Berkeley Summer Research Institute

DATE: July 31–August 10, 2012

PLACE: 2223 Fulton Street, 6th floor

SPONSOR: Institute of East Asian Studies




AGENDA

Agenda
TUESDAY, JULY 31

7:00 pm: Opening Dinner for BSRI participants at the Women's Faculty Club

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 1

9:00–10:30 am: Opening Introductions

Working Papers Panel 1 — Ts'ui-jung Liu, Chair
10:45–11:30 am: Shao-Hua Liu, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica

"Leprosy and Socialist Modernity in China's Ethnic Frontiers"
Discussant: Jenn-Hwan Wang

11:45 am–12:30 pm: Shiuh-Shen Chien, Associate Professor, Geography, National Taiwan University

"Projectization of Land Development and Chinese Local Entrepreneurialisam: A Case Study of College-Town Fever and Eco-City Fever"
Discussant: Robin Visser

12:30–1:30 pm: Lunch

Contextualizing Lecture 1
1:30–3:15 pm: Distinguished Speaker Brian DeLay, Associate Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley

"Independent Indians and the U.S.-Mexican War: Non-State Peoples and Geopolitical Narratives"

3:15–3:55 pm: Reception

Tour of C.V. Starr East Asian Library
3:55 pm: Depart IEAS for a walk to C.V. Starr East Asian Library
4:15–5:00 pm: Tour of C.V. Starr East Asian Library with Bruce Williams, Reference Services Coordinator, Information and Public Services, and Western Language Selector

THURSDAY, AUGUST 2

Working Papers Panel 2 — You-tien Hsing, Chair
10:00–10:45 am: David Bello, Associate Professor, History, Washington and Lee University

"Relieving Mongols of their Pastoral Identity: The Environment of Disaster Management on the 18th Century Qing Steppe"
Discussant: Yonglin Jiang

11:00–11:45 am: Shiyung Michael Liu, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

"Continuity or Discontinuity: Modern Public Health in 1940s China"
Discussant: Angelina Chin

12:00–12:45 pm: Jianxiong Ma, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology

"Re-construction of Modern Borders between Yunnan and Burma: The Changing Systems of the Mule Caravan Network, the Shan Chieftain Institutions and the Han Chinese Lineages before and after the 1870s"
Discussant: Victor Teo

12:45–1:45 pm: Lunch

Working Papers Panel 3 — Robert Weller, Chair
1:45–2:30 pm: Pál Nyíri, Professor, History, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam

"Enclaves of Improvement: Sovereignty and Developmentalism in the Special Zones of the China-Lao Borderlands"
Discussant: Shao-Hua Liu

2:45–3:30 pm: Chih-Chieh Tang, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica

"Taiwan as a Laboratory of Modernity: A Preliminary View from the Perspective of Multiple Modernities"
Discussant: Yu-Ying Lee

Contextualizing Lecture 2
4:00–5:45 pm: Distinguished Speaker Nathan Sayre, Associate Professor, Geography, University of California, Berkeley

"Follies of Fencing and Fortification: Sustainability and Spatial Control in the US-Mexico Borderlands"

5:45 pm: Reception

FRIDAY, AUGUST 3

Working Papers Panel 4 — Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair
10:00–10:45 am: Yuehtsen Juliette Chung, Associate Professor, Institute of History, National Tsing Hua University

"Biopower and Social Nexus in Chinese Eugenics"
Discussant: Shiuh-Shen Chien

11:00–11:45 am: Yonglin Jiang, Associate Professor, East Asian Studies, Bryn Mawr College

"Borderlands and Identity Building: The 'Frontier Wall against the Miao Territory' in the Ming Empire"
Discussant: Shiyung Michael Liu

12:00–12:45 pm: Martin Saxer, Postdoctoral Fellow Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore and Postdoctoral Associate in the School of Anthropology, University of Oxford

"Once, We Were in the Centre . . . Trans-Himalayan Trade in the Aftermath of Development"
Discussant: Jianxiong Ma

12:45–1:45 pm: Lunch

Working Papers Panel 5 — You-tien Hsing, Chair
1:45–2:30 pm: Jenn-Hwan Wang, Professor, Development Studies, National Chengchi University

"Small is Beautiful? Small Hydro Power and the Paradox of the Water-Energy Nexus in China"
Discussant: Pál Nyíri

2:45–3:30 pm: Angelina Chin, Assistant Professor, History, Pomona College

"Diasporic Memories and Conceptual Geography in Post-colonial Hong Kong"
Discussant: Hui-yu Caroline Ts'ai




BORDERING CHINA: MODERNITY AND SUSTAINABILITY

A CONFERENCE HELD IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE BERKELEY SUMMER RESEARCH INSTITUTE

OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

Keynote Address — Introduced by Robert Weller
4:00–6:00 pm: Peter C. Perdue, Professor, Yale University

"Ecologies of Empire: Qing Cosmopolitanism and Modern Nationalism"

6:00 pm: Reception

SATURDAY, AUGUST 4

8:30 am: Coffee

9:00 am: Welcome Remarks

Panel 1, Production, Planning, and the Economics of China's Sustainability — Robert Weller, Chair
9:15–11:30 am:

  • Po-Yi Hung, Ph.D. Candidate, Geography, University of Wisconsin-Madison
    "Tea Forest in the Making: Tea Production and Reconfiguration of Modernity, Science, and Nature on China's Southwest Frontier"
  • Alainna Thomas, Ph.D. Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of California Berkeley
    "From Bogota to Jinan – Understanding sustainable transport policy transfer in China"
  • Andrew Hao, Ph.D. Candidate, Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley
    "The Temporalities of Corporate Sustainability Initiatives in Contemporary China"
  • Discussants: Martin Saxer and Victor Teo

Panel II, Emerging Research at the Academia Sinica — Ts'ui-jung Liu, Chair
11:45 am–1:00 pm:

  • Featuring Dr. Shao-Hua Liu, Dr. Shiyung Michael Liu, and Dr. Chih-Chieh Tang

1:00–2:00 pm: Lunch

Panel III, Borderlands and the Environment in the Qing Dynasty — You-tien Hsing, Chair
2:00–4:15 pm:

  • Peter Lavelle, Visiting Assistant Professor, History, Centre College
    "Chinese Horticulture and the Politics of Reproduction along Late Qing Frontiers"
  • Benjamin Levey, Assistant Professor, History, University of Michigan, Dearborn
    "Kinship and Captivity: The Jungar Diaspora"
  • Jonathan Schlesinger, Assistant Professor, History, Indiana University, Bloomington
    "Purity and the Qing Borderlands: Fur Depletion and Empire Building in the Early 19th Century"
  • Discussants: David Bello and Wen-hsin Yeh

Keynote Address — Introduced by Wen-hsin Yeh
4:30–6:30 pm: Ruth Rogaski, Associate Professor, History, Vanderbilt University

"Making Sense of a Mountain: Changbaishan, 1600 to the Present"

7:00 pm: Mid-session Banquet at Revival Bar + Kitchen




SUNDAY, AUGUST 5

10:00 am–7:00 pm: Napa Tour

MONDAY, AUGUST 6

Working Papers Panel 6 — Ts'ui-jung Liu, Chair
10:00–10:45 am: Victor Teo, Assistant Professor, Japanese Studies, University of Hong Kong

"Dynamic Peripheries: Clandestine Globalization and the Underground Economy in China's Ethnic Borderlands: A Preliminary Survey"
Discussant: Chih-Chieh Tang

11:00–11:45 am: Hui-yu Caroline Ts'ai, Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

"Staging the Police: Visual Presentation and Everyday Coloniality"
Discussant: Martin Saxer

12:00–12:45 pm: Lunch

Working Papers Panel 7 — Robert Weller, Chair
12:45–1:30 pm: Yu-Ying Lee, Associate Professor, Social and Policy Sciences, Yuan Ze University

"Consuming Chinese Antique: Collecting Ancient Jade in Contemporary China"
Discussant: David Bello

1:45–2:30 pm: Robin Visser, Associate Professor, Asian Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

"Neo-Confucian Synthesis of Non-Anthropocentric Thought in Post-Mao Chinese Environmental Literature"
Discussant: Yuehtsen Juliette Chung

Contextualizing Lecture 3
3:00–4:45 pm: Distinguished Speaker John Chiang, Associate Professor, Geography, University of California, Berkeley

"A Brief Introduction to Climate Change"
(or "what I would like you to know", from a climate scientist)

4:45 pm: Reception

TUESDAY, AUGUST 7

Reading Session 1 — Ts'ui-jung Liu, Chair

  • 10:00–10:45 am: Jenn-Hwan Wang
  • 11:00–11:45 am: Yonglin Jiang
  • 12:00–12:45 pm: Robin Visser

12:45-1:45 pm: Lunch

Reading Session 2 — Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair

  • 1:45–2:30 pm: Yu-Ying Lee
  • 2:45–3:30 pm: Shiuh-Shen Chien

Papers: Politics, Culture, and China's Environment
3:45–5:15 pm:

  • You-tien Hsing, Professor, Geography, University of California, Berkeley
    "Projectizing Nature and Culture in China's Northwest"
  • Robert Weller, Professor and Chair of Anthropology, and Research Associate at the Institute on Culture, Religion and World Affairs, Boston University
    "China's Changing Environmentalities in a Global Context"

5:15 pm: Reception

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8

Reading Session 3 — You-tien Hsing, Chair

  • 10:00–10:45 am: Shiyung Michael Liu
  • 11:00–11:45 am: Pál Nyíri
  • 12:00–12:45 pm: Chih-Chieh Tang

12:45-1:45 pm: Lunch

Contextualizing Lecture 4
1:45–3:30 pm: Distinguished Speaker Ts'ui-jung Liu, Visiting Distinguished Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica

"A Retropsection of Climate Changes and Their Impacts in Chinese History"

4:00 pm: Gathering at Jupiter Restaurant

THURSDAY, AUGUST 9

Reading Session 4 — Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair

  • 10:00–10:45 am: David Bello
  • 11:00–11:45 am: Jianxiong Ma
  • 12:00–12:45 pm: Angelina Chin

12:45-1:45 pm: Lunch

Reading Session 5 — Robert Weller, Chair

  • 1:45–2:30 pm: Yuehtsen Juliette Chung
  • 2:45–3:30 pm: Shao-Hua Liu

Contextualizing Lecture 5:
4:00–5:45 pm: Distinguished Speaker Alex Wang, Visiting Assistant Professor, Law, University of California, Berkeley

"The Search for Sustainable Legitimacy: Environmental Law and Bureaucracy in China"

5:45 pm: Reception

FRIDAY, AUGUST 10

Reading Session 6 — Ts'ui-jung Liu, Chair

  • 10:00–10:45 am: Hui-yu Caroline Ts'ai
  • 11:00–11:45 am: Martin Saxer
  • 12:00–12:45 pm: Victor Teo

12:45–2:00 pm: Lunch

2:00–6:00 pm: Wrap-Up Sessions, Wen-hsin Yeh, Chair

6:30 pm: Final Banquet at Hotel Shattuck Plaza

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11

Departure

PARTICIPANTS

Participants
Conference Chairs

You-tien HSING, Professor, Geography, University of California, Berkeley
You-tien Hsing is Professor of Geography at the University of California, Berkeley. Her research and teaching has focused on the political economy of development in East Asia, especially in China and Taiwan. She is interested in the relationship between power and space. Hsing's first book, Making Capitalism in China: The Taiwan Connection (Oxford University Press, 1998) focuses on the role of culture in inter-regional capital flows. Her second book, The Great Urban Transformation: Politics of Land and Property in China (Oxford University Press, 2010) examines the issue of territoriality, looking at how the transformation of the state and society shapes and is shaped by land battles in Chinese cities and villages. The co-edited volume, Reclaiming Chinese Society, (Routledge, 2009) looks at China's emerging social activism in the struggles over accumulation, distribution, recognition, and representation. Hsing's current project concerns the politics of ecological and heritage conservation in Northwestern China.

Ts'ui-jung LIU, Visiting Distinguished Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica
Ts'ui-jung Liu was born in 1941 in Changhua, Taiwan. She earned her B.A. in History in 1963 and her M.A. from the Graduate Institute of History at National Taiwan University in 1966. She then earned another M.A. from Regional Studies — East Asia in 1970, and a Ph.D. in East Asian History and Languages from Harvard University in 1974. Before studying at Harvard University, Liu served as an Assistant Research Fellow at the Institute of History and Philology, Academia Sinica from 1966-1968. After returning to Taiwan in 1974, Liu worked at Academia Sinica in various positions. She was elected an Academician of Academia Sinica in 1996. Liu has also served as a visiting fellow at Georgetown, UCLA, and St. John's College at the University of Cambridge. From October 2003 to December 2009, she served as a Vice President of Academia Sinica. Liu is currently a Visiting Distinguished Fellow at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica. She has engaged in research related to economic history, population history, and environmental history. On the last subject, she co-edited Sediments of Time: Environment and Society in Chinese History (Cambridge University Press, 1998), and edited the Chinese volume Interactions between the Nature and Human Actions: Perspectives of Environmental History (Academia Sinica and Lien-ching Publishing Company, 2008).

Robert P. WELLER, Professor and Chair of Anthropology, and Research Associate at the Institute on Culture, Religion and World Affairs, Boston University
Robert P. Weller is Professor and Chair of Anthropology and Research Associate at the Institute on Culture, Religion, and World Affairs at Boston University. His books include Discovering Nature: Globalization and Environmental Culture in China and Taiwan (2006) and Alternate Civilities: Chinese Culture and the Prospects for Democracy (1999). His most recent book is Ritual and Its Consequences: An Essay on the Limits of Sincerity (with Adam Seligman, Michael Puett, and Bennett Simon, 2008). The next book is due to appear in fall 2012: "Rethinking Pluralism: Ritual, Experience, and Ambiguity" (with Adam Seligman). It focuses on ways in which we can live with the ambiguities that necessarily accompany our need to categorize, and on the implications of this for how we can live with difference. Weller's present research examines the role of religion in creating public social benefits in Chinese communities in China, Malaysia, and Taiwan.

Wen-hsin YEH, Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, and Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
Wen-hsin Yeh is Walter and Elise Haas Chair Professor in Asian Studies and the Richard H. and Laurie C. Morrison Chair in History at the University of California, Berkeley. She is also an Honorary Professor of History at Peking University. She has served as Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies since January, 2007. A leading authority on 20th century Chinese history, Yeh is author or editor of eleven books and numerous articles examining aspects of Republican history, Chinese modernity, the origins of Communism and related subjects. Her books include the Berkeley Prize-winning Provincial Passages: Culture, Space, and the Origins of Chinese Communism (University of California Press, 1996) and The Alienated Academy: Culture and Politics in Republican China, 1919-1937 (Harvard University, 1990). Her most recent book, Shanghai Splendor (University of California Press, 2007) is an urban history of Shanghai that considers the nature of Chinese capitalism and middle-class society in a century of contestation between colonial power and nationalistic mobilization.

Conference Participants

David A. BELLO, Associate Professor, History, Washington and Lee University
David A. Bello received his Ph.D. from the University of Southern California and is currently Associate Professor of East Asian History at Washington and Lee University. His research interests include environmental and borderland history, involving issues of space and ethnic identity, in Qing China (1644-1911). His first book, Opium and the Limits of Empire: Drug Prohibition in the Chinese Interior, 1729-1850, was published in 2005. He is currently working on a new book manuscript provisionally entitled "Fencing in Forest, Steppe and Mountain: Environment, Identity and Empire in Qing China's Borderlands." Two related articles have been published to date: "The Cultured Nature of Imperial Foraging in Manchuria," Late Imperial China, 31.2 (December, 2010): 1-33; and "To Go Where No Han Could Go for Long: Malaria and the Qing Construction of Ethnic Administrative Space in Frontier Yunnan," Modern China, 31.3 (July 2005): 283-317.

John CHIANG, Associate Professor, Geography, University of California, Berkeley
Dr. Chiang earned an M.S. in Physics at Cornell University and a Ph.D. in Earth and Environmental Sciences at the Lamont-Doherty Earth Observatory of Columbia University, awarded with distinction. After a two-year postdoctoral fellowship at the University of Washington, he started his current faculty position at the University of California, Berkeley in 2003. Dr. Chiang is a climate scientist specializing in the climate dynamics of the global atmosphere and its interactions with the ocean and land systems. He works on both contemporary and paleoclimate research questions, with a focus on understanding mechanisms of tropical rainfall changes. His teaching interests include climate and atmospheric dynamics, and the science and implications of global warming. He currently serves as an editor of the Journal of Climate, and has also co-edited an American Geophysical Union monograph on the ocean's role in climate change. His recent publications include "Extratropical Cooling, Interhemispheric Thermal Gradients, and Tropical Climate Change" and "Mechanical Impact of the Tibetan Plateau on the Seasonal Evolution of the South Asian Monsoon."

Shiuh-Shen CHIEN, Associate Professor, Geography, National Taiwan University
Shiuh-shen Chien obtained his Ph.D. from the London School of Economics and Political Science and now is Associate Professor of Human Geography at National Taiwan University. Prior to this, he was a visiting research fellow at the East Asian Institute of the National University of Singapore. His research interests cover development geography, the geography of globalization, transnational studies, and the political economy of urban and regional development, with empirical focuses on the Global South in general and post-socialist China in particular. He has published articles in the Asian Journal of Political Science; Asian Survey; Built Environment; Cross Currents: East Asian History and Cultural Review; Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy; Global Networks: A Journal of Transnational Affairs; Pacific Economic Review; Regional Studies; Urban Studies. Book chapters have been published by World Scientific, Ashgate, and Routledge. His ongoing research projects are titled "Post-Mao Transnational Policy Learning" and "Theorizing Formation and Transformation of Eco Cities in China."

Angelina CHIN, Assistant Professor, History, Pomona College
Angelina Chin is Assistant Professor of History at Pomona College, where she teaches courses on colonialism, popular culture, and feminism in modern East Asia. She received her Ph.D. from the History Department at the University of California, Santa Cruz. Her research interests revolve around transformations of urban identity and citizenship, as well as transregional connections in Hong Kong, Taiwan and South China. She is the author of Bound to Emancipate: Working Women and Urban Citizenship in Early Twentieth-Century China and Hong Kong (Rowman & Littlefield, 2012). She is currently working on a project about refugees and exiled intellectuals who escaped the PRC from 1949 to the 1970s.

Yuehtsen Juliette CHUNG, Associate Professor, Institute of History, National Tsing Hua University
Yuehtsen Juliette Chung is Associate Professor at the Institute of History at National Tsing Hua University in Taiwan. In 2002, she published the book Struggle for National Survival: Eugenics in Sino-Japanese Contexts, 1896-1945 with Routledge. Her recent publications include "The Postwar Return of Eugenics and the Dialectics of Scientific Practice in China," "Better Sex and Better Conception? Eugenics and Reproductive Health in China, 1950-2000," and "Eugenics in China and Hong Kong: Nationalism and Colonialism, 1890s -1940s" in The Oxford Handbook of The History of Eugenics. She is currently preparing a Chinese manuscript for publication entitled "Biopolitics and Social Nexus: Eugenics in China and its Transnational Context."

Brian DELAY, Associate Professor, History, University of California, Berkeley
Brian DeLay received his Ph.D. at Harvard University and is now Associate Professor of History at the University of California, Berkeley, where he teaches classes on borderlands in world history, U.S. relations with Latin America, and comparative histories of conquest and colonialism. His first book, War of a Thousand Deserts: Indian Raids and the U.S.-Mexican War, won prizes from several scholarly organizations, including the Society for Historians of the Early Republic, the Western History Association, and the Latin American Studies Association. He is the editor of North American Borderlands, forthcoming from Routledge, and has articles forthcoming on violence and collective identity in New Mexico, Comanche foreign policy, and the connection between arms trading and state building in Mexico. His current book project, "Shoot the State," is a hemispheric history of the arms trade in the Americas from 1750 to 1920.

Yonglin JIANG, Associate Professor, East Asian Studies, Bryn Mawr College
Yonglin Jiang is Associate Professor in the East Asian Studies Department at Bryn Mawr College. Jiang offers courses on Chinese and East Asian history. His research focuses on legal culture in imperial China and ethnicity and law in contemporary China. He is the author of The Great Ming Code (2005), The Mandate of Heaven and the Great Ming Code (2011), and a number of articles on legal philosophy, the body, ethnicity, religion, and law enforcement. Over the past several years, Jiang has visited Fenghuang, Hunan Province in China to study Miao culture, and is currently at work researching the "Southern Great Wall" and Miao customary law. In 2012-2013, Jiang will use a Frederick Burkhardt Residential Fellowship from the American Council of Learned Societies to work on a book project tentatively entitled "Negotiating Justice: Local Adjudication and Social Change in Late Imperial China" at the Institute for Advanced Studies at Princeton. He is a former president of the Society for Ming Studies.

Yu-Ying LEE, Associate Professor, Social and Policy Sciences, Yuan Ze University
Yu-Ying Lee is Associate Professor at Yuan Ze University in Taiwan. She received her Ph.D. degree from Lancaster University in the United Kingdom. Her research interests center on gender issues and consumer culture and she has published several articles on Taiwanese wedding photography and shopping culture. She currently studies consumption and collection with a particular emphasis on the art market and the relationship between cultural capital and social networks. Her latest publication is a journal article entitled, "Women's Jewelry, Men's Toys: On Gender and Ancient Jade Collecting." Lee's current book project on jade consumption in Taiwan is entitled "Collecting, Knowledge and Power: On Jade Consumption in Taiwan."

Shao-Hua LIU, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica
Shao-Hua Liu is Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Ethnology, Academia Sinica. Her book Passage to Manhood: Youth Migration, Heroin, and AIDS in Southwest China (2011) was published by Stanford University Press and included in the Studies of the Weatherhead East Asian Institute of Columbia University series. The book addresses the intersection of global modernity, heroin use, and HIV/AIDS as they are embodied in a new rite-of-passage among young men in the Sichuan province of southwestern China. Liu's research uses diseases, such as AIDS and leprosy, and crises, like drug use, as the vantage point from which to analyze the nature and trajectory of contemporary social change and health reform in China. Recently, she has been exploring the relationship of food and the environment in Taiwan.

Shiyung Michael LIU, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica
Shiyung Michael Liu is Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica. He received his Ph.D. degree from the University of Pittsburgh in 2000 and has served as a visiting scholar at several universities in Japan, the U.S. and Europe. Dr. Liu has been awarded the Chun-chiu lectureship at Oregon State University, served as an Erasmus Mundus Scholar (EU), and was a Senior Research Fellow at the Center for Historical Research of Ohio State University. He is the author of the books Prescribing Colonization (AAS, 2009) and Katana and Lancet (National Taiwan University Press, 2012, in Chinese). His current research interests are Japanese colonial medicine, environmental history, and modern history of public health. He is now at work on the project "Epidemics and the re-establishment of quarantine system in post-WWII East Asia."

Jianxiong MA, Assistant Professor, Anthropology, The Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
Jianxiong Ma is Assistant Professor of Anthropology in the division of Humanities at the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology. His books include The Lahu Minority in Southwest China: A Response to Ethnic Marginalization on the Frontier (2012) and From the 'Luo Bandits' to 'the Lahu Nationality': History and Ethnic Identity in the Construction of China's Southwestern Frontier (2012). His present research focuses on the historical formation of the Sino-Burma frontier and the ecological conditions of cultural diversity and ethnicity in Southwest China, especially in Yunnan province.

Pál NYÍRI, Professor, History, Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam
Pál Nyíri is Professor and Chair of Global History from an Anthropological Perspective at the Vrije Universiteit, Amsterdam. He obtained his Ph.D. from Moscow State University and subsequently taught or researched in Oxford, Berlin, Budapest, and Sydney. His most recent books are Mobility and Cultural Authority in Contemporary China (2010) and, with Joana Breidenbach, Seeing Culture Everywhere (2009). His primary research concerns contemporary international migration from China. Recently, he has been interested in the role of new migrants in Chinese nationalism; the migration-development-sovereignty nexus in the overseas concessions of Chinese companies; and the way in which new mobile elites shape China's view of the world. He blogs at http://mqvu.wordpress.com.

Peter C. PERDUE, Professor, History, Yale University
Peter C. Perdue is Professor of History at Yale University. He earned his Ph.D. in History and East Asian Languages from Harvard University in 1981. He is the author of Exhausting the Earth: State and Peasant in Hunan 1500-1850 A.D. (Council on East Asian Studies, Harvard University, 1987) and China Marches West: The Qing Conquest of Central Eurasia (Harvard University Press, 2005). He has also written on grain markets in China, agricultural development, and environmental history. He is a recipient of the 1988 Edgerton Award and the James A. Levitan Prize at MIT. He was elected to the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 2007. His research interests lie in modern Chinese and Japanese social and economic history, history of frontiers, and world history.

Ruth ROGASKI, Associate Professor, History, Vanderbilt University
Ruth Rogaski is Associate Professor of History in the Asian Studies Program at Vanderbilt University. She received her Ph.D. from Yale in 1996 and taught at Princeton University from 1996 to 2003. She is a historian of Qing and modern China, with allied interests in the history of medicine, urban history, women's and gender history, and social and cultural history in early modern and modern East Asia. She is the author of Hygienic Modernity: Meanings of Health and Disease in Treaty-Port China (University of California Press, 2004), which traces how hygiene became a crucial element in the formulation of Chinese modernity in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Hygienic Modernity was awarded the Fairbank Prize in East Asian history, the Levenson Prize in Chinese studies, the Welch Medal in the history of medicine, and was co-recipient of the Berkshire Prize. Rogaski has written widely on topics such as germ warfare, Chinese orphanages, and martial arts history. At present she is completing The Nature of Manchuria, which examines the intersection between natural history and projects of empire in northeast Asia from the seventeenth century to the present. Grants and fellowships from the John Simon Guggenheim Memorial Foundation, the National Science Foundation, and the American Philosophical Society have funded her research and writing.

Martin SAXER, Postdoctoral Fellow Asia Research Institute, National University of Singapore and Postdoctoral Associate in the School of Anthropology, University of Oxford
Martin Saxer is a postdoctoral fellow at the Asia Research Institute in Singapore and a postdoctoral associate in the School of Anthropology, Oxford. He was a Clarendon scholar at Oxford and received his doctorate in 2010. His publications include Manufacturing Tibetan Medicine: The Creation of an Industry and the Moral Economy of Tibetanness (Berghahn, in press) and "A Goat's Head on a Sheep's Body? Good Practices for Tibetan Medicine" (Medical Anthropology, in press). Since 2003, Saxer has conducted extensive fieldwork in Siberia, Tibet and Nepal. From 2005-2006 he worked as a junior lecturer for visual anthropology at the University of Zurich. He directed two feature length documentary films (see: www.anyma.ch/journeys) and recently started the visual ethnography blog the other image (www.theotherimage.com). His current research on "neighbouring China" (see: www.neighbouringchina.net/about) is supported by a Swiss National Science Foundation fellowship.

Nathan SAYRE, Associate Professor, Geography, University of California, Berkeley
Nathan Sayre is Associate Professor of Geography at the University of California, Berkeley. He attended Deep Springs College, received his B.A. from Yale University, and his M.A. and Ph.D. from the University of Chicago, where he studied Anthropology. Professor Sayre's research centers on semi-arid rangelands, especially in the southwestern United States. Sayre uses historical and geographical methods to understand how rangelands have changed, how they have been understood and managed, and the politics and economics surrounding land use change, fire restoration, and endangered species conservation. He has written three books on these topics: The New Ranch Handbook: A Guide to Restoring Western Rangelands (Quivira Coalition, 2001); Ranching, Endangered Species, and Urbanization in the Southwest: Species of Capital (University of Arizona Press, 2002); and Working Wilderness: The Malpai Borderlands Group and the Future of the Western Range (Rio Nuevo Press, 2005). He is currently working on a book on the history of rangeland ecology in the U.S. Before coming to Berkeley, Sayre was a post-doctoral research associate with the USDA-Agricultural Research Service-Jornada Experimental Range in Las Cruces, New Mexico, where he continues to maintain a research affiliation and collaborates with the Jornada Basin Long-Term Ecological Research site funded by the National Science Foundation. Sayre also serves as a board member for the Malpai Borderlands Group, a rancher-led NGO dedicated to ranch conservation in southeastern Arizona and southwestern New Mexico.

Chih-Chieh TANG, Associate Research Fellow, Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica
Chih-Chieh Tang is Associate Research Fellow at the Institute of Sociology, Academia Sinica as well as an adjunct Associate Professor of Sociology at National Taiwan University. He received a B.A. in Electrical Engineering from NTU and then earned his M.A. in Sociology at NTU before starting doctoral work at Universität Bielefeld. Tang completed his Ph.D. in 2002. His research interests include systems theory, historical sociology, Chinese history, Taiwan Studies, conceptual history, and the history of sociology. His book Vom traditionellen China zum modernen Taiwan sought to investigate contemporary Taiwan from the perspective of long-term structural change. His current projects are "The Periodization of Chinese History from the Perspective of System Differentiation" and "The Civilizing Process in the Chinese Society." Tang also has two forthcoming papers, "Literatization vs. Civilization: A Preliminary Comparison of the Development of Sport in China and the West with a Focus on Violence," and "Towards a Really Temporalized Theory of Event: A Luhmannian Critique and Reconstruction of Sewell's Logics of History."

Victor TEO, Assistant Professor, Japanese Studies, University of Hong Kong
Victor Teo is Assistant Professor in the Department of Japanese Studies at the School of Modern Languages and Cultures at the University of Hong Kong. He received his Ph.D. in International Relations from the London School of Economics and Political Science. His research and teaching interests are primarily related to International Relations in the Asia-Pacific Region, with a particular emphasis on Sino-Japanese Relations. Teo also has also interests in political economy and development in Asia and teaches two University Common Core Courses related to this: "China's Modernization in the East Asian Context" and "Clandestine Globalization, Criminal Organizations, and the Illicit World Political Economy." From 2006 to 2010, Teo was the editor-in-chief of Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism published by Wiley-Blackwell for the UK-based Association for the Studies in Ethnicity and Nationalism. He is currently working on three research projects. The first is a monograph based on his Ph.D. dissertation which compares China's social memories of past conflicts and how such memories affect her relations with Japan and Russia. The second project, funded by the Hong Kong Research Council and Japan Foundation, is on the normalization of Japan and the implications for her foreign policy in the Middle East and South Asia. The third project, funded by Hang Seng Fund, is tentatively entitled "China and Her Neighbours: Six Decades of Diplomacy." This project examines China's relations with her immediate neighbors. Teo has co-edited four volumes on Sino-Japanese relations with various colleagues, all published (or to be published) by Cambridge Scholars Press in the UK. He is also contributing to a forthcoming co-edited volume on the impact of the Asian financial crisis with Dixon Wong.

Hui-yu Caroline TS'AI, Research Fellow, Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica
Hui-yu Caroline Ts'ai graduated from Columbia University in 1990 with a Ph.D. in History. She is currently a Research Fellow at the Institute of Taiwan History, Academia Sinica. Her latest publication, in English, is Taiwan in Japan's Empire-Building: An Institutional Approach to Colonial Engineering (Oxford, UK: Routledge, 2009). Over the past two decades, Dr. Ts'ai's work has focused on Japan's colonial empire from the perspective of institutional history. Among her major publications are a series of articles and three oral history books on wartime mobilization and local administration in Taiwan under Japanese rule. Dr. Ts'ai is currently working on a new book project entitled Staging Police, which introduces the framework of 'everyday coloniality.' Her fourth oral history book, on Taiganban, will be ready for publication by this year's end.

Robin VISSER, Associate Professor, Asian Studies, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Robin Visser is Associate Professor in the Department of Asian Studies at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, where she teaches courses on Chinese and comparative literatures, cinemas, gender studies, urban studies, and environmental studies. Her book, Cities Surround the Countryside: Urban Aesthetics in Postsocialist China (Duke University Press, 2010), analyzes urban planning, fiction, cinema, art and cultural studies in the People's Republic of China at the turn of the 21st century. Recent publications include a translation on Taiwanese women filmmakers (in Chinese Women's Cinema, Columbia University Press, 2011) and an essay on Chinese virtual media (in Spectacle and the City, Amsterdam University Press, 2012). Forthcoming publications include essays on 1980s Chinese environmental literature (Shandong University Press, 2012), on Chinese rural aesthetics (1980-2010) (Hong Kong University Press, 2013), and on modern Chinese literature and visual arts in A Companion to Modern Chinese Literature (Wiley-Blackwell, 2015). Her current research examines Chinese environmental aesthetics.

Alex WANG, Visiting Assistant Professor, Law, University of California, Berkeley
Alex Wang is Visiting Assistant Professor of Law at Berkeley Law. He received his B.S. from Duke University, and in 2000, his J.D. from New York University. His primary research and teaching interests are environmental law, China law, and comparative law. Prior to his arrival at the University of California, Berkeley in 2011, Wang was a senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) based in Beijing and the director of NRDC's China Environmental Law & Governance Project for nearly six years. In this capacity, he worked with China's government agencies, legal community, and environmental groups to improve environmental rule of law and strengthen the role of the public in environmental protection. He has also practiced corporate law and received many fellowships. Currently, he is a member of the Advisory Board to the Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations. Wang is a regular speaker on issues related to China and environmental protection. His commentary has appeared in such publications as the New York Times, Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Bloomberg News, China Daily, Global Times, Time Magazine and on National Public Radio, Marketplace, and CCTV. Wang's recent publications include a guest edited volume of Chinese Law and Government entitled "Environmental Courts and Public Interest Litigation in China" (with J. Gao, 2010), "Environmental Courts and the Development of Public Interest Litigation in China" in the Journal of Court Innovation (with J. Gao, 2010), and "The Role of Law in Environmental Protection in China" in the Vermont Journal of Environmental Law (2007).

Jenn-hwan WANG, Professor, Development Studies, National Chengchi University
Jenn-hwan Wang is Chair Professor at the Graduate Institute of Development Studies at National Chengchi University in Taiwan. From 2006-2008 he served as the Dean of Research and Development at National Chengchi University; Wang is currently the Director of the Center for China Studies at the same institution. Professor Wang is the author or editor of 12 books written in Chinese and numerous articles covering issues related to Taiwan's economic development, comparative studies on East Asian societies, and, of late, China's development model. His recent publications include The Limits of Fast Follower: Taiwan's Economic Transition and Innovation (Juliu Books, 2010), and a textbook Mainland China and Cross-Strait Relations (Juliu Books, 2011). His most recent research project is about environmental politics in China, investigating the paradoxical nexus between fossil and hydropower electricity sectors in China's climate change policies.

SRI Participants

Andrew HAO, PhD Candidate, Anthropology, University of California, Berkeley

Po-Yi HUNG, PhD Candidate, Geography, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Peter LAVELLE, Visiting Assistant Professor, History, Centre College

Benjamin LEVEY, Assistant Professor, History, University of Michigan, Dearborn

Jonathan SCHLESINGER, Assistant Professor, History, Indiana University, Bloomington

Alainna THOMAS, PhD Candidate, City and Regional Planning, University of California, Berkeley

WORKING PAPERS

Working Papers

David Bello: Relieving Mongols of their Pastoral Identity: The Environment of Disaster Management on the 18th Century Qing Steppe

Shiuh-Shen Chien: Projectization of Land Development and Chinese Local Entrepreneurialism: A Case Study of College-Town Fever and Eco-City Fever

Angelina Chin: Diasporic Memories and Conceptual Geography in Post-colonial Hong Kong

Yuehtsen Juliette Chung: Biopower and Social Nexus in Chinese Eugenics

Yonglin Jiang: Borderlands and Identity Building: The "Frontier Wall against the Miao Territory" in the Ming Empire

Yu Ying Lee: Consuming Chinese Antique: Collecting Ancient Jade in Contemporary China

Shao-hua Liu (劉紹華): Leprosy and Socialist Modernity in China's Ethnic Frontiers

Shiyung Michael Liu (劉士永): Continuity or Discontinuity: Modern Public Health in 1940s China

Jianxiong Ma: Salt and Revenue in Frontier Formation: State Mobilized Ethnic Politics in the Yunnan-Burma Borderland since the 1720s

Pál Nyíri: Enclaves of Improvement: Sovereignty and Developmentalism in the Special Zones of the China-Lao Borderlands

Martin Saxer: "Once, We Were in the Centre..." Trans-Himalayan Trade in the Aftermath of Development

Chih-Chieh Tang: Taiwan as Laboratory of Modernity: A Preliminary View from the Perspective of Multiple Modernities

Victor Teo: Dynamic Peripheries: Clandestine Globalization and the Underground Economy in China’s Ethnic Borderlands

Hui-yu Caroline Ts'ai: Staging the Police: Visual Presentation and Everyday Coloniality

Robin Visser: Neo-Confucian Synthesis of Non-Anthropocentric Thought in Post-Mao Chinese Environmental Literature

Jenn hwan Wang: Small is beautiful? Small Hydro Power and the paradox of the Water-Energy Nexus in China

READING MATERIALS

Reading Materials

David Bello: Selected material

Shiuh-Shen Chien: Selected readings

Angelina Chin: Against Diaspora: The Sinophone as Places of Cultural Production, by Shu-mei Shih

Yuehtsen Juliette Chung: Selected readings

Yonglin Jiang: Uncivil Dialogue: Law and Custom Did Not Merge into Civil Law Under the Qing, by Jérôme Bourgon

Yu Ying Lee: Culture and Consumption

Shao-hua Liu: Health Governance: The Health Society, by Ilona Kickbusch

Shiyung Michael Liu: Selected readings

Pál Nyíri: "Corporate Security Begins in the Community": Mining, the Corporate Social Responsibility Industry, and Environmental Advocacy in Indonesia, by Marina A. Welker

Martin Saxer: The Art of Not Being Governed: An Anarchist History of Upland Southeast Asia, by James C. Scott

Chih-Chieh Tang: Selected readings

Victor Teo: Cross-border Movement of North Korean Citizens, by Lee Keum-soon

Hui-yu Caroline Ts'ai: Selected readings

Robin Visser: Selected readings

Jenn hwan Wang: China's Hydraulic Society?

SRI PAPERS

SRI Conference Papers

Po-Yi Hung: Tea Forest in the Making: Tea Production and Reconfiguration of Modernity, Science, and Nature on China's Southwest Frontier

Peter Lavelle: Chinese Horticulture and the Politics of Reproduction along Late Qing Frontiers

Benjamin Levey: Kinship and Captivity: The Jungar Diaspora

Jonathan Schlesinger: Purity and the Qing Borderlands: Fur Depletion and Empire Building in the Early 19th Century

Alainna Thomas: From Bogota to Jinan — Understanding sustainable transport policy transfer in China