Placing East Asia: A Graduate Student Conference on Urbanism and the Production of Space

DATE: March 2-3, 2012

PLACE: Various locations — see schedule and directions

SPONSORS: Institute of East Asian Studies, Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Geography, and Center for Global Metropolitan Studies
Support provided by the Walter and Elise Haas Chair Endowment at the Institute of East Asian Studies




DESCRIPTION

Description

In recent years, a growing number of scholars have turned their attention to cities and urban space as a means to understand historical and social processes. While the so-called "spatial turn" in the humanities and social sciences has spurred a diverse body of scholarship, the interpretive lens and research methods on urban issues have remained largely divided along disciplinary boundaries. Meanwhile, the push towards theoretical pluralism in area studies and urban studies has placed increased emphasis on the interconnections between the local and global environs, human agencies and institutional and cultural structures, and a diverse array of discourses and historical trajectories that shape the transformation of cities and everyday life.

This two-day interdisciplinary conference brings together graduate students working on urban studies in the East Asian region. Although the wide range of urban forms and historical experiences in East Asia precludes any generalization of an "East Asian city," the examination of the region from different disciplinary perspectives can lead to new insights on urban processes that depart from long established Euro-American assumptions. Conference participants will present papers under the following three sub-themes:

  1. Urban Experiments and Placemaking Practices: The construction and invention of urban projects that serve specific interests and ideological ends. What are the competing regimes of values that drive these projects and who are the agents involved? What kind of symbolic forms are utilized to promote urban aspirations and create new meanings of place?
  2. Industries, Networks and the City: The shaping of cities by emergent global and local production networks and industries. How does the interaction between global market forces and domestic governmental practices reshape urban processes and the politics of place? How do contestations among different social actors, changing central and local state relations and the ensuing jurisdictional fragmentation impact urban development in specific locales?
  3. Culture(s), Space(s) and Representation(s): The representations of urban space and their relations to the production of subjectivity, identity and difference. Paper topics might address questions such as: how is the city portrayed in different mediums? What kinds of cultural imaginings and truth claims are enabled by its diverse representations? How do cultural representations of urban spaces interact with larger representations of cultural identity in an increasingly fluid and global age?

This conference is sponsored by the Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), the Doreen B. Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Department of Geography, and the Center for Global Metropolitcan Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. For additional information about the conference, please contact the organizers at placingeastasia@gmail.com.

Click here to download a copy of the conference poster.


Organizing Committee

The organizing committee comprises of the following 7 members of the Haas Junior Scholars Program for Doctoral Candidates at the Institute of East Asian Studies at UC Berkeley:

  • Jennifer Choo (Department of Sociology)
  • Cecilia Chu (Department of Architecture)
  • Aileen Cruz (Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures)
  • Shih-Yang Kao (Department of Geography)
  • Seung-Youn Oh Department of (Political Science)
  • Youjeong Oh (Department of Geography)
  • Jieheerah Yun (Department of Architecture)

Faculty Advisors:

  • Margaret Crawford (Department of Architecture)
  • You-tien Hsing (Department of Geography)
  • Daniel C. O'Neill (Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures)

SCHEDULE

Schedule

Click here to download a copy of the conference schedule.

Click here to download a copy of the conference poster.

THURSDAY, MARCH 1

5:30pm – 7:00pm
PRE-CONFERENCE GATHERING
(Graduate Student Lounge, 440 Stephens Hall)


FRIDAY, MARCH 2

Note: All Friday sessions to be held at 370 Dwinelle Hall.

8:30am – 9:00am
COFFEE & REGISTRATION

9:00am – 9:15am
WELCOME & INTRODUCTORY REMARKS

Welcome
Wen-hsin Yeh (Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley)

Introductory Remarks
Cecilia Chu (Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley)
Shih-yang Kao (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley)

9:15am -10:45am
PAPER SESSION 1
SPACES OF ERASURE AND REMEMBRANCE

Jieheerah Yun (Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley), Chair
Huey Ying Hsu (Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley), Discussant

  1. Home Memories, Urban Amnesia: A Study of Popular Recollections of Hutong and Siheyuan in Postsocialist Beijing
    Yanfei Li (Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto)
  2. Representing and Coping with the Early Twentieth Century Chongqing — "Guide Songs" as Maps, Memory Cells and Means of Creating Stereotypical Images
    Igor Iwo Chabrowski (Department of History & Civilization, European University Institute)
  3. River Stories: Place, Affect, and Urban Politics in Late Socialist China
    Jessica Wilczak (Department of Geography, University of Toronto)
  4. Re-globalizing Seoul: Construction of Dongdaemun Market as "the World Design Capital"
    Jieheerah Yun (Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley)

10:45am – 11:00am
COFFEE BREAK

11:00am – 12:30pm
PAPER SESSION 2
CULTURAL INDUSTRIES AND CITIES

Youjeong Oh (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley), Chair
Marco Cenzatti (Department of City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley), Discussant

  1. Images of Persuasion: The Zone as a Virtual Strategy for Capital Accumulation
    Michael A. Ulfstjerne (Department of Cross Culture and Regional Studies, Copenhagen University)
  2. Making Artist Neighbourhoods: Art and Urban Redevelopment in Hong Kong and Taipei
    Grace Siu-fan Tang (Department of Sociology, The University of Hong Kong)
  3. Negotiating Authenticity in China's Urban Historic Preservations: The Case of the Kuan and Zhai Alleys in Chengdu
    Yanshuo Zhang (Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University)
  4. Fantasy of Fantasy Urban: Drama-Channeled City Marketing in Korea
    Youjeong Oh (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley)

12:30pm – 2:00pm
BREAK (Lunch on your own)

2:00pm – 3:15pm
PAPER SESSION 3
SPACES OF THE GRASSROOTS

Rongbin Han (Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley), Chair
Elise Youn (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley), Discussant

  1. Urban Popular Riots as Spectacle: Culture of Performance in Shitamachi Tokyo, 1905-06
    Tomoko Seto (Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago)
  2. Ghosts against Nike-ification: Representation and Ritual in Tokyo's Miyashita Park
    Love Kindstrand (Japanese Studies, Sophia University)
  3. The Invisible Border of Cyberspace: Online Communities and Public Sphericules
    Rongbin Han (Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley)

3:15pm – 3:30pm
COFFEE BREAK

3:30pm – 5:00pm
PAPER SESSION 4
URBAN POLITICAL ECOLOGY

Shih-yang Kao (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley), Chair
Freyja Knapp (Environmental Science, Policy & Management, UC Berkeley), Discussant

  1. Rediscover Another Space in Beijing: Water Distribution Territories, 1900-1950
    Lei Zhang (Department of History, Syracuse University)
  2. Brazilian Grains in Chinese Cities: Production of Urban Space through Agro-Industrial Restructuring
    Gustavo Oliveira (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley)
  3. The Bio/Geopolitics of Urbanization Strategies on the Rare Earth Frontier
    Julie Michelle Klinger (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley)
  4. The City Recycled: Inner City Demolition Waste and the Construction of Urban Periphery in Beijing
    Shih-yang Kao (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley)

5:00pm – 5:15pm
COFFEE BREAK

5:15pm – 6:15pm
KEYNOTE SESSION 1
LISTENING TO SOUND, SPACE, AND SOCIALITY IN THE STREETS OF OSAKA, JAPAN
Marié Abe (Department of Musicology and Ethnomusicology, Boston University)

Daniel O'Neill (Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley), Moderator

6:30pm – 8:00pm
RECEPTION (Graduate Student Lounge — 440 Stephens Hall)


SATURDAY, MARCH 3

Note: All Saturday sessions to be held at the Institute of East Asian Studies, 6th Floor, 2223 Fulton Street.

9:00am – 9:30am
COFFEE & REGISTRATION

9:30am – 11:00am
PAPER SESSSION 5
CONTACT ZONES AND LIMINAL SPACES

Aileen Cruz (East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley), Chair
Cecilia Chu (Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley), Discussant

  1. Kotobuki, An Asylum for All: Institutionalization of an Urban Ghetto
    Jieun Kim (Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan)
  2. Scott Pilgrim vs. the Multiculturalist State: Narratives of Race, Space and Ideology in Toronto
    Nicole Go (Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia)
  3. Spatializing Imperial Ambitions: Harbin in Yumeno Kyûsaku's The Ends of the Ice
    Aileen Cruz (Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley)
  4. Tokyo "Modernity" — Mapping Urban Space in Natsume Sōseki and Tanizaki Jun'ichirō
    Jing Wang (Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto)

11:00am – 11:15am
COFFEE BREAK

11:15am – 12:30pm
PAPER SESSION 6
SPATIALIZING URBAN KNOWLEDGE

Seung-youn Oh (Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley), Chair
William Ma (Department of Art History, UC Berkeley), Discussant

  1. Placing Shanghai: Ethnography of Space and Sensory Production of East Asian Urbanism
    Non Arkaraprasertkul (Department of Anthropology, Harvard University)
  2. Intellectual, Collector, and Dramaturg: Qi Rushan and the Collecting of Theatrical Materials in Early Republican Beijing
    Hsiao-Chun Wu (Department of History, UCLA)
  3. Material Publics, Invisible Debts: Infrastructure in the Era of Modernization in Yokosuka, Japan
    Matthew Black (Department of Anthropology, Columbia University)

12:30pm – 2:00pm
BREAK (Lunch on your own)

2:00pm – 3.30pm
PAPER SESSION 7
SHAPING URBAN PRODUCTION: NETWORKS AND STAKEHOLDERS

Jennifer Choo (Department of Sociology, UC Berkeley), Chair
Emily Huiching Chua (Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley), Discussant

  1. The Limits of Liberalization: Sub-National Government Autonomy and the Auto Industry in Post-WTO Era China
    Seung-Youn Oh (Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley)
  2. Local Elites and Ideological Ends in Urban Planning: The Case of Tianjin Binhai New Area
    Carlo Ferri (Institut National des Languages et Civilisations Orientales)
  3. Ghosts in the Shell Game: Gaolidai and City Building in Ordos
    Max Woodworth (Department of Geography, UC Berkeley)
  4. City, Inc.: The Political Economy of China's Real Estate Industry — Emergence, Growth and Propagation
    Jennifer Choo (Department of Sociology, UC Berkeley)

3:30pm – 3:45pm
COFFEE BREAK

3:45pm – 4:45pm
KEYNOTE SESSION 2
WALTER BENJAMIN DOESN'T LIVE HERE ANYMORE: THE CITY AS A SIGN
Yomi Braester (Department of Comparative Literature, University of Washington)

Michael Raine (Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley), Moderator

4:45pm – 5:00pm
CLOSING REMARKS

5:30pm – 7:00pm
POST-CONFERENCE GATHERING (location to be announced)

Click here to download a copy of the conference schedule.

Click here to download a copy of the conference poster.

KEYNOTE LECTURES

Keynote Lectures

KEYNOTE LECTURE 1
Friday, March 2
5:15 pm – 6:15 pm

Listening to Sound, Space, and Sociality in the Streets of Osaka, Japan
Marié Abe
(Department of Musicology and Ethnomusicology, Boston University)

Daniel O'Neill
(Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley), Moderator

In this presentation, I will examine the intersection of sound, public space, and sociality in contemporary Japanese urban life through ethnographic analysis of a Japanese street musical practice called chindon-ya. Chindon-ya, which dates back to the 1850s, refers to groups of outlandishly costumed street musicians in Japan who are hired to advertise an employer's business. In my ethnographic analysis of a particular chindon-ya troupe in Osaka, Japan, I pay particular attention to the production of social space through sonic culture, bridging cultural geography and anthropology of sounds. The popular imaginary of chindon-ya is closely associated with neighborhood streets, everyday soundscape, and the notion of "taishû" — the popular mass, or the public. When the neighborhood streets are increasingly regulated, privatized, and developed, and when "taishû" is fragmented through the recession era, what kinds of understanding of space and "public" emerge from chindon-ya today as they resonate with the shifting geographies of urban modernity? What kinds of physical spatial boundaries and social differences are unsettled and/or made audible by chindon-ya sounds in the urban soundscapes of Osaka? Through ethnomusicological analyses of chindon-ya performances, I seek to contribute a nuanced understanding of urban space as dynamically produced through not only social and geographical relations but also sounds and sonic practices.


KEYNOTE LECTURE 2
Saturday, March 3
3:45 pm – 4:45 pm

Walter Benjamin Doesn't Live Here Anymore: The City as a Sign
Yomi Braester
(Department of Comparative Literature, University of Washington)

Michael Raine
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley), Moderator

Key thinkers about urbanism, including Siegfried Kracauer, Walter Benjamin, Michel de Certeau and David Harvey, have asked how technologies of urban representation account for the formation of the modern subject. This influential formulation takes for granted the prediscursive status of the built environment. In other words, the city is a given, and it is the technologies of representation and ideological perceptions that change. I suggest that culture can also transform the city. I proceed to explore a number of ways in which "the city" is redefined — as a sign, as a genre, and as a site of media convergence.

ABSTRACTS

Abstracts

(In alphabetical order by last names)

Placing Shanghai: Ethnography of Space and Sensory Production of East Asian Urbanism

Non Arkaraprasertkul
Department of Anthropology, Harvard University (USA)

How do we know what we know about a city? How do we understand a city with a complex history of occupation and diverse politics of representation? Shanghai, China's largest city, attempts to represent itself to the world by establishing the traditional "global hierarchy of value," wherein a city is only considered "global" if it can exhibit an effective blend of modernity and heritage. Tapping into the colonial architecture and glittering bright lights of the Bund, and juxtaposing them with the cutting-edge skyscrapers of Pudong, the city creates a powerful visual image that matches its constructed preconception of "having been, being, and always being" — a node of social and cultural interaction.

Moving beyond this visual emphasis, however, my critique of Shanghai explores the alternative mediums through which the city is represented, and the cultural imaginings that result. I argue that in an age where international travel has become more accessible than ever before, other elements of representation — sounds, smells, food, everyday experiences — have become increasingly important to the way the urban context is perceived. As a trained ethnographic filmmaker, architect, historian, and anthropologist, I have spent the last year exploring the role of sound in the understanding of historical and social processes in the city. Drawing upon this research through the medium of film and audio recording, I use sensory ethnography to shed light on how other forms of experience reinforce, contradict, and otherwise go beyond the projected image of Shanghai's unique urban character.


Material Publics, Invisible Debts: Infrastructure in the Era of Modernization in Yokosuka, Japan

Matthew Black
Department of Anthropology, Columbia University (USA)

This paper examines the (anti-) politics and aesthetics of water infrastructure in the city of Yokosuka, a suburb of Tokyo originally built as a factory site for the Japanese Navy and still the host of a major US naval base. Recent work in anthropology and urban studies has argued that the urban ecology and aesthetics of perception involved in infrastructure can play a role in shaping subjectivities of urban political membership (see De Boeck 2011, Kal 2011) and in particular, that the vastness and permanence of infrastructural networks and their direct linkage to bodily needs lends them to an association between the national and the sublime (Greenberg 2003). Examining the contemporary representation of water infrastructure in terms of local identity as a cultural heritage of the modern and pedagogical resource, as well the notions of self-government and urban development as élan vitale developed by the colonial administrator and administrative overseer of Yokosuka's public works in the 1920's, Gotō Shimpei, I argue that neoliberal financial scrutiny of local government, has reversed this association with the sublime. In particular, I examine how the decline of the 'construction state,' repeated deindustrialization, and, not least, Yokosuka's entrenched former history in the Japanese Imperium as an industrial producer for military consumption, are today coupled with a sense of constraint and a municipal debt burden drawn from public works that together curtail the subjective potentialities of citizenship. In closing, I examine Richard Sennett's theory of citizenship as craftsmanship for an alternate conception of infrastructural politics.


Representing and Coping with Early Twentieth Century Chongqing — "Guide Songs" as Maps, Memory Cells and Means of Creating Stereotypical Images

Igor Iwo Chabrowski
Department of History and Civilization, European University Institute (Italy)

Chongqing's "guide songs" form an interesting sub-genre among the broad category of haozi 號子 (workers songs). They were a unique form of rhythm-based oral narratives describing urban space, river docks, harbors, and landing stations. Each mentioned toponym was followed by a depiction of what was associated as most characteristic, visible or meaningful to it. The aim of this paper is to read and analyze the metaphors of Chongqing presented in these workers' songs in order to understand through what images Chongqing was remembered, reproduced, and represented. I also intend to deconstruct the stereotypical image of the city by looking at historically important connections and developments of nature, work, production, social class and religion. Apart from tracing links and connections, whether with historical development of the city or mythic traditions native to Chongqing, I will also consider the function of these oral traditions in the urban environment of early 20th century Chongqing. Rhythmical and easy to remember, the songs provided ready-to-use guides and repositories of knowledge necessary to anyone arriving or living in Chongqing. They existed on a cross-road between utilitarian resource-books and cultural representation that shaped modes of thinking and visualizing urban space (in general) and Chongqing (in particular). This paper is an original contribution addressing the need to employ popular culture in our thinking about Chinese cities and the multiplicity of meanings they possessed in the pre-Communist times.


City, Inc.: The Political Economy of China's Real Estate Industry — Emergence, Growth and Propagation

Jennifer Choo
Department of Sociology, UC Berkeley (USA)

Land reserves and access to capital are two of the most basic means of production necessary for the viability and competitiveness of any real estate firm in China. Without both of those critical inputs, a real estate firm cannot do its core line of business, viz., develop property. Yet, both of those inputs are highly state controlled in China. Although by most accounts, the land-use-rights (LURs) market has become more regularized over the years, winning land use rights (LURs) and even bank loans often presupposes the prior accumulation of political capital as well as a deep knowledge of the needs and ambitions of the dominant players in that locality. As the 1982 Constitutional Amendment declared, urban land is state owned; and all rural land remains under the ownership of the collective. In addition, property development companies in China still rely, in large part, on bank loans to fund their projects, which primarily flow from state-owned banks. State-owned enterprises often have a non-negligible advantage — in the form of easier access and lower interest rates — in obtaining bank loans. And yet, all of my interviews and my own brief survey of China's statistical yearbooks reveal that although the industry began with all state-owned property development enterprises, by the late 1990's, the trend shifted and most real estate firms today are private. The majority of the firms listed on the various stock markets in China — such as the Shenzhen, Shanghai and Hong Kong Stock Exchanges — are large, state-owned firms; yet nationally-established, private real estate firms often compete with and even out-compete their state-owned behemoths. My dissertation aims to understand how this paradoxical result has obtained. It seeks first to delineate the emergence and the development of the real estate industry in China in some of the first-tier cities. It also seeks to understand the origins of a select number of market-dominant private development firms and their competitors in the state-owned sector. It further asks, what does it mean for a firm to be "private," as opposed to "state-owned"? I use primary data that I collected in the field for 18 months in Beijing, Shanghai, Guangzhou and Hong Kong from 2008 to 2010 to back up my assertions. I also rely on archives of company documents, analysis reports and national statistical and industry datasets to support my arguments.


Spatializing Imperial Ambitions: Harbin in Yumeno Kyûsaku's The Ends of the Ice

Aileen Cruz
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley (USA)

This paper examines the representation of Harbin in the Japanese detective novella, The Ends of the Ice , published in 1931. Its writer, Yumeno Kyûsaku, had never set foot in Manchuria, but he received recognition for his depiction of this cosmopolitan city. The story takes place in the 1920s and the Harbin of that time appears as a contested space of imperial ambitions, specifically those of Russians and the Japanese. At the same time, even within these groups, loyalties remain murky. With this in mind, the settings of the novella are more than just colorful locales, a look across the representational spaces of urban planning, mass media and travel writing reveals that these come to embody the fraught social relations, both within the city and across empire.


Local Elites and Ideological Ends in Urban Planning: The Case of Tianjin Binhai New Area

Carlo Ferri
Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales (France)

The paper will concentrate on the contemporary mutations of Tianjin, a historical treaty port situated less than 100 miles from Beijing on the north cost of China. The city is at the center of one of the most important Chinese urban policies: the development of Binhai New Area. This Free Economic Zone, first initiated by the local government at the beginning of the 1990s as a response to the development of southern economic zones, became in 2006 a project of national priority thanks to the introduction of the National Comprehensive Reform. Nowadays, Binhai enjoys the same status of Shenzhen Special Economic Zone and Shanghai Pudong New Area.

I will first outline what I call the "Tianjin clique" and reflect on its role in the city's renaissance. Tianjin's growth in importance on the national scene can in fact be seen as a result of the increasing national influence of its elites, including Prime Minister Wen Jiabao or current Minister of Transport Li Shenglin. Subsequently, I will analyze the ideological ends connected to this particular urban project: Are urban projects replacing an ideological vacuum?in contemporary China? In other words, does urban development preserve the legitimacy of the CPC in a country which remains formally communist but has adopted capitalist practices? For which ideological ends could urban projects, like the Tianjin Sino — Singapore Eco — city, be used for? Which ambiguities are visible when comparing the official discourse and the reality of urban planning, including side effects such as speculation and corruption?

My paper will thus analyse the reality of contemporary urban changes in Tianjin with a transdisciplinary approach and a wide range of different sources (official documents, interviews and field studies).


Scott Pilgrim vs. the Multiculturalist State: Narratives of Race, Space and Ideology in Toronto

Nicole Go
Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia (Canada)

This paper will explore the interstices of race, space, ideology and the urban landscape in Bryan Lee O'Malley's six-volume graphic novel series Scott Pilgrim (2004-2010). The series is set in Toronto, a city that often touts its multicultural neighbourhoods as evidence of its cosmopolitan progressiveness, yet takes care to de-emphasize the racialization of its space. While much of the action in Scott Pilgrim takes place on Bathurst Street in an area wedged somewhat between Chinatown and Koreatown, its setting between two of Toronto's Asian cultural ghettoes is never acknowledged. Instead, O'Malley gestures to a hierarchical relationship of space through the desirability of white (non-racialized) space to the ethnic Asian characters that skim along its periphery in both a physical and cultural sense.


The Invisible Border of Cyberspace: Online Communities and Public Sphericules

Rongbin Han
Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley (USA)

The Internet has created relatively "free spaces" for public expressions in China. Recognizing the limited efficacy of prohibitive control tactics, the state has adapted to new PR tactics like Internet commentators (popularly named "fifty centers") to produce pro-state commentary in the virtual space. However, struggles over control in the competitive terrain of online discourse are not binary interactions between state agents and those representing "society". A constituency of netizens has named themselves "voluntary fifty centers" and defends the regime on a voluntary basis. Why netizens are willing to defend the regime despite its unpopular control over the Internet? How do the minority "voluntary fifty centers" manage to maintain their identity and sustain their discourse?

In this project, I explore the fragmentary politics of online discussion by looking at online communities. Through extensive analysis of "voluntary fifty centers", I demonstrate how group identity can be shaped through repeated rhetoric interactions with both opposing netizens and fellow community members. I argue that such interactions have turned some online platforms into communities that are externally polarized yet internally coherent. Such online communities where netizens share interests, values, and experiences, establish strong virtual and even physical ties, and develop shared linguistic codes, are important to understand discourse production and reproduction in Chinese cyberspace.


The City Recycled: Inner City Demolition Waste and the Construction of Urban Periphery in Beijing

Shih-Yang Kao
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley (USA)

In recent years, as China is gearing its economy from the export industries toward urban development and domestic consumption, trash begins to receive more and more public attentions. As a subject that lures media weekly and frustrates many Chinese urban dwellers in their everyday lives, garbage is always rendered either as the "downside" of China's economic boom or as a result of failed urban management. As such, it has become part of the popular yet unchecked narrative of "China Speed," in which crises — be it social, environmental or political — appear when social, institutional or political arrangements fail to evolve as fast as the country's economy does.

This paper takes a different approach from those who read China's trash through the narrative of over-speeding. Taking Beijing's demolition waste as an example, I argue that China's garbage boom has enabled a new round of accumulation in villages and towns surrounding the Chinese metropolises. This finding suggests that the power of trash lies in its potential to expand the market to places that do not have the favorable conditions for growth. Trash therefore is not an anti-thesis to, nor a by-product of, economic development. Instead, in the context of post-socialist China it is a productive element that lubricates and speeds up the process of market transition.


Kotobuki, An Asylum for All: Institutionalization of an Urban Ghetto

Jieun Kim
Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan at Ann Arbor (USA)

When the mass land reclamation of Yoshida Shinden was completed in 1874, in a measure to turn a small fishing town of Yokohama into the national open port, the developers named one of its southernmost sections, 'longevity' (kotobuki). However, historical contingencies made Kotobuki a receptacle to numerous short-lived dreams, and, for most of its history, it has held one of the nation's lowest life expectancy records. Once known as the "Western Town" epitomizing the pioneering spirits of day laborers in the 1950s, Kotobuki now came to be known as a "Welfare Town". As an attempt to handle this historical irony, this paper will pay particular attention to the diverse local activities and practices that experimented with the spatial opportunities and possibilities of Kotobuki in the past half-century. While Kotobuki has served as the last resort to many of the socially abandoned, from zainichi Koreans to the homeless, its marginality also attracted those who were in search of new sociality, such as activists, architects and artists. Interestingly, despite the wide spectrum of these heterogeneous attempts made in Kotobuki, these practices were reflected in the spatial structure with the intensification of its spatial features as a doyagai (flophouse district) that made the whole town look like an institution in itself. This paper will suggest that it is the dialectic relationship between the pressing needs and contesting dreams that resulted in the perpetuation a liminal space of the socially abandoned.


Ghosts against Nike-ification: Representation and Ritual in Tokyo's Miyashita Park

Love Kindstrand
Department of Japanese Studies, Sophia University (Japan)

In the spring of 2010, dozens of volunteers, activists, artists and archivists converged on a dilapidated public park in central Shibuya, the capital of Japan's retail consumer culture. Mobilizing through online social media, they had gathered to stop the construction of "Nike Park," a semi-private extreme-sports experience. As the "Artists in Residence," the occupants challenged both local authorities and commercial interests with a radically different vision of urban public space that, evolving through six months of occupation, transformed Miyashita Park into a celebration of alternative visions of globalization and the organization of urban commons, pathways to which were actualized in a struggle for spatial representation, in and through the multiplicity of its engaged participants. In this article, I use Turner's theory of ritual to trace the discourse of occupation, its political imageries and the source of its symbolic energy to the liminal capacities inherent in the margins of an increasingly regimented urban landscape. I consider the campaign against Nike-ification of Miyashita Park as a spatiotemporal plateau of protest culture that predates and informs more recent attempts to appropriate public space, and construct spaces of representation from which to imagine, enact and coordinate responses to the hegemony of abstract space, and construct viable "futures in the present".


The Bio/Geopolitics of Urbanization Strategies on the Rare Earth Frontier

Julie Michelle Klinger
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley (USA)

In Baotou, Inner Mongolia, biopolitical techniques are deployed in urbanization precisely because of their perceived geopolitical necessity contingent upon ongoing control of Rare Earth deposits in an historically contested borderland. Access to Rare Earth Elements (REEs) in Baotou is contingent upon a three-part process: (i) possessing a stable, hegemonic claim to the soils containing REEs; (ii) establishing or retrenching borders in order to keep out competing claims and interests, and; (iii) deploying cultural and political processes of subject formation within these locales in order enlist the populace in the project of maintaining the hegemonic claims to the land and resources in question as well as enforcing physical and ideological borders.

In this essay, I do three things in order to mark the conceptual field upon which a theoretical-empirical analysis of the manner in which biopolitical and geopolitical techniques are deployed to produce a particular vision of urbanity in the name of securing a strategic resource frontier. First, I provide a synopsis of the significance of Rare Earth Elements and explain why the REE frontier has moved from North America to China. Second, I engage the interwoven concepts of borderland, frontier, and hinterland in order to expose potentially generative divergences and overlaps among these terms. Third, I present one example of the way in which biopolitical techniques are deployed through cultural mechanisms toward hegemonic geopolitical ends to secure unfettered access to strategic resources.


Home Memories, Urban Amnesia: A Study of Popular Recollections of Hutong and Siheyuan in Postsocialist Bejing

Yanfei Li
Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto (Canada)

This paper studies how hutong and siheyuan (alleyways and courtyard houses), the defining features of Beijing vernacular forms of residential space, are remembered when they are experiencing massive demolition in the accelerated urban spatial reproduction since the 1990s. Investigating the essays from a popular Sunday column named "Siheyuan"(Courtyard House) in Beijing Evening as exemplary narratives about these architectural forms circulated in China's mass media, this paper addresses the questions how hutong and siheyuan are represented; why they need to be remembered as such; what cultural meanings these representations register in the Chinese postsocialist urban culture. Perusing these popular retrospective texts in their historical and social contexts, I argue that the proliferation of narratives on hutong and siheyuan, though accompanying to the fast physical disappearance of the architectural forms, expresses not merely the nostalgic sentiments; the large corpus and popularity of these narratives have started a trend of memory making to respond to the cultural amnesia embodied in the profit-driven urban renewal in China's postsocialist city.


The Limits of Liberalization: Sub-national Gocernment Autonomy and the Auto Industry in Post-WTO Era China

Seung-Youn Oh
Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley (USA)

My project juxtaposes the relationship between Chinese regional economic development and its global linkages. I conduct a sectoral analysis of the Chinese automotive industry in which the central government mandates that the entry mode of foreign enterprises be a joint venture (JV) with Chinese SOEs. Such ownership restraint creates dual dependencies for automotive SOEs by situating them between Chinese governments and global automakers. This also constrains two of the most important strategies of global firms: entry mode and entry timing. This paper investigates the varying roles of SOEs in mediating and restructuring global-local economic relations by posing two questions: 1) why do some Chinese SOEs "thrust" local suppliers up the production ladder and create global-local linkage, while other SOEs largely remain "stalled" in the low-value added segment of production and created global-local entanglement; and 2) what factors explain the different SOEs' capacities in developing local supplier networks?

Based on my structured comparison of three auto JVs — Guangzhou Honda; First Auto Works-Tianjin Toyota; and Beijing Hyundai — I argue that the configuration of supplier networks depends on SOEs' capacities of juggling the dual dependencies on governments and foreign partners. Examining the role of SOEs in channeling global and local economic forces sheds light on the unique developmental path of the Chinese auto industry, where rules at the international, national and regional levels are at play. This paper also illuminates the changing dynamics of agency roles in SOEs and the newly developing corporate governance in China. Lastly, it discusses the impact of external actors including foreign partners on the developing corporate and economic governance in the host region and how sub-national entities interact with the governments at various levels through FDI flows.


Fantasy of Fantasy Urban: Drama-Channeled City Marketing in Korea

Youjeong Oh
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley (USA)

In this paper, I examined drama-conveyed city promotion, practiced by more than fifty Koran cities over the past decade, from the intertwined perspective between the drama industry and the political economy of Korean cities. The ever-widening demands on drama content from both the domestic and overseas broadcasting market have made the drama-production industry in Korea extremely speculative. Having illusory visions for a mega-hit, numerous drama producers are jumping into the market but without capital. Deprived of funding and spaces to shoot a drama, Korean drama producers are heading to cities for sponsorship that comes as cash, land and landscape. Bearing similar fantasies for immediate and short-term effects in publicity and accumulating economic and political capital, Korean cities have actively engaged in the drama-channeled city marketing. For those cities that have been historically excluded from the nation's developmental axes and lack political and economic capability to promote tangible urban projects, the construction of the fantasized urban spaces through which they can garner publicity and political and economic benefits has been a seductive tools for local development. Riding on the wide stretches of television drama, the drama-conveyed city marketing turned out to be powerful in generating immediate publicity. When associated with the drama industry characterized by speculation and short-term popularity, however, this kind of city marketing reveals serious limitations in terms of stability, sustainability and connectivity. While the fantasies of television drama have escalated the expectations of cities, the fantasy world of TV drama without any improvement in reality has come out hollow and short-lived.


Brazilian Grains in Chinese Cities: Production of Urban Space through Agro-Industrial Restructuring

Gustavo Oliveira
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley (USA)

Most accounts of Brazil-China agricultural trade highlight the relative shortage of farmland and water resources per capita in China as the fundamental factor triggering increased imports of grains from Brazil and elsewhere. The rationale rests on arguments about comparative advantage, claiming China should import land- and water-intensive commodities from countries more abundant in these resources such as Brazil, while shifting production and exports towards labor-intensive commodities, primarily industrial and manufactured products. Yet these accounts "naturalize" a new and radically fabricated agro-ecological arrangement of people, plants, animals and industries in China, Brazil and the rest of the world — characterized by the production of urban space. Conversion of farmland for urban development certainly contributes to the deterioration of China's ecological resource base, but grain and food production continue to satisfy most domestic demand. Grain imports from Brazil, therefore, are actually required for industrial processing and animal feed production — reflecting and reinforcing the concentration of livestock production and agricultural processing attendant to growing urbanization. These imports outcompete Chinese peasant production that could otherwise fully satisfy domestic demand, undermining the reproduction of agroecological peasant agriculture and non-urban livelihoods in China. This process consolidates agribusiness production systems and consequent urbanization in Brazil as well, foreclosing possibilities for land redistribution and agrarian reform that could revert last century's rural exodus and thereby resolve long-term socio-economic and ecological problems in Brazil. In China, moreover, the rapid process of urbanization resulting from this agro-industrial restructuring generates agricultural labor shortages and depresses rural incomes, curtailing increased agricultural production and shifting agriculture towards capital-intensive commercial practices that reinforce dependence upon an international agro-industrial market. While the Chinese government attempts to balance food security with expanding cities, different regional, industrial and bureaucratic interests come into conflict, as port cities benefit and agricultural regions decline. Moreover, strengthening movements for labor rights, environmental justice, food safety, and peasant resistance to land grabs fundamentally challenge this massive agro-ecological restructuring. Recent fieldwork in Beijing, Shandong and Heilongjiang is reviewed in making this argument.


Urban Popular Riots as Spectacle: Culture of Performance in Shitamachi Tokyo, 1905-06

Tomoko Seto
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago (USA)

Immediately after the Russo-Japanese War (1904-05), the city of Tokyo saw what historians call the "era of popular violence" during which a series of urban riots led by dissident activists against national and local authorities erupted and culminated in nation-wide rice riots in 1918. Though scholars of modern Japan have examined this era of turmoil to study the simultaneous emergence of Japanese imperial expansion, the construction processes of the modern nation-state, and the beginning of the historical trajectory of the movement for democracy in Japan, they have tended to overlook the significance of Edo-style performing arts widely appreciated and practiced among local populace that helped to increase popular participation in the riots.

My paper examines media representations of the site of the riots, namely, Tokyo's shitamachi (literally, "low city") area imagined to have preserved its distinctive tradition as the cultural center for townspeople since the Tokugawa period (1603-1868), specifically at the time of two formative incidents: the 1905 Hibiya Riots and the 1906 riots against the city's streetcar fare-increase. Newspapers reporting the events depicted that the shitamachi dwellers had participated in the riots in a manner inspired by Edo-style performing arts — by improvising their roles as heroic performers and sympathetic spectators, while appropriating neighborhood public space such as parks and streets as a makeshift theater. These representations reveal that popular cultural practices were a significant part of dissident activism of the time, magnifying the scale of the riots and threatening the authorities.


Making Artist Neighbourhoods: Art and Urban Redevelopment in Hong Kong and Taipei

Grace Siu-Fan Tang
Department of Sociology, The University of Hong Kong (Hong Kong)

Drawing on two extending case studies of artist village housed in state premises with roots in colonial history, one in Hong Kong's former Shek Kip Mei Factory Estate and one in Taipei's Treasure Hill old neighbourhood, this article explores how state's space in old urban cores becomes new sites of production for artists and arts practitioners, and how these state spaces are exploited for amenity, entertainment and commercial potentials. The production of these new spaces in the 2000s suggests that the cities seek to expand their cultural fabric by adapting the artist villages and the area around them into a cultural district or cluster. Along this process, artists and creative professionals are used as an urban revitalization tool in both cities. By broadening the research scope beyond privately-owned space, this research adds another dimension on how state-owned territory is revitalised with the leveraging of artists and their activities. While urban studies on art districts in major Western cities have claimed that artistic activities are a key factor for gentrification and displacement in urban development, I argue that paying attention to the nature and the category of space enable us to discover how artists and their activities leads to different development trajectories of urban places and ways to explain socio-spatial changes. Rather than viewing the two artist neighbourhoods in case as part of an "industry" subjected to the economic analysis and policy responses as other industries, the study shows that these production sites require a more cultural understanding of what they represent as a form of local urban culture that is being preserved, created and reinvented.


Images of Persuasion — The Zone as a Virtual Strategy for Capital Accumulation

Michael A. Ulfstjerne
Department of Cross Cultural and Regional Studies, Copenhagen University (Denmark)

This paper examines the underlying dynamics behind the planning and construction of the 'Jiang Yuan Cultural & Creativity Industry Zone' in Ordos, Inner Mongolia. Following the recent global emphasis on creativity as a driver for economic growth, local governments across China increasingly encourage the formation of creative clusters and zones for cultural production, but despite many efforts and meticulous planning to develop such zones, many of these endeavors are never completed. This paper attempts to review the process from planning to building in light of the various stakeholders and interests invested in such developments. The paper argues that private real estate developers and, to some extent local governments, effectively appropriate the recent emphasis on creativity and clustering as a short-term strategy to accumulate capital. Consequently, the criteria for success and failure are volatile and highly contingent on the particular gaze and stage of development. In the process, the production of images, models and plans are likely to serve as feasibility criteria to convince local governments to allocate land-use rights and this way effectively pre-empt alternative uses of land.


Tokyo "Modernity" — Mapping Urban Space in Natsume Sōseki and Tanizaki Jun'ichirō

Jing Wang
Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto (Canada)

During the Meiji (1868-1912) and Taisho (1912-1926) eras, the Tokyo landscape changed in earnest due to rapid industrialization and an influx of foreign nationals and people from the countryside. The transformation of Tokyo's urban space plays a significant thematic role in modern Japanese literature: not only did it display internal socioeconomic changes, but helped the Japanese people imagine the very condition of modernity — a product (at least in part) of colonial encounters (Tani Barlow 1997). In this sense, representations of urban space played an important role in both framing and dissolving the image of (western) modernity.

Using Sōseki's Sanshirō (1908) and Tanizaki's Chijin no ai (Naomi, 1924), I will explore metaphorical colonial tensions in the metropole, and how it complicates the equating of modernization to westernization. In Sanshirō, representations of urban space not only reveal overt references to the Russo-Japanese War (Komori Yōichi 1999) but the imprint of colonial relations within Japan's domestic space. These are brought to the fore by imagining either rural space or suburban space as Tokyo's exterior. In Chijin no ai, an analysis of race, gender, and class relations in Tokyo will reveal how representations of hierarchical spatial relations helped reinforce a consciousness of modernity. At the same time, I will argue that the heterogeneity of urban space embodied in these literary texts also introduces the possibility of discrepancies that undermine the unity and homogeneity of (western) modernity.


River Stories: Place, Affect, and Urban Politics in Late Socialist China

Jessica Wilczak
Department of Geography, University of Toronto (Canada)

This paper examines how residents, activists, artists, and government officials in Chengdu, China rallied to and rewrote the symbolism of the Fu-Nan Rivers in the nineties, and the role that this moment played in shaping the city's political culture. From 1993 to 1997 the government of Chengdu conducted a massive environmental improvement project. The city's main waterways, the Fu-Nan Rivers, were dredged and widened. About 500 factories along the river were closed, and 100,000 people living along the riverbanks were relocated to make way for urban parks.

Most scholars of contemporary urban China would read the Fu-Nan Rivers Revitalization Project as a massive urban renewal project carried out by an entrepreneurial city government in order attract global capital flows, dressed in green rhetoric. Yet those who participated in the project describe it as a personally transformative moment of local collective action that opened up a new sense of political possibility. I trace the narratives told about this moment in media reports, policy documents, and interviews with key participants. Where do these accounts conflict, and what does this reveal about political struggles then and now? Over a decade after the event, do participants feel their projects succeeded? What legacy has this moment left? In contrast to dominant accounts of contemporary urban politics in China, which tend to sideline the importance of the city-as-place, this paper suggests that affective geographies are key to understanding local political outcomes in late socialist China.


Ghosts in the Shell Game: Gaolidai and City Building in Ordos

Max D. Woodworth
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley (USA)

Ordos Municipality, in China's Inner Mongolia Autonomous Region, is the epicenter of the province's burgeoning resource-extraction sector. Against the backdrop of rapid expansion in select industries over the past decade, massive-scale urbanization has occurred throughout the municipality, placing the city at the forefront of changes brought about through the Western Development Project initiated in 2000. A broad range of actors has piled into the real estate sector in Ordos, including large, nationally active real estate developers, local development groups, diversified state-owned enterprises, and subsidiary firms of resource-extraction conglomerates. An additional set of actors contributing to the vast urban spatial reconfigurations in Ordos can be found in informal, high-interest loan networks in which local residents and outside investor groups participate. Informal lending supplies capital for construction projects and serves as a prime investment arena for wealthy local residents. It has also become the main target of the municipal government's efforts to bring order to the chaotic investment landscape in this frontier boomtown setting. This paper examines the role of private, high-interest loan networks in shaping patterns of real estate development in the city and their connections to the production of excess capacity in all categories of real property. I identify major lending networks and analyze the relative significance of these networks in the local real estate market. It then considers local government efforts to co-opt these networks through the establishment of a "Private Capital Investment Service Center."


Intellectual, Collector, and Dramaturg: Qi Rushan and the Collecting of Theatrical Materials in Early Republican Beijing

Hsiao-Chun Wu
Department of History, University of California, Los Angles (USA)

This paper examines the ways in which the local conditions of an urban setting promoted emerging modern scholarship in early twentieth-century China. Confronted with Western imperialism and the crisis of modernity, Chinese intellectuals in the early twentieth century were eager to develop academic disciplines in accord with Western, "modern" norms. By focusing on the collecting activities of the drama connoisseur Qi Rushan (1875-1962) in early Republican Beijing, this paper shows how the intellectuals' call for new scholarship was made possible by urban conditions and practices. This paper will first contextualize Qi's collecting activities within the May Fourth intellectual trend, which emphasized a scientific approach to conducting research. Collecting, as stressed in the May Fourth folksong movement, was endowed by the intellectuals with the foremost importance in academic practice. The paper will then turn to Qi's career as a collector in Republican Beijing to examine how urban history and culture helped to fulfill his academic ambitions. Political transformation, the unique thriving opera scene, and the city's cultural market enabled collectors such as Qi to gather a wide variety of theatrical materials in Beijing, ranging from Qing official documents about court performance to actor's experiences. Qi's career as a collector in Beijing shows that locality played an indispensable role in realizing the universal idea of modern academic practice. This paper concludes with a brief discussion of how the established categories of ya (elegant) and su (vulgar) were modified via the collecting of theatrical materials.


Re-globalizing Seoul: Construction of Dongdaemun Market as "the World Design Capital"

Jieheerah Yun
Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley (USA)

Dongdaemun Market, located in the eastern part of Seoul, has been considered by many Seoul residents as the center of fashion industry in South Korea. Most recently, Dongdaemun Sports Stadium has been demolished to make room for Dongdaemun Design Plaza and Park (DDPP), which has become a central piece of urban development. The promotion of the park complex is a part of the DesignSeoul Project, the government's efforts to re-globalize South Korean city after the Asian financial crisis by elevating Seoul as the world design capital. Perceived economic success associated with the Dongdaemun Market has made the area the potent site to rearticulate and re-globalize the identity of Seoul through carefully calculated strategies in which urban aesthetics play a crucial role. The park complex, which includes rediscovered old city walls dating back to the 15th century, has been praised by media as the successful example of bridging the past and future of Seoul.

Notwithstanding the celebratory media portrayal of the park complex, the city government's attempts to redesign the market have not been received with universal approval. Voices of dissension came from various constituents. Invocation of anti-colonial feelings during the demolition of the Dongdaemun Sports Stadium was questioned by many local residents who argued that positive memories associated with the sports activities surpassed the negative image. At the same time, the local government's DesignSeoul Project has invited criticisms from young artists who argued local problems had to be addressed first before discussions of a global city.

This paper argues the DesignSeoul Project has inadvertently encouraged discussions regarding what constitutes youth culture as well as who defines the status of a "global city." The construction of DDPP has galvanized political discussions regarding what should be preserved as the example of "Korean culture." Subversive uses of official DesignSeoul posters and Taoist philosophy by urban residents demonstrate that processes of globalization cannot be described as a simple top-down or a bottom-up phenomenon. This study challenges construction of dichotomy between the state and civil society by concluding that interlocking relationship between the state and civil society has shaped the South Korean urban and suburban environments.


Rediscover Another Space in Beijing: Water Distribution Territories, 1900-1950

Lei Zhang
Department of History, Syracuse University (USA)

Drinking water had always been scarce in Beijing, a city seated in a semi-arid region. In the Qing Dynasty (1644-1911), to maintain some control over the distribution of this precious commodity, the state licensed Shandong water carriers, who had contributed to the Manchu conquest of China. As a consequence, Shandong water carriers held the right to lease wells and water distribution territories for indefinite periods and to pass on these leaseholds to their descendants, which remains so well into the mid twentieth century.

Water distribution territories are special areas assigned to certain water carriers to deliver water. It represented a sort of hidden space in Beijing, which provided a spatial perspective to appreciate this pre-industry city as well. In this paper, I will reconstruct the water distribution territories and examine how they were created and maintained based on the primary sources housed in Beijing and Tokyo. Within the water distribution territories, I will place water carriers into their three daily places-wells, streets and courtyard-to see the way they manipulated water distribution territories to deal aptly with their peers, state and residents to their ends.

The water distribution territories underlay the order of water supply; meanwhile it facilitated the water carriers' monopolization. I intend to argue that the water distribution territory is the outcome of negotiations between state, guild and water carriers, which reflected not only a sense of place imbedded into the landscape of Beijing associated with regional networks and local ties, but also the conflicting identity under the process of modernization.


Authenticity and Creativity in China's Urban Historic Preservations — the Case of the Kuan and Zhai Alleys in Chengdu

Yanshuo Zhang
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University, USA

The conflict between preserving the nation's traditional architecture and developing regional economy has been troubling China since the Open-up and Reform period. While in the past, many historic districts in urban areas were demolished to make way for developmental purposes, recently, China has adopted a more sophisticated approach to solve the problem: the vernacular architectural districts in many cities have been turned into tourist sites with the appeal of both "traditional flavor" and modern amenities. But can the transformed districts still authentically represent history and sustain the traditional values that were guarded by the original residents? These are important questions to ask, as the term "authenticity" is highly fluid and thus can be taken advantage of by different interest groups, such as local governments eager to stimulate regional economy. Chengdu's Kuan and Zhai Alleys serve as a good example to examine the tensions and problems typical to Chinese cities in transition. As the last surviving vernacular architectural district, the alleys have been transformed into Chengdu's iconic cultural tourist cite. But such a transformation jeopardizes many historic evidences once embedded in the area, including the community spirit crucial to the city's identity. By presenting alarming facts behind the commodification of the historic district, the paper aims at providing some remedies for future preservation efforts: a people-focused approach is needed to highlight the human elements in historic communities and protect authentic memories of a city's past.

PARTICIPANTS

Participants

Marie Abe
Department of Musicology and Ethnomusicology, Boston University

Non Arkaraprasertkul
Department of Anthropology, Harvard University

Matthew Black
Department of Anthropology, Columbia University

Yomi Braester
Department of Comparative Literature, University of Washington

Marco Cenzatti
Department of City and Regional Planning, UC Berkeley

Igor Iwo Chabrowski
Department of History & Civilization, European University Institute

Jennifer Choo
Department of Sociology, UC Berkeley

Cecilia Chu
Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley

Emily Huiching Chua
Department of Anthropology, UC Berkeley

Aileen Cruz
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

Carlo Ferri
Institut National des Langues et Civilisations Orientales

Nicole Go
Department of Asian Studies, University of British Columbia

Rongbin Han
Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley

Huey Ying Hsu
Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley

Shih-yang Kao
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley

Jieun Kim
Department of Anthropology, University of Michigan

Love Kindstrand
Japanese Studies, Sophia University

Julie Klinger
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley

Freyja Knapp
Environmental Science, Policy & Management, UC Berkeley

Yanfei Li
Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto

William Ma
Department of Art History, UC Berkeley

Seung-youn Oh
Department of Political Science, UC Berkeley

Youjeong Oh
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley

Gustavo Oliveira
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley

Daniel O'Neill
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

Michael Raine
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

Tomoko Seto
Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Chicago

Grace Tang
Department of Sociology, The University of Hong Kong

Michael A. Ulfstjerne
Department of Cross Culture and Regional Studies, Copenhagen University

Jing Wang
Department of East Asian Studies, University of Toronto

Jessica Wilczak
Department of Geography, University of Toronto

Max Woodworth
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley

Hsiao-Chun Wu
Department of History, UCLA

Elise Youn
Department of Geography, UC Berkeley

Jieheerah Yun
Department of Architecture, UC Berkeley

Lei Zhang
Department of History, Syracuse University

Yanshuo Zhang
Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University

DIRECTIONS

Directions
Thursday, March 1, 2012

A pre-conference gathering will be held at Graduate Student Lounge, 440 Stephens Hall from 17:30 to 19:00.

The Graduate Student Lounge is located on the 3rd floor of Stephens Hall. Enter from north side of the building (through the archway entrance) and walk up the stairs. Look for directional signage posted on the walls.

Friday, March 2, 2012

All Friday sessions to be held at 370 Dwinelle Hall.

Dwinelle Hall is notorious for being hard to navigate. In order to find the room we suggest that you follow the directions below.

  1. Enter through the main entrance off the big plaza on the east side of Dwinelle Hall. This will be Level D.
  2. Once you are inside the building, turn right and walk down the main hall. There will be an elevator. Take it to Level F/G. Alternately, you can take the stairwell directly opposite to the elevator.
  3. Once you exit the elevator, follow the directional signage to "Common Ground Cafe." Room 370 is located at the far end of the Cafe.

Conference Reception will be held at the Graduate Student Lounge — 440 Stephens Hall.

Saturday, March 3, 2012

All Saturday sessions to be held at the Institute of East Asian Studies, 6th Floor, 2223 Fulton Street.

Location map

Directions to the Berkeley campus
By BART

If traveling by BART, exit the Richmond-Fremont line at the Berkeley station (not North Berkeley). When you leave the BART station, walk east on Center Street one block to the campus border.

From Interstate 80

To reach the campus by car from Interstate 80, exit at the University Avenue off-ramp in Berkeley. Take University Avenue east (toward the hills) approximately two miles until you reach the campus.

From Highways 24/13

To reach the campus from Highways 24/13, exit 13 at Tunnel Road in Berkeley. Continue on Tunnel Road as it becomes Ashby. Turn right at College Avenue and drive approximately one mile north to Bancroft Way.

Directions to the campus are also available at www.berkeley.edu/ visitors/ traveling.html

Parking

There are various public parking lots and facilities near campus and in downtown Berkeley. This list includes municipal and privately owned parking lots and garages open to the public. Please consult signs for hours and fees prior to entering the facilities.

More information is available on the UC Berkeley Parking and Transportation page.