Past Events

2012 Events

Of Power and Profit: American Seamen in Asian Waters
Photography Exhibit
Dates: October 5, 2011 – January 25, 2012, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, IEAS Publications, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

image "Of Power and Profit: American Seamen in Asian Waters" is an exhibit of prints made from photographs by a nineteenth century American naval officer, Asa Mattice. In the 1880s, he was assigned to the USS Juniata, which undertook a three-year survey expedition, calling at ports from Suez to Sapporo. The photographs in this exhibit are the voyages relics of encounter.

As the nineteenth century moved into the era of high colonialism, ships journeyed forth from the metropoles on voyages of power and profit. The USS Juniata rode the wave of America's post-Civil War international expansion. Unlike the whaler or slaver privateers of earlier generations, now the fleets served national agendas. The US "opening of Japan" at mid-century signaled a new conception of America's relation to Asia.

With missions from the ice fields to the tropics, the Juniata was a part of the US effort to explore, engage, and extract. On board the USS Juniata was military engineer turned naval instructor Asa Mattice. He turned his camera on the sights around him, capturing images of Asia in the last century, and capturing too the sensibilities of his place and time. The photographs from the voyage shown in this exhibit include photographs of Korea, China, Japan, and Southeast Asia. The categories of these visions — the "views," the "everyday life," the "coolie," — consolidated all through the generations of occidental gaze. The shadows captured on these plates, rescued from oblivion by photographer John Dowling, document a moment in America's trajectory toward being a contender in the Pacific.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809

(No event on January 16, 2012.)



Chinese Policy towards the League of Nations during the Sino-Japanese Conflict (1931 — 1945)
Speaker: Lan Hong, Associate Professor, South China Normal University, Modern Chinese History
Date: January 17, 2012, 2-3:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

This talk will map out the intricate relationship between China, Japan, and the League of Nations throughout the Sino-Japanese Conflict. While China engaged in fierce struggles with Japanese forces, it also had to play politics with the League of Nations. Chinese leaders from Chiang Kai-shek to Mao Zedong each faced the necessity of dealing with the League of Nation's own political goals throughout this turbulent time; these shifts in opinion give historians today a unique look at how global geopolitics interacted with Chinese foreign policy.

This talk will be conducted in Chinese without translation.

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6322



  China's Regulatory State: A New Strategy for Globalization
Speaker: Roselyn Hsueh, Assistant Professor, Political Science, Temple University
Date: January 18, 2012, 4 p.m. Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Center for the Study of Law and Society, Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy

Today's China is governed by a new economic model that marks a radical break from the Mao and Deng eras; it departs fundamentally from both the East Asian developmental state and its own Communist past. It has not, however, adopted a liberal economic model. China has retained elements of statist control even though it has liberalized foreign direct investment more than any other developing country in recent years. In China's Regulatory State, Roselyn Hsueh demonstrates that even as the Chinese government introduces competition and devolves economic decisionmaking, the state has selectively imposed new regulations at the sectoral level, asserting and even tightening control over industry and market development, to achieve state goals. This mode of economic integration is contrasted with Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan's manifestly different approaches to globalization.

Introduced by Stanley Lubman, Lecturer in Residence, UC Berkeley Law School

This talk is part of the IEAS book series "New Perspectives in Asia."

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



The Redistribution Effect of China's Individual Tax: CCS Visiting Scholar Talk Series
Speaker: Li Qing, Lecturer, Renmin University of China, Institute of Public Finance
Date: January 19, 2102, 2-3:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

The redistribution effect and the progressivity of China's individual income tax during the ten years from 2000 to 2009 are evaluated from the perspectives of income groups and income composition by calculating average tax rates and pre-tax and after-tax income shares. Considering the data of gray income of urban residents, the calculation indicates that the overall average tax rates, tax rates of wage and tax rates of property income are lower than the results basing on the data from the statistic authority and the tax bureau, revealing the regressive effect of individual income tax on income distribution. Strong policy implications can be got from the contradiction of the two conclusions from different perspectives. The mechanism of a perfect tax system will fail and can not achieve its policy objective of improving distribution without strict supervision on higher income group and exact statistics of their real income. Therefore, to establish an effective system of tax collecting and administration is a breakthrough of individual tax reform.

This talk will be conducted in Chinese without translation.

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6322



Parameters of Identity: Practice, Place, and Tradition in East Asia
Date: January 20, 2012, 1:30-7:00 p.m.
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

Studies of East Asia rooted in nationalist historiographies have tended to view culture and identity as if they were at once atomistic and homogeneous. In fact, culture and identity are much more porous and fluid than such approaches would suggest. Prominent scholars in many fields thus challenged those earlier narratives of unity, continuity, and homogeneity. The result has been a more rigorously critical approach to political, cultural, intellectual, and artistic identities throughout East Asia.

Having rejected the idea of a static East Asian tradition, can we acknowledge that culture and identity are fluid and diverse and still talk about them in a meaningful way?

This conference proposes to address this larger question, as well as related questions including, but not limited to: What roles have geography and place played in forging connections and identities? To what extent can identity be invented or reinvented, and what institutional or social mechanisms might affect these processes? When have cultures and identities been transmitted and carried on, and when has transmission failed? Why? How have material evidence of the past encouraged us to rethink the boundaries and periods of style, chronology, or culture attached to somewhat arbitrary delineations of space or regions?

Click here to view the conference website.

This conference is made possible through the Walter and Elise Haas Chair Endowment at the Institute of East Asian Studies.

Event Contact: abuster@berkeley.edu



Missionary Photography in Korea: Encountering the West Through Christianity
Speaker: Donald N. Clark, Murchison Professor of History, Trinity University
Date: January 20, 2012, 12 p.m.
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

image During the lifetimes that they spent in Korea, Western missionaries took many photographs and collected much valuable memorabilia. Photographs from the Clark-Roberts collection, taken between 1905 and 1973 and covering three generations of American Presbyterians who went to Korea in 1902, are the basis of this illustrated lecture. The collection concentrates on Pyongyang, in North Korea, which was once known as the "Jerusalem of the East" for its concentration of Christian institutions.

Donald N. Clark is Murchison Professor of History at Trinity University in San Antonio. He is the author of many books and articles on modern Korea, two of which bear directly on this presentation: Missionary Photography in Korea (New York: The Korea Society, 2009), and Living Dangerously in Korea: The Western Experience, 1900-1950 (EastBridge, 2003).

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Tourist Distractions: Travels in South Korean Melodrama: TSWG Colloquium
Speaker: Dr. Youngmin Choe, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Univ. of Southern California
Date: January 20, 2012, 2-4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Townsend Center for the Humanities, Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

From Lord of the Rings in New Zealand to Twilight in the northwest United States and Italy, cinema has inspired tourists to travel to places featured in and contrived for films. Studies on film-induced tourism tend to focus on the impact of such phenomena on local culture and community development, marketing strategies by local tourist boards, and on-site experiences of film-induced tourists, focusing more on how to use film, and less on questioning the cinematic language that induces the desire to travel and its ideological underpinnings. Such approaches also undervalue differences in film genres, and subsequently the ways in which these genres influence the viewer's displacement of film sight onto film site. Focusing on melodramas, this talk will discuss Korean films that unexpectedly generated tourism, particularly during the period from 1998-2002 when South Korea sought out cinematic collaborations with Japan and China as a platform for regional reconciliation. Choe argues that the trope of travel featured in this intercultural cinema, which was initially intended to promote cross-cultural understanding, later became a means to propagate a film's affective experience beyond the screen, so much so that many films seem self-conscious of their own capacities to not only provoke tourism, but also to provide ersatz historical experiences of political and historical negotiation. The talk will also assess what is at stake when historical and political affect becomes commodified and consumed through practices such as film-induced tourism.



North Korean Cross-Roads: International Reaction to the Succession of Kim Jong-un
Speaker:
 •  Michael Nacht, Thomas and Alison Schneider Professor of Public
    Policy, UC Berkeley
Panelists:
 •  T.J. Pempel, Professor and Forcey Chair of Political Science for Study
    of East Asia, UC Berkeley;
 •  Lowell Dittmer, Political Science, UC Berkeley;
 •  Daniel J. Sargent, History, UC Berkeley;
 •  Donald N. Clark, Murchison Professor of History, Trinity University
Moderator: Hong Yung Lee, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Date: January 20, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

With the death of dictator Kim Jong-il, the attention of the international community is focused on the transition in North Korea and the succession of his son Kim Jong-un. Speaker Michael Nacht (UC Berkeley Goldman School of Public Policy) and a panel of faculty experts will discuss the international reaction to the leadership transition and how these events may affect future policy.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Parameters of Identity: Practice, Place, and Tradition in East Asia
Date: January 21, 2012, 9:00 a.m.-3:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

Studies of East Asia rooted in nationalist historiographies have tended to view culture and identity as if they were at once atomistic and homogeneous. In fact, culture and identity are much more porous and fluid than such approaches would suggest. Prominent scholars in many fields thus challenged those earlier narratives of unity, continuity, and homogeneity. The result has been a more rigorously critical approach to political, cultural, intellectual, and artistic identities throughout East Asia.

Having rejected the idea of a static East Asian tradition, can we acknowledge that culture and identity are fluid and diverse and still talk about them in a meaningful way?

This conference proposes to address this larger question, as well as related questions including, but not limited to: What roles have geography and place played in forging connections and identities? To what extent can identity be invented or reinvented, and what institutional or social mechanisms might affect these processes? When have cultures and identities been transmitted and carried on, and when has transmission failed? Why? How have material evidence of the past encouraged us to rethink the boundaries and periods of style, chronology, or culture attached to somewhat arbitrary delineations of space or regions?

Click here to view the conference website.

This conference is made possible through the Walter and Elise Haas Chair Endowment at the Institute of East Asian Studies.

Event Contact: abuster@berkeley.edu



Photographic Encounter with 19th Century Korea
Speaker: Jiwon Shin, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Date: January 23, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

This talk considers a case of postcolonial archiving with discussion of recent efforts by South Korean research foundations to digitally archive photographic images of late nineteenth and early twentieth century Korea produced by Westerners. Many of the photographs assembled in the South Korean archive had previously been part of Euro-American archives, produced in the context of growing Western power in East Asia, and documenting people and scenery little known in the West. The South Korean digital archives of these images partially critique the orientalist and imperialist view inscribed in them; at the same time, the postcolonial taxonomy produces a self-orientalizing view of Korea's past.

Introduced by Clare You, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



  In the Service of His Korean Majesty: William Nelson Lovatt, the Pusan Customs,and Sino-Korean Relations, 1876-1888
Speaker: Wayne Patterson, Department of History, St. Norbert College
Date: January 25, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

When discussing Korea's "Chinese Decade," roughly defined as the dozen or so years prior to the Sino-Japanese War of 1894-1895, most of the attention is focused on the heavy-handed activities of Yuan Shikai in Seoul. Less well known is that part of this Chinese effort to bind Korea more closely to China involved the absorption of Korea's newly-formed Maritime Customs Service. Using the recently-discovered correspondence of the first commissioner of customs in Pusan from 1883 to 1886, the book uncovers some heretofore unknown aspects of this attempted takeover by China in the late Choson period.

Introduced by Kate Chouta, IEAS Publications.

This talk is part of the IEAS book series "New Perspectives in Asia."

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Building China: Migrant Workers in China's Construction Industry
Speaker: Sarah Swider, Sociology, Wayne State University
Discussant: Katie Quan, Institute for Research on Labor and Employment, UCB
Date: January 27, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk focuses on understanding the working and living conditions of migrant workers in the informal sector of China's construction industry. It presents three distinct employment arrangements found among these migrant workers. Each employment arrangement is linked with specific mechanisms that channel migrants into a segmented informal labor market, together which shape the lives of these migrants on and off the jobsite.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



East Asian Imaginarium: Case Studies in Architecture
Multimedia Exhibit
Dates: February 1–24, 2012, every day, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

"East Asian Imaginarium: Case Studies in Architecture" presents the designs of four UC Berkeley Architecture students for a new building devoted to East Asian Studies at Berkeley. In 2007, Berkeley celebrated the construction of the magnificent C.V. Starr East Asia Library, the first free-standing library in the United States dedicated exclusively to East Asian collections. This marked the completion of Phase 1 of the Chang-Lin Tien Center for East Asian Studies.

Phase 2 of the Chang-Lin Tien Center calls for a building devoted to the study of East Asia, housing the Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures and the Institute of East Asian Studies. The designs displayed in this exhibit showcase the imagination and skill of Berkeley students in envisioning a new home for East Asian Studies. Four students were selected for the quality and ingenuity of their designs:

  • Sherrilyn Mulyono (Architecture – 4th year)
  • Jina Lee (Architecture – graduated Dec 2011)
  • Timon Covelli (Architecture – 4th year)
  • Jin Young Park (Architecture – 4th year)

Professor Renee Chow, who oversaw these students' work in her class "On Site: In Section," during the fall 2011 semester, offers a description of the project, and each of the students provides a description of his or her designs, together with plans and images to convey their visions to viewers.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6492



My Heart is in Okinawa: Everyday Life between Japan and America
Panelists:
 •  Keiko Yamanaka, Lecturer, Department of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley
 •  Kensuke Sumii, Visiting Scholar, CJS, UC Berkeley
 •  Todd Carrel, Lecturer, School of Journalism, UC Berkeley
 •  Wesley Ueunten, Assistant Professor, Asian American Studies, San Francisco
    State University
Date: February 1, 2012, 4:00-6:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

image Okinawa, Japan's southernmost islands, means different things to different parties. For many Japanese, Okinawa symbolizes a tropical paradise with blue oceans and white beaches. For the Japanese state, it provides the ideal site to host Asia's largest American military bases. For the American government, it is a strategic cornerstone for protecting its regional interests. For the Okinawans who have lived there for generations, however, it is home — the home where their heart belongs no matter what happens to it, no matter where they live, and no matter how long they are away. The tragic turns of events brought to the islanders the Ground Battle in 1945, the American military occupation until 1972, and the poorest prefecture throughout the post-WWII era sharply divided by the foreign military presence. How do Okinawans live them in their everyday life? This panel presentation combines academic papers with videographies to deliver voices of ordinary Okinawans living inside and outside of Okinawa.

Schedule:
4:10 Keiko Yamanaka, "Introduction"

4:15 Kensuke Sumii
Paper "Estrangement: Residual Sovereignty and Bare Life of Okinawa"

4:40 Todd Carrel
Video, "Okinawa: Video Reports from Japan and America"
Stories by Noah Buhayar, Diana Jou, Ayako Mie, Laurel Moorhead, Tyler Sipe, Jake Schoneker, and Jun Stinson

5:10 Keiko Yamanaka
Video, "Nuchi du Takara (Life Is a Treasure): Tales of the 'Battle of Okinawa' Survivors in California"

5:30 Wesley Ueunten
Paper, "Post-War Articulations of Okinawan Identity in Northern California"

6:00 Questions and Answers

Open to all audiences

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



Transformation by Thangka: Yoga Tantra Paintings from Sakya's Tibet
Speaker: Jeff Durham, Curator of Himalayan Art, Asian Art Museum
Date: February 2, 2012, 5-6:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

The Five Jinas, cosmic Buddhas associated with the four directions and their central axis, appear prominently across the Himalayan art historical corpus. These sets are visual synecdoche for the initiation (abhisekha) of Shakyamuni as told in yoga tantra texts like the Tattvasamgraha. In these accounts, four progressive initiations elevate Shakyamuni to full enlightenment (abhisambodhi) and with it realization of his true identity as Vairochana. When painted on a thangka, these events become an exemplar through whose re-enactment subsequent isomorphic awakenings can take shape.

Given their soteriological importance, the Five Jinas are the single most important iconographic motif in Sarma Buddhist art. As early as the 11th century, Ngari temples associated with Rinchen Zangpo and the Kashmiri art style focus on the Five Jina motif of the yoga tantras. Five Jina motifs also figure prominently in the corpus of (11th-12th century) central Tibetan paintings, where Indian styles predominate. By the 13th century, however, new anuttara yoga tantra deities had largely eclipsed Vairochana and his yoga tantra imagery. It was during this time that Sakya masters commissioned a particularly important set of Five Jinas — which is now being conserved by San Francisco's Asian Art Museum. In these three magnificent paintings, artists have focused on the old yoga tantra motif, but here they employ a radical new style — the Beri, or Nepalese. The Beri employs deep detailing to create dimensional effects on each thangka. Each thangka in its turn is part of a larger dimension — that of the Vajradhatu mandala from which each derives. On these thangkas, the ordinary sense of vision becomes a laboratory in which we can directly watch two flat dimensions magically become three.

Trained in Sanskrit and Tibetan at the University of Virginia, Jeff Durham is curator of Himalayan Art at the Asian Art Museum of San Francisco. Prior to joining the Museum, he served as professor of Religious Studies at St. Thomas Aquinas College in New York, where he developed cross-cultural approaches to the study of sacred art. Currently involved with a project focused on the influence of Yogacara thought on Yoga Tantra practice, Jeff has visions of creating the first transdisciplinary, pan-Asian exhibition of Vajrayana art on the west coast.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104



Chinese New Year Banquet
Date: February 3, 2012, 6-9 p.m. — Call or email for details
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Please join the Center for Chinese Studies in celebrating the Year of the Dragon.

Event is Friday, February 3 from 6-9 pm in a Richmond restaurant. RSVP to Chloe Alexander at ccs-vs@berkeley.edu or 510-643-6322 by January 27.

Food, fun, and fabulous raffle prizes.
$15 students and staff; $25 faculty and non-staff. Children under 15 free.

Payment must be received in advance.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6322



Assignment: China — The Week that Changed the World
Documentary film
Speaker: Mike Chinoy, Former CNN Senior Asia Correspondent and Beijing Bureau Chief
Date: February 6, 2012, 2 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

image Richard Nixon's visit to China in February 1972 changed the course of history — reshaping the global balance of power and opening the door to the establishment of relations between the People's Republic and the United States. This film contains remarkable and previously unreleased footage of the Nixon visit, interviews with Chinese officials, people who worked for Nixon, as well as many of the journalistic luminaries who accompanied the president. Reported and narrated by U.S.-China Institute Senior Fellow Mike Chinoy, formerly CNN's Senior Asia Correspondent and Beijing Bureau Chief, the film offers fascinating and previously untold perspective on one of the most important historical moments of the 20th century.

Film screening will followed by Q&A with Mike Chinoy.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Japan's IT Strategy: Successes and Failures
Speaker:
 •  Jun Murai, Dean/Professor, Faculty of Environment and Information Studies,
    Keio University
Panelists:
 •  Sang Hyon Kyong, former Minister of Information and Communication,
    Republic of Korea;
 •  Peter Cowhey, Dean; Qualcomm Endowed Chair in Communications and
    Technology Policy, International Relations and Pacific Studies,
    UC San Diego
Date: February 6, 2012, 5-6:30 p.m.
Location: Alumni House, Toll Room
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, The Berkeley Roundtable on the International Economy, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS)

image Japan's IT strategy has seen a repetitive cycle of successes and failures every five years. Between 1990 and 1995, Japan already established Internet access for universities and research centers, which began the foundational structure towards an information society. However, despite this advancement in information technology and the rapid increase of individual Internet users through the launching of Windows 95, IT implementation on the industry and administrative organization levels fell gravely behind by the year 2000.

To break through the slump, the IT Strategic Headquarters was established within the Cabinet Office, and the government and the private sector collaborated to promote the e-Japan Strategy. As a result, by 2005 Japan boasted the world's leading broadband network and even leaped into the implementation of e-commerce and trading.

With these IT infrastructures in place, it was expected for information technology to quickly follow and spread through all aspects of society. However, due to the conservative nature of the medical, educational and administrative organizations, Japan was unable to keep up with continuing changes, finding itself falling behind again over the subsequent five years.

In this lecture, Murai will examine these successes and failures of Japan's IT strategy, and discuss what new plans and goals to set based on these past experiences and lessons.

Jun Murai, Ph.D., is Dean/Professor, Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University; Founder of WIDE Project; Chair of AI3 Project; and Chair of SOI Asia Project

Born in March 1955 in Tokyo, he graduated Keio University in 1979, Department of Mathematics, Faculty of Science and Technology. He received M.S. for Computer Science from Keio University in 1981, and received his Ph.D. in Computer Science, Keio University in 1987, specializing in computer science, computer network and computer communication.

He is currently the Dean, Faculty of Environment and Information Studies, Keio University since October 2009. Former director of WIDE project from 1988-2010. Former Vice-President of Keio University from May 2005 to May 2009. He was an Executive Director of the Keio Research Institute at SFC, Keio University from 1999 to 2005.

He is appointed as one of the advisory member of IT Strategy Headquarters established within the Cabinet of Japan from August 2000 to July 2009, and the Information Security Policy Council established within the Cabinet of Japan since May 2005, a member of Science Council of Japan from October 2005. A visiting professor at Tsinghua University, Beijing since September 2007.

His recent publications include "Explorers! of the Wonderful Internet", Tarojirosha Editus Co., Ltd. September 2003, "Internet II", Iwanami Publication July 1998, "Internet", Iwanami Publication November 1995, "Evolution and Revolution of the Internet in Japan", Proc. of CyberJapan:Technology, Policy Society Symposium, The Library of Congress, May 1996. "Unwired Internet", Impress R&D as a supervisor, April 2005. "New-generation Internet", Iwanami Publication January 2010.

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



The Dew of Wisdom: Traditional Korean Tea Ceremony by Inje University
Speaker: Jaesup Pak, Professor of Korean Language and Literature, Inje University
Date: February 7, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

image Tea, called "cha" in Korean, was introduced to Korea from China sometime in the 6th or 7th century. In Korea, tea has always been more than just a simple beverage. Artistic activities, including music, poetry, and painting, flourished as part of tea ceremonies; thus it is referred to as the "Dew of Wisdom."

Program:

Introduction of Korean tea

Korean tea ceremony
Accompanied by geomungo musician Hyeyong Shin

Tea sharing

Download the event poster here.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World
Speaker/Performer: Lynn Struve, East Asian Languages and Cultures; History, Indiana University, Bloomington
Moderator: Brooks Jessup, History, University of Minnesota, Morris
Date: February 8, 2012, 4-5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

The mid-sixteenth through the mid-seventeenth century saw a notable efflorescence in attention to dreams and dreaming among Chinese intellectuals and constituted a distinct phase in the long history of Chinese "dream culture." The reasons for this are intimately related to virtually every trend — in philosophy, religion, the literary arts, examination competition, politics, and the fate of the country — that affected the subjective consciousness of literati during the late Ming. This efflorescence was carried into the very early Qing period by survivors of the Ming collapse but petered out when the "conquest generation" passed away. It lost salience with the decline of the cultural matrix that uniquely identifies the late Ming, but it sent certain significant influences onward into the middle Qing period.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



The Power and Glory of China's Ming Dynasty
Dates: February 10–11, 2012
Location: Herbst Theater, San Francisco
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Humanities West, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco

In 1368, a military genius born a peasant reunited China and drove the once-invincible Mongol cavalry back to the homeland of Genghis Khan. The Hongwu emperor revitalized the world's largest economy yet eschewed both military and commercial adventurism. But his half-Mongol son, the Yongle emperor, rebuilt the Mongol capital at Beijing and lavished resources on vast fleets led by the Muslim eunuch Zheng He. Decades before Columbus sailed, maritime power extended Ming military and diplomatic influence to Southeast Asia, India and East Africa. Trade flourished, spurred by Ming productivity, the unquenchable European thirst for porcelain, and the vast silver reserves of Mexico and Peru. Ming urban culture transmuted that silver into a blossoming of arts, crafts, literature, and drama that rivaled the cultural riches of the Renaissance. By 1644, desperation among the rural poor, declining fiscal control, and a renewed challenge from the north brought down the Ming dynasty, leaving the less exuberant Qing regime to warily fend off ever-increasing European maritime power and arrogance.

Schedule:

Friday, February 10, 2012, 7:30 to 10:00 pm:

Welcome and Overview of Program. Moderator, Wen-hsin Yeh (Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley)

Melody of China performers Yangqin Zhao and Gangqin Zhao of San Francisco perform on the Yangqin and Guzheng.

Ming China and the Larger World. Timothy Brook (Chinese History, Institute of Asian Research, University of British Columbia). The Ming founder came to power by defeating the Mongol occupation and declaring that he would restore China to its original character as a village society. That he failed was not for want of trying. But the world had changed since the Song dynasty, and the Ming had to change with it. There would be no return to arcadia when goods could be traded, trade routes followed, and money made. His son Yongle would be more aggressive in casting the Ming as a maritime power, famously sending his Muslim eunuch Zheng He on diplomatic excursions into the Indian Ocean. But the bigger story is that Chinese, slowly but surely, were discovering profitable links with economies elsewhere. The flood of trade was unstoppable, fueling a prosperity that Chinese had not known for centuries and drawing Europeans around the world in unprecedented numbers. A global economy was on the horizon.

Art and Visual Culture at the Ming Court. Michael Knight (Chinese Art, Asian Art Museum, SF). Great changes occurred in court arts during the 276 years of the Ming dynasty. In the early decades of the dynasty, the main concerns were building an appropriate imperial capital and demonstrating the legitimacy of the emperor. By the end of the dynasty some estimates place the number of members of the imperial family as high as 60,000; each member both a drain on state resources and a potential consumer of art. Throughout the dynasty, a vast array of objects was required to serve the needs of the court; these ranged from the simplest bowl for serving rice to items used in the most elaborate court rituals. This lecture provides an overview of the function of art at the Ming court in four sections: the court environment at the primary capital of Beijing and the secondary capital at Nanjing; daily life and entertainment at court; visual symbols of hierarchy and rank; and court religion.


Saturday, February 11, 2012, 10:00 am to noon and 1:30 to 4:00 pm:

Welcome. Wen-hsin Yeh, Moderator

Manifesting Heaven's Mandate: the Yongle Emperor's Fight for Legitimacy. Sarah Schneewind (History, UC San Diego). The Ming founder passed over his fourth son, Zhu Di, for the succession, choosing instead a peaceable grandson likely to change the violent tenor of his own reign. But Zhu Di usurped his nephew's throne in a bloody civil war and alienated the allegiance of the most respected literati men. His power, as the Yongle emperor, was not in question, but throughout his reign, he strove in numerous and dramatic ways to assert his legitimacy to the broad public, within the framework of the venerable Mandate of Heaven ideology. The dramatic pre-Columbian sea voyages led by the Muslim eunuch Zheng He were part of that effort. While his successors ended the voyages, Yongle's legitimation strategies affected the Ming path forward, and the way historians have understood the Ming period.

Late Ming Drama. Sophie Volpp. The late Ming (roughly 1570-1644) ushered in the golden age of the Chinese literary drama, when a gentleman might be expected to have some skill as a playwright. Literati composed plays in unprecedented numbers and owned private acting troupes, often coaching the actors themselves. The stage so dominated the cultural sensibility of the period that theatricality came to occupy an important ideological niche in diverse genres of cultural production. This lecture focuses on the particular quality of relations among literati and actors in the privileged and precarious world of the late Ming. The Peach Blossom Fan (1698) is not a late-Ming play, but we include it here not only because it dramatizes the fall of the Ming but because it provides a fully-realized incarnation of the concerns regarding theatricality that are so dominant in late-Ming drama.

Lunch. Theatre closes from noon to 1 pm. Program resumes at 1:30 pm

Late Ming Drama: The Peony Pavilion in Performance. Sheila Melvin. Late Ming drama has had a renaissance in China and Taiwan after the revival in 2004-05 of Tang Xianzu's Peony Pavilion (Mudan ting) in a "Youth edition" by producer Pai Hsien-yung performed at China's top universities (and UC Berkeley's Zellerbach Hall). Kunqu — the style of opera — had been a dying art with an aging audience of cognoscenti. Pai Hsien-yung's production revived it with a production that featured vivid staging on lavish sets and starred young actors with rigorous training. Kunqu became popular among younger audiences, and a host of Ming plays were revived. Most recently, small-scale chamber opera has become fashionable, in response to the block-buster productions of the kunqu revival. This presentation considers Pai Hsien-yung's production of Peony Pavilion against the backdrop of two East-West collaborations: Chen Shizheng's 1999 Lincoln Center production, which showcased traditional Chinese popular arts, and Peter Sellars's 1998 experimental version, which featured music by experimental composer Tan Dun, best known for his score for the film Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon.

The Ming in Retrospect. Lynn Struve (History, Indiana University). Members of the educated social stratum who faced the collapse of the "Great Ming" were filled with conflicted feelings about the impending demise. On one hand, they were acutely aware of the dynasty's numerous present problems, which typically signaled the end of Heaven's patience with any Chinese ruling order. On the other, the two fatal challenges to the dynasty's existence — insurrections of commoners and invasions by "barbarians" — brought directly to mind the principal reasons why the Ming founder, Taizu, had never ceased to be revered as a great dynastic progenitor. Ironically, many placed blame for the dynasty's difficulties on the emperor who actually had brought the Ming to the pinnacle of its geopolitical greatness, the third emperor Chengzu. He increasingly was seen to have marred the dynasty's cosmic moral legitimacy in his fratricidal usurpation of the throne — a violation that was being finally paid for in the seventeenth century.

Panel Discussion with all Presenters and written questions from the Audience.

In conjunction with "The Power and Glory of China's Ming Dynasty" three related events will take place in the Bay area:

Humanities West Book Discussion with Lynn Harris
"Ming China 1368 — 1649: A Concise History of a Resilient Empire" by John Dardess
January 11, 2012, 5:30 to 6:30 pm
Board Room, Commonwealth Club of San Francisco
595 Market Street

In this engaging book, John Dardess examines how the Ming dynasty was able to endure for 276 years, focusing on its foreign relations, the lives of its 16 emperors, its system of governance, the literati who served it, and the mass outlawry that allowed the Manchu invasions to succeed. Lynn Harris will moderate the discussion. The author will not be present.

RSVP: commonwealthclub.org
Co-Sponsored by the Humanities Member-Led Forum
Free to Members of Commonwealth Club
$5 for non-members


Fireside Chat with George Hammond: "The Power and Glory of China's Ming Dynasty Preview"
February 7, 2012, 6:30 pm
Orinda Library, Orinda
Free


"The Dreaming Mind and the End of the Ming World"
Lynn Struve
February 8, 2012, 4 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room
2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor, Rm 603, Berkeley
(510) 643-6492
Sponsored by the Institute of East Asian Studies.
Free

The mid-sixteenth through the mid-seventeenth century saw a notable efflorescence in attention to dreams and dreaming among Chinese intellectuals and constituted a distinct phase in the long history of Chinese "dream culture." The reasons for this are intimately related to virtually every trend-in philosophy, religion, the literary arts, examination competition, politics, and the fate of the country-that affected the subjective consciousness of literati during the late Ming. This efflorescence was carried into the very early Qing period by survivors of the Ming collapse but petered out when the "conquest generation" passed away. It lost salience with the decline of the cultural matrix that uniquely identifies the late Ming, but it sent certain significant influences onward into the middle Qing period.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 415-391-9700



East Asian Imaginarium: UC Berkeley Students Present Architectural Designs
Panelists:
 •  Sherrilyn Mulyono, 4th Year Architecture Student and Organizer of
    "East Asian Imaginarium";
 •  Jin Young Park, 4th Year Architecture Student, UC Berkeley;
 •  Jina Lee, graduate of Architecture, December 2011
Moderator: Renee Chow, Professor, Architecture, UC Berkeley
Date: February 10, 2012, 12 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

The UC Berkeley Architecture students behind the current exhibit at IEAS, "East Asian Imaginarium: Case Studies in Architecture" (IEAS Gallery, on display through Friday, February 24), will present and discuss their designs for a new building on the UC Berkeley campus dedicated to East Asian Studies.

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: Caverlee Cary, Institute of East Asian Studies, ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Disordered Tourists: On Social Ordering Projects and their Unintended Outcomes in China
Speaker: Timothy Oakes, Geography, University of Colorado at Boulder
Discussant: You-tien Hsing, Geography, UCB
Date: February 10, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

image This talk will explore tourism in China as a project of ordering with unforeseen consequences. Such ordering projects rely on a kind of "expert knowledge" of tourists and tourism, one that conceives of tourism as a set of categorized behaviors and motivations. In China, this expert knowledge of tourism is part of a much larger set of ordering projects seeking to shape modern Chinese society in particular ways. But these projects are unable to account for the "disordered" actions often displayed by actual tourists and their hosts in any other way but to find them deviant from the norm. This is because such ordering projects conceive of tourism and tourists as stable categories of knowledge rather than social processes. The talk therefore explores both a critique of tourism as a modernist project of ordering and a reconsidering of tourism as a social process. I hope to suggest a productive alternative to our search for the Chinese tourist and what his or her "difference" might tell us about (alternative) Asian modernity and, indeed, our Eurocentric assumptions about tourism in general.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Tibet in the Age of Manuscripts: Reflections on Recent Textual Discoveries: 2012 Khyentse Lecture
Speaker: Matthew T. Kapstein, Numata Visiting Professor of Buddhist Studies, The University of Chicago Divinity School
Date: February 16, 2012, 5-7 p.m.
Location: Faculty Club, Heyns Room
Sponsors: Center for Buddhist Studies, Khyentse Foundation

image During the past few decades, the discovery, cataloguing, and partial publication of important Tibetan manuscript collections has substantially transformed our view of the intellectual and religious history of Tibet. Important developments about which we were almost entirely ignorant only a decade ago may now be studied in detail thanks to copious newly available documentation. The present talk will review aspects of the recent manuscript finds, considering their implications for our understanding of Tibetan cultural history more generally.

Matthew T. Kapstein specializes in the history of Buddhist philosophy in India and Tibet, as well as in the cultural history of Tibetan Buddhism more generally. Kapstein has published a dozen books and numerous articles, among the most recent of which are a general introduction to Tibetan cultural history, The Tibetans (Oxford 2006), an edited volume on Sino-Tibetan religious relations, Buddhism Between Tibet and China (Boston 2009), and a translation of an eleventh-century philosophical allegory in the acclaimed Clay Sanskrit Series, The Rise of Wisdom Moon (New York 2009). With Kurtis Schaeffer (University of Virginia) and Gray Tuttle (Columbia), he has completed "Sources of Tibetan Traditions," to be published in the Columbia University Press Sources of Asian Traditions series in early 2012. Kapstein is additionally Director of Tibetan Studies at the École Pratique des Hautes Études, Paris.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104



Accidental Cosmopolitanization: Citizenship Contradictions of Rural Marriage Immigration in South Korea
Speaker: Chang Kyung-Sup, Professor of Sociology, Seoul National University
Date: February 24, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

image As a late modern irony in South Korea, rural villages have become a platform for cosmopolitanization in terms of rapidly increasing marriages between Korean bachelors and foreign brides from various Asian countries. These marriage immigrants are seen as the first non-Korean ethnic groups to become integrated and accepted socially by Koreans. On official, social, and personal levels, there are intense negotiations and inventive suggestions concerning the status of foreign brides as meaningful Korean citizens, which will be discussed along with the contradictions that can structurally deny or threaten their genuine sociocultural and political membership in Korean society.

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Political Preference, Environmental Sensitivity, and the Allocation of the Natural Disaster Subsidy: Empirical Evidence from Typhoon Morakot in Taiwan
Speaker: Chang Hung-Hao, Agriculture and Economics, National Taiwan University
Discussant: Jim Wu, Business Management, National Sun Yat-Sen University
Date: February 28, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



A Photographic Pilgrimage: Lisa Ross in Conversation
Speaker/Performer: Lisa Ross, Photographer
Date: February 29, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies , Center for Buddhist Studies

In conjunction with the exhibition in the IEAS Gallery, "Desert Mazar: Sacred Sites in Western China," photographer Lisa Ross will discuss her work in Central Asia, in conversation with Sanjyot Mehendale (Vice-Chair Center for Buddhist Studies, Lecturer in Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley).

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Desert Mazar: Sacred Sites in Western China
Photography Exhibit
Dates: March 1 – June 1, 2012, every day, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Near Eastern Studies, Silk Road Initiative, Center for Chinese Studies

Wedged between the Mongol and Kazakh steppes, mainland China, and the high ranges of the Pamirs and Himalayas, the desert expanse of the Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region has been a crossroads of languages, cultures and religions. Across the region, the spiritual landscape is marked by mazar, the Uighur term for tombs. Mazar may be as simple as a cave or flags secured to scraps of brush, but they command intense devotional power. Photographer Lisa Ross has traced Uighur pilgrimmage routes and captured images of these sacred sites, sites whose simplicity belies the complex cross-currents of religion and ritual that intersect in the veneration of history's holy men.

The pre-opening reception on February 29 follows a 4 pm event with photographer Lisa Ross in conversation with Sanjyot Mehendale (Vice-Chair Center for Buddhist Studies, Lecturer in Near Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley).

Symposium: April 24, 2012, 4-7 pm
Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room
"Shamans, Buddhists and Muslim Saints: The Layered History of the Desert Mazar"

Participants:
Beth Citron, Assistant Curator, Rubin Museum of Art
Rahile Dawut, Xinjiang University, China
Johan Elverskog, Religious Studies, Southern Methodist University and Visiting Fellow, Stanford University
Sanjyot Mehendale, Lecturer, Department of Near Eastern Studies, UCB
Alexandre Papas, National Center for Scientific Research, Paris
Lisa Ross, Photographer

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Placing East Asia: A Graduate Student Conference on Urbanism and the Production of Space
Location: 370 Dwinelle Hall
Date: March 2, 2012, 8:30 a.m.-6:15 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This two-day interdisciplinary conference brings together graduate students working on urban studies in the East Asian region. Although the wide range of urban forms and historical experiences in East Asia preclude any generalization of an "East Asian city," examining the region from different disciplinary perspectives can bring new insights on urban processes. Conference participants will present papers in seven thematic sessions, focusing on the interconnections between the local and global environs, human agencies and institutional structures, as well as the diverse array of discourses that shape the transformation of cities and everyday life.

Click here to view the conference website.

Event Contact: placingeastasia@gmail.com



Boredom, Nostalgia, and the Nation in Maedako Hiroichiro's "Third-class Passengers" (1921)
Speaker: Kristina Vassil, East Asian Languages and Literature, Colgate University
Discussant: Alan Tansman, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Date: March 2, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Area, Literature, and Method
Speaker: Jing Tsu, Modern Chinese Literature and Culture, Yale University
Discussant: Pheng Cheah, Department of Rhetoric, UC Berkeley
Date: March 2, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

image Building on her recent work, Sound and Script in Chinese Diaspora (Harvard UP 2010), Professor Jing Tsu outlines the possibility of "New Area Studies," a focus in her current research. As the national borders of modern Chinese literature become more diffused than ever before, the methodological question of how to study national or comparative literatures, as traditions and critical paradigms become insufficient to the reality of diaspora and ethnic minorities in a global context, bears important relevance to the future of literary studies at large. Focusing on transnational alphabetization movements and the relationship between small-time literary players in the Sinophone world, this talk discusses issues of approach, disciplinary history, and comparative Sinophone studies.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321

 


Placing East Asia: A Graduate Student Conference on Urbanism and the Production of Space
Date: March 3, 2012, 9 a.m.-5 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies
This two-day interdisciplinary conference brings together graduate students working on urban studies in the East Asian region. Although the wide range of urban forms and historical experiences in East Asia preclude any generalization of an "East Asian city," examining the region from different disciplinary perspectives can bring new insights on urban processes. Conference participants will present papers in seven thematic sessions, focusing on the interconnections between the local and global environs, human agencies and institutional structures, as well as the diverse array of discourses that shape the transformation of cities and everyday life.

Click here to view the conference website.

Event Contact: placingeastasia@gmail.com



Waking the Green Tiger Documentary Film
Speaker/Performer: Gary Marcuse, filmmaker
Date: March 5, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

image Waking the Green Tiger documents the rise of a green movement in China, as farmers and activists join together to oppose a massive dam project on the Upper Yangtze River. This dramatic story is told against a background of eyewitness accounts — and extraordinary archival footage — describing an earlier era under Chairman Mao when the masses were mobilized to conquer nature in the name of progress.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321

 


Disaster, Relief and Volunteering for Civil Society in Post-3.11 Japan
Speaker: David H. Slater, Associate Professor, Cultural Anthropology and Japanese Studies, Sophia University
Date: March 6, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

image In the face of the triple tragedies that befell Japan on March 11th, 2011, one story that is still developing is that of volunteer activity. Thousands of citizens have become mobilized in ways that were almost unimaginable before, from digging toxic mud in Tohoku to staging anti-nuke protests in Tokyo, the largest in Honshu since the 1970's ANPO demonstrations. This talk lays out the different stages of disaster and relief, the ways in which information, people and goods have circulated throughout Japan, and the different types of volunteering that have made such a difference. While this situation is always changing, Slater will also lay out some of the possible options for volunteer work in the coming months.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Asian Cancers: Genetic Exceptionalism and Ethical Ownership
Speaker: Aihwa Ong, Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Discussant: Chang YuPei, Communications and Technology, National Chiao Tung University
Date: March 7, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



  Empire's Proxy: American Literature and U.S. Imperialism in the Philipines
Speaker: Meg Wesling, Associate Professor, Department of Literature, University of California, San Diego
Date: March 7, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies, Department of English

image In the late nineteenth century, American teachers descended upon the Philippines after the conclusion of the Spanish-American War. Motivated by President William McKinley's project of "benevolent assimilation," they established a school system that focused on English language and American literature to advance the superiority of the Anglo-Saxon tradition, which was held up as justification for the United States' civilizing mission and offered as a promise of moral uplift and political advancement. Meanwhile, on American soil, the field of American literature was just being developed and fundamentally, though invisibly, defined by this new, extraterritorial expansion. This book thus links the field-formation of English in the U.S. not just to U.S. nation-building project on the eve of the twentieth century, but also to the state-building project in the colonial outposts, where the very "traditions of good literature," promoted in the United States, served as the handmaiden of imperial conquest, in the form of the linguistic, cultural, and ideological imposition of English.

Introduced by Jeffrey Hadler, Department of South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley.

This talk is part of the IEAS book series "New Perspectives in Asia."

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Unified Tuberculosis Control on the Korean Peninsula: Promise and Perils
Speaker/Performer: Stephen W. Linton, Chairman, Eugene Bell Foundation
Date: March 9, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

image Multi-drug resistant tuberculosis, North Korea's most serious public health challenge, provides unprecedented opportunities for constructive engagement on the Korean peninsula. Koreans from North and South have worked quietly for years to develop an efficient, transparent and effective strategy to diagnose and treat this deadly disease. A joint South-North program to treat MDR-TB would be the first step toward a unified program for infectious disease control.

Dr. Stephen Linton founded the Eugene Bell Foundation in 1995 to provide developmental assistance to North Korea. He will discuss his foundation's work over the years coordinating the delivery of TB medication, diagnostic equipment, and supplies to 1/3 of the North Korean population.

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



The Game Generation and Leisure Capital in Taiwan
Speaker: Chang YuPei, Communication and Technology, National Chiao Tung University
Date: March 13, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809

Document (PDF): IEAS Residential Research Fellows Talk Schedule



Re-reading Levenson: A Conversation
Panelists:
 •  Wen-hsin Yeh, Walter and Elise Haas Chair Professor in Asian Studies,
    Richard H. and Laurie C. Morrison Chair in History, Director of the Institute
    of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
 •  Geremie R. Barmé, School of Culture, History & Language, Australian
    National University
 •  Timothy Cheek, Louis Cha Chair of Chinese Research and Associate Director,
    Centre for Chinese Research, Institute of Asian Research, University of
    British Columbia
 •  Gloria Davies, School of Languages, Cultures and Linguistics, Monash
    University
Moderator: Wen-hsin Yeh, Walter and Elise Haas Chair Professor in Asian Studies, Richard H. and Laurie C. Morrison Chair in History, Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
Date: March 13, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

image Joseph Levenson's "Confucian China and Its Modern Fate: A Trilogy" was an early and compelling work of modern Chinese intellectual history. Conceived and written between 1949 and 1967, it appeared during a crucial period in the post-WWII era when the development of "Chinese Studies" in the US academy, led by John Fairbank (Levenson's teacher), was beginning in earnest. In part a product of the Cold War as well as of Weberian sociology, the trilogy offers a particular approach to the history of ideas.

Levenson employed writings from the late-nineteenth and early twentieth centuries to investigate reasons for the apparent disintegration of "traditional" intellectual, historical, social, and cultural structures. Writing with exceptional verve, he provided what was to many a compelling analysis of the fundamental dilemmas and problems of a "Chinese modernity".

Today, with the passage of half a century, and in the context of China's "civilizational" re-emergence, the intellectual design, agenda, and methodology of Levenson's trilogy warrant reconsideration. This Conversation is a preliminary effort at such a reevaluation.

To attend the reception following this event, send RSVP to yuwelch@berkeley.edu.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



China Then and Now
Speaker: Nicholas Platt, President Emeritus, The Asia Society
Date: March 16, 2012, 4-5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Asia Society

image Nicholas Platt, long-time China specialist, three-time U.S. Ambassador (Pakistan, Zambia and the Philippines), and author of the recently published memoir China Boys, will share his experiences and insights gained from a long and distinguished career in the diplomatic service and as President of the Asia Society in New York for 12 years.

As a young diplomatic officer in the early 1960s, when Communist China was firmly closed to the west, Platt took the unusual step of studying Mandarin. This put him in a key position when U.S. relations to China suddenly opened. Platt was one of the State Department officials chosen to accompany President Nixon on his historic visit to China in 1973. The following year he and his family were stationed in Beijing with the opening of a U.S. Liaison Office, the forerunner of the U.S. Embassy in the PRC.

Showing some of his 'home movie' footage of the Nixon trip, and film of family and diplomatic events, and reading from his memoir, Platt will talk about life in China in 1973. As a former president of the Asia society, which oversees numerous contacts and exchanges with China, and a frequent visitor and lecturer in the PRC, Platt is in a unique position to compare those early days of diplomatic contact to relations with the West today, as China now emerges as a major player on the world stage and an economic Power house.

Open to all audiences.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible. No RSVP needed.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Exit Emperor Kim Jong-Il: Notes from His Former Mentor
Speaker/Performer: John H. Cha, www.morningcalmbooks.com
Date: March 19, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

image Exit Emperor Kim Jong-il; Notes from his former mentor is a compelling portrait of two men caught up in a struggle for the survival of North Korean society. It is a product of an eight-year study of individuals who observed and worked under Kim Jong-il, the dictator of North Korea. Among them was Hwang Jang-yop, a renowned philosopher/writer and former International Secretariat of North Korea, and mentor to Kim Jong-il. Exit Emperor Kim Jong-il tells a story about Hwang's journey in his battle against Kim's greed for power.

Hwang was driven to defect from North Korea because he wanted to tell the world about the corrupt dictatorship and its policies that he felt was responsible for the massive famine in North Korea. Through testimonies from Hwang and other defectors from North Korea, we are able to reveal what's going on inside the man, Kim Jong-il, and the society he rules.

In planning and carrying out his defection, Hwang knew that it would come at a high cost — the sacrifice of his family, friends, and colleagues — yet he was compelled to come in from the cold because Kim, left alone, would ruin the entire Korean peninsula and the people Hwang so loved.

Through Hwang's eyes, Exit Emperor Kim Jong-il reveals a three dimensional portrait of Kim Jong-il rarely chronicled: from Kim's early days and rise to power to his current economic crisis and power struggle.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Covering China: Disasters, Disease, Dissent, and More
Speaker: Audra Ang, Former AP reporter in Beijing; CCS visiting scholar
Date: March 20, 2012, 12:05-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

This talk will be a brief overview of what it's like to be a foreign correspondent in China, including how they find the news and the problems they run into.

Audra Ang has worked at Associate Press since 1999 and was stationed in Beijing from 2002-2009 where she focused on human rights, health and spot-news disasters. She is currently a visiting scholar in residence at the Center for Chinese Studies working on her memoir about China, and lessons learned through meals and other food-related experiences.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



The Woman, The Orphan, and The Tiger
Film — Documentary
Speaker: Jane Jin Kaisen
Discussant: Jinsoo An, Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, University of California, Berkeley
Date: March 20, 2012, 3:30-5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Korean Studies (CKS), Townsend Center for the Humanities

image The Woman, The Orphan, and The Tiger follows a group of international adoptees and other women of the Korean Diaspora in their twenties and thirties. It explores the ways in which trauma is passed on from previous generations to the present through a sense of being haunted. The physical return of the Diaspora confronts and de-stabilizes narratives that have been constructed to systematically silence histories of injustice committed onto certain parts of the population in South Korea. A genealogy is created by relating the stories of three generations of women: the former comfort women who were subjected to military sexual slavery by the Japanese military between World War I and II, the approximately one million women who have worked as sex-workers around US military bases in South Korea from the nineteen fifties to the present, and the estimated two hundred thousand children who were adopted from South Korea to the West since the nineteen fifties. The film exposes how military and patriarchal violence against women and children became central in geopolitical negotiations between South Korea, the United States, and Japan, and how this part of world history has been systematically silenced, but reverberates in the present moment.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



An Unprepared Profession
Speaker: Dana Buntrock, Professor, Architecture, UC Berkeley
Date: March 21, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Uneasy Partners: Africa's Relations with China
Panelists:
 •  Julia Strauss, Senior Lecturer in Chinese Politics, Department of Politics
    and International Studies, School of Oriental and African Studies, University
    of London and Visiting Scholar, UCLA Asia Institute
 •  Steven Chikwaba Nakana, Steven C. Nakana, PhD candidate, Graduate
    Institute for International and Development Studies, Geneva, Switzerland
 •  Alexander C. Cook, History, UC Berkeley
Date: March 21, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for African Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

The presence of China in the countries of Africa — companies, workers, government representatives — has generated a range of reactions from Africans. Chinese too may perceive their goals and actions very differently from how they are seen by Africans, not to mention observers in Europe or America. These mutual perceptions, mis-perceptions, and disjunctures between perception and reality, are varied, nuanced, and not always easy to disentangle. This panel will discuss some of the issues involving African-Chinese relations, issues that affect interactions from natural resources management to trade to foreign aid, and the complexities of African and Chinese mutual perception.

Presentations:

Steven C. Nakana
"The Relationship Between Chinese Investors and Zambian Organized Labor in the Copper Mining Sector Between 1997 and 2008"

Over the past thirteen years, Chinese investors in the Zambian mining sector have witnessed a rise in strike action by organized labor. These protest actions have led to studies investigating China's developmental influence within the African political economy, wherein, two contradictory interpretations exist. The first observes that strike actions are attributable to exploitative Chinese labor practices and therefore views China as problematic for the development and governance of African countries. The second views China as a "trade partner" and "development model", observing that during the past two decades China has provided condition-free aid to African countries and lacks a colonial history.

People's experiences, sets of ideas and narratives of past events or history, which in the Zambian case are predominantly shaped by the history of colonialism and the socioeconomic and political struggles that ensued, influence their 'agency,' which in turn plays a significant role in contemporary interactions. Zambian organized labor draws upon its historical, colonial-era narrative of struggle in responding to this new dynamic. In times of conflict, particularly those characterized by power imbalances such as employer-worker relations, these narratives are mobilized and deployed by workers. This begs the question: what is the relationship between Chinese investors and strike action by Zambian organized labor?

In my PhD study, I utilize the concept of "social integration," a phenomenon that encapsulates micro-social processes of induction, ranging from benign to militant methods of social action, that lead to the adoption or acceptance of norms, values, attitudes, and behaviors practiced within a particular social setting, political economy, or industrial sector. My discussion seeks to provide an alternative picture of Sino-Zambian capital-labor relations at mines owned by China Nonferrous Corporation Mine (NFCA) between 1997 and 2008 in Zambia's Copperbelt Province.

My presentation will examine the history and protest culture of organized labor in discussing the relationship between Chinese investors and strike action in Zambia. From this history, I seek to highlight three main factors: (1) how strike action is not only deployed as a weapon but also as an image or frame that conveys workers' lived experiences; (2) how strike action has become the basis on which worker demands, grievances and responses to capital or the state are framed and expressed; and (3) how strike action has become a means of influencing state and intra-firm policy, as well as public and scholarly discourse, by conveying or disseminating certain imagery about workers' lived experiences.

I will conclude by arguing that strike action in NFCA-owned mines has been deployed by organized labor in persuading and cajoling employers to accept, comply with, and internalize labor's demands, rules, and norms, in particular, demands for higher wages and safe working conditions. In other words, the strike action is used as a behavioral change device, designed to stimulate organizational learning that seeks to achieve policy and behavioral change within a particular firm or industry. Therefore, labor protests are not indicative of the exploitative nature of Chinese investments but, rather, they are in fact a historic tool that organized labor deploys to leverage and socially integrate representatives of both domestic and foreign capital into the norms and values envisioned in Zambian labor law regime.

Alexander C. Cook
"Chinese Uhuru: Mao and the Congo Crisis"

"People of the world, unite and defeat the U.S. aggressors and all their running dogs! People of the world, be courageous, and dare to fight, defy difficulties and advance wave upon wave. Then the whole world will belong to the people. Monsters of all kinds shall be destroyed." Mao's most famous quotation in defiance of imperialism was issued at a 1964 rally in Tiananmen Square in support of the people of the Congo. Though little remembered today, the Congo Crisis of 1960-1965, like the Spanish Civil War a generation before, was a proxy war and cause celebre for partisans across the ideological spectrum, from Che Guevara to the mercenary Mike Hoare. Mao too invested the conflict with far-reaching world historical importance. Contrasting propaganda performance with archival evidence, this paper examines the significance of the Congo Crisis to communist China, its implications for Chinese understandings of themselves and the world, and the distance between representation and reality on the eve of the Cultural Revolution.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Migration and Competitiveness: Japan and the United States
Date: March 22, 2012 8 a.m.-5 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Global Partnership, John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, Philip Martin, Professor and Chair, UC Comparative Immigration & Integration Program, UC Davis

This workshop explores the effects of immigrants on particular economic sectors. Each presentation has five sections: an industry profile, migrant employment patterns, the effects of migrants, links between migration, labor and other policies, and alternative options and scenarios.

The industry profile explains the current structure of output and employment, including the use of subcontractors and migrant workers by geography, occupation, size of employer and other factors. Migrant employment explains the current role of migrants, the evolution of migrant employment, how migrant employment patterns are changing. The effects of migrants focus the 3 R's of labor markets, viz, how migrants affect recruitment, remuneration or pay, and retention. Policies deals with the interaction of migration and labor policies and how these policies affect labor markets in the short-, medium-, and long-terms. Options and scenarios examine current policy debates and their consequences for the industry, local and migrant workers, and consumers and society, including the integration of migrants and their families.

Schedule

Thursday, March 22

8:00 AM — Breakfast available in the conference room

8:30 AM — Welcome and introductions, Philip Martin, UC Davis and Steve Vogel, UC Berkeley

8:45 AM — Overview of Migration Patterns and Policies (25 minute presentations)
Yasushi Iguchi, Kwansei Gakuin University — Japan
Philip Martin, UC Davis — United States
Discussion

9:45 AM — Break

10:00 AM — Agriculture
Mitsuyoshi Ando, University of Tokyo and Kenji Horiguchi, Waseda University- Japan
Philip Martin, UC Davis — United States
Discussion, James Lincoln, UC Berkeley, Sally Fairfax, UC Berkeley (10-12 minutes each)

11:30 AM — Lunch and Keynote Speech, Michael Teitelbaum, Harvard and Sloan Foundation

12:45 PM — Health Care
Jun Inoue, Hitotsubashi University — Japan
Lindsay Lowell, Georgetown University — United States
Discussion, Charles Harns, IOM MRTC, Rick Mines

2:15 PM — Break

2:30 PM — Science and Engineering
Nana Oishi, Sophia University — Japan
Norm Matloff, UC Davis — United States
Discussion, Robert Cole, UC Berkeley, Michael Teitelbaum, Harvard

4:00 PM — Break

4:15 PM — SME Manufacturing and Construction
Yasushi Iguchi, Kwansei Gakuin University — SME Manufacturing Japan
Philip Martin, UC Davis and Robert Glover, University of Texas-Austin — Construction and Meatpacking, United States
Discussion, Keiko Yamanaka, UC Berkeley

5:00 PM — Adjourn

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3415



Politics of Culture and Nature in China's Northwest
Speaker: You-tien Hsing, Professor, Geography, UC Berkeley
Date: April 3, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Wutai Shan, the Mongols, and Qing Cosmopolitanism
Speaker: Johan Elverskog, Religious Studies, Southern Methodist University, and Visiting Fellow, Stanford University
Date: April 4, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

While cosmopolitanism has become a popular theoretical lens to explore everything from the medieval world of the Indian Ocean to the TV-viewing habits of Asian American teenagers little work has been done on its applicability for the study of late imperial China. Taking as its focus the important borderland pilgrimage site of Wutai Shan this talk explores the possibility, and viability, of cosmopolitanism as a conceptual framework for the study of both the Qing dynasty and China within the broader Eurasian world.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Reimagining Language: The Bilingual Ode to Mukden in Thirty-Two Scripts
Speaker: Patricia Berger, Professor, Chinese Art, Art History, UC Berkeley
Date: April 5, 2012, 5-7 p.m.
Location: 308J Doe Library
Sponsors: Townsend Center Working Group in Asian Art and Visual Cultures, Center for Chinese Studies

image Townsend Center Working Group in Asian Art and Visual Cultures presents a talk by Patricia Berger, Art History, UC Berkeley

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321

 


A Study on the Engines of Chinese Long-term Economic Development
Speaker: Chancellor Hong Yinxing, Nanjing University, China
Date: April 5, 2012, 5-6 p.m.
Location: 306 Soda Hall (HP Auditorium)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Department of Economics, Department of Mechanical Engineering

image After China became the second largest economy in the world in 2010, it faced a daunting challenge of the sustainability of its economic growth mode. In response to the challenge, China has had to search for new growth engines in this transitional global economy, including switching its development engine from external to internal, attaching greater importance to consumption and emphasizing an inclusive growth pattern.

Hong Yinxing, the chancellor of Nanjing University, and Director of the Center for Yangtze River Delta's Socioeconomic Development, will talk on sustainable development in China.

中国经济长期发展的动力研究

中国成为世界第二大经济体后,原先的经济增长方式不可持续。中国必须在在转型中寻找经济增长新动力,包括将其发展的引擎由外转内、强化消费需求对经济增长的拉动力和由效率性增长转向公平性增长等。

Professor Hong's academic expertise lies in theory and policy research on economic operation mechanism, economic development and macro-economy. He is the author of more than 30 books.

The talk will be in Chinese with English translation.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



In Search Of The Origins Of Domestic Water Buffalo In China
Speaker: Li Liu, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University
Date: April 6, 2012, 12:05-1 p.m.
Location: 3401 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

image Recent studies on water buffalo (Bubalus) remains from Asia have challenged a traditional belief that water buffalo were first domesticated over 7000 years ago in China and related to rice cultivation. We integrate zooarchaeological and ancient DNA approaches to analyzing water buffalo remains from Neolithic and Bronze Age sites in China, in order to determine their species status and to shed light on the origin of modern domestic water buffalo. The preliminary results of our research indicate that the Chinese indigenous buffalo (B. mephistopheles) existing during the Holocene were neither domestic nor closely-related to the ancestral population of modern domestic water buffalo in Asia. Several lines of evidence from archaeology and ethnography suggest that the domesticated swamp water buffalo is likely to have been introduced to China through the so-called Southwest Silk Road, which connected Southwest China with SE Asia, around the Han dynasty (206 BC – AD 220) when cultural interaction between China and its surrounding regions intensified.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Healing Texts, Healing Practices, Healing Bodies: A Workshop on Medicine and Buddhism
Conference/Symposium
Date: April 6, 2012, 2:30-5 p.m.
Location: 370 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies

image The prevention, alleviation and cure of physical and mental ills have been central concerns of Buddhist traditions across Asia, as well as a major drive in the creation and promotion of healing rituals and therapies. At the same time, monks have played a key role in the spread and circulation of medical knowledge beyond national borders, and Buddhist institutions have provided fertile ground for the development and consolidation of medical treatises and curative techniques.

The workshop Healing Texts, Healing Practices, Healing Bodies aims to be a platform for scholars working in different fields of Buddhist studies to explore the intersections of Buddhism and medical knowledge in comparative perspective. The papers will analyze different therapeutic strategies emerging from textual sources and ritual practices; discuss how discourses on physical and mental illness have been constructed, represented and embodied; and examine how conceptions of pollution and filth have informed notions of disease as well as their treatment.

*This is a 2-day workshop
Day 1: Friday, April 6th | 2:30pm-5:00pm
Day 2: Saturday, April 7th | 10:00am — 5:00pm

Click here to view the event website.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156

Directions: Dwinelle Hall is notorious for being hard to navigate. In order to find the room we suggest that you follow the directions below. 1. Enter campus via Sather Gate which is located where Telegraph Avenue meets the Berkeley campus. After going through the Gate and crossing the immediately following bridge, the first building on your left will be Dwinelle Hall. Enter through the doors off the big plaza. 2. This entrance to Dwinelle Hall is on Level D. To the right in the main hall, there will be an elevator. Take it to Level F/G. Alternately, you can take the stairwell directly opposite the elevator. 3. Once you have exited the elevator, room 370 will be immediately to your left. (directions courtesy of BBRG, UC Berkeley)



The Luxury of Love: Rise of the "Bats" in Post-IMF South Korea
Speaker: John (Songpae) Cho, Korea Foundation Postdoctoral Fellow
Date: April 6, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

image "Bats" refers to married gay men who blur the affective, emotional, temporal/spatial, and financial boundaries maintained by single gay men between their weekend gay lives and their weekday heterosexual ones. Ironically, just as many single gay men are retreating and retiring from their gay lives in order to focus on their careers or even marrying women under the pressures of South Korea's neoliberal and biopolitical reforms, designed to boost the flagging birth rate and stave off an imminent crisis of biological/social reproduction, married gay men, who were all but invisible during the period of the country's gay community building in the mid-1990s till late 1990s, are emerging as a powerful new sexual constituency. The same force that compels many single gay men to retreat/retire — the lack of job security and familial support, especially in their own age, from their own wives and children — is what is seen to enable married gay men to enjoy the "luxury of love."

In assessing the paradoxical fall and rise of these two sexual constituencies, this presentation asks: How do emotional caring, physical nurturing, and even romantic love become the purview and luxury of the rich or the lucky few? Or, more broadly, where does "security" come from in this age of neoliberal insecurity and bio-politics? Indeed, in attending to the pathos, regret, and disempowerment expressed by gay men in post-IMF South Korea, it is too easy to miss those most absent/present within these men's narratives — the voices of those women who are being currently actively targeted by the Korean patriarchal state to marry, take care of, and reproduce the nation.

Ironically, in mobilizing and exploiting these women in order to maintain their sense of emotional stability, secure their "social face," and fit into the homosocial bonding of the nation, both single and married gay men may be more complicit with — rather than challenge — the Korean government's contemporary biopolitical project.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Healing Texts, Healing Practices, Healing Bodies: A Workshop on Medicine and Buddhism
Conference/Symposium
Date: April 7, 2012, 10:00 a.m.-5 p.m.
Location: 370 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies

image The prevention, alleviation and cure of physical and mental ills have been central concerns of Buddhist traditions across Asia, as well as a major drive in the creation and promotion of healing rituals and therapies. At the same time, monks have played a key role in the spread and circulation of medical knowledge beyond national borders, and Buddhist institutions have provided fertile ground for the development and consolidation of medical treatises and curative techniques.

The workshop Healing Texts, Healing Practices, Healing Bodies aims to be a platform for scholars working in different fields of Buddhist studies to explore the intersections of Buddhism and medical knowledge in comparative perspective. The papers will analyze different therapeutic strategies emerging from textual sources and ritual practices; discuss how discourses on physical and mental illness have been constructed, represented and embodied; and examine how conceptions of pollution and filth have informed notions of disease as well as their treatment.

*This is a 2-day workshop
Day 1: Friday, April 6th | 2:30pm-5:00pm
Day 2: Saturday, April 7th | 10:00am — 5:00pm

Click here to view the event website.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156

Directions: Dwinelle Hall is notorious for being hard to navigate. In order to find the room we suggest that you follow the directions below. 1. Enter campus via Sather Gate which is located where Telegraph Avenue meets the Berkeley campus. After going through the Gate and crossing the immediately following bridge, the first building on your left will be Dwinelle Hall. Enter through the doors off the big plaza. 2. This entrance to Dwinelle Hall is on Level D. To the right in the main hall, there will be an elevator. Take it to Level F/G. Alternately, you can take the stairwell directly opposite the elevator. 3. Once you have exited the elevator, room 370 will be immediately to your left. (directions courtesy of BBRG, UC Berkeley)



Strait Talk 2012 — Conflict Resolution: Conflicts around the World
Speakers: Tatsushi Arai, Professor of Peacebuilding and Conflict Transformation, SIT; Pushpa Iyer, Professor of Conflict Resolution, Monterey Institute
Date: April 9, 2012, 6-7:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Japan Policy Research Institute at the USF Center for Pacific Rim Studies, Boalt School of Law, Center for Chinese Studies, ASUC (Associated Students of the University of California)
The speakers will be examining various conflicts around the world, including those in the East Asian region. Furthermore, they will be discussing their works in the region as well as various works done by the local communities to transform these conflicts.

Strait Talk is a non-partisan dialogue program that seeks to transform international conflict by connecting young people from both sides of the Taiwan Strait and the United States and empowering them to strive for peace.

Event Contact: straittalk.berkeley@gmail.com, 626-390-9996



Religious Revivalism in Current North China
Speaker: Shin-yi Chao, Associate Professor, Philosophy and Religion, Rutgers University, Camden Campus
Date: April 10, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Arcade Hoange (d. 1716) and the Invention of Chinese Belles Lettres in Europe
Speaker: Patricia Sieber, East Asian Languages and Literatures, Ohio State University
Discussant: William H. Ma, Art History, UC Berkeley
Date: April 11, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

This presentation will examine the man who should be rightfully credited at the very least as the first translator of Chinese belles lettres into a European language, Arcade Hoange (d. 1716), a Catholic convert from Fujian who, while serving as a royal interpreter at the Bibliothèque royale in Paris (ca. 1712-16), partially translated Yu Jiao Li, a popular early Qing romance. The paper proposes that we treat Hoange, his translation strategies, and the afterlife of his manuscripts as an entry into reexamining post-WWII American assumptions about cultural agency in early European sinological practice and contemplate the possibility of a co-authored approach not only in the production of Western-inspired literature by modern Chinese writers, as Lydia Liu suggested, but also in the creation of Chinese literary categories by early modern Westerners.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Making Cold War Homes: The Politics of Domesticity in the US Military Occupation of Okinawa
Speaker: Mire Koikari, Associate Professor, Women's Studies, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Date: April 12, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: 554 Barrows Hall
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

image This presentation focuses on domestic reformism in US-occupied Okinawa where science-technical education, foreign aid, and military expansionism converged to turn Okinawan home into a crucial site of cold war politics in the 1950s and 1960s.

Initiated by American occupiers and pursued by home economists of Michigan State University, the University of Hawai'i, and the East-West Center, postwar domestic reform disseminated a series of discourses and practices concerning "modern" and "rational" home and homemaking, generating enthusiasm and excitement among Okinawan women amidst violent militarization of the island. As American women collaborated with home economists in mainland Japan and other regions in Asia and the Pacific, they created a transnational network of domestic experts whose movements crossed numerous borders and boundaries.

Drawing on the notion of domesticity as the "engine" of nation and empire building and utilizing archival materials available in Okinawa, Michigan, Hawai'i and Washington DC, the presentation illuminates how domesticity and militarism became intertwined with each other in Cold War Okinawa.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Power into Play: Guest Ritual and Tribute-Paying Dramas of the Qianlong Reign
Speaker: Liana Chen, East Asian Languages and Literatures, George Washington University
Date: April 12, 2012, 4-5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

image Theatre played an important role in the formation of court culture in Qing China. Performances associated with court activities took many forms, ranging from spectacular pageantries on the three-tiered theatres to small-scale performances in the private residences at the inner court. This presentation draws upon the archival materials of both Qing court theatre bureau and non-theatrical archives to examine the pedagogical role of theatrical performances in state-sponsored ceremonial events during the Qianlong reign. It explores the ways in which theatrical performances at the Qing court participated in the creation of an imperial self-image of benevolence and fulfilled the emperor's desire to project his power.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



After Three Gorges Dam: What Have We Learned? A Post-Project Assessment of the World's Largest Hydro Dam
Date: April 13–14, 2012, 9 a.m.-7 p.m.
Location: Wurster Hall, Room 112
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Dept. of Landscape Architecture & Environmental Planning, Civil and Environmental Engineering, Center of Global Metropolitan Studies, Chinese American Environmental Protection Association, ASCE San Francisco Section, Probe International, ESA, Pacific Environment

Three years ago the world's largest hydroelectric dam was completed at Three Gorges on the Yangtze, inundating a 700 km reservoir, and displacing at least 1.4 million people and potentially affecting the lives of 400 million people living downstream. Because of its social and environmental impacts the decision to build this project was bitterly contested within China.

China is now at a critical point in its development path. Over the last three decades it has invested heavily in large-scale infrastructure projects like the Three Gorges Dam, choosing rapid development as its priority. Now, as the long term environmental and social impacts and economic costs of this policy escalate, the Chinese government has started to acknowledge the need to address them.

On May 18, 2011, the State Council of the Chinese Government, chaired by Premier Wen Jiabao, issued a statement expressing the urgent need to solve problems caused by Three Gorges Dam's massive social, environmental, and public safety impacts. The Three Gorges Dam has become a test case of how, or whether, China can develop the appropriate planning, legal and economically accountable institutions to ensure future infrastructure projects promote environmentally sustainable growth.

This official statement has given credibility to the long-standing concerns of experts both within China and in other countries about the potential consequences of the world's largest megaproject. These scientists, engineers and economists have not previously had the opportunity to present their evaluations together in an open forum.

The intent of this symposium is to convene invited experts both from within China, and outside, who are knowledgeable on the planning and environmental assessments of large dams — particularly the Three Gorges Project; to share their evaluations of what anticipated and unanticipated project impacts have occurred, what future long-term impacts are likely to occur, and what actions can be undertaken to minimize adverse impacts. These ideas and analyses could help shape the debate both within China concerning its current massive investment in new hydro dams, as well as influence decisions on dams that China is involved with in other countries.

With its up-to-date information on new developments related to the Three Gorges, we anticipate this symposium will attract the interest of a range of participants, including professionals interested in water resources planning, scholars interested in China, media interested in science and development, and NGOs interested in the future of China's environmental policies.

Event Contact: Raymond.Wong@ghd.com, 650-867-3304

Click here to go to the conference website.



Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities
Conference/Symposium
Date: April 13, 2012, 2-5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

image This annual conference, which alternates between Berkeley and Stanford, brings together a keynote speaker and twelve graduate students to present innovative research on many aspects of modern Chinese cultural production in humanistic disciplines. This year's keynote speaker is Xiaobing Tang.

For more information visit the conference website.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321

 


On the Legacy of Socialist Visual Experience
Speaker: Xiaobing Tang, Comparative Literature, University of Michigan
Date: April 13, 2012, 4-5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

image One of the main resources for contemporary art in China has been the artistic products and practices from the socialist period, in particular the Cultural Revolution. In this presentation, Professor Xiaobing Tang will examine how the legacy of socialist visual experience has been constructed and kept relevant. Focusing on the different stages in the conceptual development of contemporary artist Wang Guangyi, he will explore the paradigmatic implications of a critical cultural identity that the artist claims from the socialist past.

This talk is the keynote speech for the Berkeley-Stanford Graduate Student Conference in Modern Chinese Humanities which begins Friday afternoon and continues on Saturday, from 10-4.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Professional Panel on Asia-related Careers
Panel Discussion
Date: April 16, 2012, 6-7:30 p.m.
Location: Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, Tan Oak Room (4th floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

The Group in Asian Studies will be hosting a professional panel on Asia-related careers. The purpose of the event is to showcase the diversity of career paths that students studying Asia can take.

Panelists will include professionals from the Foreign Service of the US Dept of State, Chinese Cultural Center of San Francisco, Asian Services in Action, Inc. and Institute of East Asian Studies. An audience Q&A will follow.

Event Contact: asianst@berkeley.edu, 510-642-0333



What Is China?
Speaker: Xin Liu, Professor, Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Date: April 17, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS)

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Towards Long-term Sustainability: In Response to the Fukushima Nuclear Disaster
Conference/Symposium
Date: April 20 – 21, 2012 every day
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies (CJS)

This symposium addresses questions that Japan is facing after the Great East Japan Earthquake of March 11, 2011, and the Fukushima nuclear accident. The first day of the symposium features three speakers, all of whom have been actively involved in analyzing the Fukushima nuclear plant accident, its historical context, and/or the sociopolitical actions taken by various stakeholders. The second day of the symposium expands the discussion to situate the causes and consequences of the earthquake disaster and Fukushima accident in the context of a long-term sustainable future. Not only did the disaster affect the earthquake and tsunami victims, but it also severely damaged distribution networks and made residents of the rest of Japan realize the vulnerability of our society. The breadth of the problems in contemporary Japan makes it clear that future sustainability is at risk beyond the islands.

Click here to view the conference website.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Xinjiang Memories: A Shanghai "Educated Youth" in Hami, 1956-1960
Speaker: Sun Jinyun, College of Foreign Languages, Xinjiang University
Introducer: Lynne Joiner
Date: April 23, 2012, 4-5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Growing up in a Cantonese family in Shanghai, Sun did not feel accepted in the community. She volunteered to go to Xinjiang in 1956 as a way to escape the political troubles of her father. She had left the city before she went to Hami. Now retired and in her 70s, Sun ended up spending her life in Xinjiang, including many years in Altai and Urumqi. She will talk about her early years and experiences in the Hami of the 50s.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Edible Origins: Finding Food, Symbols and Society in Early East Asia
Speaker:
 •  June-Jeong Lee, Anthropology, Seoul National University
Panelists:
 •  Lisa Janz, University of Arizona
 •  Seungki Kwak, University of Washington
Moderator and Panelist: Junko Habu, Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Date: April 23, 2012, 4:30-6:30 p.m. Location: Hearst Museum of Anthropology
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Hearst Museum of Anthropology, Department of Anthropology, Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Archaeological Research Facility, Academy of Korean Studies

Featured Speaker: June-Jeong Lee, Seoul National University
"Food Production in Korea: Its Socioeconomic and Symbolic Meaning"
The mysteries of Northeast Asia's prehistoric migration, exchange, and development are explored through an examination of when and how the first domesticated plants and animals were introduced to Korean peninsula. The adoption of first domesticates, such as rice and swine, was not only an economic breakthrough, but resonated across the realms of the social, political, and symbolic life of the community.

Panelist/Speaker: Junko Habu, University of California, Berkeley
"Jomon Food Diversity and Long-term Sustainability: Lessons from Prehistoric Japan"
This presentation focuses on the mechanisms of settlement growth and decline in complex hunter-gatherer societies of prehistoric Japan. Early and Middle Jomon (ca. 6000=4000 years ago) archaeological data from northern Japan indicate that the loss of food diversity and an expansion of the scale of society may have negatively affected long-term sustainability of prehistoric hunter-gatherer societies. Through an examination of this case study, it is argued that archaeology is critical in our understanding of long-term human-environmental interactions.

Panelist/Speaker: Lisa Janz, University of Arizona
"Dune-Dwellers: Post-Glacial Hunter-Gatherers and Early Herders in Mongolia"
New analysis of old archaeological collections from the Gobi Desert indicate that following the last Ice Age, between about 8000 to 3000 years ago, hunter-gatherers began to intensively occupy and exploit dune-field/wetland environments across the arid steppes and deserts of Northeast Asia. This oasis adaptation overlaps with the Early Bronze Age and the rise of nomadic pastoralism in Mongolia. Several intriguing clues suggest that dune-dwelling hunter-gatherers may also have been the first herders, raising questions about their relationship with neighbouring agriculturalist and pastoralist groups.

Panelist/Speaker: Seungki Kwak, University of Washington
"Tracing prehistoric subsistence: Application of Organic Geochemistry Analyses on Potsherds from Ancient Korean Peninsula"
This study attempts to understand prehistoric human subsistence in Korean peninsula using organic geochemistry analyses on potsherds. Organic geochemistry Analyses has contributed to archaeology in various cases including ceramic studies since its initial application. While other approaches are focusing on reconstructing the ancient pot function such as use-wear analysis and ethnographic studies, organic geochemistry analyses on archaeological ceramics endeavor to be precise about types of food groups that was cooked or stored within a pot by attempting to isolate and identify the specific organic compounds trapped in the fabric of its wall. Since organic compounds are often preserved in direct association with archaeological ceramics, organic geochemistry analyses have become an important method of investigation which archaeologists use to better understand the function of ceramic artifacts and local diets. If we conduct these analyses on the pottery from different locations, we will be able to understand past subsistence behaviors even in the absence of faunal or floral remains. The direct examination of the remains of resources in the Korean peninsula is limited to shell middens, because the high acidity of sediment does not allow long-term preservation of bone or plant remains. Therefore, organic geochemistry analyses could be the most suitable method in this setting. This research will provide a unique chance to understand ancient subsistence through the direct examination of potteries: the most wide-spread material culture in the prehistoric Korea.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Social Policy and Healthy Aging among Older Chinese Immigrants in the United States, Sweden, and Japan
Speaker:
 •  Kazumi Hoshino, IEAS Residential Faculty Fellow, CJS Visiting Scholar,
    UC Berkeley
Panelists:
 •  Andrew Scharlach, Kleiner Professor of Aging, School of Social Welfare,
    UC Berkeley
 •  Winston Tseng, Lecturer, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley
Date: April 24, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Presenter: Kazumi Hoshino, Ph.D. (IEAS Residential Faculty Fellow, CJS Visiting Scholar, UC Berkeley)
Social Policy and Healthy Aging Among Older Chinese Immigrants in the United States, Sweden, and Japan

Discussant 1: Andrew Scharlach, Ph.D. (Kleiner Professor of Aging, School of Social Welfare, UC Berkeley)
Social Policy and Healthy Aging in the United States, Sweden, and Japan

Discussant 2: Winston Tseng, Ph.D. (Lecturer, School of Public Health, UC Berkeley)
Global Chinese Immigration and Healthy Aging

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Shamans, Buddhists and Muslim Saints: The Layered History of the Desert Mazar
Speakers:
 •  Johan Elverskog, Southern Methodist University; Visiting Fellow, Stanford University
 •  Alexandre Papas, National Center for Scientific Research, Paris
 •  Rahile Dawut, Xinjiang University, China
 •  Sanjyot Mehendele, Vice-Chair Center for Buddhist Studies, Lecturer in Near
    Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley
Panelists:
 •  Beth Citron, Rubin Museum of Art
 •  Lisa Ross, Photographer
Date: April 24, 2012, 3-7 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

In conjunction with the exhibition in the IEAS Gallery, "Desert Mazar: Sacred Sites in Western China," a symposium on the historical and contemporary religious landscape of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region.

3:00-3:20 — Introduction
Sanjyot Mehendale, Vice Chair, Center for Buddhist Studies

3:20-4:00 — Framing the Desert Mazar: Exhibitions, Artists and Scholarship
Beth Citron (Assistant Curator, Rubin Museum of Art) and Lisa Ross (Artist/Photographer)

4:00-4:30 — Buddhist-Muslim Interaction in Mongol Inner Asia
Johan Elverskog, Visiting Fellow, Stanford University

4:30-4:40 — Coffee/Tea Break

4:40-5:10 — Sufis, Dervishes and Maddahs in the Mazars of East Turkestan
Alexandre Papas, National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS), Paris

5:10-5:40 — Mapping the Sacred Landscape: Uyghur Shrines in Xinjiang
Rahila Dawut, Xinjiang University, China

5:40-6:30 — Panel Discussion and Q&A
Chair, Sanjyot Mehendale

Event Contact: Sanjyot Mehendele, buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104



Cultural Geographies of 1960s Japan: Cinema, Music + Arts
Conference/Symposium
Date: April 26 – 27, 2012 every day
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Department of Music, Arts Research Center, Film Studies, Department of History of Art

image This workshop proposes to take the concerns of cultural geography as a model (or metaphor) for a way of thinking the landscape of art- and film-making in the 1960s Tokyo counterculture. By mapping the circulation of different forms of cinema, music, media and performance arts, the location of the different institutions that housed them, and the network of relations between the people involved, the workshop will enhance our understanding of intermediality in 1960s arts as a social and spatial, as well as textual, practice. The 1960s "counter-culture" must be taken at its word: as a relational term opposed to the commercial culture of high economic growth that also formed its condition of possibility. Combining the hermeneutic analysis of texts and art works with the recent emphasis on inter-medial connections and the analysis of spatial culture, the workshop aims to create a new perspective on the relation of avant-garde and mainstream culture.

Thursday, April 26
Doors open between 7:15 — 7:45 pm

7:30 pm: Welcome and keynote

Miryam Sas, Film&Media and Comparative Literature, UC Berkeley
Michael Raine, Film&Media and EALC, UC Berkeley

Kuroda Raiji (KuroDalaiJee), Fukuoka Asian Art Museum
The Substructure of Art Performance in 1960s Japan

Respondent: Julia Bryan-Wilson, Art History, UC Berkeley

Friday, April 27

10 am: Conceptualizing urban (film) space

Sharon Hayashi, York University
Archives and Archaeologies: Mapping the Social Space of 1960s Tokyo

Roland Domenig, University of Vienna
Don't stop! Keep moving on! — The kinetics of Shinjuku in 1969

Go Hirasawa, Meiji Gakuin University
Film as Group-Based Creation in the City Space called Shinjuku

Chair: Dan O'Neill, EALC, UC Berkeley

Noon: Presentation by Ann Adachi on film / video preservation in Japan
Followed by: Musical presentation with demonstration: Music for Electric Metronomes / Ichiyanagi Toshi
Yayoi Uno Everett, Emory University
Bonnie Wade, Music, UC Berkeley

1:00 pm: Break for lunch

2:30 pm: Media / Mediation

Yuriko Furuhata, McGill University
Techniques of Circulation: Expanded Cinema, Expo 70, and the Securitization of Urban Space

Shigeru Matsui, Tokyo University of the Arts
Tono Yoshiaki and TV Environment

Miki Kaneda, Music, UC Berkeley
Memories of Place: The Sogetsu Art Center and Experimental Music in Japan

Chair: Ted Mack, University of Washington

5 pm: Concluding round table

Opening remarks by:
Steven Ridgely, University of Wisconsin-Madison
William Marotti, UCLA
Justin Jesty, University of Washington

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156

Download the program here.



Memory and Community in Early Southern Song
Speaker: Stephen West, Department of Languages and Literatures, Arizona State University
Discussant: Mark Halperin, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Davis
Date: April 26, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

According to Li Chi (1928), the flood of refugees from North China during the Jurchen invasions was the largest single migration in Chinese history. The effects of that migration ranged from the influence of standard Central Plain dialect (汴洛 or 中原官話) on the dialect spoken in Hangzhou to a flood of text production that lamented the fall of the Northern Song. This talk will investigate how texts produced from, or attributed to memory, were instrumental in creating localized "imagined communities" of alienated and estranged refugees in and around Hangzhou. Such an investigation is meant to counter the post-Enlightenment impulse to identify such texts as mimetic representations of the objects, events, and people of the north that they describe and to further appropriate these localized voices into seamless narratives on the development of Chinese cities and their relationship to political change.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



"Strange Tales of the Electric Art": Hypnotism and the Literary Imagination in Early Twentieth-Century China
Speaker: Tie Xiao, CCS Postdoctoral Fellow
Discussant: Laurence Coderre, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Date: April 30, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

While now often written off as a "pseudo"-scientific hoax, the widespread engagement with hypnotism (cuimianshu) in early twentieth-century China was integral to what was most self-consciously "modern." Its early practitioners claimed to hold the miraculous cure for the spiritual and bodily ailments of the nation and positioned themselves as part of an enlightened vanguard. The diffusion of the imported psychological knowledge of somnambulism and thought-transference introduced such concepts as hallucination and divided consciousness that extended well beyond the boundaries of medical science and was intrinsically bound up with the contemporary preoccupation with new dimensions of subjectivity and interiority as well as the politics of awakening. This study traces the introduction and dissemination of the idea of induced hypnosis, and illustrates how hypnotism animated literary imaginations where its promise of cure and enlightenment was overshadowed by the anxieties about unconscious manipulation. By inquiring into what has been disregarded as irrational, this study explores where the boundaries of plausibility and implausibility, the normal and the pathological, were disputed.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Poetry (Shi): Screening of a South Korean Film by Lee Chang-dong
Speaker: Jinsoo An, Assistant Professor, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Date: May 1, 2012, 6 p.m. Location: Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

image South Korean film "Poetry" (Lee Chang-dong, 2010) is an exquisite portrayal of woman's brave fight against Alzheimer's, and against her guilt over her grandson's brutal crime. Mija, played by Yun Jung-hee, is an aging part-time maid and full-time guardian of her apathetic grandson. Concerned by her frequent forgetfulness, she takes a poetry class at the local arts center to sharpen her mind. She begins to appreciate the wonders of the natural world, but a schoolgirl's suicide initiates a chain of tragic events that will change her life forever. (Source: Kino International)

Note: This film will be screened in its entirety (139 min.) in Korean with English subtitles.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674

 


Petitioning Beijing: The High Tide of 2003-06
Speaker: Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Date: May 2, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Seminar Room
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Spatial Data Analysis with China Geo-Explorer
Speaker: Shuming Bao, China Data Center, University of Michigan
Date: May 3, 2012, 3 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, C.V. Starr East Asian Library

Within the last ten years, the UM China Data Center has made lots of efforts in the development and distribution of government statistics, Census data, and GIS data of China. Those information provide a rich source for the study of population, economy, social environment and their relative changes in China. It has been a challenge how to efficiently integrate those space-time data, provide methodology for different research targets, and promote their applications in different fields. This presentation will present some recent development of spatial intelligence technologies for spatial data integration, data analysis, as well as their applications for China studies. The presentation will introduce the newly developed spatial data explorer (China Geo-Explorer) as a joint effort by the University of Michigan China Data Center and Wuhan University. It will demonstrate how space-time data of different formats and sources can be integrated, visualized, analyzed and reported in a web based system. Some applications in population and regional development, disaster assessment, environment and health, cultural and religious studies, and household surveys will be discussed for China and global studies.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



China: The Age of Ambition
Speaker: Evan Osnos, China Correspondent, The New Yorker
Date: May 4, 2012, 5-7 p.m. — Note change in time
Location: 105 North Gate Hall
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Graduate School of Journalism, Institute of East Asian Studies

The speaker will examine how Chinese individuals are seeking to redefine their identities in ways that were not previously available to them.

Evan Osnos joined The New Yorker as a staff writer in 2008. He is the magazine's correspondent in China, where he has lived since 2005. His articles have focused on China's young neoconservatives, the rise and fall of a tycoon, the influx of African migrants, and the life of China's best boxer. Previously, he worked as the Beijing bureau chief of the Chicago Tribune, where he contributed to a series that won the 2008 Pulitzer Prize for investigative reporting. He has received the Asia Society's Osborn Elliott Prize for Excellence in Journalism on Asia (2007), the Livingston Award for Young Journalists (2006), and prizes from the Overseas Press Club (2007) and the Society of Professional Journalists (2006).

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Beyond Ideological Conflict: Political Incorporation of Buddhist Youth in the Early PRC
Speaker: Brooks Jessup, Assistant Professor, History, University of Minnesota, Morris
Date: May 9, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk is part of the IEAS Residential Research Fellows series of weekly presentations on current research. For the full schedule, see attached poster.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Inner Mongolia: Grassland, Desert, City, People
Panel Discussion
Moderator: You-tien Hsing, Geography, UC Berkeley
Date: May 18, 2012, 3-5 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

image Based on recent fieldwork, the panelists will explore the social and ecological issues in Inner Mongolia with the following focus:

  • Jerry Zee, Anthropology, Berkeley, "Governing Sand Storms with Science"
  • Yan Lu, environmental journalist, Beijing, "Commodifying Nature and Culture"
  • Kristen McDonald, Pacific Environment, San Francisco,"NGOs of Grassland Restoration in Gansu"
  • You-tien Hsing, Geography, Berkeley, "Territorializing the Border"

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



In the Shadow of Hiroshima: Childrens' Visions of Life
Multimedia Exhibit
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Dates: June 12–September 12, 2012, Monday through Friday, 9 a.m.–5 p.m.
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Japanese Studies

Image from the exhibit 'In the Shadow of Hiroshima: Childrens' Visions of Life' "In the Shadow of Hiroshima: Childrens' Visions of Life" is an exhibit that evokes war, horror, and devastation — with hardly a trace of any of these depicted in the works themselves.

"Hiroshima" is a city whose name is inextricably linked with the moment in August 1945 when it became the victim of the first atomic bomb attack. While the images of its destruction are widely known, less familiar is the tale of its survival and resilience.

Drawn within a couple of years of the bombing by children in Hiroshima, aged 7 to 12, the colorful pictures in this exhibition depict merriment and good cheer: schoolyard games, excursions into beautiful countrysides, flowers, city streets devoid of desolation. Only two children chose to depict the iconic dome at ground zero that caps the skeletal remains of the Hiroshima Prefectural Industrial Promotion Hall, the dome has become known world-wide as the symbol of Hiroshima and the atomic bombing. In the picture at right, the dome crowds the extreme left of the composition, just barely included and jostling with the other structural elements of the bustling city along the dominant blue swath of the river. In the picture at left, done by a boy then only recently arrived in the city from the U.S., the dome is the full focus of the composition. For the rest, the young artists chose to depict the things that matter to them: a dress, a doll, a car, a cap — things that might catch the interest of a child anywhere.

The pictures were sent to All Souls Church, Unitarian, in Washington, D.C. in the late 1940s by one of the two surviving schools in Hiroshima as a thank-you gift for aid they had received. A selection of fifteen of the pictures, and three picture facsimiles for originals too fragile to travel, comprise this exhibit. The entire collection held by All Souls Church can be viewed at http://www.hiroshimaschoolyard.com/.

In 2010, the pictures returned to Hiroshima for the first time, as part of a project seeking out those who had made them over sixty years before. The survivors were invited to attend an exhibit and ceremony at the annual August 6 atomic bombing anniversary observance in Hiroshima. A representative of All Souls Church has provided an account of the visit on one of the information panels. A documentary filmmaker covered the event and interviewed the survivors about their pictures, their lives, and their experiences as children growing up in Hiroshima. The film, "Pictures from a Hiroshima Schoolyard," will be screened on August 10 (see Public Programs, below).

Layers of uncertainty cloud our understanding of these pictures. The pictures were later given titles; these are not included here as they were not titles given to the works by the children themselves. Even the names of the children, written in English on each picture not by the children but by other hands, may be erroneously translated. For some of the artists, we have, thanks to the filmed interviews, the words of the adults they have now become as they look back over the decades at the children they once were, and sift through their memories of that time and place. For others, who could not be located or who have passed away, we can know little of their thoughts or intentions. Rather than pursuit of definitive answers, what this exhibit inspires is the quest for greater understanding of the larger picture of twentieth-century history, the dark context of the devastated city, and the confrontation with the realities of atomic power that have haunted society since that fateful day in August 1945.

The Institute of East Asian Studies gratefully acknowledges All Souls Church, Unitarian, in Washington D.C. for the generous loan of these pictures.

Public Programs:
August 10, 4:30 p.m.
145 Dwinelle Hall
UC Berkeley
Documentary Screening: "Pictures from a Hiroshima Schoolyard"
(Shizumi Shigeto Manale and Bryan Reichhardt, Producers)
Observance of the anniversary of the bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki
Sneak Preview of the film and discussion with writer-director Bryan Reichhardt
Moderated by Steven Vogel, Political Science, and Chair, Center for Japanese Studies, UC Berkeley

September 11, 4:00 p.m.
IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor
UC Berkeley
Lecture: "Hiroshima Maidens, Bikini Islanders, and Lucky Dragons: Contesting War Memories and Promoting Peace in Cold War Japan and the US"
Speaker: Elyssa Faison, History, University of Oklahoma
Moderated by Junko Habu, Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Closing Reception follows.

Sponsored by the Institute of East Asian Studies and the Center for Japanese Studies.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Bordering China: Modernity and Sustainability: A Conference Held in Conjunction with the Berkeley Summer Research Institute
Conference/Symposium
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Dates: August 3-4, 2012
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Schedule

Friday, August 3:

Keynote Address, introduced by Robert Weller
4:00-6:00 pm
Peter C. Perdue, "Ecologies of Empire: Qing Cosmopolitanism and Modern Nationalism"


Saturday, August 4:

9:00 am: Welcome Remarks

Panel 1: Production, Planning, and the Economics of China's Sustainability
Robert Weller, Chair
9:15-11:30 am:

  • Po-Yi Hung "Tea Forest in the Making: Tea Production and Reconfiguration of Modernity, Science and Nature on China's Southwest Frontier"
  • Alainna Thomas "From Bogota to Jinan — Understanding sustainable transport policy transfer in China"
  • Andrew Hao "The Temporalities of Corporate Sustainability Initiatives in Contemporary China"

  • Discussants: Martin Saxter and Victor Teo

Emerging Research at the Academia Sinica
Ts'ui-jung Liu, Chair
11:45-1:00 pm: featuring Dr. Shao-Hua Liu, Dr.Shiyung Michael Liu, and Dr. Chih-Chieh Tang

Panel 2: Borderlands and the Environment in the Qing Dynasty
You-tien Hsing, Chair
2:00-4:15 pm:

  • Peter Lavelle "Chinese Horticulture and the Politics of Reproduction along Late Qing Frontiers"
  • Benjamin Levey "Kinship and Captivity: The Jungar Diaspora"
  • Jonathan Schlesinger "Purity and the Qing Borderlands: Fur Depletion and Empire Building in the Early 19th Century"

  • Discussants: David Bello and Wen-hsin Yeh

Keynote Address 2, introduced by Wen-hsin Yeh
4:30-6:30 pm
Ruth Rogaski "Making Sense of a Mountain: Changbaishan, 1600 to the Present"

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809

Click here to download the Bordering China: Modernity and Sustainability Conference Schedule



Architecture.Energy.Japan.2012
Workshop
Locations: Wurster Hall, Various
Dates: August 5–10, 2012
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, Department of Architecture

Image from the workshop 'Architecture.Energy.Japan.2012' New conversations between practicing architects, engineers, construction firms, educators and researchers will explore design and simulation, regulation and policy, sustainable certification and utility and government programs as strategies for achieving a wiser use of energy resources without compromise of comfort or aesthetics.

Full program and registration form here.

Registration required: $40

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



"Japan: Another Lost Decade?": Architecture.Energy.2012
Speaker: Dr. Andrew Dewit, Rikkyo University, Tokyo, Japan
Lecture
Location: 112 Wurster Hall
Date: August 9, 2012, 5-6 p.m.
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, Department of Architecture

Dr. Andrew Dewit will outline the political economy of Japan's power policy in mid-2012. The Noda regime, backed by the Ministry of Finance and large banks, is attempting to return to the earlier status quo, which remains key to the business models of many extant utilities. However, smaller local governments and innovative capital are strongly incentivized in opposition and Japan's Ministry of Economy Trade + Industry is increasingly aware of a competing economic revolution based on biotech, information technology, and renewable energy. In coddling vested interests, Japan could forfeit its future.

Event Contact: cjs@berkeley.edu



Pictures from a Hiroshima Schoolyard
Speaker: Bryan Reichhardt, Director
Moderator: Keiko Yamanaka, Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley
Film — Documentary
Date: August 10, 2012, 4:30 p.m.
Location: 145 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Japanese Studies

"Pictures from a Hiroshima Schoolyard," a documentary about the children's pictures from Hiroshima, and the context of their creation. Selected pictures are on display in the exhibit "In the Shadow of Hiroshima" on view at the Institute of East Asian Studies. The film will presents war-torn Japan, and the experiences of the Japanese children (now in their late 70's) who drew these pictures. Through interviews and documentary footage of their lives today, these survivors will recount their own memories of the blast, the aftermath of the nuclear attack, school days during reconstruction and the gifts they received from America. The camera will follow them as they reunite with each other and finally with the pictures from their childhood over sixty years ago.

Further information about the film is available at http://www.hiroshimaschoolyard.com/.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Trends in Educational Attainment in China over the 20th Century
Speaker: Donald Treiman, Distinguished Professor of Sociology Emeritus, UCLA; Faculty Associate, California Center for Population Research, UCLA
Discussant: Julian Chow, School of Social Welfare, UC Berkeley
Colloquium
Date: August 31, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

Image from the colloquia 'Trends in Educational Attainment in China over the 20th Century' This paper first describes trends in educational attainment in China over the 20th century and then, using data from recent national probability sample surveys, considers how the process of educational attainment has varied over time. The speaker studies the role of political events, mainly the Cultural Revolution; the opportunity costs of education created by the Family Responsibility System; and trends in the gender gap and the rural-urban divide.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Histories of Nuclear Crisis in Korea, Opportunities for Northeast Asia's Peace?
Speaker: Jae-Jung Suh, The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University
Moderator: John Lie, Sociology, UC Berkeley and Chair, Center for Korean Studies
Lecture
Date: September 6, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

North Korea and the United States have been entangled in disputes, charges, and counter charges over the former's nuclear activities as they have been engaged in a flurry of diplomatic activities and even preparations for military actions. Broadly speaking, there are two crises over nuclear weapons in Korea: a 60 years crisis and a 20 years crisis. The former began during the Korean War and is not yet over, hatching the latter in the 1990s. I discuss these historical crises and present a theoretical model that explains not only these crises but also the three diplomatic efforts to resolve them peacefully: Geneva Agreed Framework of 1994, Perry Process of 1998-1999, and the Six Party Talks.

This lecture is part of a series "Continental Korea," placing Korea in historical East Asian context.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



The South China Sea and Re-Assessing Regional Order in Asia
Conference
Date: September 7–8, 2012, 10 a.m.-5 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

The seas of East and Southeast Asia have become a flashpoint in international relations among Asian nations. With China's growing political influence, its claims to territory, resources, and access have generated not only varying degrees of resistance and conflict, but a renegotiating of relations across the region and internationally. Most recently, the South China Sea has emerged as the site of contested space. With participants from the fields of international relations, political science, history, and law, this two-day conference explores the historical background of the South China Sea crisis; the legal issues involved, including interpreting the Law of the Sea in the current context; the South China Sea not only as a source of energy and food but in terms of strategic significance; the further complications posed by the uneasy thaw in relations between China and Taiwan; the play not only of government action but of public response; and finally what the current maneuvering signals for the future of Asia.

Go to http://ieas.berkeley.edu/southchinasea to view the conference website.

Participants include:

  • Richard Buxbaum, UC Berkeley
  • Lowell Dittmer, UC Berkeley
  • Penny Edwards, UC Berkeley
  • Donald K. Emmerson, Stanford University
  • Xing Hang, Brandeis University
  • Alexander Huang, Tamkang University
  • Su Lin Lewis, UC Berkeley
  • Chong-Pin Lin, Taiwan National Defense University
  • Micah Muscolino, Georgetown University
  • TJ Pempel, UC Berkeley
  • Ben Purser, University of Colorado
  • David Rosenberg, Middlebury College
  • Harry Scheiber, UC Berkeley
  • Dingli Shen, Fudan University, China
  • Yann-Huei Song, Academia Sinica
  • Jae-Jung Suh, Johns Hopkins University
  • Alex Wang, UC Berkeley
  • Litai Xue, Stanford University
  • Wen-Hsin Yeh, UC Berkeley

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Transnational Public Sphere? Historical Contentions and Dialogues in Northeast Asia
Speaker: Jae-Jung Suh, The Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies (SAIS), Johns Hopkins University
Lecture
Date: September 7, 2012, 3:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

This talk is part of a larger conference on Asian relations, "The South China Sea: Re-Assessing Regional Order in Asia." Time approximate.

President Myung-Bak Lee of Korea recently visited a small rock island and had a monument established there. This, and his demand that Japan's Emperor apologize for the past wrong doings during the colonial rule, irked many Japanese and led the Kan government to take a stern response. As a result, the bilateral relationship, which had seen some of the best days, quickly deteriorated to a low where the Japanese Ambassador was recalled. This is not an isolated incident in the region. Korea, Japan, and China have been entangled in various disputes and dialogues about their common past since the end of the Second World War. Rather than focusing exclusively on the recent example, I situate it in the post-war history of the region. I examine various incidents of historical contentions to assess whether these disputes condemn the region to a future of conflicts or whether they hold a future possibility of a transnational public sphere in Northeast Asia.

This lecture is part of a series "Continental Korea," placing Korea in historical East Asian context.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Bordering China: Interactions with Vietnam and Taiwan in the Late 19th and Early 20th Centuries
Lecture
Date: September 8, 12:15-1:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Two talks by UC Berkeley graduate students, described below, explore aspects of historical Chinese interactions with its neighbors at this brown bag luncheon session. Current UC Berkeley students can sign up for lunch by emailing ccary@berkeley.edu (space limited, first-come basis, deadline September 5).

Peiting C. Li"Crossing imperial and national boundaries: political and business networks of Taiwanese overseas in China, 1895-1945"
This paper looks at the movement of Taiwanese subjects of the Japanese empire between China and Taiwan during the early to mid-twentieth century. After becoming a Japanese colony in 1895, Taiwan residents had two years to decide whether to remain on Taiwan and become Japanese colonial citizens or return to China and become citizens of the Qing empire. A third category of classification were Japanese-registered colonial subjects in China, called Taiwan sekimin. Concentrated in southern China, these Taiwan sekimin played a role in expanding Japanese imperial influence in China. At the same time, Taiwanese sekimin also used Japanese colonial citizenship to their advantage in legal and business undertakings. After a brief survey of the Taiwan sekimin in southern China, I discuss a case study of one Taiwanese colonial subject active in southern China and Southeast Asia, Lin Xiongzheng (1888-1946). I argue that it was Lin's primary role as an investor that allowed him to successfully tap into both Japanese imperial and overseas Chinese business networks. While considering national and ethnic-centered frameworks for understanding overseas Chinese, this paper highlights the political and business networks of Taiwanese overseas in China, which crossed imperial and national boundaries in an increasingly cosmopolitan and integrated East Asia in the early to mid-twentieth century.

Linh D. VU"Allegiances and Patronage across the Late Nineteenth-Century Guangxi-Tonkin Border"
My research focuses on the intricate allegiances and patronage involving communities along the Sino-Vietnamese border in the late nineteenth century, highlighting the agency of local inhabitants. The narrative surrounds a mutiny of a Qing military officer of Guangxi in 1879. Due to the degeneration of the Qing Bannermen and Green Standards troops, the "brave brigade" system (yongying) was implemented, allowing officers to recruit subordinates from their hometowns and via kinship networks. Within post-Taiping politics, marginal characters gained access to legitimate avenues of social and political mobility by crossing the divide between bandits and soldiers, moving up the chain of command to positions normally reserved for military school graduates, and even obtaining positions usually held by successful candidates of civil service examinations. Such fluidity demonstrates the high level of local agency at a time of weak institutions, especially in the borderlands where government authorities fade. Through Qing and Nguyen court records, biographies, newspapers, and travelogues, I demonstrate that Sino-Vietnamese borderland communities were not passive entities acted upon by imperial or colonial powers. Rather, they readily adopted the roles of loyalists, collaborators, and resisters to the Qing, the Nguyen, or the French when their best interests were met. Ever-shifting allegiances of these seemingly marginal actors influenced the regional contours of the Sinitic tributary system and later the Western colonial order. This study on events at the end of the Qing dynasty questions whether local agency and borderland communities continue to matter in the era of a strong centralized state nowadays.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Bourgeois Decadence or Proletarian Pleasure? Women, Men, and Smoking in China across the 1949 Divide
Speaker: Carol Benedict, Professor, Edmund Walsh School of Foreign Service and the Department of History, Georgetown University
Discussant: Wen-hsin Yeh, Richard H. and Laurie C. Morrison Chair Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley
Colloquium
Date: September 10, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

Image from the colloquium 'Bourgeois Decadence or Proletarian Pleasure? Women, Men, and Smoking in China across the 1949 Divide' Cigarette smoking in China today is a highly gendered practice. With 301 million current smokers, China has the highest rate of cigarette consumption in the world. However, at present most Chinese smokers are men: about 53 percent of men over age fifteen smoke while only two percent of women do.

The stark differences in patterns of men and women's smoking behavior in China are often attributed to lingering cultural taboos against female smoking, generally assumed to have been in place for centuries. In fact, the masculinization of Chinese smoking is of fairly recent vintage, dating only from the mid-1900s. In the opening decades of the twentieth century, many Chinese women smoked tobacco but by 1949, smoking among women was in steep decline. In contrast, smoking prevalence among men remained consistently high across the entire century.

An essential aspect of the gendered history of smoking in China are changes in social and political norms across the 1949 divide that made smoking politically incorrect for women but not for men. In this presentation, I will discuss how and why female smoking in China came to be perceived as a bourgeois vice after 1949 while smoking among men was readily transformed into a legitimate proletarian pleasure.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Hiroshima Maidens and Lucky Dragons: Shaping Japan's Postwar Nuclear World
Speaker: Elyssa Faison, History, University of Oklahoma
Moderator: Junko Habu, Anthropology, UC Berkeley
Lecture
Date: September 11, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Japanese Studies

Image from the lecture 'Hiroshima Maidens and Lucky Dragons: Shaping Japan's Postwar Nuclear World' In 1953, President Dwight D. Eisenhower made his famous "Atoms for Peace" speech. In 1954 the U.S. conducted the atmospheric nuclear test code named "Castle Bravo" at Bikini Atoll in the Marshall Islands, inadvertently contaminating a nearby Japanese fishing trawler. Only three days later, the Japanese Diet approved its first budget for the development of nuclear power. Finally, in 1955 a group of twenty-five young female atomic bomb victims arrived at New York's Mount Sinai Hospital for a series of reconstructive surgeries. This paper will demonstrate how these transpacific events were part of a crucial moment in the development of two imbricated discourses, a scientific discourse and a discourse on peace and Japan's unique role in promoting it, and analyze how the masculinization of the discourse of "science" (in its nationalist frame) was closely tied to the feminization of narratives of "peace."

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Archaeological Reconstructions of Jomon Period Dwellings in Japan
Speaker: John Ertl, Associate Professor, Kanazawa University; Visiting Scholar, Center for Japanese Studies
Colloquium
Date: September 14, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), IEAS Conference Room
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Image from the colloquium 'Archaeological Reconstructions of Jomon Period Dwellings in Japan' This talk examines the practice of prehistoric architectural reconstruction in Japan. The pit house has become one of the most emblematic features of Jomon culture — perhaps second to cord-marked pottery — and hundreds of examples may be found at historical parks throughout the country. As such, these buildings are an essential aspect of the contemporary image of the Jomon period, but one that is only partially informed by the archaeological record. These reconstructions are considered archaeological interpretations, in that any one site or feature provides only limited information on the original shape, materials, and construction techniques. Evidence is thus drawn from a number of sources involving collaboration amongst specialists from fields including architecture, history, ethnology, engineering, and natural sciences. This talk centers on reconstructions at Goshono, a middle-Jomon period site unique for the discovery of burnt remains in 1997 that provided the first evidence of dirt-covered roofs on Jomon pit houses. The research and activities at Goshono are framed in this talk as representative of an increasing "diversity" of contexts in which archaeological knowledge is produced. Specifically, "diversity" is used to reference a broadening of interpretative strategies, the multiplicity of collaborators and audiences, and a sharp increase in the amount and types of data used in analyses.

John Ertl (PhD Cultural Anthropology, UCB) is an associate professor at Kanazawa University, Japan. He is a visiting scholar at the Center for Japanese Studies as a Japan Society for the Promotion of Science (JSPS) fellow. For the past year he has been conducting ethnographic research on the "production of archaeological knowledge" at the department of anthropology East Asian Archaeology Laboratory.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Ghosts of Premodern Korea: Haunting and Balancing the Cosmos
Speaker: Michael Pettid, Professor of Asian and Asian American Studies, Professor of Asian and Asian American Studies, Binghamton University
Colloquium
Date: September 17, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Conference Room
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies (CKS)

Mul Kwisin Given the significance of death to humans, an understanding of how societies conceive of death, the afterlife, and what might occur to the dead can reveal a great deal of how a given society understands its place within the cosmos. Particularly interesting are those beliefs concerning the condition of the dead after death; specifically, the nature and function of ghosts.

There are numerous accounts in the literature of the Koryŏ and early Chosŏn periods in Korea that feature encounters with ghosts or beings from beyond the human world. While these accounts can be sometimes humorous or frightening, a more important value is the insight they offer into the way that the peoples of these times understood death and the afterlife.

Narratives of ghosts can range from didactic tales that aim at altering the lifestyles of the living to those accounts that reveal social fears such as the retaliation of one who wrongly died. This talk will use period accounts from Koryŏ and early Chosŏn to examine how death was understood. This study will thus bring into relief the understandings of these peoples concerning death and the afterlife, and how this was reflected in the lives of the living.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Publicity-driven Government Accountability in China
Speaker: Greg Distelhorst, Ph.D. candidate, Political Science, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Colloquium
Date: September 18, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for 'Publicity-driven Government Accountability in China' colloquia This study shows how negative publicity (or the threat thereof) makes China's unelected officials more responsive to citizens. Between the news media and the activities of nonprofessional internet users, negligent or malfeasant officials in contemporary China are under threat of disclosure of their activities, which in turn leads to public opprobrium, arrested career advancement, and even criminal liability. To test the hypothesis that negative publicity is career-threatening, two groups of Chinese bureaucrats are targeted in a survey experiment. The experiment finds that bureaucrats perceive complaints from journalists to be more damaging to their careers than those of ordinary citizens or other social elites. By highlighting the role of top-down punishments, publicity-driven accountability shows how the bureaucratic discipline associated with effective authoritarian governance also provides a fulcrum for society to discipline officials from below.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Korea in the Cross-Fire: The War Photographs of John Rich
Exhibit - Photography
Date: September 19, 2012 - February 4, 2013
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

Image for 'Korea in the Cross-Fire: The War Photographs of John Rich' photography exhibit The year 2013 marks the sixtieth anniversary of the armistice that ended what we now commonly call "the Korean War." Seen as the first open conflict of the cold war, the Korean conflict pitted north against south as defined by the 38th parallel. Only a few short years after the end of world war, the Korean "proxy war" began. NATO forces, overwhelmingly American, engaged initially Korean, and ultimately Chinese, armies, in a conflict that raged northward and southward with a destructive power that ravaged the countryside and left enormous numbers of dead, destitute, and homeless.

Yet the Korean War is often referred to in the US as a "forgotten war," despite widespread coverage by the popular press. One of the photo-journalists documenting the war for American readership was John Rich, a veteran correspondent who had covered the Pacific War and Japanese occupation. Following the war in his images, through to the final days of armistice and withdrawal, Rich witnessed and captured with his lens both key moments of action by the highest officials and the daily life of the cities and countryside. Rich turned the unblinking eye of his camera on a people caught in the cross-fire of civil war.

This display comprises not the images he took for popular consumption but his personal photographs, revealing his vision of the conflict and destruction around him. The opening of this exhibit will be marked by a panel on the legacy of a divided Korea today, and will close in 2013 with a program exploring the regional and international origins of the Korean War.

Wednesday, September 19, 2:00 pm
IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, Sixth Floor, Berkeley
Panel: "Scarred Heritage: Achieving Peace and Reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula"

Thursday, January 31, 2013, 2:00 pm
IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, Sixth Floor, Berkeley
Panel: "The Origins of the Korean War in International Context"

IEAS and CKS gratefully acknowledge Seoul Selection for providing the pictures in this exhibition.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Scarred Heritage: Achieving Peace and Reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula
Speakers: T.J. Pempel, Jeong Gwan Lee, Bruce Cumings, Philip Yun, David Kang, David Straub, Victor Cha
Seminar
Date: September 19, 2012, 2-6 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Korean Studies, Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in San Francisco, Center for Chinese Studies

Image for 'Scarred Heritage: Achieving Peace and Reconciliation on the Korean Peninsula' seminar 2:00-2:15: Opening – T.J. Pempel (UC Berkeley)

2:15-2:30: Welcoming Remarks – Jeong Gwan Lee(Korean Consul General)

2:30-3:00: A Reexamination of Kim Daejung's Sunshine Policy and Its Aftermath – Bruce Cumings (University of Chicago)

3:00-3:30: North Korea's Diplomatic and Security Strategy – Philip Yun (Ploughshares Fund)
Since the death of Kim Jong Il, there has been significant media attention to unusual events in North Korea -- from the ouster of a high North Korean general to the new leader Kim Jong Un's TV appearance with Mickey Mouse. Are these harbingers of more changes to come? More significantly, what changes can we expect to the DPRK's approach to its diplomacy and strategy? Philip Yun will give his perspective, providing a brief overview of North Korea's approach to national security, outlining what shifts, if any, have occurred during the short tenure of Kim Jong Un, and finally offering a glimpse of what we might expect in the future.

3:30-4:00: Explaining China's Seemingly Irrational Support of North Korea – David Kang (University of Southern California)
China continues to support North Korea, much to the consternation and confusion of many outsider observers. Yet Chinese support of the DPRK is not really that surprising. Some have even gone so far as to call it a "Sunshine Policy with Chinese characteristics." This talk will explore China's views of the DPRK and suggest reasons both for Chinese support of North Korea, and why such support is unlikely to change in the near future.

4:00-4:30: A Principled Approach: U.S. Policy Toward the Korean Peninsula – David Straub (Stanford University)
Since the Korean War, U.S. policy toward the Korean Peninsula has been remarkably consistent. The United States has been a strong supporter of its treaty ally South Korea; toward North Korea, the United States has had little interest in anything but inducing it not to do certain things, especially not to develop nuclear weapons. Straub, a former career U.S. diplomat and Korea specialist now at Stanford, will explain the factors that have long shaped American policymakers' attitudes toward Korea — and that will likely continue to do so.

4:30-5:00: Korea and the Next Administration – Victor Cha (Georgetown University)
How will domestic-political change in the United States and in South Korea affect alliance relations? How will it affect policy towards North Korea? How will North Korea respond to the new administrations in Washington and Seoul? While there are no clear answers, there is a range of possible outcomes. Cha will discuss why this range is fairly narrowly defined by past policy failures, past experiences, and changing political climates in the U.S. and the ROK. There are, however, a number of hot button issues that could take relations on a difficult track.

5:00-5:45: Panel Discussion and Q&A Moderated by T.J. Pempel (UC Berkeley)

5:45-6:15: Reception (IEAS Lobby)

Sponsor: Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in San Francisco

Target audience: All Audiences

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Law, Politics and Society in Republican China
Conference
Dates: Friday, September 21, 2012, 3 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Saturday, September 22, 2012, 10:00 a.m. - 5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

Increasingly, issues of governance and state effectiveness are taking precedence over those concerning the seizure of power and the legitimacy of the state. Interactions between state and society are taking historical center stage, displacing old preoccupations with the social basis of political regimes and the class nature of power.

An emerging focus of recent Chinese scholarship concerns the use of law in politics and society. With the recent publication of the 16-volume Zhonghua minguo shi (History of the Republic of China), a rich empirical account of the major political events centering upon the regimes of the pre-1949 period, a major reference work has enriched the field.

At this conference, the chief editors of this work, Wang Chaoguang and Jin Yilin, together with other scholars from China, the U.S., and Europe, share recent Chinese and Western scholarship on Republican Chinese law, presenting work from both sides in comparative perspective.

Schedule:
Friday: 3:00 p.m. to 5:30 p.m.
Saturday: 10:00 a.m. to 5:30 p.m.

For conference details go to ieas.berkeley.edu/lawpoliticssociety.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Buddhist Nuns? The Workings of Initiation Rituals and Normative Texts in Their Historical and Local Contexts
Speaker: Ute Hüsken, University of Oslo, Norway
Lecture
Date: September 27, 2012, 5-6:30 p.m.
Location: 370 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for 'Buddhist Nuns? The Workings of Initiation Rituals and Normative Texts in Their Historical and Local Contexts' lecture Buddhism is often perceived and represented as a universal religion. At the same time, Buddhism always takes historically and locally specific forms. These forms emerge in close interaction with wider cultural and social norms and values. Contextual changes, the transfer of Buddhism from one context to another, and other dynamics often lead to conflicts and contradictions. Such conflicts challenge fundamental norms and values which are expressed in diverse canonical texts and also by contemporary representatives of Buddhist traditions. One of the most pressing contemporary challenges are the controversies over the ordination of women into the monastic community: Should women be allowed to formally lead the life of a Buddhist mendicant, become ordained nuns (bhikkhuni / bhikshuni) and be full-fledged members of the Sangha? In my presentation I will introduce some canonical textual traditions on the matter, discuss their contemporary interpretations and applications, and discuss the actual state-of-affairs in the Tibetan and Theravada traditions, interpreting the ordination as Buddhist nun as legal act and as a transformative rite de passage respectively.

Ute Hüsken is an Indian studies scholar and cultural anthropologist with PhD degree from Göttingen University (1996) and Habilitation from Heidelberg University (2002). Her main fields of expertise are Ritual Studies, Women in Buddhism, and South Indian Hindu traditions. Since 2007 she is Professor of Sanskrit at Oslo University, where she teaches courses on religion in South Asia, Sanskrit, Pali, ancient and contemporary Buddhism, Hinduism, and Jainism. Together with Ronald L. Grimes (Canada) she co-edits the Oxford Ritual Studies Series (OUP).

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104



Bargaining with Kinship: Chosonjok Migrant Mothers in the Age of Korea Wind
Speaker: Caren Freeman, Department of Anthropology, University of Virginia Colloquium
Date: September 28, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Korean Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Image for 'Bargaining with Kinship: Chosonjok Migrant Mothers in the Age of Korea Wind' colloquium The large-scale influx of Korean Chinese (or Chosonjok) migrants from northeastern China into South Korea in the last decades of the twentieth century conjures up images of formerly impassable Cold War borders suddenly rendered passable. Yet Chosonjok opportunities for mobility at this historical juncture were largely created by the migrants themselves and at great cost to their families and communities in northeastern China. Chosonjok mothers in particular became experts in manipulating the kinship categories sanctioned by South Korea's restrictive immigration laws. Arranging a "fake marriage" to a South Korean man, traveling in the guise of the mother of a married-out bride, and posing as a separated family member (isan kajok) in search of long-lost kin were all common ways of exploiting South Korea's kin-based policies.

While effective in circumventing the law, these acts of "faking kinship" generated a unique set of legal, moral and cultural dilemmas for migrant women and their family members. I will explore these dilemmas and chart the emergence of a new morality whereby kinship identities and relationships had become bargaining chips in a high-risk game of transnational mobility. As Chosonjok mothers contemplated the risks involved in wagering their marital relationships for an entree into the Korean labor market, they provoked moralizing discourses about the proper role of wives and mothers. I examine these discourses to see what they reveal about local norms of parenting and conjugal life. In contrast to findings in the literature on transnational motherhood in other parts of the world, the large-scale exodus of Chosonjok mothers posed the greatest challenge, not to existing models of maternity, but rather to models of matrimony.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Rural Roots of Reforms near Shanghai, c. 1971-1989 (Compared to Medial Entrepreneurship in Taiwan, Thailand, and Luzon)
Speaker: Lynn T. White, III, Woodrow Wilson School, Princeton University
Elvera Kwang Siam Lim Memorial Lecture
Date: October 3, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: Faculty Club, Heyns Room
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for 'Rural Roots of Reforms near Shanghai, c. 1971-1989' lecture "Green revolution" exploded near Shanghai during the late 1960s. By the early 1970s — long before 1978 — field mechanization justified local leaders to run rural factories; evidence of substantive "reforms" then is extensive for some rich parts of China. By the mid-1980s, these factories took most rural inputs; so socialist planning practically ended. Lynn will compare these changes near Shanghai with others in Taiwan and Thailand, and with usual non-growth in Luzon, showing that these cases were all politically and locally led (more than growth in Northeast Asia has been).

This lecture is the 2012 Elvera Kwang Siam Lim Memorial lecture. Learn more about Elvera Kwang Siam Lim here.

Click here for the downloadable notes on which the paper is based.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Fresh Insights into the Ancient Korean Past
Panel Discussion
Panelists:
 •  Mark Byington, Harvard University
 •  Jonathan Best, Wesleyan University
 •  Martin Bale, Yale University
 •  Jack Davey, UCLA
Moderator: Junko Habu, UC Berkeley
Date: October 5, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Berkeley City Club, 2315 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

Image for the 'Fresh Insights into the Ancient Korean Past' panel discussion Through the artistry and material culture of early craftspeople in what is now Korea, archaeologists are gaining insights into the development of the region into a socio-politically complex society. New and ever more significant discoveries are rewriting history, and changing scholars' understanding of relations within and across the civilizations of Northeast Asia.

This panel is part of a series "Continental Korea," placing Korea in historical East Asian context.

Presentations:

Martin T. BaleDaggers, Greenstone, and Burnished Vessels: Political Economy in Mumun Period Korea
An examination of material cultural elements of political economy can enable us to understand changes in the transformation of political and ritual landscapes in the southern Korean Peninsula and northern Kyushu in the transition from transegalitarian to incipiently socio-politically complex societies. The production and distribution of polished groundstone daggers and other prestige artefacts occurred as part of a nascent political economy in the Korean Mumun Period, c. 1500-300 BC, and in the Early Yayoi of Kyushu, c. 800/700-300 BC. I use several interconnected theoretical models to explore the interplay of exchange, culture change, and the materialisation of ideology in the construction of the meaning of groundstone daggers. The objects were a key part of mortuary culture for a millennium, and I argue that their meaning changed diachronically according to changes in local and regional social scales. In particular, competing elite actors altered their meaning in the name of the accumulation of social capital and used the production and distribution of the artefacts to build political power by attracting and maintaining supporters between 850 and 550 BC.

Jack DaveyMortuary Ritual and Political Identity in Iron Age Korea
Was the Korean Iron Age, defined here as lasting roughly 600 years (300 BC to 300 AD), just a precursor to the Three Kingdoms Period? Dramatic social change — characterized by increased but inconsistent contact with China, the coalescing of villages and towns into regional centers, and the extension of elite authority through control of emerging iron and ceramic production systems — indicates tthat Iron Age polities should be seen as more than simple developmental or incipient versions of the Three Kingdoms states (Koguryo, Paekche, Silla, and a number of smaller iron producing centers collectively referred to as Kaya). Archaeologically, this change is reflected most clearly in the mortuary record of the southern portion of the peninsula. Beginning in the first century BC, early wood-coffin pit graves are gradually replaced by large cemeteries of densely clustered wood-chambered tombs containing an abundance of iron and ceramic objects. These grow in scale until by the fourth century massive elite tombs dominate hillsides while sprawling necropolises that contained hundreds of lavishly equipped and more modest graves become the central features of emerging urban centers.

This talk introduces this somewhat neglected period of Korean prehistory through examination of two recently excavated cemeteries in the region and then assesses current theories of social and political organization through a close analysis of Chinese and Chinese imitation bronze mirrors interred as grave goods. While these objects have been extensively documented and analyzed as to their provenance and decoration, here attention is paid more to the positioning and ritual significance of mirrors in Korean tombs. The diversity of ways mirrors are placed in graves indicates the variable strategies local elites used to establish and maintain power in a period of social upheaval.

Jonathan BestGolden Finds from the Mirŭk-sa's Reliquary Chamber and Their Revisionist Implications for Paekche History
The Mirŭk-sa, the "Temple of Maitreya," was a magnificent Buddhist monastic center of unique and complex design that was constructed at the command of King Mu (r. 600–641) of Paekche in the second quarter of the seventh century, a time of incessant warfare on the Korean peninsula. The continuing archaeological investigation of the temple's site that was initiated in 1980 has yielded literally volumes of fresh data about the history of this major early Korean Buddhist site. Visually the most spectacular and arguably historically the most significant of the discoveries made at the site was the recent unearthing of the undisturbed reliquary chamber in the base of the temple's western pagoda. This presentation will focus on the significance of the chamber's golden contents in terms not only of art history, but also for the new light that they shed on Buddhism's political role in Paekche and on the traditional account of the Mirŭk-sa's founding preserved in the thirteenth-century Samguk yusa.

Mark ByingtonThe Lelang Census of 45 BC and Historical Geography in Northern Korea
Research on the history of the Korean peninsula prior to the fourth century has long been hindered by uncertainty as to the geographical locations of the principal towns, tribal centers, and geographical features that are named in historical texts. An example of this concerns the Han Chinese commandery of Lelang, which existed in the northern part of the Korean peninsula from 108 BC until the fourth century. While there has been some debate regarding the locations and extents of the commandery and its districts, the lack of hard data has allowed for little more than speculation in such debates. More recently, however, archaeological advances have begun to produce evidence for Han and indigenous occupations for the centuries associated with the commandery, and one discovery in particular — wooden tablets containing a census for Lelang dating to 45 BC — permits scholars to move ahead more confidently in the use of historical geography as a means to draw the historical map for the period of peninsular history, and leads to the solution of some long-standing problems in the history of this time and place.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



The Trial of Li Zhuang: Professionalism and Populism in China's Legal Reform
Speaker: Sida Liu, Sociology, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussant: Alex Wang, Boalt School of Law, UC Berkeley
Colloquium
Date: October 5, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the colloquium 'The Trial of Li Zhuang: Professionalism and Populism in China's Legal Reform' China's contemporary legal reform is characterized by the coexistence of two ideologies, professionalism and populism, in legal discourses and law practice. The conflicts between the two ideologies are best characterized in the trial of Li Zhuang during the anti-crime campaign in Chongqing in 2009-2011. In this case, the fate of an individual criminal defense lawyer was linked with the broadest legal policies and the highest-level political struggles in the Chinese state. By a scholarly analysis of the Li Zhuang case, this study demonstrates that, although populism remains an intimidating force in China's legal practice, professionalism has gained the support from a wider range of legal professionals, state officials, and the public through the media and professional mobilization.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



UC Berkeley Haas Junior Scholars Conference: Multi-disciplinary Interrogations of State and Society in China
Conference
Dates: October 6-7, 2012
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

The Haas Junior Scholars Program, in conjunction with the Institute of East Asian Studies at the University of California, Berkeley, is organizing a conference on changing state-society boundaries to be held on October 6th and 7th, 2012. The conference will bring together early-career China scholars from diverse disciplinary backgrounds to explore recent transformations of state power and authority; varying definitional frameworks for discussing the disaggregated Chinese state; and new interdisciplinary lenses to analyze China's multi-vocal society and state-encumbered market.

For conference details go to ieas.berkeley.edu/redrawingboundaries.

Event Contact: redrawingboundaries@berkeley.edu.



The Rise of Philanthropy and Support for Civil Society in China
Speaker: Anthony Spires, Sociology, Chinese University of Hong Kong
Colloquium
Date: October 8, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the colloquium 'The Rise of Philanthropy and Support for Civil Society in China' In the past two decades, the number of grassroots NGOs in China has grown dramatically. Yet most scholarship on Chinese civil society has had little to say about the resources they rely on for survival. In this talk we present the first large-scale study to map the landscape of these groups. We compare 263 NGOs across issue areas (including HIV, education, environment, and labor rights) and regions (Beijing, Guangdong, and Yunnan). We find these groups are tapping into high levels of human resources — volunteers, boards of directors, and informal government ties — even in the absence of official government approval for their activities. We also detail their sources of funding, revealing a diverse support system with clear regional and issue-based biases. Taken together, our findings form a baseline for understanding China's grassroots NGOs and point out new research questions that have yet to be addressed in the civil society literature.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Kizil to Koguryŏ: the Multi-cultural World of Han Architecture
Speaker: Nancy S. Steinhardt, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Pennsylvania
Moderator: Pat Berger, History of Art, UC Berkeley
Lecture
Date: October 9, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Korean Studies

Image for the lecture 'Kizil to Koguryŏ: the Multi-cultural World of Han Architecture' Koguryŏ is a North Asian empire that at its zenith in the 5th and 6th centuries spanned North Korea and parts of South Korea and Liaoning and Jilin provinces. The Kizil and Kumtura caves in the Kuche region lie in north central Xinjiang. The empire and the site flourished alongside the powerful Northern Wei dynasty (386-534) and more than a dozen Chinese and non-Chinese dynasties, kingdoms, and states in the fifth and sixth centuries. This lecture begins with an examination of Koguryŏ tombs, mountain-castles, and monasteries. It continues to demonstrate that the while the Koguryŏ tomb is in many ways indistinguishable from those of Northern Wei and the Chinese Southern Dynasties, and its mountain-castles are uniquely Koguryŏ structures, Koguryŏ monasteries are unique on the Korean peninsula and by comparison to China's earliest monasteries, but find compatibility in Japan's earliest Buddhist monasteries. Last, the lecture turns to the use of the octagon in Koguryŏ ground plans and ceiling construction. The purpose of eight-sided building plans in East Asia is explored. The ceilings, shared in Kizil and Koguryŏ tombs, will be shown to have sources in Han rock-carved architecture, and to be related to Dome of Heaven-type ceilings across the Asian continent.

Introduced by Pat Berger, History of Art, UC Berkeley.

This lecture is part of a series "Continental Korea," placing Korea in historical East Asian context.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



U.S.-Korea Relations in the "Pacific Century"
Speaker: Kathleen Stephens, Senior Associate, Institute for the Study of Diplomacy, Georgetown University
Colloquium
Date: October 12, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: Alumni House
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

Kathleen Stephens President Obama has declared U.S.-South Korean relations "stronger than ever," and opinion polls in both countries show broad public agreement that this is the case. This presentation will suggest factors that explain this much strengthened relationship, and discuss challenges both countries face in the region and beyond.

As a Peace Corps volunteer in South Korea in the 1970s, a political officer at the U.S. Embassy in Seoul in the 1980s, and returning as U.S. Ambassador to Korea, Foreign Service officer Kathleen Stephens saw firsthand South Korea's extraordinary economic development, its tumultuous but successful democratization, and its rise to a position of substantial regional and global influence. Ambassador Stephens will describe South Korea's journey, and reflect on U.S.-Korean relations over the years. She will also discuss U.S. policy toward North Korea.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674

Click here to view Ambassador Stephens' bio.



The Afterlife of a Material Object: The Mysterious Gold Seal of 57 C.E.
Speaker: Joshua A Fogel, Professor, Department of History, York University
Colloquium
Date: October 12, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies (IEAS), Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the lecture 'The Afterlife of a Material Object: The Mysterious Gold Seal of 57 C.E.' According to the Later Han History, in the year 57 the emperor presented an emissary from what is now Japan with a gold seal and accompanying cord. The seal promptly disappeared from history until 1784 when a farmer in Kyushu discovered it while repairing an irrigation ditch in his rice paddy. Since then over 350 books and articles have been written about the seal (roughly one inch square at the base). The historiography can be broken down into four waves represented by distinctive attributes, including the view that the seal is entirely bogus. The gold seal is the first material object to pass between representative governments of "China" and "Japan," and the first instances of Chinese characters making their way to the archipelago from the mainland. It now rests in permanent display in the Fukuoka City Museum.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Reading Texts on Their Own Terms: Two Talks on Early Medieval China
Speakers: Antje Richter, Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Colorado at Boulder
Matthias L. Richter, Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Colorado at Boulder
Colloquium
Date: October 15, 2012, 3-5 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

These two talks will focus on Chinese texts.

Antje Richter will speak on "Writing in Genres in Early Medieval China, or: What Makes a Letter a Letter?"
Chinese literary thought has always been expressed in different literary genres, from essay to rhapsody to poem to letter. This talk will address the generic differences between specialized prose writings about literature and personal correspondences about the same topic from early medieval China, the period of nascent explicit reflection about genres in China. The talk will focus on authors of whom we have both letters and non-epistolary texts about literary issues, in particular Cao Pi ("Lun wen" and various letters). To add to this comparative perspective, literary letters by a few other authors will be included as well, in particular texts by Cao Zhi, Shen Yue, John Keats, and Hugo von Hofmannsthal. Exploring how individual authors dealt with the specific potential of a genre, not only helps to illuminate genre features, but also reveals that writers differed considerably in their ability or inclination to exploit these features for their communicative ends.

Matthias L. Richter will speak on "Before Laozi became a Daoist"
Laozi has been much discussed as an exemplary composite text, compiled from heterogeneous short texts. It has also been noted that some of these short textual units in the Warring States Guodian counterparts are not yet quite as "Daoist" as the transmitted Laozi. Focusing on the early Han "Laozi" versions from Mawangdui, this talk will demonstrate two points: Firstly, the ideological homogenization of the originally independent short texts did not only take place during the accretion of the eighty-one chapters. The process of making Laozi more "Daoist" continued even after the text had already reached its full length. And secondly, close attention to the materiality of manuscripts is crucial for reading their text as it was meant in the past, instead of as we see it through the lens of later textual and philosophical history.

The two talks will be followed by a reading of some original texts.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Teach For China: Transforming Education in Rural China
Speaker: Andrea Pasinetti, Teach For China's Founder and CEO
Information Session
Date: October 16, 2012, 3-4:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the 'Teach For China: Transforming Education in Rural China' information session The speaker will address educational inequity in China and how Teach For China is addressing this critical issue. He will reflect on some of the challenges and successes of starting a non-profit in China, and share Teach For China's 50 year vision where all children in China will have equal access to a quality education. This organization takes a unique approach to eliminating educational inequity by enlisting the U.S. and China's most promising future leaders in the effort. Teach For China recruits, selects, trains and supports outstanding U.S. and Chinese graduates who work side-by-side to deliver an excellent education in under-resourced, rural Chinese communities.

For more information, please visit www.tfchina.org.

Application Deadlines: September 23, 2012; October 21, 2012; January 19, 2013; February 24, 2013.

Target audience: Students - Undergraduate

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321

Document the Recruitment flier here.



Prisoners' Rights in Japan: A Tale of Two Detention Bills
Speaker: Silvia Croydon, Assistant Professor, Graduate School of Law, Kyoto University
Colloquium
Date: October 16, 2012, 4:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Image for the 'Prisoners' Rights in Japan: A Tale of Two Detention Bills' colloquium; photo: Associated Press Japan's prison system is one of the most orderly in the world. Within it, incidents of homicide or serious injury to prison staff and inmates rarely happen. In each of the years from 1998 to 2005, for example, there were no more than two reported assaults on prison staff and 15 inmate-on-inmate attacks across the entire network of Japanese prisons, which consists of an inmate population of approximately 60,000-70,000. Maintaining such an environment is something that the Japanese Ministry of Justice is extremely proud about. Some have suggested, however, that this order and safety comes at the price of violating the inmates' basic rights. With a view to making the debate on Japan's prison policies more informed, this talk will offer an empirical examination of the processes through which the concerns for safety and security in Japan are balanced against efforts to protect the rights of inmates.

Silvia Croydon is a Fellow at the Hakubi Centre for Advanced Research and an Assistant Professor at the Graduate School of Law at Kyōto University, where she is examining the prospects for the Association of Southeast Asian Nations and the Asia Pacific Forum of National Human Rights Institutions to fill the existing gap in Asia with regards to a regional human rights mechanism. Prior to this, she undertook a two-year Japan Society for the Promotion of Science Post-doctoral Research Fellowship at the University of Tōkyō's Graduate School of Law and Politics, during which she studied the introduction of the quasi-jury system (saiban'in seido) in Japan as well as similar policy moves in other East Asian countries. Silvia's doctorate, obtained in 2010 from the Faculty of Oriental Studies at the University of Oxford, dealt with Japan's criminal justice system.

(Photo: Associated Press)

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



A Contested Borderland: Korean Migrants, Confused Identities, and Passports in the Russian Far East, 1880-1910
Speaker: Alyssa Park, Assistant Professor of History, University of Iowa
Colloquium
Date: October 19, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for the 'A Contested Borderland: Korean Migrants, Confused Identities, and Passports in the Russian Far East, 1880-1910' colloquium This talk addresses the jurisdictional contests over Koreans in the Russian Far East at the turn of the 20th century. After the Russians acquired a new boundary with Korea in 1860, the former military buffer zone was transformed into a porous borderland where disparate peoples, economies, and ideas coexisted and contended with each other. Thousands of Koreans migrated to the Russian Far East and became one of the largest ethnic groups there. Their movement spurred a flurry of debates between border officials of Chosôn Korea and Russia about the ambiguous subjecthood of Koreans abroad. This talk examines local debates about the legal status of Koreans by situating them within global context of "hardening" national borders, prevalence of passports, and discourse about aliens and subjects.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Countering the Counter-Power: The Political Effects of Internet Rumors and Rumor Rebuttals in China
Speaker: Haifeng Huang, Political Science, University of California, Merced
Discussant: Anne Meng, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Colloquium
Date: October 22, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the 'Countering the Counter-Power: The Political Effects of Internet Rumors and Rumor Rebuttals in China' colloquium Rumors exist in almost every society but can be particularly prevalent in authoritarian countries, partly due to the lack of authoritative information sources in such countries. The rise of the internet and especially social media has significantly increased the speed and breadth with which rumors can circulate among the population. While anecdotal evidences have suggested that rumors can spark or intensify social protests, currently little is known about their influences on citizens' trust and evaluation of the government, and the effects of official efforts to dispel rumors. China, with her vibrant Internet community and significant visibility of online rumors and the authorities' anti-rumor efforts, offers an ideal environment to examine these issues. In this project I experimentally investigate if and how internet rumors influence people's attitudes toward the government, and whether the authorities can effectively combat rumors.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



The U.S.-Japan Relationship and Global Social Innovation
Speaker: Toshiya Hoshino, Professor, Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), Osaka University
Discussant: T.J. Pempel, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Colloquium
Date: October 24, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies (CJS), Osaka University San Francisco Center for Education and Research

Image for 'The U.S.-Japan Relationship and Global Social Innovation' colloquium In this talk, Professor Hoshino will contrast two world-views, a state-centric perspective based on national sovereignty and power rivalry among states and a more solidarist perspective on resolving common global problems. He contends that we stand at a crossroads in our understanding of how to build a sustainable future world order. Close bilateral relations between the United States and Japan, based on the security alliance plus common values and interests, can provide public goods to maintain a balance of power in Asia, spur technological innovation, and promote a more just world order.

Toshiya Hoshino is presently a Professor at Osaka School of International Public Policy (OSIPP), Osaka University. From August 2006 to August 2008, he served as a Minister-Counselor in charge of political affairs at the Permanent Mission of Japan to the United Nations (UN). At the UN, he was a principal advisor to the Chair of the UN Peacebuilding Commission (PBC) when Japan assumed its Chairmanship.

He is a specialist in UN peace and security policies (conflict prevention, peacemaking, peacekeeping, and peacebuilding), human security and humanitarian issues, security in the Asia-Pacific region, and Japan-U.S. relations.

He graduated from Sophia University, Tokyo, completed a Master's at the University of Tokyo, and Doctorate (Ph.D.) from Osaka University.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Contemporary Conversations between Buddhism and Science
Speaker/Performer: David E. Presti, University of California, Berkeley
Colloquium
Date: October 25, 2012, 5-6:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for 'Contemporary Conversations between Buddhism and Science' colloquium Back in the 1980s, the Dalai Lama offered the suggestion that a dialogue between Buddhist contemplatives and Western scientists interested in the nature of mind might lead to new ideas and be of benefit to both Buddhist and scientific communities. This dialogue has grown to become a nearly annual event between the Dalai Lama and various scientists and educators. As part of enlarging this conversation, educational programs are evolving in which Tibetan monks and nuns engage in the study of science. While the dialogue between Buddhism and science has opened up interesting new arenas of investigation, certain topics of potential great import remain unaddressed. These include deep questions about the nature of consciousness and the limitations of Western science, as it is conventionally practiced, to address such questions.

David Presti has taught neurobiology and cognitive science at the University ofCalifornia in Berkeley for 22 years. For the past 8 years, he has also been teaching neuroscience to Tibetan Buddhist monastics in India. His educational background is in physics, molecular biology, and psychology, and his primary research interest is in the connection between mental experience and brain-body physiology, the so-called mind-body problem.

Open to all audiences

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104

Download the Buddhism and Science Flyer here.



Sources of Shang History: New Discoveries and Advances in Chinese Archaeology and Paleography: A Symposium in Honor of the 80th Birthday of David N. Keightley
Conference/Symposium
Dates: October 26-27, 2012, 1 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

This symsposium honors the 80th birthday of one of the greatest scholars in the field of Chinese Oracle bones, Professor Emeritus David N. Keightley. Scholars will come together to present a selection of new work in the field of oracle bones, and assess the legendary work of Professor Keightley.

For more information visit the conference website here.

Event Contact: Caverlee Cary, Assistant Director for Program Planning, ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



"The Mystery of the Century": Buddhist Lay Monk Villages (Jaegaseung burak) Near Korea's Northernmost Border, 1600s to 1960s
Speaker: Hwansoo Kim, Department of Religion and the Asian and Middle Eastern Studies Department
Moderator: Eunsu Cho, Visiting Professor, International and Area Studies Teaching Program, UC Berkeley
Lecture
Date: October 30, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for 'The Mystery of the Century: Buddhist Lay Monk Villages (Jaegaseung burak) Near Korea's Northernmost Border, 1600s to 1960s' colloquium A Japanese newspaper editorial from 1930s colonial Korea characterized the isolated villages of married Buddhist monks spread across the northern border between Korea and China as "the mystery of the century." These lay monk villages (K. jaegaseung burak or Jp. zaikesô buraku) existed from the seventeenth century until the 1960s. The males in these villages shaved their heads and had wives and children, and their households ranged in number from thousands to tens of thousands at their peak. These lay monks and their families comprised the descendents of the Jurchens, an ethnic group from northern China who migrated to Korea and later mixed with Koreans.

In this presentation, based on previous scholarship and on untapped primary sources, I would like to take up two questions. First, how did these villagers come to take on a monastic identity (or, at minimum, the appellation)? Second, how should we understand the history of these communities within the context of Korean Buddhism? While scholars conventionally understanding the origin of this monastic identity as coincidental and unauthentic, I argue that Korean monks fleeing or relocating as a result of Joseon Korea's anti-Buddhist policies perhaps contributed to the formation of a monastic identity of the males in these villages. Finally, I will address how the Neo-Confucian Joseon dynasty, imperial Japan, and North Korean authorities politicized these communities for their own purposes.

This lecture is part of a series "Continental Korea," placing Korea in historical East Asian context.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Buddhism, Becker and Social Violence: Toward a Buddhist Critical Social Theory
Speaker/Performer: William Waldron, Middlebury College
Colloquium
Date: November 1, 2012, 5-6:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for 'Buddhism, Becker and Social Violence: Toward a Buddhist Critical Social Theory' colloquium In Escape from Evil, Ernest Becker famously declared that "evil comes from man's urge to heroic victory over evil." He argues that is it our vain attempt — driven by hope, fear and ignorance — to forge unchanging personal and social identities that ends up making "the earth an even more eager graveyard than it naturally is." Indian Buddhist thought similarly suggests that it is our attempt to turn reality on its head (viparyāsa) — to find satisfaction, permanence, and personal identity in a world characterized by its opposites — that ends up making more, not less, suffering and unhappiness. Buddhist thought, though, has not typically directed its trenchant analysis toward the dreadful dynamics of social and political life, leaving modern Buddhists bereft of a critical social theory. This talk suggests such an approach by interweaving ideas from traditional Buddhism, Ernest Becker and the natural and social sciences.

William Waldron teaches courses on Buddhism, Buddhist Philosophy, and the Study of Religion at Middlebury College. He received his B.A. in South Asian Studies and Ph. D. in Buddhist Studies from the University of Wisconsin, after working with native scholars in India, Nepal and Japan. His research focuses on the Yogācāra school of Indian Buddhism. He has published a monograph on the 'store-house consciousness' (ālaya-vijñāna) (The Buddhist Unconscious) and numerous articles on Buddhist philosophy of mind in dialogue with modern philosophy and cognitive science.

Open to all audiences

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510-643-5104

Download the event flyer here.



'Believing' (信) in Song China: Evidence from the Longshu jingtu wen (龍舒淨土文) and Other Sources
Speaker: Robert P.W. Hymes, Department of East Asian Languages and Cultures, Columbia University
Discussant: Nicolas Tackett, Department of History, UC Berkeley
Colloquium
Date: November 2, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

The position of the field of Chinese religion on the notion of "belief" seems unclear or unsettled. Both Talal Asad's work and the "orthodoxy/orthopraxy" debate growing out of James Watson's proposal have left at least part of the field inclined to the position that "belief" and "believing" are not central to Chinese religion, or even that there is a sort of "West = belief" / "China = practice" dichotomy. Ongoing work on a translation of the Longshu jingtu wen has brought the speaker back to the question of "believing" (xin 信) in the Song dynasty, and he will offer an empirical approach to the question based on that work and other sources.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Listening to Films: Radio and Communal Film Culture in 1970s China
Speaker: Nicole Huang, Professor of Chinese Literature and Visual Culture, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Discussant: Weihong Bao, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Colloquium
Date: November 5, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

Image for 'Listening to Films: Radio and Communal Film Culture in 1970s China' colloquium The study engages the interface between the visual and the auditory in late Mao China. The focus is on the cinematic soundtracks of a handful of films, including model opera films and feature films from the period, that were edited specifically for the purpose of radio broadcasting. Coined as "edited film recording," this made-for-radio sonic compilation would retain much of the music and dialogues straight from the original track, complemented by a voice-over narrator that supplies backgrounds, settings, and connections among different scenes and figures to a broad audience. Film literacy thus could be achieved without an actual access to the film products themselves. The hybridity of the genre created an illusion of broader and equal access to the symbolic order of a socialist visual culture. While communal life in 1970s China can be characterized by an infatuation with film and film culture, a web of other media, particularly those of sound, facilitated this fascination. The 'grey period' of China's 1970s could then be seen as a decade of cross-platform saturation of media culture.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



The Rise of China and Japan-South Korea Relations: Potentials vs. Obstacles
Speaker: Yoshihide Soeya, Professor of Political Science, Faculty of Law, Keio University Colloquium
Date: November 6, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Korean Studies

Image for 'The Rise of China and Japan-South Korea Relations: Potentials vs. Obstacles' colloquium The spectacular rise of China gives rise to two divergent trends of the time. For one thing, the rise of China is the result of China pursuing open door and reform policies within the liberal international order where Japan, as well as South Korea in more recent years, has had an important role to play. At the same time, however, "the China-centric nationalism" seems to be on the rise as well, explicit in its assertion of territorial claims dating back into "ancient times" of Chinese domination, implying a paradigm clash with the liberal international order. How should Japan and South Korea cope with these apparently contradictory realities associated with the rise of China?

Yoshihide Soeya is a Professor of Political Science in the Faculty of Law and the Director of the Institute of East Asian Studies at Keio University. He is the author of Nihon no "midoru pawa" gaiko (Chikuma Shinsho, 2005), and most recently co-edited Japan as a 'Normal Country'?: A Country in Search of its Place in the World (University of Toronto Press, 2011). He received his PhD from the University of Michigan.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Take It Personally: A Certain Tendency in Chinese Independent Documentary
Speaker: Qi Wang, Film Studies, Georgia Tech
Colloquium
Date: November 7, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the 'Take It Personally: A Certain Tendency in Chinese Independent Documentary' colloquium For over two decades, Chinese independent documentaries have gained wide respect for their archiving of alternative social realities that are still regularly excluded from representation in official media. In contrast to the prevalent and much discussed verité practice that contributes impressively to such alternative documentation by way of a cool, "objective" observation of a given phenomenon, the speaker distills an initially neglected line of "personal documentary" and explore its exercise of a subjectively-driven intervention in historical thinking through the moving image. She will delineate the formal features as well as theoretical implications of this extraordinary practice and support her discussion with various examples that range from "I Have Graduated" (dir. Wang Guangli, 1993), "West of the Tracks" (dir. Wang Bing, 2003), the oeuvres of Wu Wenguang to some of the newest works.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



Colonial Modernity in Question: Hollywood Movies and Gender Discourse in Wartime Colonial Korea, 1931-1945
Speaker: Yumi Moon, Assistant Professor of History, Stanford University
Colloquium
Date: November 8, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for the 'Colonial Modernity in Question: Hollywood Movies and Gender Discourse in Wartime Colonial Korea, 1931-1945' colloquium U.S. films were the major medium through which Koreans perceived America during Japanese colonial rule (1910–45). In the past few decades, the paradigm of "colonial modernity" has provided a dominant frame within which to interpret Korea's transformation under Japan's colonial rule. Does this concept offer a relevant framework for characterizing cultural and ideological changes that occurred in colonial Korea? Yumi Moon investigates the popularity of American movies during wartime colonial Korea (1931–40) and the different reception of American movies by Korean versus Japanese consumers. She surveys the articles on movies and gender in Chosôn Ilbo, the Korean daily newspaper, and Keijō Nippo, the major newspaper for Japanese settlers, and traces the influence of American films on the gender discourse in colonial Korea. Through this survey, she suggests that the Korean discourse of "New Women," the epitome of modernity in colonial Korea, had separate origins from the Japanese settler discourse of women.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674

 


Haiku for China? Zhou Zuoren's Interest in Modern Japanese Poetry
Speaker: Frederik Green, San Francisco State University
Lecture
Date: November 9, 2012, 12-1 p.m.
Location: EALC Library, 287 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Japanese Studies

Image for the 'Haiku for China? Zhou Zuoren's Interest in Modern Japanese Poetry' lecture This talk will explore the influence modern Japanese poetry exerted on Zhou Zuoren, one of the most significant Chinese writers, critics, and translators of the first part of the twentieth century, as well as its impact on modern Chinese culture as mediated through Zhou. By analyzing Zhou's translation activities, his critical essays on modern Japanese poesy, and his own Japanese-language verse, this talk seeks to comment on the importance of Japan's modern poetry on the development of certain aspects central to Chinese modernity, namely vernacularization and the making of a new Chinese poetic voice. Focusing mainly on two distinct genres, Japanese free verse poetry and the Japanese short lyric, haiku and tanka in particular, this talk explores the liberating effects translation and linguistic migration had on Zhou and comments on the degree to which Zhou understood modern Japanese poetry to be conducive to modern poetic sensibilities.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



A Martyr's Grievance: Flesh as Burden in the Prison Letters of Lutgarde Yi Suni (1782-1801)
Speaker/Performer: Deberniere Torrey, University of Utah
Colloquium
Date: November 9, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for the 'A Martyr's Grievance: Flesh as Burden in the Prison Letters of Lutgarde Yi Suni (1782-1801)' colloquium In 1801, hundreds of Korean Catholics were executed for engaging in religious activity not sanctioned by the Chosôn state. Yi Suni, a young female Catholic awaiting execution, wrote two letters from prison. These letters reveal Yi's identity as positioned between Korean tradition and the Catholic worldview. Yi's letters articulate the standard modes of formality, advice-giving, and filial piety typical of women's writing in late Chosôn Korea, while also revealing that her Catholic identity allows her to transcend certain gender-based boundaries. Yet this new identity brings its own burden. When Yi's letters are examined against the motif of han (suffering, grievance) characterizing a subgenre of Chosôn women's writing, we find that the new burden remains subtextualized rather than articulated. This qualifies the common perception that Catholicism was a liberating force for late Chosôn women. At the same time, Yi's new identity, even with its unacknowledged burden, gives her a uniquely self-conscious voice.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Women's Activism and Post-3.11 Japan
Panelists:
 •  Yasuo Goto, Fukushima University
 •  Nobuyo Goto, Fukushima Medical University
 •  Hiroko Aihara, Freelance Journalist, Fukushima
 •  Ayumi Kinezuka, Shizuoka Family Farmers Movement
 •  Hisae Ogawa, Codepink Osaka
Date: November 13, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Image for the 'Women's Activism and Post-3.11 Japan' panel discussion Keynote Presentation
Women and Youth Leading the Grassroots Movements in Post-3.11 Japan
Yasuo Goto, Fukushima University
Nobuyo Goto, Fukushima Medical University

Post-3.11, many activist movements emerged from numerous corners of Japan. Some describe this as the beginning of a new type of civil movement and democracy, as many of the activists are youths and women, widely utilizing the internet to promote their cause. However, large media outlets have not captured their efforts for the world to see; therefore, this talk will address the women involved in these "untold reform movements" among Japanese society.

Fall of Mainstream Media and Rise of Citizen Centered Independent Media
Hiroko Aihara, Freelance Journalist, Fukushima

Fight Against Radiation Contamination as a Family Farmer in Solidarity with Consumers
Ayumi Kinezuka, Shizuoka Family Farmers Movement

Grassroots Women's Actions for Peace and a Nuclear Free World
Hisae Ogawa, Codepink Osaka

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Constructing "Home" in Transnational Spaces: The Case of Japanese-Pakistani Muslim Families
Speaker: Masako Kudo, Associate Professor, Cultural Anthropology, Kyoto Women's University
Colloquium
Date: November 16, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: 554 Barrows Hall, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, Center for South Asia Studies

This presentation explores the ways in which the lives of Japanese-Pakistani Muslim families expand across national boundaries as their life-cycles evolve. This type of family increased in number following the influx of Pakistani labor migrants to Japan in the late 1980s. Upon marriage to Pakistani men, the vast majority of the Japanese spouses converted to Islam, and consequently, religion became one of the main factors that affected the process of family making.

Besides examining the changes that took place after marriage, this presentation will also focus on the recent tendency for these mixed households to cross national boundaries as the offspring grow up, namely, the pattern where the Japanese wives and the children relocate to Pakistan or to a third country, leaving their migrant husbands behind in Japan. What are the motives behind this transnational dispersal of the family, and how is such a move made possible? Furthermore, what are the limitations and possibilities involved in the transnational practices? By using longitudinal data obtained through in-depth interviews with a number of Japanese spouses, this presentation aims to illustrate the complex dynamics involved in family making in this type of newly emerging cross-border marriage in contemporary Japan.

Masako Kudo is associate professor of Cultural Anthropology at Kyoto Women's University. She obtained her B.A. degree from Sophia University, M.Sc. degree from the University of Edinburgh, and M.A. and Ph.D degrees from the University of Tokyo. Her major publications include Ekkyo no Jinruigaku: Zainichi Pakisutan-jin Musulimu Imin no Tsuma-tachi (An Anthropology of Border-Crossing in Japan: Japanese Wives of Pakistan Muslim Migrants) (in Japanese), 2008, University of Tokyo Press; "Becoming the Other in One's Own Homeland?: The Processes of Self-construction among Japanese Muslim Women," Japanese Review of Cultural Anthropology, Vol 8 (2008); and "Pakistani Husbands, Japanese Wives: A New Presence in Tokyo and Beyond," Asian Anthropology, Vol.8 (2009). She has conducted research among Japanese women married to Pakistani Muslim migrants in Japan and abroad. More recently, her research extended to the UK where she has studied the changing socioeconomic status and identity issues of British women with Pakistani backgrounds.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510-642-3156



Berkeley China Forum 2012: China in Transition
Featured Speakers: Lowell Dittmer, Professor, Political Science, UCB
Katie Quan, Associate Chair, Institute for Research and Labor and Employment
Jack Jia, Chairman and CEO, Baynote, Inc; Partner, GSR Ventures
Conference/Symposium
Date: November 18, 2012, 9:30 a.m.-6:30 p.m.
Location: Martin Luther King Jr. Student Union, East Pauley Ballroom
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Berkeley China Forum, a "TED TALK" about China, is a non-profit organization that creates a platform for people to discuss opportunities and challenges that China faces. Topics include Technology Innovation, Economic Transformation, Clean Energy, Social Entrepreneurship and Public Opinion.

For more information: BerkeleyChinaForum.org
To register: BerkeleyChinaForum.eventbrite.com

Panels:

  • Entrepreneurship and Technology Innovation
  • Clean Energy, Green Technology and Sustainable Development
  • Economic Transformation Following Globalization
  • Social Entrepreneurship and the Responsibility of Youth
  • Public Opinion and China from Different Perspectives

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321



China, Taiwan, and Maritime Sovereignty in Asia
Panel Discussion
Date: November 29, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Taipei Economic and Cultural Office in San Francisco, Center for Chinese Studies

Territorial disputes between China and Taiwan, Japan, and Southeast Asia have heightened regional and global tensions.

Three experts on maritime disputes will discuss the current issues, the outlook for China's new leadership, and prospects for a peaceful resolution.

Moderated by Lowell Dittmer, Political Science, UC Berkeley.

Panelists:

  • Edward I–Hsin Chen — Professor in the Graduate Institute of Americas (GIA) at Tamkang University. He earned his Ph.D. from Department of Political Science at Columbia University in 1986. He was a Legislator from 1996 to1999, an Assemblyman in 2005, and the director of the institute from 2001 to 2005.
  • Han-Yi Shaw — Research Fellow at the Research Center for International Legal Studies, National Chengchi University. He graduated from the University of Chicago then earned his masters degree from Columbia University.
  • Yann-Huei Song — Research Fellow at the Institute of European and American Studies, Academia Sinica. He received his Ph.D. in International Relations from Kent State University, Ohio, and L.L.M. as well as J.S.D. from the School of Law (Boalt Hall), University of California, Berkeley, the United States.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510-642-2809



Colonial Madness: Psychiatry under Japanese Colonial Rule
Speaker: Jun Yoo, Professor of Modern Korean History, University of Hawaii at Manoa
Colloquium
Date: November 30, 2012, 4 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for the 'Colonial Madness: Psychiatry under Japanese Colonial Rule' colloquium This paper examines the social pathology of mental illness under Japanese colonial rule and how madness became an object of medical discourse and a privileged site for constructing normality. In contrast to the earlier periods, colonial authorities resorted to modern forms of surveillance (what Michel Foucault terms "bio-power") as it took a great interest in the regulation of public health. In part, this was achieved by the utilization of "specialists" (from economists to psychiatrists, demographers to medical doctors) to conduct studies about the life processes of the Korean people. For the first time, surveys and studies of Korean mental health, crime, genetic illnesses, and other topics proliferated in both the private and state sectors. In particular, it will analyze the emergence of three discursive sites (e.g., medicine, psychiatry, and criminology) — and their corresponding institutions (e.g., hospital, asylum, and prison) and how these new apparatuses of power sought to manage the subject population through means of normalization and social control. It will probe the emerging field of psychiatry and how it deployed gender categories to frame and quantify new social pathologies like the hysteric (a female malady), recidivist, imbecile, and the likes. One of the central aims is to analyze the moral connotations attached to these new diagnostic labels and the processes by which standards of normativity were framed in the Korean context. Likewise, it seeks to understand the changing socio-economic conditions that contributed to the rise of these statistics.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510-642-5674



Early 1950s Print Media Images of America Published in China: Visiting Scholar's Talk
Speaker: Bin Chang, School of Literature, Hebei University, China
Colloquium
Date: December 5, 2012, 4-5:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the 'Early 1950s Print Media Images of America Published in China' colloquium The 1950s Cold War era was a contest between the Communist Line led by the Soviet Union and the Capitalist Line led by the United States. American government support of the Nationalist Party regime, headed by Chiang Kai-Shek, interfered with China's internal affairs. In the particular case of the Korean War, Commander General of UN Forces, Douglas MacArthur, pushed his troops to the Yalu River border, between North Korea and PRC. This resulted in the bombing of Chinese cities, seriously endangering PRC's national security. Beginning on October 19, 1950, the Chinese government decided to send its army, the Chinese People's Volunteers, into the Korean Peninsula to support the North Koreans.

The Chinese people framed the Korean War as "the Movement/War to Resist America and Aid (North) Korea" (RAAK 抗美援朝运动/战争). At that time, many Chinese people shared one of two common psychologies: fear or worship toward America. As a response, the Chinese government launched a political propaganda campaign in the late 1950s. The "Three views toward the U.S. to educate the Chinese" (Sanshi Jiaoyu 三视教育) consisted of "Hating U.S. imperialism, Despising U.S. imperialism, and Defeating U.S. imperialism." This imaging of the United States was an ideological necessity. It was accomplished by deformation and exaggeration of visual images of America and Americans. Many Chinese newspapers and magazines published political cartoons about America — i.e. American politicians, policy, economy, internal affairs and diplomacy. There was a special focus on the U.S. persistence in grooming and supporting Japanese military forces and intervention in the Korean War, even using germ warfare in Korea. Among the political cartoons, one-third are original Chinese depictions, and two-thirds are derived from other communist states such as the Soviet Union,Poland,Hungary,Romania,Czechoslovakia,and North Korea,as well as some Capitalist counties, for example, Britain, Japan, South Korea, India, and others.

Bin Chang is Professor of Chinese literature of School of Literature at Hebei University of P.R. of China. Her research focuses on Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature,particularly Chinese Feminist Literature & Korean War Literature of China. She received her PhD in Modern and Contemporary Chinese Literature from Sun Yat-sen University of China in 2004. So far, she has published academic papers for over 60 and five academic books in Chinese. She was awarded "Excellent Talent of the New Century" and "Baogang Excellent Teacher" by Ministry of Education of China in 2011. Meanwhile she has also gained a lot of academic awards from Chinese Academy of Social Sciences to other authoritative academic institution in China since 2006. She hosts three research projects sponsored by National Social Science Fund of China in 2005, 2010 and 2011. As Chinese scholar, she joined the international cooperation project sponsored by Ministry of Education of Republic of Korea in 2006.She did research as visiting scholar in Korea Foreign Language University (Soul) in 2005, and in East Asia Culture University (Tokyo) in 2008. For more related details, please click: http://wxy.hbu.cn/teacher/200909/wen407.html.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-3622



Organizing Literary Information in Tang China
Speaker: Christopher Nugent, Asian Studies, Williams College
Colloquium
Date: December 7, 2012, 4-6 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the 'Organizing Literary Information in Tang China' colloquium The social elite in Tang China were expected to display familiarity with a substantial body of past literary works in contexts as varied as social poetry composition and the civil service exam. While simple memorization was one strategy, there was a recognized need for more systematic ways of organizing literary information so that it could be mastered and utilized efficiently. My talk examines leishu 類書 ("categorically arranged writings") as one way of managing literary information in this period. I will discuss what the arrangement, sources, and content of such leishu as the Chuxue ji 初學記 can tell us about different ways writers and thinkers in the Tang understood and made use of their literary inheritance.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu>, 510-643-6321



Voicing Authority: Impersonation and Ventriloquism in Chinese Rhetorical and Musical Traditions
Conference
Date: December 14, 2012, 9:15 a.m.-5 p.m.
Location: IEAS conference room, 2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley, CA 94720
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Image for the 'Voicing Authority: Impersonation and Ventriloquism in Chinese Rhetorical and Musical Traditions' conference In a wide range of contexts, over a long historical span, and in a wide range of literary or other performative genres in Chinese arts, politics, and religion, it seems useful to ask the question what voice is being made audible, and by what set of expressive conventions. Such questions direct our attention away from the specific content of the source as document, and toward more anthropological questions about the historical beliefs and practices that enable a particular sort of meaningful action. Shijing liturgical songs remind us of the centrality of conventions of impersonation — whereby bodies and voices of gods or ancestral spirits are made ritually present via the bodies and voices of qualified participants who "lend" body, voice, or both, to the rite — from the earliest stages of written tradition. In the Chu ci anthology, of course, the tradition of spirit mediumship or "shamanism" that has long been recognized as crucial to our understanding of the relevant liturgical protocols is one in which the role of embodying and the role of conveying thoughts and actions are merged in a single performer, who enacts both the bodily presence and the first-person voice of a god. In referring to such ritual conventions as "impersonation," we need to bear in mind that unlike in the case of one living person imitating another, in these instances the performers of these ritual roles are making themselves instruments for the making visible and audible of what is not otherwise accessible. The conception underlying this conference is to explore both such early documents of mediumship or ritual "ventriloquism" as well as the ways in which the dynamics of this sort of performance persistently recur in later periods. The aim of this conference is to bring together a group of scholars from a variety of periods and disciplines whose work has bearing on such questions, with the hope that a wide-ranging exchange of ideas and "cases" will stimulate fresh perspectives on this recurrent set of issues.

For conference details, click here to go to the conference website.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510-643-6321