March 11 earthquake, tsunami, and nuclear crisis.

Proposals for the Future: Starting from the Inconvenient Truth after Fukushima
Hideaki Takabe, Professor, Osaka University

The Tohoku Earthquake that hit northern Japan on March 11, 2011 and the subsequent tsunami led to the explosions at the Fukushima I (Daiichi) Nuclear Power Plant. In this talk, Prof. Takabe first analyzes the mechanisms behind the explosion and reviews the development of nuclear energy in Japan.

Nuclear power research in Japan sparked soon after President Eisenhower delivered his 1953 United Nations speech, "Atoms for Peace". Then in the 1970s after the oil crisis, Japan began to increasingly promote the use of nuclear power plants.

Shifting to other countries, China has continuously faced a shortage of energy due to the dramatic increase in consumption. Together with India, jointly a population of more than two billion, how can we meet these energy requirements? Based on his research as a member of the Steering and Evaluation Committee for the Earth Simulator Project, Prof. Takabe proposes new worldwide energy policies and governance in order to keep this enlightened age for thousands of years to come.

Protest and Survive: Declaration of Independence from Nuclear Power in Fukushima Prefecture
Yasuo Goto, Professor, Fukushima University

Fighting Against Radiation: The Emergence of New Social Movements in Fukushima for the Protection of Children
Nobuyo Goto, Lecturer, Fukushima Medical University

Discussant
Steve Vogel, Professor, UC Berkeley

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



Construction of the Jeju Naval Base and the Vicious Triangle Created among Korea, China and the United States
Wooksik Cheong, Representative, Peace Network
October 28, 2011, 4-5:30 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
image Jeju Island's Gangjeong Village, located off the southern tip of the Korean Peninsula, is suffering from the construction of a South Korean naval base. One might think this should be acquiesced for the sake of national security. However, it has been concluded that, for the sake of national security and peace, the base construction must be stopped because the base would ruin not only this beautiful and peaceful natural community, but also relations between South Korea and China. Jeju Naval Base is highly likely to be used as a port call and, in the event of a contingency, as a stopover or launching point for the U.S. Navy. Should the Jeju base be used by the U.S. military for the purpose of blockading China, China is expected to retaliate in various ways including diplomatic complaints and economic retaliations, such as travel and trade restrictions. In a worst case scenario, China's reaction could include military actions such as a retaliatory attack or maritime transportation blockade. Construction of the Jeju Naval Base is likely to worsen the arms race and negatively impact triangular relations among South Korea, China, and the United States.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Solids and Surfaces in Chinese Drama: The Kwang Siam Lim Memorial Lecture
Tina Lu, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Yale University
October 28, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies
image Over eighty percent of chuanqi (Chinese drama or "marvel tales") are named after a signature object, something that passes from one set of hands to another. However, contemporary writings on drama, even as they dwell on many details of performance, do not for the most part treat props, and in the plays themselves these signature objects are often strikingly lacking in solidity. Is an object really just an idea or is it something beyond an idea? In an age marked by anxieties about the nature of money and the liquidity of wealth and status, this question strikes at the heart of the matter.

Event Contact: 510-643-6321, ccs@berkeley.edu
 




Seismic Isolation Technology in Japan and the Performance of Rubber Isolated buildings in the Great 2011 Earthquake: SEMM Seminar
Nobuo Murota, Bridgestone Corporation
October 31, 2011, 12-1 p.m.
Center for Japanese Studies, Civil and Environmental Engineering
A giant earthquake of magnitude 9.0 occurred in Pacific Ocean off of Tohoku district Japan on March 11, 2011. The highest seismic intensity of 7 in JMA scale was recorded in Miyagi. In the Tohoku district, around 230 buildings are seismically isolated mainly by elastomeric isolators (seismic rubber bearings). According to the official survey reports by several organizations, the records of those buildings have verified the effectiveness of the seismic isolation. The response acceleration of the seismically isolated buildings was reduced from 30 to 50% of input ground acceleration. Additionally, the difference of the conditions inside the room between seismically isolated and the fixed-base building was obvious as well as the damage in main structures of the buildings. The displacements of the isolators by the earthquake were around 200 mm according to the records of the instruments.

the presentation will describe the principles of seismic isolation, the main properties of elastomeric isolators, and the current status of seismic isolation in Japan. Then, the performance of seismically isolated buildings in the Tohoku District – Off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake 2011 will be reported with records obtained from several buildings, focusing on the behavior of elastomeric isolators.

Event Contact: 510-642-3261



Progress or Retreat?: The Outlook for Rule of Law in a Changing China
Panelist/Discussants: Keith Hand, Associate Professor of Law, UC Hastings College of the Law; Hyeon-Ju Rho, Former Director, American Bar Association's Rule of Law Initiative China Program; Alex Wang, Visiting Assistant Professor of Law, UC Berkeley School of Law
October 31, 2011, 4 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Law, Energy & the Environment at Berkeley Law, Center for Chinese Studies
Earlier this year, China's chief legislator announced that China now has a complete system of laws covering all areas of social relations. The system, he said, is "scientific, harmonious and consistent." In contrast, one of China's leading legal scholars announced last year that "China's rule of law is in full retreat." Which is the case? What is the outlook for Chinese rule of law in the coming years? Three speakers, each with significant on-the-ground experience working on legal development in China, will address these questions from a number of perspectives, including resolution of constitutional disputes, the changing role of lawyers, environmental protection, and citizen protest.

  • Professor Keith Hand (UC Hastings) will discuss recent setbacks for formal constitutional adjudication and patterns of informal bargaining, consultation and mediation in the resolution of constitutional disputes in China.
  • Hyeon-Ju Rho, former director of the American Bar Association's Rule of Law Initiative China Program, will discuss recent developments in public interest lawyering in China, and the evolving role of lawyers in Chinese society.
  • Professor Alex Wang (UC Berkeley) will discuss the uncertain role of law in China's efforts to address severe environmental problems, and promising bottom-up efforts at legal innovation on the part of citizens and local courts.
Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Do China's Stock Markets Matter?
Carl E. Walter
November 1, 2011, 12:45-1:45 p.m.
Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy, Center for Chinese Studies
This year marks the 20th anniversary of the establishment of China's two stock exchanges in Shenzhen and Shanghai. This talk explores the role stock markets play and their overall significance, and describes how Western legal, accounting and financial concepts have changed China's economic landscape, although perhaps not in any fundamental way.

Carl E. Walter worked in China and its financial sector for the past 20 years and actively participated in many of the country's financial reform efforts. While at Credit Suisse First Boston he played a major role in China's groundbreaking first overseas IPO in 1992, as well as the first primary listing of a state-owned enterprise on the New York Stock Exchange in 1994. He was a member of senior management at China International Capital Corporation, China's first and most successful joint venture investment bank where he supported a number of domestic and international stock and bond underwritings for major Chinese Corporations.

More recently at JPMorgan, he was China Chief Operating Officer and Chief Executive Officer of its banking subsidiary. During this time Mr. Walter helped build a pioneering domestic security, risk and currency trading operation.

Event Contact: bclbe@law.berkeley.edu, 510-642-0532



A Comparative Study on Female and Senior Labor in East Asia
Kaku Sechiyama, University of Tokyo
November 1, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Japanese Studies , Center for Korean Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
East Asian capitalist societies of South Korea, Taiwan and Japan are now facing an unprecedented decline in birth rates and rapid aging of their population. To cope with the future shortage of the labor force, we will have three possible options, either singly or combined: (1) aggressively make full use of married women's labor power, (2) raise the rate of employment among seniors, and (3) utilize immigrant labor.

Although these three societies are often lumped together as a "Confucian cultural sphere," there exist significant and very interesting differences among them in terms of issues concerning who should be in the labor force.

In this presentation, I will focus on female and senior labor patterns to show how different they are from each other and what the solutions could be for each society. I will also briefly refer to the differences between the socialist societies of China and North Korea in terms of gender.

Kaku Sechiyama is a Professor of Sociology at the University of Tokyo, specializing in gender and East Asian studies. He is also a Visiting Scholar at the Center for Japanese Studies, UC Berkeley.

Open to all audiences

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



Citizenship and Skill in Twentieth-Century China
Jacob Eyferth, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago
November 2, 2011, 4 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
image Before the middle of the twentieth century, most of China's industrial output originated in the countryside, in small-town workshops and rural farms. Production was typically manual; production-related knowledge was passed on tacitly or orally from parents to children or from masters to apprentices. Regional specialization created economic interdependence; it also gave communities of skilled producers visibility in the wider cultural universe and a stake in the sociopolitical realm. As in the English cases described by the historical sociologist Margaret Somers, protoindustrial producers in the Chinese countryside understood their skills as a form of social membership: a precondition for the inclusion in a particular community of skilled producers and, through this community, in the wider polity. While China had no native language of citizenship rights, it had a long tradition of self-regulating guilds, villages, and kinship groups; of substantive rights to training, regulated employment, and guaranteed livelihood for members of such groups; and of informal representation of local interests through these groups. My talk will provide examples of several of such "communities of skill" and sketch out their history in the twentieth century, when local control over economically useful skills came under increasing attack.

Introduced by Andrew Jones, Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Lives of the Buddha: A Symposium in Celebration of the Book "Sugata Saurabha" by Todd Lewis and Subarna Man Tuladhar: 2011 Toshihide Numata Book Prize Presentation and Symposium
Todd Lewis, College of the Holy Cross; John Strong, Bates College; Gregory Schopen, University of California, Los Angeles; Alexander von Rospatt, University of California, Berkeley
November 4, 2011, 3-7:30 p.m.
Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai, Jodo Shinshu Center, Institute of Buddhist Studies
The winners of the 2011 Toshihide Numata Book Prize are Professor Todd Lewis (College of the Holy Cross) and Mr. Subarna Man Tuladhar (Translator, Nepal), for their 2010 book Sugata Saurabha An Epic Poem from Nepal on the Life of the Buddha by Chittadhar Hridaya (New York: Oxford University Press).

Schedule
3:00–3:15 pm
Introductory Remarks and Book Prize Presentation
Rev. Brian Nagata, Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai (Society for the Promotion of Buddhism)

3:15–4:15 pm
Keynote Address and Discussion – A Confluence of Narrative Ambitions: Reading Chittadhar Hridaya's Sugata Saurabha Todd Lewis, College of the Holy Cross

Demonstrating to what extent the Indic cultural world was alive for the traditional Newar elite in mid-20th Century Nepal, this lecture will explore the narrative richness in Sugata Saurabha, among the greatest works of modern Himalayan literature. Composed during five years of imprisonment and smuggled out in fragments past his jailers, Chittadhar Hridaya's 19-chapter narrative of the Buddha's life is remarkable not only for its doctrinal erudition but also for the artistry of its rhythmic patterns and end rhymes. The author's originality is also found in his enlivening the great sage's life with details of Newar urban society and culture, poetic license taken where the classical sources are silent.

The lecture will then examine this text as a specimen of Buddhist modernism; it will explore how this work as a case study in the matrix of modernity in Nepal, reflecting the author's awareness of classical Sanskrit sources, as well as his knowledge of Hindi translations from the Pali Canon, publications from the Mahabodhi Society, among other influences. Yet another level to be examined in the fabric of Sugata Saurabha's narrative is how it is crafted to defend the integrity of Newar culture, offering a positive vision of the author's own traditions.

Illustrated with paintings from the original publication and informed by details of the great poet's life, the lecture will argue that Sugata Saurabha deserves a place among the great literary accomplishments of Buddhist history and modern world literature.

4:30–6:30 pm
Symposium on "Lives of the Buddha"

Chair, Robert Sharf, UC Berkeley

Sugata and the Goat's Milk - John Strong, Bates College
The Scent of Sanctity and the Sweet Smell of the Buddha - Gregory Schopen, UCLA
Remarks on the Representation of the Buddha's Life in the Newar tradition - Alexander von Rospatt, UC Berkeley
Response: Todd Lewis, College of the Holy Cross

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104



"Why My Robot Wife Divorced Me": Genre and Labor in Post-Mao Chinese Literature
Paola Iovene, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago
Panelist/Discussant: Liu Xiao, East Asian Languages, UC Berkeley November 4, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies
image The speaker will discuss the functions of science fiction in post-Mao China, tracing parallels with popular science writings that circulated at the time of the Great Leap Forward and detailing the ways in which writers redefined the literary credentials of the genre. While allegedly promoting science, science fiction stories of the early 1980s recounted weird events and explored unconventional scenarios, thus helping expand the scope of non-realist writing. Most crucially, the genre introduced a new hierarchy between manual and mental labor. In contrast to the glorification of physical labor in the literature and arts of the previous decades, science fiction stories associated manual labor with vulgarity and uncouthness, or with a primitive stage of human evolution attributed to non-Chinese natives of distant lands, or, most frequently, with (female) robots. The laboring body was no longer the essential element that defined humanity, but rather an obstacle to future developments—the sub-human residue of a technological regime that was about to be overcome. The speaker suggests that at a time when new social and economic distinctions emerged, the main labor performed by the genre of science fiction was to celebrate the Chinese mind as disembodied intellect.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Deng Xiaoping, the Man who Transformed China
Ezra Vogel, Professor Emeritus, Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies, Harvard University
Panelist/Discussants: Wen-hsin Yeh, Professor, History, and Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley; Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science and Acting Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
November 7, 2011, 5 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
In 1978 Deng Xiaoping inherited a country in a disastrous mess, bitterly divided after the Cultural Revolution, with not enough food to feed the population, a per capita income less than $100 a year and few contacts with the rest of the world. From 1978-1992 he set China on a course that brought 10 percent a year growth over three decades. How did Deng become a person who could provide that leadership and how did he manage the process of transforming the country? What was his legacy?

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



The Neighbourhood Consensus: Contestation and Legitimacy in China's Urban Governance
Luigi Tomba, Australian National University
Moderator: You-tien Hsing, Professor, Geography, UC Berkeley
November 8, 2011, 4 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies
Contemporary Chinese neighbourhoods are, despite their spatial and organizational diversification, sites of intense activities of government. In the process of production of a new identity for the Chinese urban dweller, neighbourhoods are sites of conflict, socialization and accommodation of complex interests. While conflicts appear to be catalysed in and contained by the spatial boundaries of modern neighbourhoods they also reveal a convergence between the dominant political discourses of legitimacy and the practices and language of contestation. While this might be seen as an instance of strategic framing, Tomba argues that the dominance of such hegemonic frames, by reproducing an emphasis on "stability" fosters legitimacy for the practices of urban governance.

Luigi Tomba is a Political Scientist whose work has long been concerned with political and social change in urban China. Born and educated in Italy, he spent the last twenty years researching Chinese cities, their social and spatial complexity and their transformation into post-industrial and global cities. His work touched many aspects of China's social transformation and its consequences, including local governance, migration, spatial transformation, the middle classes, housing, social stratification and inequality. Since 2005 he has been the co-editor of The China Journal, a world's leading area studies journal on contemporary China, published at The Australian National University. With a history of more than 30 years, it was ranked the highest impact Area Studies Journal in several years over the last decade, according to the Journal Citation Reports. His publications in English include Paradoxes of Labour Reform: Chinese Labour Theory and Practice from Socialism to the Market and edited volumes East Asian Capitalism: Conflicts, Growth and Crisis and Contemporary Chinese Society and Politics, with Andrew Kipnis and Jonathan Unger. His current project is The Neighbourhood Consensus: Social Distinction and Government in China's Communities, from which this talk will be drawn.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Tokyo Workshop: Architecture.Energy.2011
Panel Discussion November 15, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Panelist/Discussants: Dana Buntrock, Professor of Architecture, UC Berkeley; Norihisa Kawashima, Architect, Nikken Sekkei; Susan Ubbelohde, Professor of Architecture, UC Berkeley; Brendon Levitt, Associate, Loisos + Ubbelohde
Center for Japanese Studies
image Following March 11, electric resources in northern Japan were curtailed, and the conventional means architects rely on to develop new skills when faced with an emerging problem—industry support—were also impacted.

A team from UC Berkeley quickly organized a summer workshop in Tokyo, sharing low-consumption approaches to natural energy resources and energy saving that have been developed locally. The workshop was attended by nearly 60 Tokyo-based architects from leading offices, construction companies, and universities.

Panelists discussing the workshop and where we hope to go from include UCB faculty, an alumnus, and an architect from Tokyo's Nikken Sekkei.

Open to all audiences

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



Vasubandhu's Ultimate: How Scriptural Hermeneutics Lays the Foundation for a Yogācāra Mainstream
Jonathan Gold, Department of Religion, Princeton University
November 17, 2011, 5-6:30 p.m.
Center for Buddhist Studies
image Vasubandhu is among the best known and most influential of Buddhist philosophers, but he is also extremely controversial and difficult to pin down. His scholarship is hounded on the one side by issues of dating and attribution, and on the other side by controversies over how to characterize his mature, Yogācāra philosophy. Yet even in the face of such complexities, it turns out to be fruitful to read works attributed to Vasubandhu for their conceptual continuity — in particular, their continuity on the nature of causality and the uses of scripture. This presentation paints a picture of how Vasubandhu's works employ scriptural citations within philosophical arguments, noting parallels among diverse texts. We see that these arguments reflect the interpretive principles found in the Saṃdhinirmocanasūtra, which points us suggestively to a hermeneutical motive behind the elusive Yogācāra text, the Trisvabhāvanirdeśa. Vasubandhu was keenly aware of the paradox of articulating, in language, a view that the ultimate nature of reality is beyond words. His solution lays the ground for subsequent Indian Yogācāra, with its emphasis on the conventional utility of epistemology (pramāṇa) and the acceptance of "sliding scales" of truth.

Jonathan C. Gold Ph.D. University of Chicago) is Assistant Professor and Julis Foundation University Preceptor in the Department of Religion at Princeton University. His research focuses on Indian and Tibetan intellectual traditions, especially theories of language, translation and learning. He is the author of The Dharma's Gatekeepers: Sakya Paṇḍita on Buddhist Scholarship in Tibet (State University of New York Press, 2007), which explains the nature of language and the role of the scholar from the unique perspective of a great thirteenth-century Tibetan philosopher. His current project is a study of the Indian Buddhist philosopher Vasubandhu.

Open to all audiences

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104



Crazy Love: Japanese Underground Cinema and Happenings: A Lecture and Screening with Hirasawa Go
Hirasawa Go, Meiji University
November 17, 2011, 5-8 p.m.
Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Townsend Center for the Humanities, Film Studies, Department of Comparative Literature, Arts Research Center
image Acclaimed film curator and scholar HIRASAWA Go (Meiji University) will screen rare works of Japanese underground cinema from the 1960s that were related to the Neo-Dada movement and Happenings.

A lecture and introduction will precede the screenings.

Crazy Love
A pre-Stonewall, post-Kenneth Anger, highly stylized musical queer love extravaganza, "Crazy Love" romps exuberantly through the late 1960s Tokyo underground. Full of ephemeral performance art moments captured on film, with Fluxus artists and butoh dancers and the influential performance group Zero Jigen, Okabe's second film takes the avant-garde into a light and playful register. The director himself appears recreating his favorite roles from Bonnie and Clyde to Spaghetti Westerns, with quotation stills from Godard, Kennedy's assassination and the Vietnam War. Renowned curator and scholar Hirasawa Go will help us with the "who's who" and what's what of this film in a pre-show talk.

1968, 90 min., 16mm, b&w with color in part. Directed by Michio Okabe. Print courtesy of Fukuoka Public Library Film Archive with permission from Michio Okabe.

Hirasawa Go has written about and programmed many events centered on Japanese political cinema of the 1960s and 1970s. He is co-author of Film/Revolution (Kawade Shobo Shinsha, 2003), A Will: Art Theatre Shinjuku Bunka (Kawade Shobo Shinsha, 2008), a series of interviews with radical filmmaker Adachi Masao and producer Kuzui Kinshiro, and editor of Underground Film Archives (Kawade Shobo Shinsha, 2001), Godard (Kawade Shobo Shinsha, 2003), Fassbinder (Gendai Shicho Shinsha, 2005), Wakamatsu Koji (Sakuhinsha, 2007), Koji Wakamatsu: cinéaste de la révolte (IMHO, France, 2010) and Culture Theory of 1968 (Mainichi Shinbunsha, 2010).

Open to all audiences

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



A Photographic Encounter with 19th Century Korea
Jiwon Shin, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
November 29, 2011, 4 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies
image This talk considers a case of postcolonial archiving with discussion of recent efforts by South Korean research foundations to digitally archive photographic images of late nineteenth and early twentieth century Korea produced by Westerners. Many of the photographs assembled in the South Korean archive had previously been part of Euro-American archives, produced in the context of growing Western power in East Asia, and documenting people and scenery little known in the West. The South Korean digital archives of these images partially critique the orientalist and imperialist view inscribed in them; at the same time, the postcolonial taxonomy produces a self-orientalizing view of Korea's past.

This lecture is presented in conjunction with the photography exhibit "Of Power and Profit: American Seamen in Asian Waters," currently on display at the Institute of East Asian Studies.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Early Reception of the "Zhuangzi" in the West
Richard Lynn, East Asian Studies, University of Toronto
November 30, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies
image The reception of the Daoist classic "Zhuangzi" in the West has a long history even prior to the first translations in the 1880s. The speaker will discuss the 17th and 18th centuries European general encounter with South and East Asian religious traditions, an experience that shaped the development of modern Orientalism before imperialist ambitions and commercial greed during the early 19th century compromised what had originally been a search to expand Western religious perspectives on God, creation, and the individual soul. Key players in this process were members of the Jesuit mission to Peking. The writings of Joseph-Henri Prémare and Jean-François Foucquet will be examined, as well as the writings of a coterie of 18th century intellectuals, secular devotees of Christian mysticism associated with the "Quietism" movement.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Borges, Buddhism and Dreams
Amelia Barili, Department of Spanish and Portuguese, UC Berkeley
December 1, 2011, 5-6:30 p.m.
Center for Buddhist Studies
Borges and Barili One of the great writers of the 20th century, Jorge Luis Borges, was fascinated with Buddhism and with dreams. Amelia Barili, a longtime friend of his, will guide us in exploring the relation between these two themes and their presence in Borges' lectures and writings.

Dr. Amelia Barili is the former book review editor of the Argentine newspaper "La Prensa". She is faculty member of UC Berkeley, the Dharma Realm Buddhist University and Osher Lifelong Learning Institute. She teaches "Borges, Buddhism, and Cognitive Science," and "Borges, Buddhism and Dreams," and is writing a book on "Borges on Buddhism, Buddhism in Borges."

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104



The Song Emperor Huizong: Daoist, Painter, Builder, Captive
Patricia Ebrey, History, University of Washington
Panelist/Discussant: Nicolas Tackett, History, UC Berkeley
December 2, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)
image Huizong came to the Song throne in the first month of 1100, a few months after his seventeenth birthday, and reigned almost twenty-six years, till the end of 1125. He was the most artistically accomplished of all Chinese emperors, talented especially at painting and calligraphy. His decision to ally with the Jurchens against the Khitans failed spectacularly, however, and he and his kinsmen were taken into captivity in the far north. Since his reign ended so badly, traditional historians have viewed Huizong's many pursuits as his vices, not his virtues. His love of art was seen as self-indulgence, his faith in Daoism as self-delusion, his trust in Cai Jing as unwise and irresponsible. So long as one sets aside this moral framework, however, there are ample sources to look at Huizong and his reign afresh, to consider how he understood monarchy and its challenges, what he got from Daoism, how he made use of the resources of the throne, why he chose to ally with the Jurchen, and other related issues.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Shredding for the Motherland: The Guitar in China
James Millward, History, Georgetown University
Panelist/Discussant: Andrew F. Jones, CCS chair (on leave this year); Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
December 9, 2011, 4-6 p.m.
Center for Chinese Studies
image The guitar is, arguably, the most popular musical instrument today, in China as elsewhere in the world. China now produces most of the world's guitars. Yet guitar-playing, in either popular or art music genres, came to China only within the past few decades. In the early 20th century it appeared in jazz clubs or as props for Modern Girl pin-ups, but for reasons relating to its Western, romantic and bohemian associations the guitar remained little known beyond Shanghai and Guangzhou, was banned during the Cultural Revolution, even while it flourished in the Soviet Union through similar political epochs. In the late 20th century the guitar reemerged in China and its iconography has largely realigned with global meanings, yet it remains a transculturated object, its complicated semiotics reflecting China's evolving self-image and place in the world.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Memorial for Robert Scalapino
December 10, 2011, 2-5 p.m.
The Faculty Club, Great Hall
Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Department of Political Science
Robert Scalapino, photo by G. Paul Bishop Robert A. Scalapino, Robson Research Professor of Government Emeritus at the University of California, Berkeley, renowned worldwide for his many accomplishments in the field of East Asian studies and distinguished career at Berkeley spanning six decades, died Monday, November 1, 2011. Colleagues and family members will offer their memories.

Speakers:
  • George Breslauer
  • Han Sung Joo
  • Chongsik Lee
  • George Yu
  • Joyce Kallgren
  • Chong Moon Lee
  • George Chu
  • Jan Berris
  • Rich Ellings
  • Mike Lampton
  • Peter Hayes
  • Stephen Noerper
  • Rick Baum (read by Rochelle Halperin)
  • Sadako Ogata (read by Steve Vogel)
  • Ezra Vogel (read by Steve Vogel)
  • Origin Jablon
  • Diane Jablon
  • Jaull Loram
  • Tom White
  • Doug Scalapino
  • Benjamin Thompson
  • Kevin O'Brien
Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809

Photo by G. Paul Bishop



Screening of "Datong: The Great Society": Followed by a discussion with the filmmaker
Evans Chan, Filmmaker
December 13, 2011, 3-6 p.m.
Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)
image Synopsis: Kang Youwei 康有爲 (Liu Kai Chi), hailed as "the first modern Chinese," arrived in Sweden in 1904 and began a four-year sojourn on an idyllic island. A political fugitive from China's Qing dynasty, Kang and his disciple Liang Qichao 梁啟超 (Ben Yeung) organized China's first attempt at modern political reform in 1898, and built China's first political party in exile. Kang met President Theodore Roosevelt twice as a result of the anti-American boycott (1905-1906) he orchestrated to counteract the infamous Chinese Exclusion Act. Kang's most formidable challenge, though, was to rescue the reform-minded emperor from the lethal yoke of the recalcitrant Empress Dowager, and to convince his compatriots to modernize China by reforming the Manchu monarchy, rather than unleashing a violent revolution as championed by Dr. Sun Yatsen.
Datong: Great Society depicts the controversial career of a polygamist poet-philosopher, who, at the turn of the 20th century, liberated Chinese women from foot-binding and endorsed homosexual partnerships. The force of his life and visionary writings would find an admirer in Mao Zedong. Yet, it was Kang's revival of the tradition of a Confucian utopia, Datong (The Great Society), at the dawn of Chinese modernity that may turn out to be his most potent challenge to this post-socialist world in general, and a furiously rising China in particular.

WINNER OF THE SOUTHERN METROPOLITAN DAILY'S INAUGURAL MOVIE OF THE YEAR AWARD

"The whole idea of finding oneself somewhere else — in every sense of that phrase — makes Evans Chan's Datong: The Great Society a very moving film. The life of this great Southern intellectual/utopian philosopher caught between admiration for the West, exile, and patriotic self-sacrifice, resonates so strongly with the struggles of China's diasporic intelligentsia today." (Chris Berry, Professor of Film & Television Studies, Goldsmiths, University of London)

"With his keen observations, poetic sensibility, and formal innovativeness, Evans Chan is a true intellectual director working in Chinese cinema today, bringing with him a rare vision to deconstruct Chinese history." (Peggy Chiao Hsiung-ping, Taiwan critic and producer)

Open to all audiences.