Parameters of Identity: Practice, Place, and Tradition in East Asia

DATE: January 20-21, 2012

LOCATION: Various locations - see schedule

SPONSOR: Institute of East Asian Studies
Support provided by the Walter and Elise Haas Chair Endowment at the Institute of East Asian Studies




DESCRIPTION

Description
Parameters of Identity: Practice, Place, and Tradition in East Asia: A graduate student conference at the University of California at Berkeley, January 20-21, 2012

Studies of East Asia rooted in nationalist historiographies have tended to view culture and identity as if they were at once atomistic and homogeneous. In fact, culture and identity are much more porous and fluid than such approaches would suggest. Prominent scholars in many fields thus challenged those earlier narratives of unity, continuity, and homogeneity. The result has been a more rigorously critical approach to political, cultural, intellectual, and artistic identities throughout East Asia.

Having rejected the idea of a static East Asian tradition, can we acknowledge that culture and identity are fluid and diverse and still talk about them in a meaningful way?

This conference proposes to address this larger question, as well as related questions including, but not limited to: What roles have geography and place played in forging connections and identities? To what extent can identity be invented or reinvented, and what institutional or social mechanisms might affect these processes? When have cultures and identities been transmitted and carried on, and when has transmission failed? Why? How have material evidence of the past encouraged us to rethink the boundaries and periods of style, chronology, or culture attached to somewhat arbitrary delineations of space or regions?

This conference is made possible through the generous contributions of the Haas Junior Scholars Program at the UC Berkeley Institute of East Asian Studies.

SCHEDULE

Schedule
Friday, January 20, 2012

11:00AM-12:00PM
C.V. Starr East Asian Library Tour
Meet at the circulation desk

12:00-1:30PM
Lunch
Participants from Berkeley will be happy to lead visitors to nearby restaurants

1:30-2:00PM
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Introductory Remarks
Amanda Buster – Department of History, UC Berkeley

2:00-3:30PM
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
First panel: Categories and Self-Expression

  • How Far Are We From Home? Homecoming and the Formation of the Ethical Subject in the 1920s China
    Yu Zhang – Department of East Asian Languages, Stanford University
  • Han Trouble and the Ethnic Cure: An Ethnographic Study of China's Han Clothing Movement
    Kevin Carrico – Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
  • Characterizing Asia: Some Thoughts on Literary Form and Social Form in Asian-Anglophone Novels
    Sunny Xiang – Department of English, UC Berkeley
  • Ethnicity and the Labor Problem in Japan's South Pacific Mandate: Anthropology and the Categorization of Indigenous Populations
    Ti Ngo – Department of History, UC Berkeley
  • Respondent: Scott McGinnis – Department of History, UC Berkeley

3:30-4:00PM – Break

4:00-5:00PM
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Keynote Lecture
Who Cares about Identity?
Professor Susan Naquin – Department of History, Princeton University

5:30-7:00PM
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Second panel: Place and Belonging

  • Complaining about Lived Spaces: Personal Responses to Urban Problems in Northern Song (960-1127) Kaifeng
    Lik Hang Tsui – Department of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford
  • Jin Yufu, Manchukuo, and the Dongbei Tongshi
    Cyrus Chen – Department of History, UC Berkeley
  • Take Me to the Water: Aquatic Life and Ritual of Boat-dwellers in Modern Shandong and Jiangsu
    Ching-chih Lin – Department of History, UC Berkeley
  • Respondent: Wen-shing Chou – Assistant Professor of Art History, Hunter College

8:00PM – Dinner for conference participants
Great China
2115 Kittredge Street, Berkeley, CA 94704
(Kittredge at Fulton Street)
510.843.7996


Saturday, January 21, 2012

9:00-10:00AM – Breakfast

10:00-11:30AM
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies, 6th Floor (2223 Fulton Street)
Third panel: Intellectual Traditions

  • Virgin Territory: The Modern Feminist History of Takamure Itsue
    Andrea Horbinski – Department of History, UC Berkeley
  • The Politics in Qianlong’s Poetry on "Monthly Orders": Falconry, Avian Collection, and Natural History in Eighteenth-Century China
    Xinxian Zheng – Department of East Asian Studies, Princeton University
  • The Social Hermits: Changes in Lifestyle and Practice of the yinshi in the Late Ming
    Bingyu Zheng – Department of History, Princeton Unversity
  • Cultural Diversity and the Origins of Writing in East Asia: A Case Study of the Dinggong Pottery Sherd Inscription
    Christopher Foster – Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University
  • Respondent: Michelle Wang – Department of Art History, UC Berkeley

11:30AM-1:00PM – Lunch provided at the Institute of East Asian Studies

1:00-2:30PM
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies, 6th Floor (2223 Fulton Street)
Fourth panel: Institutions, States, and Identities

  • Nationalist Orthography; The Aesthetic Dimension of Hangul in Pre-Colonial Korea
    Matthew Haley – Department of East Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin
  • Trans-national Heroines? Female Immigrants' Narratives and Diversified Identities in Chinese Clan Associations in Singapore
    Pei-jin Peggy Wu – Department of Anthropology, National Tsing-hwa University
  • The Mortuary Culture of Medieval China and Transformation of Tang Elites
    Claire Yang – Department of History, UC Berkeley
  • Respondent: Amanda Buster – Department of History, UC Berkeley

2:30-3:30PM
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies, 6th Floor (2223 Fulton Street)
Closing Remarks

ABSTRACTS

Abstracts

Kevin Carrico
Department of Anthropology, Cornell University
Han Trouble and the Ethnic Cure: An Ethnographic Study of China's Han Clothing Movement

Based upon a year of ethnographic research, this paper analyzes the under-examined identity of China's majority Han nationality and its reinvention in a rapidly changing social context. While minority nationalities have long been represented and reified through images of "ethnic clothing," the Han Clothing Movement is a grassroots neo-traditionalist and ethno-nationalist drive which has emerged over the past decade to promote a similar yet different style of "ethnic clothing" for China's previously unmarked majority, anchoring Han identity in purportedly eternal materials amidst unprecedented social transformations.

Yet in the practice of identity, whereas "minorities" are imaginarily associated with a lengthy tradition of colorful song, dance, and celebration, the Han Clothing Movement identifies the Han majority with a similarly lengthy tradition of solemn ritual, towards the stated goal of recreating a "land of ritual and propriety" (liyi zhi bang). From such mundane practices as greetings to the recreation of such sacred practices as initiation ceremonies and traditional "Han" marriages, the Han Clothing Movement expands beyond clothing to infuse modern urban life with supposedly eternal rituals. Analyses of ritual practice and discussions with participants reveal that, from the dyadic spaces of ritualized greetings to the communal spaces of sacred rituals, the recreation of the imaginary "land of ritual and propriety" is based in a fundamental alienation from contemporary society, temporarily alleviated in ritual space. Separated from the din and chaos of the rapidly changing city beyond, the eternalized and solemn ritual space creates a vision of China "as it should be"- suturing a fundamental lack in lived experience to realize ever so briefly what my informants identified as the "real China." The opposition of majority/ ritual- minority/ dance further allows for the enjoyable "ethnicization" of Han majority identity while maintaining its imagined civilizational exceptionality.


Cyrus Chen
Department of History, University of California, Berkeley
Jin Yufu, Manchukuo, and the Dongbei Tongshi

Jin Yufu (1887-1962) 金毓黼 has come to prominence in the past decade as border studies have surged in the PRC. Scholars in the PRC, DPRK, and ROK in particular have developed an interest in Jin as the progenitor of the notion that the ancient Koguryo empire was "Chinese." As an archaeologist, collector, compiler and historian of northeast Asian history, a bureaucrat in the Zhang Zuolin and Zhang Xueliang warlord regimes, and the assistant director of the Fengtian Library under the Manchukuo government (1932-36), Jin lived and worked within a network of people that spanned political and intellectual circles and connected him with Japanese archaeologists and historians doing research in the region primarily during the Manchukuo era (1932-1945). Using Jin's diaries and published works to trace the social, political, and intellectual networks in which Jin wrote and published throughout the nineteen thirties and forties, I argue that as nationalistic as it was, Jin's classic ethnoracial history of the northeast region — the Dongbei Tongshi (1941) — was a product of transnational associations.


Christopher Foster
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University
Cultural Diversity and the Origins of Writing in East Asia: A Case Study of the Dinggong Pottery Sherd Inscription

Language is one of the principle mediums for constructing and communicating cultural identity. For this reason, research on the origins of writing — as a linguistic technology — bears directly on the broader issue of cultural genesis. Unfortunately, while scholars have begun to dismantle the narrative of a single homogenous Chinese culture sprouting from the Central Plains, a similar complexity has yet to penetrate models of the origins of writing in East Asia. Instead, the debate remains stalled around the question of whether Neolithic pottery marks relate to the Anyang oracle-bone inscriptions. Latent in this orientation is a teleological fallacy, namely the assumption that if there are examples of nascent writing in Neolithic East Asia, then they must have ultimately evolved in a linear fashion into Chinese characters, the earliest representative of which being the oracle-bone inscriptions. This paper complicates the debate in two ways. First, it disentangles definitions of writing from their usual reliance on speech. Defining writing as visibly recorded speech encourages scholars to connect Neolithic signs to Chinese characters (Anyang script) because this is the only means of accessing a familiar spoken language. By establishing an alternative set of empirical criteria to evaluate early signs, it may be possible to identify operative writing systems that do not necessarily record a known spoken language or its predecessors. Employing these new criteria, the paper next presents a case study on a pottery sherd from Dinggong 丁公 Shandong Province, bearing a series of unusual signs.This case study suggests that regional experimentation might have produced multiple writing systems in East Asia, and was not limited to a single linear evolution culminating in the Chinese script. The invention and use of writing, as with the construction of cultural identity itself, is a complex phenomenon and deserves to be treated as such.


Matthew Haley
Department of Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin
Nationalist Orthography; The Aesthetic Dimension of Hangul in Pre-Colonial Korea

It is of no surprise that Korea's native alphabet, Hangeul, assumed a symbolic relationship with nationalism during a period when nationhood and national culture started to become immediately meaningful (1894 to 1910). Hangeul was, after all, the vernacular script, and therefore it represented an indigenous culture in response to foreign influences.

However, this popular interpretation assumes that the vernacular script was only held in abeyance until the wellspring of modern nationalism could articulate and express the values that are supposedly inherent to it, which is tantamount to saying that Hangeul, one of Korea's most treasured cultural resources, owes its current elevated status to the imposition of foreign ideology and Western international relations. This will hardly do, for it implies the evacuation of all agency on part of the Korean reformers. At this point we must look at that which is residual to pre-colonial nationalist thought, so that rather than recursively locating Hangeul's significance in externally imposed systems of political and social doctrine, we may instead turn to the changing structures of emotional feeling, intuition, and perception that orthographic reform gave to the script.

This presentation will discuss in detail how orthographic efforts to consider Hangeul in the realm of sensuous perception distinguished the Korean script from mere written orality and made it into an autonomous object fit for nationalist appreciation (analogous to the autonomy of art). The question in concern to parameters of identity will therefore be aimed at how orthographic reform bound the Korean language as a phenomenal object from which the nationalist goal of constructing a sovereign state could be derived through the shared aesthetic experience of its form.


Andrea J. Horbinski
Department of History, University of California, Berkeley
Virgin Territory: The Modern Feminist History of Takamure Itsue

A leading feminist figure in her own lifetime and after her death, the pioneering women's historian Takamure Itsue (1894-1964) stood at the crux of many powerful and interrelated intellectual and social movements. Takamure's continuing relevance and controversial position as a feminist and intellectual figure lie in her unique integration of disparate intellectual and social currents such as feminism, modernism and anarchism into a distinctive vision of an ancient Japanese past that, having been delineated, could be used as a criticism of and in the present and as an ideal for the future by calling into question received notions of the "Japanese" past. Takamure's genealogy-based historiography was predicated on and called attention to the fluidity of cultural practices around marriage and kinship in the Japanese archipelago over time, but, ironically, her admiration for the deep past of the Yamato culture led to her embracing a nationalist pan-Asianism. In this paper I explore the multiplicity and even the contradictions of Takamure's views, as well as her maternalist feminism, which united them. Taken all in all, Takamure the intellectual must be understood as a modernist, whose feminist modernism has many similarities to the thought of other popular intellectuals of the modern period; the differences between her thought and that of more well-known figures such as Yanagita Kunio are both the product and the emblem of the alternate ways in which women experienced and participated in the construction of modernity and mass culture in imperial Japan. Takamure's historiography, predicated as it was on a contextualized but limited understanding of social institutions in the archipelago up through the Heian period, deftly illustrates the intellectual pitfalls that may open up when a scholar challenges a particular fixed notion, even as the basic assumptions of Takamure's thought may challenge the modern construction of history itself.


Ching-chih Lin
Department of History, University of California, Berkeley
Take Me To The Water: Aquatic Life and Ritual of Boat-Dwellers in Modern Shandong and Jiangsu

The essay will investigate the life and religious culture of freshwater fisherfolk in north China and their relationship with government and environmental change in modern Chinese history. The subjects of the study are the boat-dwelling people who inhabited the Grand Canal and other lakes and waterways between southwest Shandong and north Jiangsu. Their ancestors were forced to resettle from the land to dwell on boats due to river floods and rising lakes during the late Ming and early Qing periods, a time when their collective memory of environmental refugees was imprinted. Life on boats also played a role in shaping their religious beliefs and practices. This study will explore the lifestyle and religious culture of the boat-dwellers whom have been rarely known for centuries, despite their population of no less than one hundred thousand. Other issues to be explored include the impact of state policies and the interplay of environment and culture, as well as the interaction between boat-dwellers and land-people. This floating community intentionally used the labyrinthine waterways and marshes of the lakes as natural obstacles to escape state control and avoid contact with land-based people. Local residents of Shandong and Jiangsu disdained them as outsiders because of their frequent migration to adapt to fishing seasons and avoid state control and natural disaster. Without a fixed base, the floating population reconstructed imagined hometowns in either Jiangsu or Shandong. The boat-dwellers' floating memory and aquatic mobility across provinces have reshaped their identity and attitudes toward state and hometown, which can help us rethink about our current understanding of political, cultural, and spatial identity.


Lik Hang Tsui
University of Oxford
Complaining about Lived Spaces: Personal Responses to Urban Problems in Northern Song (960-1127) Kaifeng

This paper explores the understudied issue of urban problems and its links to urban identity in pre-modern China. Specifically it looks at responses to negative impact of urban development on Kaifeng's urban life in the Northern Song (960-1127). In the mid-eleventh century, Kaifeng had a population of about 1.4 million and was the political and commercial center of the Song empire; although writers, painters, and even historians have portrayed the capital city's splendour for centuries, various urban problems emerged in the seemingly thriving city in a time when China transformed into a more urbanized society. This study takes a critical look at these problems by analyzing personal perspectives on city life as a point of departure. It first looks at how extreme weather conditions adversely affected the lives of residents in the context of Kaifeng's built environment, especially how Ouyang Xiu (1007-1072), an important literati scholar, reflected on and responded to the frustrations that arose in his epistolary writings. These are then related to the built environment and social conditions in the Kaifeng city, as well as its climate during the Medieval Warm Period. The paper goes on to study the city's other inadequacies in food and medical services that Ouyang Xiu mentioned. By gaining a fuller understanding of the more negative aspects of life in a rapid developing city and combining the study of activities and feelings of urban dwellers, the city's spatial setting, and environmental parameters, investigating Ouyang Xiu's encounters with the city helps to flesh out the common experiences identities of urban dwellers in the eleventh century. This approach to China's urban history is expected to compensate for the limitations resulting from focusing too much on the structural and economic trajectories of urban development in pre-modern China.


Pei-jin Peggy Wu
Department of Anthropology, National Tsing-hwa University
Trans-national Heroines? Female Immigrants' Narratives and Diversified Identities in Chinese Clan Associations in Singapore

This article examines the relationship among personal experiences and social memories of the Red Head-scarfs (Hong Tou Jin), and diversified identities of Chinese clan associations in Singapore. I will provide some case studies of early female immigrants who were construction workers. Moreover, I will also describe how Chinese clan associations associate "Hong Tou Jin" as national heroines and their diversified identities of overseas Chinese.

At the beginning of the 20th century, some single Chinese women immigrated to Singapore from Samsui County in Guangdong Province, South China. They worked as coolies on construction sites and were referred to as "Hong Tou Jin" who liked to wear red headscarves as sunhats. They struggled for a living for a large part of their lives with physical labor. Yet, their social contribution to the building of urban Singapore was neglected by the society. These women had been forgotten by Singaporeans. Inconceivably, "Hong Tou Jin" became the national symbol of Singapore in the government's propaganda in the 2000s. The Singaporeans used "Hong Tou Jin" to present individual understandings of early Chinese migration history and their national identities through stories, handmade dolls, artistic works and inventive Chinese cuisine.

I visited several Chinese clan associations to collect people's memories about early female immigrants' lives. However, people of Samsui, Cantonese or other Chinese communities thought that the "Hong Tou Jin" did not worthwhile to win the honor because they were still just poor female workers, but national heroines. In my opinion, most people re-shaped their memories of "Hong Tou Jin" by the information from modern media and national history, and added their nostalgic imaginations to the past. Identities of Chinese clan associations became diversified through the changes of political, economic and social context. The changing process accentuates the differences amongst identities of overseas Chinese.


Sunny Xiang
Department of English, University of California, Berkeley
Characterizing Asia: Some Thoughts on Literary Form and Social Form in Asian-Anglophone Novels

Through Chang-rae Lee's A Gesture Life and Kazuo Ishiguro's An Artist of the Floating World, my paper explores how Asia and Asianness mediates the relation between the categories of "Asian American" and "world," particularly as they pertain to the literary representation of racial identity. Though Lee's and Ishiguro's novels take place fifty years apart and on opposite sides of the Pacific, the narrators, Franklin and Ono respectively, present two remarkably similar profiles: both are elderly Japanese men whose scrupulous attention to decorum in carrying out their day-to-day lives translates into a pronounced self-consciousness in relating their personal histories. But whereas Lee casts Franklin as the "primary citizen" of his suburban community to exemplify a distinctly American strain of racialization, Ishiguro uses Ono's vaunted belief in himself as an artistic and political paragon to substantiate a normative human flaw. If Franklin's self-restraint, blind compliance, and perceptive limitations corroborate the racial typology of the Asian American "model minority," then how do the same qualities in Ono shore up what Ishiguro calls the universal "inability of normal human beings to see beyond their immediate surrounding"? Given that both characters are profoundly nationalistic, how does Ishiguro instrumentalize post-WWII Japan, to which Ono maintains an unquestioning allegiance, as a (mere) narrative ploy for elucidating his protagonist's parochialism while Lee presents America and Japan, with which Franklin strenuously aligns himself, as the (material) determinant for both formal citizenship and social integration? In short, how can Asianness uncontradictorily index the particularity of race and the generality of humanness? Lee's and Ishiguro's novels invite us to complicate the relation between literary form and racial form. More broadly, they also suggest that the antinomous nature of Asia makes it a particularly well-suited problematic for critically engaging the representation of racial identity in an era of transnationalism and globality.


Claire Yi Yang
Department of History, University of California, Berkeley
The Mortuary Culture of Medieval China and Transformation of Tang Elites

My presentation reveals the initial stage of my dissertation research, which will engage with the dramatic set of cultural, social, political, and economic changes that radically transformed China between the 8th and the 13th centuries. Existing narratives of this so-called "Tang-Song transition," while increasingly detailed and complex, have thus far failed to integrate the remarkable developments in mortuary culture that archaeologists have identified and that coincided nearly precisely with the initial stage of the Tang-Song transition. My research will not only track the ideological shift in notions of the afterlife in Tang mortuary culture, but also use this shift as a means to study one of the key elements of this great period of change, involving the emergence of a new civil-bureaucratic scholar-elite, which eventually replaced the aristocratic "great clans" that had successfully maintained their social eminence and dominated the upper echelons of the government bureaucracy for centuries.

One initial step of my research is to examine what roles geography and place have played in forging connections and identities, for which my presentation will focus on Yangzhou prefecture in the Lower Yangzi region. Starting from the mid-Tang dynasty, the Lower Yangzi region was rapidly changing from a backwater region to the economic center of China; with the massive southward migrations that began in the mid-Tang, it also became a demographic center. Due to the burgeoning commercial opportunities and urbanization, the presence of a non-officeholding elite was most prevalent in the Lower Yangzi region during the late Tang, particularly in Jiangnan Dong circuit and Yangzhou prefecture. Thus, we may evaluate the cultural values of this new elite as well as regional and temporal variations in elite types, i.e., officeholding vs. non-officeholding elites. A close reading and statistical study of the tomb epitaphs from Yangzhou indicate the cultural heterogeneity in Tang elite society and reveal a different set of values and ideals held by the non-officeholding elite in the Lower Yangzi region.


Yu Zhang
Department of East Asian Languages, Stanford University
How Far Are We From Home? Homecoming and the Formation of the Ethical Subject in the 1920s China

The modern Chinese homecoming narrative, which deals with the urban-educated, enlightened young intellectuals' experience of visiting their rural home, is closely bound up with the widening gap between urban centers and rural areas, a gulf which deepened at the dawn of Chinese modernity. Modernity therefore involves a critical spatial and cultural reorientation: the physical and social mobility from the countryside to the city. The construction of modern individual often undergoes a displacement, initially freed from the traditional social ties in the rural community in order to become cosmopolitan citizens in the city. Conversely, the modern individual's return visit to the hometown that traverses the city/country divide involves another round of spiritual journey of self-discovery and self-revelation. What does this social and physical mobility have to do with the fashioning of the modern self? The widely accepted narrative of the historical development of the modern self is often told as a transition from the celebration of the individual as a gesture of protest or a marker of authenticity in the 1920s to a conscious entry into the collective in the 1930s and 1940s. This standard narrative depends primarily on an urban and national vision, which largely disregards the perspective of the local.

In this paper I attempt to provide an alternative vision, namely, to chart the development of the modern individual from the perspective of the hometown left behind. I conduct a "symptomatic reading" of a series of homecoming narratives by major Republican authors from Lu Xun to Sha Ting, between 1920 and 1940. This paper explores the literary-historical trajectory from the nostalgic, empathetic, and responsible filial son with tender feelings toward his rural home to the figure of the single-minded, cynical, and self-centered revolutionary youth, lacking in filiality, who resolutely departs from his rural home. It further explores how the modern self is built into the tension of the social-economic situation of the time and how selfhood and morality are inextricably entangled in the landscape of modernity.


Bingyu Zheng
Department of History, Princeton University
The Social Hermits: Changes in Lifestyle and Practice of the yinshi in the Late Ming

This paper studies the lives of two prominent late Ming yinshi, Chen Jiru 陳繼儒 (1558-1639) and Zhao Huanguang 趙宦光‚ (1559-1625), and explores how the historical conditions of the late Ming influenced their construction of their own yinshi identity. Previous scholarship on the Chinese yinshi tradition, focused mainly on the medieval Chinese individuals, has upheld the ideal image of the moral, withdrawn, and solitary — noble recluse — as the defining figure of the yinshi. This paper argues instead that the yinshi tradition was much more receptive and open to different interpretations in nature, and changed and grew as the historical traditions surrounding the yinshi changed. That was the case in the late Ming, when socioeconomic and intellectual developments allowed literati like Chen and Zhao the possibility of becoming that could acquire a high degree of fame and wealth during their lifetimes.


Xinxian Zheng
Department of East Asian Studies, Princeton University
The Politics in Qianlong’s Poetry on "Monthly Orders": Falconry, Avian Collection, and Natural History in Eighteenth-Century China

This paper challenges the "May-Fourth legacy" inherited by PRC in portraying the De xiansheng 德先生 (Mr. Science) to be modern, western, and of revolutionary nature. I examine the making of the Wuhou xue 物候學 (Study of the plants and animals in the seventy-two pentads based on recorded observations) as a modern ecological science from two perspectives.

The first section unravels the rise of Wuhou in intellectual debates of early modern China. Different from Joseph Needham, James Legge, and Fung Yu-lan, who essentialized Wuhou as a term of Chinese philosophy rooted in the Han text of the Rituals, I argue for it being an invented tradition at the turn of nineteenth century. I attribute the rapture in how Qing court perceived the nature to the Manchu practices of animal hunting and husbandry, revealed by the comparisons between the 1716 encyclopedia authorized by the Kangxi emperor and the 1799 poems of four chapters composed by the Qianlong emperor. These works promoted the state-literati interactions in comprehending and governing the nature. To invent local culture and shape regional identities, nineteenth-century annotators of the Rituals shifted their attention from the Han text Yueling 月令 (monthly ordinance) to Xia Xiaozheng 夏小正 (The lesser Annuary of the Xia dynasty), which was possibly a Song dynasty text with more emphases to natural observations. Such a process is an intriguing counterpart to the rise of "phenology" in Britain under the provincially cosmopolitan naturalist Gilbert White, who inspired Darwin by his 1789 letters The Natural History and Antiquities of Selborne.

The second section explores the process of Wuhou being revived and homogenized as Chinese indigenous knowledge by the Zhejiang-born and Harvard-trained meteorologist Zhu Kezhen 竺可楨 (1890-1972, also known as Co-ching Chu). By looking at Zhu's essays published in the 1910s and 1930s, I show how Wuhou xue evolved into a modern discipline in the Republican era. In contrast to his overseas cohort of 1910 Hu Shi 胡適 (1891-1962), Zhu was a fascinating alternative, arguably representative, of being modern while maintaining a prudent distance from Western or Japanese-mediated knowledge systems. The discursive history of Wuhou xue hints at the hybrid and even ambivalent nature of science in modern China.

PARTICIPANTS

Participants

Amanda Buster – Department of History, UC Berkeley

Kevin Carrico – Department of Anthropology, Cornell University

Cyrus Chen – Department of History, UC Berkeley

Wen-shing Chou – Assistant Professor of Art History, Hunter College

Christopher Foster – Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University

Matthew Haley – Department of East Asian Studies, University of Texas at Austin

Andrea Horbinski – Department of History, UC Berkeley

Ching-chih Lin – Department of History, UC Berkeley

Scott McGinnis – Department of History, UC Berkeley

Susan Naquin – Professor of History, Princeton University

Ti Ngo – Department of History, UC Berkeley

Lik Hang Tsui – Department of Oriental Studies, University of Oxford

Pei-jin Peggy Wu – Department of Anthropology, National Tsing-hwa University

Sunny Xiang – Department of English, UC Berkeley

Claire Yang – Department of History, UC Berkeley

Yu Zhang – Department of East Asian Languages, Stanford University

Bingyu Zheng – Department of History, Princeton Unversity

Xinxian Zheng – Department of East Asian Studies, Princeton University

DIRECTIONS

Directions

The events for the conference "Parameters of Identity: Practice, Place, and Tradition in East Asia" will be held in various locations on and around the UC Berkeley campus.

C.V. Starr East Asian Library

See section B4 on this large campus map.

CV Starr Library

3335 Dwinelle Hall

See section C3 on this large campus map.

Dwinelle Hall

Great China Restaurant – 2115 Kittredge Street, Berkeley

See section D1 on this large campus map.

Great China Restaurant

Institute of East Asian Studies – 2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor conference room

See section D1 on this large campus map.

IEAS


Directions to the Berkeley campus
By BART

If traveling by BART, exit the Richmond-Fremont line at the Berkeley station (not North Berkeley). When you leave the BART station, walk east up Center Street (towards the hills) one block.

From Interstate 80

To reach the campus by car from Interstate 80, exit at the University Avenue off-ramp in Berkeley. Take University Avenue east (toward the hills) approximately two miles until you reach the campus.

From Highways 24/13

To reach the campus from Highways 24/13, exit 13 at Tunnel Road in Berkeley. Continue on Tunnel Road as it becomes Ashby. Turn right at College Avenue and drive approximately one mile north to Bancroft Way.

Directions to the campus are also available at www.berkeley.edu/ visitors/ traveling.html

Parking

There are various public parking lots and facilities near campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.