Past Events

2013 Events

Korea in the Cross-Fire: The War Photographs of John Rich
Exhibit — Photography
Dates: September 19, 2012 – February 4, 2013 | 9:00 a.m. – 5:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

Image for 'Korea in the Cross-Fire: The War Photographs of John Rich' photography exhibit The year 2013 marks the sixtieth anniversary of the armistice that ended what we now commonly call "the Korean War." Seen as the first open conflict of the cold war, the Korean conflict pitted north against south as defined by the 38th parallel. Only a few short years after the end of world war, the Korean "proxy war" began. NATO forces, overwhelmingly American, engaged initially Korean, and ultimately Chinese, armies, in a conflict that raged northward and southward with a destructive power that ravaged the countryside and left enormous numbers of dead, destitute, and homeless.

Yet the Korean War is often referred to in the US as a "forgotten war," despite widespread coverage by the popular press. One of the photo-journalists documenting the war for American readership was John Rich, a veteran correspondent who had covered the Pacific War and Japanese occupation. Following the war in his images, through to the final days of armistice and withdrawal, Rich witnessed and captured with his lens both key moments of action by the highest officials and the daily life of the cities and countryside. Rich turned the unblinking eye of his camera on a people caught in the cross-fire of civil war.

This display comprises not the images he took for popular consumption but his personal photographs, revealing his vision of the conflict and destruction around him. The opening of this exhibit will be marked by a panel on the legacy of a divided Korea today, and will close in 2013 with a program exploring the regional and international origins of the Korean War.

Thursday, January 31, 2013, 2:00 pm
IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, Sixth Floor, Berkeley
Panel: "The Origins of the Korean War in International Context"

IEAS and CKS gratefully acknowledge Seoul Selection for providing the pictures in this exhibition.

This exhibit is part of the IEAS Arts of Asia series. See other IEAS Exhibits here.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Connected Worlds: New Approaches across Pre-Modern Studies
Haas Junior Scholars Program Conference
January 24–26, 2013
Locations: 370 and 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

Image for the 'Connected Worlds: New Approaches across Pre-Modern Studies' conference This multidisciplinary conference brings together scholars interested in the study of interconnectedness during the pre-modern period. The panels will cross traditional disciplinary boundaries based on geography or periodization, and deal with themes like trade and travel, cross-cultural exchange, empire-building, and the making of ethnographic and geographic 'knowledge.' The conference also features four talks by invited speakers from Yale University, Stanford University, California State University (Chico), and the University of Southern California.

"Connected Worlds" is sponsored by the Walter and Elise Haas Chair in Asia Studies and the Haas Junior Scholars Program at the Institute of East Asian Studies, with additional support provided by the Classics Department, the Graduate Group in Ancient History and Mediterranean Archaeology, the History Department, the History of Art Department, the Townsend Center for the Humanities, the Center for Chinese Studies, the Center for Japanese Studies, the English Department, the Program in Medieval Studies, and the Division of Student Affairs.

Visit http://ieas.berkeley.edu/connectedworlds for the full conference schedule.

Event Contact: connected.worlds.conference@gmail.com



Letters of Advice for a Buddhist Queen of Tibet: Female Empowerment, Tantric Statecraft, and Contested Reputations
Lecture
Speaker: Jann Ronis, Shinjo Ito Postdoctoral Fellow, UC Berkeley
Date: January 24, 2013 | 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for the 'Letters of Advice for a Buddhist Queen of Tibet: Female Empowerment, Tantric Statecraft, and Contested Reputations' lecture At the turn of the nineteenth century the ruler of the powerful kingdom of Dergé in Eastern Tibet was the queen Tsewang Lhamo (d. 1812). This paper explores two epistles written for her by chaplains to the royal family. The conventions of advice for Buddhist kings written from the perspective of exoteric Buddhism are well known to scholars. These Tibetan epistles differ for being addressed to a woman and for operating out of a tantric ethical framework. The two works challenge the mainstream Buddhist views of the inferior spiritual and worldly capabilities of women in terms of esoteric doctrine and mythical precedents of the Buddha's past lives as women. Several key passages from the epistles will be highlighted in this paper. The normative claims made in the letters will be augmented with a profile of the political career and posthumous reputation of this unusually well documented female monarch.

Jann Ronis studied religion, Tibetan studies, Sinology, and the Tibetan and Chinese languages at the University of Virginia. He received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia in 2009 for a dissertation about developments in the monasteries of eastern Tibet, along the border between Tibet and China, in the seventeenth and eighteenth centuries. At Berkeley, Dr. Ronis is researching the twelfth and thirteenth century formation of an important ritual tradition in Tibetan Buddhism — the Kagye (bka' brgyad), or Eight Dispensations in an effort to better understand the domestication of Buddhism in Tibet.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



Theatrical Engagement: Stan Lai in Conversation
Lecture
Speaker: Stan Lai
Moderator: Wen‑hsin Yeh, Professor of Modern Chinese History, and Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
Date: January 29, 2013 | 5:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Arts Research Center, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Center for Chinese Studies

Stan Lai Influential playwright Stan Lai has stretched the boundaries of the theatrical experience in his native Taiwan, in China, and around the world. He has negotiated the fraught landscape between China and Taiwan through drama, and in recent years through active efforts to reshape the theatrical culture of China. In a wide-ranging conversation with Professor of Modern Chinese History Wen‑hsin Yeh, Lai explores his work, his ideas, and his unique vision.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809

 


Observations on Chinese Contemporary Art — Thinking and Practice
Colloquium
Speaker: Professor Xu Weixin, Dean, Department of Art, People's University (Renmin daxue)
Date: January 30, 2013 | 4:00–5:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the colloquium on Observations on Chinese Contemporary Art — Thinking and Practice Chinese Contemporary Art takes special interest in those artistic phenomena imbued with the spirit of folk art or marginalized art, in contrast to official (i.e., state-sponsored) art forms in China. We can date the start of contemporary art to 1978, the year when China first began its reforms; with its opening up to the world, Chinese contemporary art was shaped by the concepts underlying modern Western art, even as it retained Chinese characteristics. This new focus inevitably meant some departures, even confrontations with the so-called mainstream art, in both form and the content. The past thirty years of development in China have wrought tremendous changes to both the social environment and the economy, with the result that Chinese Contemporary Art has changed greatly over time as well. Evolving trends in China have much to teach us about China's place in the world and sense of itself. Illustrated by more than 100 slides, the lecture gives a concise introduction to the processes of generation and development with respect to these artistic phenomena. The talk will begin with a comparison of the classic works in Chinese and Western art history and end with a review of the speaker's own artistic practices and concerns.

http://www.guardian.co.uk/artanddesign/2012/feb/24/cultural-revolution-portraits-xu-weixin

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Flashpoint in Korea: Proxies, Rivals, and the Origins of the Korean War
Symposium
Panelists:
 •  Allan R. Millett, History and American Studies, University of New Orleans
 •  Sheila Miyoshi Jager, East Asian Studies, Oberlin College
 •  Michael Devine, Director, Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum
Moderator: Hong Yung Lee, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Date: January 31, 2013, | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Center for Korean Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

Image for the symposium on Flashpoint in Korea: Proxies, Rivals, and the Origins of the Korean War The Korean War, following hard upon the horrors of World War II and marking the hot-war initiation of the "Cold War," has been discussed as a civil war and a proxy war; as a new kind of international conflict and as a continuation of unfinished business.

In conjunction with the closing of the exhibition "Korea in the Cross-Fire: The War Photographs of John Rich" the Institute of East Asian Studies and Center for Korean Studies present a discussion of the origins of the Korean War in the context of internal, Asian, and international rivalries.

Speakers:
"The War Before the War: Korea, 1945–1950"
Allan R. Millett (Ambrose Professor of History and Director of the Eisenhower Center for American Studies, University of New Orleans)

The conflict to unify post-colonial Korea began with Japan's surrender in 1945. Two Korean liberationist movements, based abroad in China, the Soviet Union, and the United States, returned to Korea under the limited patronage of the United States and the Soviet Union. In the Korea above the 38th Parallel, the Kapsan Faction (Kim Il‑sung) took control of the Soviet-supported government. The competition for power in the American zone pitted four different factions against each other until the South Korean Labor (Communist) Party abandoned electoral politics and started an armed rebellion in April, 1948, which eventually encouraged the DPRK invasion of June, 1950.


"The Atomic Bombs President Truman Did Not Drop: Nuclear Weapons from Hiroshima to the Dismissal of General Douglas MacArthur"
Michael Devine (Director, Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum)

President Harry S. Truman will be known forever as the world leader who authorized the use of atomic bombs to end World War II. During his presidency, Truman initiated the building and stockpiling of a huge atomic arsenal and the development of a second generation nuclear weapon, the Hydrogen Bomb (or "super"). President Truman also insisted on civilian control over nuclear weapons, and he rejected advice to deploy nuclear weapons in several times of crisis, most significantly during the Korean War of 1950–53. In deciding not to use nuclear weapons in Korea, in spite of an overwhelming U.S. numerical superiority of 65 — 1 over the atomic arsenal of the Soviet Union, Truman kept the conflict confined to the Korean Peninsula and spared both North and South Korea from nuclear devastation.


"Brothers At War: The Unending Conflict in Korea"
Sheila Miyoshi Jager (Associate Professor of East Asian Studies, Oberlin College)

More than sixty years after North Korea invaded South Korea, the first major hot war of the cold war has yet to end. Today, the essentially continuous war between the Koreas threatens to reach beyond their borders, as North Korea continues to develop nuclear weapons and long-range missiles. How did we get to this point? This talk broadly traces the story of Korean competition and conflict — and Great Power competition and conflict — over the peninsula: an unending war between two "brothers" with ramifications for the rest of the world. If a resolution to the conflict is ever to be found, this history must be understood and taken into account.


Moderator: Hong Yung Lee, Political Science, UC Berkeley

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



What is Otaku?: The Changing Meanings of otaku in Japan
Colloquium
Speaker: Taishin Ikeda, Visiting Scholar, Center for Japanese Studies; Associate Professor, Konan Women's University
Date: February 1, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Now, the term, otaku, is widely known all over the world, but the meanings the term indicates aren't entirely clear. In fact, its meanings changed over time. In this presentation, I will examine the change in the meanings and images of otaku in Japanese contexts. The term became popular in Japanese society at the end of 1980's. At that time, it had very negative connotations. After that, as the situation around ACG culture has varying, the meanings, images, and evaluations of otaku are changing together. Finally, I will address the definition of otaku according to my own ideas. In addition, I will explain a new representation about Japanese women. It is called Joshi (女子). Joshi is a very old term, but it has acquired new meanings and is often used in contemporary Japanese media. I would like to examine what this Joshi is and what problem it offers to Japanese culture.

現在、オタクという言葉は、世界中で広く知られるようになった。しかし、その言葉が示す意味内容は、必ずしも明確ではない。実際、その意味はこれまで変化してきた。本発表では、日本文化の中で、オタクの意味内容とイメージがどのように変わったきたのかを明らかにする。オタクという言葉は、1980年代末に日本社会に広まったが、その言葉は極めてネガティブな意味付けがなされていた。その後、日本社会におけるアニメ・マンガ・ゲームといった文化を取り巻く環境が変化するにつれて、オタクという言葉の意味やイメージ、評価も変わってきたのである。最終的には、現在、オタクはどのように定義できるかを示したい。

加えて、新しい日本女性の表象についても報告する。その表象は、「女子」と呼ばれている。「女子」はかなり古い言葉だが、現在、それは新しい意味を獲得して、メディア上で頻繁に使われている。この「女子」という言葉の示す意味内容、およびその言葉が現代の日本文化に対して提起する問題についても報告する予定である。

*Paper will be presented in Japanese, with English translation.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



Who Wins? China Wires Africa: The Cases of Angola and Nigeria
Lecture
Speaker: Roselyn Hsueh, Visiting Scholar/ Residential Research Fellow, U.C.Berkeley; Assistant Professor, Temple University
Moderator: Vinod K. Aggarwal, Political Science, and Professor and Director, APEC Study Center, UC Berkeley Date: February 4, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

In recent years, Chinese telecommunications companies, with the assistance of Chinese financial institutions and diplomatic backing, have successfully secured contracts to build infrastructure and wire Africa for the 21st century. The practical implications for economic development are important. But also important are the theoretical implications: what, for instance, is the relevance of such South-South linkages for how we think about globalization and the state? Our paper begins by considering China's broader foreign economic policy agenda in Africa. What role does this play in the headway that Chinese telecommunications companies have made across African markets? What does this mean for market players from other countries (both African and non-African)? Importantly, what impact does China's growing presence have on the relationship between state-building and market-building in traditionally weak states across the continent? To answer these questions, we take our study to the sector-level to investigate the growing presence of Chinese telecommunications equipment makers and service providers in Africa's telecommunication markets.

This talk is part of a series of presentations by IEAS Residential Research Fellows.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



China's Latest Twists and Turns
Colloquium
Speaker: Jeffrey Wasserstrom, History, UC Irvine
Discussants: Kevin O'Brien, Political Science, UC Berkeley; Xiao Qiang, School of Information, UC Berkeley
Date: February 5, 2013 | 12:30–2:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for the colloquium on China's Latest Twists and Turns Through 2012, China constantly made headlines — just as it had in the last Olympic year. In 2012 as in 2008, we read of trauma in Tibet, environmental protests in the Yangzi Delta, and nationalist outbursts in Beijing. There were also surprising news stories. There was no earthquake or globally-wowing Bird's Nest spectacle in 2012, but a blind lawyer made a miraculous escape and Bo Xilai fell unexpectedly fast. The one expected 2012 big news event, Hu Jintao passing the baton to Xi Jinping, seemed anticlimactic when it finally occurred, and no one is quite sure how the new leader will be different from the old one. As 2013 begins with its own dramas, such as a strike by journalists, Jeffrey Wasserstrom turns a cultural historian's eye on recent developments in an informal presentation meant to stimulate debate and discussion.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Wither in Hong Sangsoo — A reading of a story by Kyung Hyun Kim: Preceded by "Weather in Hong Sangsoo" (video essay by Kyung Hyun Kim, 21 min)
Colloquium
Speaker: Kyung Hyun Kim, Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures, University of California, Irvine
Date: February 6, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for the colloquium on Wither in Hong Sangsoo The speaker will read from a story about an imaginary dialogue that takes place between the narrator, a retired film critic, and Hong Sangsoo, an amnesiac filmmaker. It is set in 2022. The story attempts to braid together a few concerns in the works of Hong Sangsoo that encompass the possibility of nondualistic relations: between authenticity and falsity, between humility and vanity, and between cultivation and resolute action.

Preceding this reading of a story entitled "Wither in Hong Sangsoo" is a 21-minute video essay called "Weather in Hong Sangsoo." "Weather in Hong Sangsoo" is a compilation film that collages footage from films Hong has thus far directed in a career that spans over past 15 years — one that began with his debut film, The Day a Pig Fell into the Well (1996), and continues most recently with In Another Country (2012). The video essay foregrounds cryptic themes found in Hong Sangsoo's films, such as weather, trees, and unseen, and argues that they are constant forces of passion, renewal, and even transmigration in Hong's work.

Kyung Hyun Kim is Professor of East Asian Languages and Literatures and Director of Critical Theory Emphasis at UC Irvine. He is also the author of "The Remasculinization of Korean Cinema" [Duke University Press, 2004] "Virtual Hallyu: Korean Cinema of the Global Era" [Duke University Press, 2011].

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Media Histories / Media Theories and East Asia
Conference/Symposium
Dates: February 7–8, 2013 | 9:00 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Locations: 370 & 3335 Dwinelle
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, Berkeley East Asia National Resource Center, Center for Chinese Studies, Department of Comparative Literature

Image for the conference on Media Histories / Media Theories and East Asia In February 2013, UC Berkeley's Pacific Film Archive will hold a retrospective of the films of Art Theatre Guild (ATG), Tokyo's center of cinematic innovation from 1961–1988. This conference takes this opportunity, in conjunction with this film series and several exhibitions on Japanese arts, to bring together five invited media theorists from Japan, the prominent film director Hani Susumu from ATG, and scholars from the U.S. and Europe to discuss Japanese and East Asian cross-cultural developments in media theory and culture from the early twentieth century to the present.

The Media Histories / Media Theories & East Asia conference brings together prominent and emerging scholars to discuss Japanese and East Asian cross-cultural developments in media theory and culture from the early twentieth century to the present. The symposium will read East Asian film and visual arts as part of a changing media landscape in relation to commercial cinema, television, and intermedia arts as well as political, economic and cultural transformations. We encourage submissions on topics such as: the relation between urban space and the arts in cultural politics; reading the problems of film audience and reception; the important (and neglected) role of East Asian film and media theory and critical writings; East Asian arts movements in transnational perspective; film and visual art as a mediator of cultural/political history; avant-garde artist networks, commercial culture, and architectural transformation. The symposium aims to foster transnational and local scholarly perspectives on East Asian arts and media theory in the context of recent cross-disciplinary arguments in film and media studies.

Event details will be posted on the official conference website.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



From Buddhist Monasteries and Meditation to Mental Hospitals and MRIs
Lecture
Speaker: James Robson, Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations, Harvard University
Date: February 7, 2013 | 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for the lecture on From Buddhist Monasteries and Meditation to Mental Hospitals and MRIs This talk explores the intersections between Buddhism/Buddhist institutions and madness/mental institutions. It begins with a general discussion of the place of madness within the Buddhist tradition by tracking references to madness in a variety of sources (from doctrinal texts to law codes). Following that general discussion, the talk moves to the intriguing history of the institutional connections between Buddhist monasteries and mental institutions in China, Taiwan and Japan. I introduce some case studies of sites where modern mental hospitals grew up within the precincts or adjacent to Buddhist monasteries. What, I will ask, is the historical relationship between the Buddhist monasteries and the new mental hospitals? Have there been institutional connections between the monasteries and the hospitals throughout history? In addressing these questions we encounter a history of the fundamental role played by Buddhist monasteries in the therapy of those beset with mental illnesses. Due to modern changes in the care for the mentally ill — including a move toward mandatory hospitalization — the earlier history of the connections between the Buddhist monasteries and those afflicted with mental illness became hidden. One of the primary goals of this paper is to recover some of that history and show the role that was played by Buddhist temples in providing therapies, magical cures, and day to day care for the mentally ill. I will conclude the talk by shifting our attention to the West and the dramatic increase in the number of psychotherapists, counselors, mental health workers, and neuroscientists who have become interested in meditation and various forms of what have come to be called "Buddhist Psychotherapy" and "Buddhist Mindfulness." A spate of articles in the New York Times ("Mindfulness Meditation, Based on Buddha's Teachings, Gains Ground With Therapists," "Lotus Therapy," and "The Neural Buddhists"), for example, evinces the high level of popular interests in these topics. Recent therapies claimed to be derived from the Buddhist tradition have continued apace despite little understanding of the long history of the care for the mentally ill within Buddhism and little accurate information concerning scientific research on Buddhist meditation and mindfulness practices and their application to specific psychiatric disorders and general self-help therapies.

James Robson is a Professor of East Asian Religions in the Department of East Asian Languages and Civilizations at Harvard University. He received his Ph.D. from Stanford University and previously taught at Williams College and the University of Michigan. He specializes in the history of Chinese Buddhism and Daoism. He is the author of the Power of Place: The Religious Landscape of the Southern Sacred Peak [Nanyue 南嶽] in Medieval China (Harvard University Press, 2009) and has published on topics ranging from sacred geography and local religious history to talismans and the historical development of Chan/Zen Buddhism. He has been engaged in a long-term collaborative research project with the École Française d'Extrême-Orient studying local religious statuary from Hunan province and is the editor of the forthcoming Norton Anthology of World Religions: Daoism.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



In Search of Sustainable Legitimacy: Environmental Law and Bureaucracy
Lecture
Speaker: Alex Wang, Visiting Assistant Professor, Law, UC Berkeley
Moderator: Thomas B. Gold, Sociology, and Director, IUP Program, UC Berkeley
Date: February 8, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

This talk will examine why and how China mobilized the bureaucracy to prioritize and meet a range of pollution targets during the 11th FYP (2006–2010). This study draws on research into environmental regulation, law, governance, and China's broader political context.

Alex Wang's primary research and teaching interests are environmental law, China law, and comparative law. Prior to coming to Berkeley Law in 2011, Mr. Wang was a senior attorney for the Natural Resources Defense Council (NRDC) based in Beijing and the director of NRDC's China Environmental Law & Governance Project for nearly six years. In this capacity, he worked with China's government agencies, legal community, and environmental groups to improve environmental rule of law and strengthen the role of the public in environmental protection. He helped to establish NRDC's Beijing office in 2006. He was a Fulbright Fellow to China from 2004–05. Prior to that, Mr. Wang was an attorney at the law firm of Simpson Thacher & Bartlett LLP in New York City, where he worked on mergers & acquisitions, securities matters, and pro bono Endangered Species Act litigation. He was selected as a fellow to the National Committee on U.S.-China Relations (2008–10), and is a member of the Advisory Board to the Asia Society's Center on U.S.-China Relations.

Mr. Wang is a regular speaker on issues related to China and environmental protection, and has been an invited speaker at various institutions, such as the Council on Foreign Relations and the Asia Society. His commentary has appeared in such places as the New York Times, Huffington Post, Wall Street Journal, Los Angeles Times, Bloomberg News, China Daily, Global Times, Time Magazine, National Public Radio, Marketplace, and CCTV.

Mr. Wang's recent publications include "China's Environmental Tipping Point" in China In and Beyond the Headlines (2011, forthcoming), a guest edited volume of Chinese Law and Government entitled "Environmental Courts and Public Interest Litigation in China" (with J. Gao) (2010), "Environmental Courts and the Development of Public Interest Litigation in China" in the Journal of Court Innovation (with J. Gao) (2010), and "The Role of Law in Environmental Protection in China" in the Vermont Journal of Environmental Law (2007). His latest article "In Search of Sustainable Legitimacy: Environmental Law and Bureaucracy in China" is forthcoming in the Harvard Environmental Law Review (summer 2013).

This talk is part of a series of presentations by IEAS Residential Research Fellows.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Annual Chinese New Year's Banquet
Social Event
Date: February 8, 2013 | 6:00–9:00 p.m.
Location: Restaurant 168 in the Pacific East Mall — 3288 Pierce Street, Richmond, CA
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Year of the Snake Please join the Center for Chinese Studies for our annual Lunar New Year's Banquet. There will be great food and door prizes, it is the perfect way to welcome the Year of the Snake.

$15 UC Berkeley students and staff; $25 faculty and community.

Contact Angel Ryono at ccs-vs@berkeley.edu or 510‑643‑6322 for more information.

Attendance restrictions: Registration for this event has now closed.

Reservation required

Reservation info: Make reservations by February 1 by calling Angel Ryono at 510‑643‑6322, or by emailing Angel Ryono at ccs-vs@berkeley.edu.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6322



Ryuichi Sakamoto: Eco-Activism in Japan and the U.S. Post-Fukushima
Symposium
Speaker: Ryuichi Sakamoto
Date: February 9, 2013 | 1:00–2:30 p.m.
Location: Alumni House, Toll Room
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, The Japan Foundation, Department of Anthropology

Image for Eco-Activism in Japan and the U.S. Post-Fukushima The Center for Japanese Studies welcomes Ryuichi Sakamoto, internationally-acclaimed musician, composer, producer and activist, to campus as the winner of the 3rd Berkeley Japan Prize.

The Berkeley Japan Prize, established in 2008, is a lifetime achievement award from the Center for Japanese Studies to an individual who has made significant contributions in furthering the understanding of Japan on the global stage.

Sakamoto is well known for his involvement in No Nukes activism. He wrote the score for Alexei and the Spring (2002), a documentary film about the aftermath of Chernobyl, and organized the No Nukes Concert 2012 in Japan. In honor of Sakamoto's contributions to the rise of eco-activism, especially in the Post-Fukushima accident era, the Center for Japanese Studies hosts a panel of prominent scholars and activists, to be followed by comments from Sakamoto.

Visit http://ieas.berkeley.edu/cjs/berkeley_japan_prize_current.html for the full schedule.

This event is supported by the Japan Foundation.

Free and open to the public.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



Ryuichi Sakamoto LIVE: Solo Piano + Talk
Performing Arts — Music
Speaker/Performer: Ryuichi Sakamoto
Date: February 9, 2013 | 8:00–9:30 p.m.
Location: Hertz Concert Hall
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, The Japan Foundation

Ryuichi Sakamoto The Center for Japanese Studies welcomes Ryuichi Sakamoto, internationally-acclaimed musician, composer, producer and activist, to campus as the winner of the 3rd Berkeley Japan Prize.

The Berkeley Japan Prize, established in 2008, is a lifetime achievement award from the Center for Japanese Studies to an individual who has made significant contributions in furthering the understanding of Japan on the global stage.

For this rare Bay Area appearance, Sakamoto performs a solo piano concert followed by a conversation with Ken Ueno (Associate Professor, Department of Music at UCB, Composer/Vocalist).

This event is supported by the Japan Foundation.

Tickets required: $30 general, $10 students (present IDs at the door)

Ticket info: Tickets go on sale January 11. Buy tickets online, or by calling Cal Performances at 510.642.9988.

Visit http://ieas.berkeley.edu/cjs/berkeley_japan_prize.html for the full schedule.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



Law and/or Justice in Island Disputes in East Asia
Colloquium
Speaker: Tetsuya Toyoda, Associate Professor, International Law, Akita International University
Date: February 11, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

The remaining three major territorial disputes in East Asia are over small islands, the Dokdo/Takeshima dispute between the Republic of Korea (and DPRK) and Japan, the Senkaku/Diaoyutai dispute between Japan and China (and Taiwan), and the Paracel and Spratly dispute between China (and Taiwan), Vietnam, Malaysia, Brunei, and the Philippines. With the rise of nationalism in East Asia, the disputes over those islands have become serious impediments to regional cooperation. One of reasons of unease comes from the fact that the rules of modern international law for territorial demarcation are not fit to the sense of justice of the peoples in East Asia.

My presentation is about possible solutions best fit to the sense of justice, and thus least unacceptable, in the region, with particular attention to Art. 121(3) of the UN Convention on the Law of the Sea which provides that rocks which cannot sustain human habitation or economic life of their own shall have no exclusive economic zone or continental shelf.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



China and Latin America: Perceptions, Problems, and Opportunities
Panelists:
 •  Carol Wise, International Relations, University of Southern California
 •  Julia Strauss, Politics and International Studies, School of Orienal and
    African Studies (SOAS), University of London
 •  Barry Eichengreen, Economics, UC Berkeley
 •  Margaret Myers, Director, China and Latin America Program, Inter-America
    Dialogue
Moderator: Harley Shaiken, Education, and Director, Center for Latin American Studies, UC Berkeley
Panel Discussion
Date: February 12, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Latin American Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

While once China's relations with Latin America focused on revolutionary movements and social justice, today China's focus is on markets and materials. With this change have come tensions and new relationships to define and cultivate. From village level competition to tensions at the level of government and industry, changes in both China and Latin America have generated new problems to negotiate, and new relationships to define and cultivate. This panel explores the changing role of China in Latin America, the economics that drive relations, cultural overtures, and opportunities for the future.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Flexible Repression: Governing "Underground" Civil Society in Authoritarian China
Colloquium
Speaker: Diana Fu, Shorenstein Postdoctoral Fellow, Stanford University
Date: February 13, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for Flexible Repression: Governing 'Underground' Civil Society in Authoritarian China What technologies of control does the Chinese authoritarian state use to induce compliance in groups deemed to be "enemies of the state"? Foucault argued that disciplinary power relies on the state's ability to render society both visible and predictable. But under conditions of imperfect surveillance and ambiguous policies, how does a fragmented authoritarian state police "underground" groups? This talk attempts to open the black box of the state coercive apparatus. Findings based on original empirical data gathered from 18 months of fieldwork inside "underground" labor organizations in four Chinese cities suggest that the state deploys a model of flexible repression which makes use of disciplinary power more than coercive violence. Contrary to axiomatic assumptions that "underground" civil society must necessarily oppose state power, I show they can also collaborate with the state under certain conditions. Illegal organizations constitute the vast majority of associational life in most authoritarian states. How to govern these groups that are said to be nibbling away at state power is a formidable challenge for any regime that restricts free association.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



What Is the K in K‑pop? The Soft-Power Industry and the Hollowed Tradition in South Korea
Colloquium
Speaker: John Lie, Professor, Sociology, UC Berkeley
Moderator: Elaine Kim, Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley
Date: February 14, 2013, | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

How do we make sense of the global expansion of South Korean popular music? By considering its history and the production process, I explain not only the sources of K‑pop's export success but also provide a window that illuminates contemporary South Korean political economy and Korean culture.

This talk is part of a series of presentations by IEAS Residential Research Fellows.

Event Contact: 510‑642‑2809



Seeking Asylum, Finding God: Religion and Moral Economy of Migrants' Illegality
Colloquium
Speaker: Jaeeun Kim, Shorenstein Asia-Pacific Center Postdoctoral Fellow, Stanford University
Date: February 15, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for Seeking Asylum, Finding God: Religion and Moral Economy of Migrants' Illegality The literature on immigration and religion has recently focused on how religion provides an alternative imaginary geography of belonging beyond the nation-state. Such works have analyzed how membership in a faith community provides illegal migrants with a path to de facto incorporation into the "local" society or a sense of belonging to a "transnational" community of faith, despite their de jure exclusion from the "national" citizenry in their state of residence. This talk will discuss the hitherto underexplored question, namely, how asylum procedures in contemporary immigration states prompt a certain group of migrants to take on a particular religious identity in pursuit of legal status. Drawing on ongoing research on the migration careers, legalization strategies, and conversion patterns of ethnic Korean migrants from China to the United States, the speaker shows that asylum-seeking is a contingent, temporally unfolding, and essentially an interactive process, guided not by long-term planning, but by everyday pragmatism, shifting state policies, and various middlemen informing migrants' perception of these policies. Kim also shows how religious institutions — which have developed distinctive understandings of the nation, the community of faith, and divine justice — get involved in, respond to, channel, and give meanings to this particular legalization strategy, and how the newly acquired religious identity reshapes these migrants' "cartography of belonging," through which they make sense of their place in the local society, in the states of origin and residence, and in the transnational community of faith.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Introducing Hearts of Pine: Songs in the Lives of Three Korean Survivors of the Japanese "Comfort Women"
Colloquium
Speaker: Joshua Pilzer, Assistant Professor of Ethnomusicology, University of Toronto
Date: February 19, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for Introducing Hearts of Pine: Songs in the Lives of Three Korean Survivors of the Japanese 'Comfort Women' In this presentation ethnomusicologist Josh Pilzer introduces the book that has resulted from his ten-year project on musical lives of South Korean survivors of the 'comfort women' system. During the long era of public secrecy about Japanese military sexual slavery, Korean survivors made use of veiled expressive forms such as song to reckon with their experiences and forge social selves without exposing their already opaquely public secrets. In the era of the "comfort women grandmothers" protest movement, which began in the early 1990s, the women became star witnesses and super-symbols of South Korea's colonial victimization at the hands of Japan; and the new normative constraints of this role compelled the women to continue to express taboo sentiments and continue the work of self-making behind the veils of song, often in the most public of places. The women's songs are thus simultaneously records of traumatic experiences; transcripts of struggles to overcome traumatic memory and achieve different kinds of cultural membership; performances of traumatic experience for an expectant public; and works of art that stretch beyond the horizons of traumatic experience and even those of Korean cultural identity.

Joshua D. Pilzer (PhD University of Chicago 2006) is an ethnomusicologist of Korean and Japanese music. His current research concerns the place of music in the texture of post-colonial Korean life, music's social utility and social poetics, and music as alternative history. He is interested in particular in the relationships between music, survival, traumatic experience, marginalization, socialization, public culture, and identity. He is the author of Hearts of Pine (Oxford University Press, 2012). Pilzer has published articles in Ethnomusicology, Dongyang Umak Yeonggu, and The Courtesan's Arts: Cross-Cultural Perspectives (New York: Oxford University Press, 2006), and has forthcoming articles in The Oxford Handbook of Applied Ethnomusicology and Music and War. He is currently conducting fieldwork for his next book project, an ethnography of music and song among Korean victims of the atomic bombing of Japan and their children in Hapcheon, "Korea's Hiroshima."

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Tsuneno's Journey: Households, Networks, and the Limits of the Ordinary in Early Modern Japan
Colloquium
Speaker: Amy Stanley, Assistant Professor, History, Northwestern University
Moderator: Mary Elizabeth Berry, Professor, History, UC Berkeley
Date: February 20, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Image for Tsuneno's Journey: Households, Networks, and the Limits of the Ordinary in Early Modern Japan Tsuneno, daughter of a Shin priest in a small Echigo village, had an unexpectedly interesting life that produced a large volume of correspondence. Over the course of the 1830's and '40's, she married twice, divorced twice, ran away to Edo, worked as a waitress, took up with a gangster who extorted her family, married a down-and-out masterless samurai, and finally entered the service of the famous Edo city magistrate Toyama Kinshiro. Her brothers, despairing of her behavior, called her a selfish idiot, but she insisted that she was a filial daughter.

This talk investigates Tsuneno's life (and its paper trail) in order to ask: What was the Tokugawa-era household (ie), and what did it mean to its members? And how might a revaluation of the "household system" join the typically small-scale, intimate histories of Tokugawa women to broader narratives about social and economic change in early modern Japan?

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



Images, Conventions, and Significance: Reading Buddha Images from Gandhara
Colloquium
Speaker: Juhyung Rhi, Seoul National University, Korea
Date: February 21, 2013 | 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for Images, Conventions, and Significance: Reading Buddha Images from Gandhara

Two things seem clear as regards Buddha images from Gandhara. They were mostly votive dedications, and they had no straightforward connections to narrative themes from the Buddha's life. We are justified to ask, then, what they were supposed to mean as presentation, if not representation, of the Buddha. Did they reflect simple iconographic conventions? Or were they encoded with meanings that are not instantly manifest? Juhyung Rhi is professor of art history at Seoul National University and currently a member at the Institute for Advanced Study in Princeton. As a specialist in Indian Buddhist art, he has written extensively on early Indian traditions, in particular Gandharan.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104

Download a copy of the announcement here.

 


Varieties of the Utopian in Contemporary Chinese Science Fiction
Colloquium
Speaker: Mingwei Song, Department of East Asian Languages and Literatures, Wellesley College
Date: February 22, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Image for Varieties of the Utopian in Contemporary Chinese Science Fiction In 2066, China dominates the world as the sole superpower. A team of go players are sent to the poverty-stricken United States to show off China's cultural superiority. Thus begins the story of Han Song's 2066: Mars over America (2000), which, together with numerous other new wave science fiction novels appearing in China over the last decade, has strengthened as well as complicated the utopian vision for a new, powerful China. Deeply entangled with the politics of a changing China, science fiction today mingles nationalism with utopianism/dystopianism; sharpens social criticism with an acute awareness of China's potential for further reform as well as its limitations; and envelops political consciousness in discourses on the power or powers of technology. This presentation analyzes the variations of the utopian motif in the major works of the three most influential SF authors, whom the speaker names as China's "Big Three": Liu Cixin (b. 1963), Wang Jinkang (b. 1948) and Han Song (b. 1965). The speaker's discussion focuses on three themes: (1) the appropriation of Mao's heritage in the narrative of China's future; (2) the myth of development; and (3) the uncertainty of a technologized post-human world.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Curriculum Design and National Identity Construction during the Anti-Japanese War: Focus on Relevant Chiang Kai‑Shek's Personal Orders
Colloquium
Speaker: Zhengwei Liu, Professor, Vice-dean, School of Education, Zhejiang University, China
Date: February 25, 2013 | 2:00–3:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies (CCS)

Image for Curriculum Design and National Identity Construction during the Anti-Japanese War: Focus on Relevant Chiang Kai‑Shek's Personal Orders After 1927, the Kuomintang (KMT) gradually increased the supervision of education. As the 1937 Lugouqiao Incident signaled full-scale Sino-Japanese War, Chiang Kai‑shek took advantage of the political turbulence — as well as the study tour of the League of Nations which yielded an investigative report on The Reorganization of Education in China — to criticize policy advocated by pro-American intellectuals, including the liberal reform of Chinese education. On one hand, Chiang urged the Ministry of Education to implement the partisan discipline system in all universities, the secondary and primary schools. On the other hand, he gave nine personal orders to Chen Lifu, the Minister of Education, dictating that the Ministry of Education should lay special emphasis, in the curriculum design, on traditional ethnics, history, geography, farming, politics, war, education and science.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6322

Download the Abstract and Biography (English & Chinese) here.



The Mosque in China
Colloquium
Speaker: Nancy Steinhardt, Professor, East Asian Languages and Civilizations, University of Pennsylvania
Moderator: Heba Moustafa, History of Art, UC Berkeley
Date: February 26, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Image for The Mosque in China The first Muslims came to China in the Tang dynasty (618–907) and mosques were built at the same time. China's oldest mosques survive in coastal cities populated by Muslim traders in the Song dynasty.

This talk examines the oldest mosques and selected famous ones through extant buildings and textual records. It will demonstrate that even though every necessary feature for Muslim worship is present in the mosques, they are almost purely Chinese building complexes. It will be suggested that the ability of mosque and Chinese architecture to converge without compromising the beliefs of the one or the structural principles of the other was a major reason for the survival of both through thirteen centuries.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Balancing, Bandwagoning, or Standing Alone?: China's Rise and the Future of the Korean Peninsula
Colloquium
Speaker: Chung‑in Moon, Professor of Political Science, Yonsei University
Date: February 27, 2013 | 12:00 p.m.
Location: 223 Moses Hall
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Chung‑in Moon What is South Korea's perception of China's rise? How has China's rise influenced its interactions with the two Koreas as well as the ROK-US alliance? What is South Korea's most ideal strategic choice? Balancing, bandwagoning, standing alone, or shaping a new regional order? What implications might these options have on the future of Korean peninsula?

Chung‑in Moon is a professor of political science at Yonsei University and Editor-in-Chief of Global Asia, a quarterly magazine in English. He is also Director of the Kim Dae‑jung Presidential Library and Museum. He served as Chairman of the Presidential Committee on Northeast Asian Cooperation Initiative, a cabinet-level post, and Ambassador for International Security Affairs at the Ministry of Foreign Affairs and Trade, the Republic of Korea. He has published over 45 books and 250 articles in edited volumes and such scholarly journals. His recent publications include What Does Japan Now Think? (in Korean, 2013), The Sunshine Policy-In Defense of Engagement as a Path to Peace in Korea (2012), Exploring the Future of China (in Korean 2010 and Chinese in 2012), The United States and Northeast Asia: Debates, Issues, and New Order (with John Ikenberry 2008), and War and Peace in East Asia (2006). He attended the 1st and 2nd Pyongyang Korean summit as a special delegate. He is a recipient of Public Policy Scholar Award (the Woodrow Wilson International Center in Washington, D.C.), the Lixian Scholar Award (Beijing University), and the Pacific Leadership Fellowship (UCSD). He served as the President of the Korea Peace Research Association and Vice President of the International Studies Association (ISA) of North America. He is a member of ASEAN Regional Forum-Eminent and Expert Persons (ARF-EEPs) representing South Korea and served as co-chair of the first and second AFR-EEPs meetings in June 2006 and February 2007.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



On the Spatiality of Trade in Two Siberian Border Towns: Surfaces, Verticality and the Subterranean
Lecture
Speaker: Franck Billé, Research Associate, Department of Social Anthropology & Mongolia and Inner Asia Studies Unit, University of Cambridge, UK
Date: February 28, 2013 | 12:00 p.m.
Location: 270 Stephens Hall
Sponsors: Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

The two Manchurian cities of Blagoveshchensk (Russia) and Heihe (China) are the point along the 2500 mile border where Russian and Chinese urbanisms come closest together. Economically co-dependent, these 'twin' cities are nonetheless very different kinds of siblings. With the bulk of the trade taking place on the Chinese side, Heihe has rapidly developed into a modern town; by contrast Blagoveshchensk appears sedate and almost stagnant. This imbalance is especially visible at night when Heihe's riverbank illuminates in a wide array of colors.

If these lights are in many ways symptomatic of China's economic boom and newly acquired confidence, they are viewed with some ambivalence by Russian onlookers. Brushed aside as a cheap spectacle barely concealing enduring economic and cultural poverty, Heihe's riverbank is consistently described as a façade. In addition, Russian descriptions of Heihe tend to focus on the open-air markets and the commercial activities that take place at street level. Yet, much is happening beyond these surfaces.

Taking its cue from these 'surface readings' the paper will explore Russian spatial focus on horizontality. I will suggest that a certain cultural bias whereby horizontality is the primary plane where modernity is staged and enacted renders invisible those economic drivers that operate below this surface as well as along a vertical axis.

Event Contact: 510‑642‑3230



Why Did Japan Stop Growing?
Colloquium
Speaker: Takeo Hoshi, Senior Fellow in Japanese Studies, FSI; Director; Japan Studies Program, Shorenstein APARC; and Professor of Finance (by courtesy), Graduate School of Business, Stanford University
Date: February 28, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Takeo Hoshi The talk will be based on Takeo Hoshi's NIRA reports with Anil Kashyap in 2011 and 2012. Hoshi will start by arguing that Japan's stagnation in the last 20 years was a result of the failure to respond to the new challenges that started to emerge in the 1970s (i) end of catching up process, (ii) limit of export led growth in the post Breton Woods system, and (iii) rapid aging. In addition, Japanese government and the BOJ made mistakes of (i) not addressing the non-performing loans problem sooner, (ii) expanding fiscal expenditure too much and on wasteful investments, and (iii) keeping the monetary policy too tight to allow deflation. Then, Hoshi argues that Japan needs more than expansionary macroeconomic policy to restore the growth. More concretely, he suggests nine policies in three policy areas that can be implemented to help Japan grow again: (1) deregulation, (2) opening up the country to the rest of the world, and (3) improving macroeconomic policy. The deregulation includes reforms to reduce the cost of doing business, stopping protection of zombie firms, deregulation especially in non-manufacturing, and growth enhancing special zones. Opening up policy includes trade opening including the participation in TPP, agricultural reform, and more open immigration policy. Improving macroeconomic policy includes the commitment to fiscal consolidation in the long run and more aggressive monetary policy. Finally, Hoshi will end the talk by evaluating Abenomics using the framework developed for the NIRA reports.

The Japanese version of the reports has been published as a book from Nihon Keizai Shimbun Shuppan last month.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



Cities of Devotion: Newar Buddhist Traditions and the Paintings of Yuvak Tuladhar
Exhibit — Painting
Artist: Yuvak Tuladhar
Dates: March 1 – May 1, 2013 | 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies

Newar Buddhist Traditions and the Paintings of Yuvak Tuladhar Long after Buddhism faded in India, the artists of the historical Nepal Valley (where Buddhism survives as a vibrant tradition to this day) continued to create Buddhist icons of such renown that they were sought across Central Asia and even attracted the patronage of the imperial court in China. Today this venerable artistic tradition continues to flourish in its homestead in the ateliers of the Kathmandu Valley. Though besieged by rampant development, the glorious royal squares in the center of Nepal's ancient capitals, Kathmandu, Patan, and Bhaktapur, have been kept intact with their unique ensembles of temples and palatial buildings. The name of Bhaktapur itself means "City of Devotees."

The magnificent artistic heritage and deeply held beliefs continue to inspire Newar craftsmen and artists such as Yuvak Tuladhar. His icons reveal a personal and powerful vision of Buddhism, and his gentle town- and landscapes express a yearning for the Nepal of his childhood, a place that has changed dramatically­indeed in many ways beyond recognition­as Kathmandu has exploded as the fastest growing city of Asia.

Public Program
Friday, March 22, 5 p.m.
Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room
2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley CA

CONTEMPORARY FORMS OF NEPALESE ART PRACTICE
 • Contemporary Nepalese Art: Narratives of Visuality and Postmodernity
      Dina Bangdel, Art History, Virginia Commonwealth University
 • A Conversation with Artist Yuvak Tuladhar

Participants:
Dina Bangdel, Art History, Virginia Commonwealth University
Atreyee Gupta, History of Art, UC Berkeley
Todd Lewis, World Religions, Holy Cross University
Sugata Ray, History of Art, UC Berkeley
Yuvak Tuladhar, Artist
Sanjeev Uprety, Central Department of English, Tribhuvan University, Nepal

Moderator:
Alexander von Rospatt, South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

This exhibit is part of the IEAS Arts of Asia series. See other IEAS Exhibits here.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Two Talks on Han Dynasty Chang'an
Colloquium
Speakers:
 •  Griet Vankeerberghen, History and Classical Studies, McGill University
 •  Liu Rui, Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences
Date: March 4, 2013 | 12:00–2:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Burial goods found in the underground ramp to the burial chamber of Emperor Jing (r. 157–141 BCE) at Yangling, near present-day Xi'an

PRESENTATIONS
Western Han Chang'an: Emperors and their Local Lords
Griet Vankeerberghen, History and Classical Studies, McGill University

Water Resources of Western Han Chang'an: Weishui Bridge and Kunming Pond
Liu Rui, Institute of Archaeology, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences

Vankeerberghen will speak in English. Liu will speak in Chinese, with translation.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



The Sun is Not So Central
Colloquium
Speaker: Michael Cherney, Photographer
Date: March 4, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Center for Chinese Studies

Image for The Sun is Not So Central Michael Cherney's painterly photographs call upon the Chinese tradition in their contemporary interpretations. He writes "I try to utilize the advantage of the Chinese landscape, which allows for contrast between recent history and ancient history. My hope is that, through methods touched upon in this presentation, I am able to imbue photography with the sense of "the rise and fall of the ten thousand things" that can be found in more traditional Chinese works." In this talk Cherney shows examples of his work and how they relate to works from the classical Chinese painting tradition.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking
Colloquium
Speaker: Aimee Lee, Freelance Hanji Artist
Date: March 6, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking With a history of well over 1,500 years, Korean handmade paper, known as hanji, is familiar to Koreans but a mystery outside its home country. This lustrous paper that comes in a wide array of thickness, color, size, and translucency was once a coveted item inside and beyond Korean borders. Made by farmers during bitter cold winters, hanji was a noble marker of the literati that demanded paper for books, documents, calligraphy, and painting. Hanji also played a spiritual role as the ground for illuminated sutras, the body of temple decorations, and spirit of rituals where it was burned in hopes that its ashes would rise to the sky. Fashioned into objects that ranged from kites to armor to shrouds to chamber pots, there was seemingly no end to the possibilities of human ingenuity merged with transformation of nature's fibers, until the forces of history and industrialization collided and left this once celebrated substrate and its related practices near extinction.

Join Aimee Lee as she shares her experience of searching for a traditional Korean paper-making teacher as recounted in "Hanji Unfurled", the first English-language book about hanji. Of the handful of American hanji researchers, she is the only one to have interacted with Koreans in their own language while simultaneously learning the craft. Not only did she meet the few remaining paper-makers who still practice the indigenous Korean sheet formation method, but she also found teachers of related crafts that include jiseung — cording and weaving hanji, joomchi — texturing and felting hanji, natural dyeing, and calligraphy. Her talk will be accompanied by images, videos, and samples of hanji and paper objects. Her book will be available for sale and signing.

Aimee Lee is an interdisciplinary artist who works in paper, book, performance, and installation arts. She holds a BA from Oberlin College and MFA from Columbia College. Her post-graduate Fulbright research focused on Korean paper-making and allied crafts, and she built the first American hanji studio at the Morgan Conservatory in Cleveland, Ohio in 2010. In 2012, her first book, "Hanji Unfurled: One Journey into Korean Papermaking", was published by The Legacy Press. She exhibits internationally and travels as an artist-in-residence and teacher while raising awareness of hanji. For more information, visit aimeelee.net.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



The Taiwan Edge: UC Berkeley "TUSA" Scholars Present: 2013 TUSA Forum
Presentation
Date: March 8, 2013 | 2:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

UC Berkeley, together with Harvard and Chicago, host annually a selection of scholars from Taiwan's "Top University Strategic Alliance"(TUSA) program. Drawn from a range of disciplines, from agriculture to art, from psychology to politics, from labor to law, these scholars will present their work in a joint session hosted by the Institute of East Asian Studies.

The Making and Reinvention of The Dijian tushuo
(Illustrated Arguments of the Emperor's Mirror)
Li‑chiang Lin, Professor, Graduate Institute of Art History, National Taiwan Normal University
Discussant: Patricia Berger, History of Art, UC Berkeley

Technology, Offshoring, and Growth
Chu‑Ping Lo, Assistant Professor, Department of Agricultural Economics, National Taiwan University
Discussant: David Roland‑Holst, Agricultural and Resource Economics, UC Berkeley

Neurobehavioral Aspects of Insomnia: Implications for the Association between Sleep and Emotion
Chien‑Ming Yang, Professor, Department of Psychology/The Research Center for Mind, Brain, and Learning, National Chengchi University
Discussant: Kaiping Peng, Psychology, UC Berkeley

The Country Differences in the International Human Resource Management
Meiyu Fang, Associate Professor, Graduate Institute of Human Resource Management, School of Management, National Central University
Discussant: James Lincoln, Haas School of Business, UC Berkeley

The Rise of Judicial Politics in Taiwan
Chin‑Shou Wang, Associate Professor, Department of Political Science & the Graduate Institute of Political Economy, National Cheng Kung University
Discussant: Thomas Gold, Sociology, UC Berkeley

WTO, Climate Change and China
Yao‑Ming Hsu, Associate Professor, College of Law, National Chengchi University
Discussant: Rachel Stern, Boalt Law School, UC Berkeley

ABSTRACTS:

Li‑Chiang LIN
The Making and Reinvention of The Dijian tushuo (Illustrated Arguments of the Emperor's Mirror)

This talk comprises two parts: it will first decipher the original intention of the making of the Chinese woodblock printed book Dijian tushuo through careful reading of both texts and pictures of this imperial textbook; secondly, it will briefly discuss my on-going investigation of its disseminations and reinventions, with focus on its reprint and appropriations in the 17th century Japan and the 18th century France. The Dijian tushuo (Illustrated Arguments of the Emperor's mirror; hence Dijian) was compiled in 1572 under the supervision of the Ming prime minister Zhang Juzheng (1525–1582) as the primer textbook for the emperor who reigned 1573–1620, who was then only 10-year-old in Chinese count. I have researched on the Chinese editions of the Dijian and hoped to solve the problems relating to the compilation process and, behind its facade as a textbook, the real agenda of its maker. However, there are still many more to be explored. This book was originally a hand-painted manuscript but was later made into woodblock-printed books. They were widely circulated and even got transported to Japan and France in the following centuries. My ongoing project is hoped to investigate further more on these Japanese and French versions of the Dijian.

New methodology has been proposed by scholars with emphasis on the interaction and communication between different countries, which stresses the reciprocity in the interaction between transmitter and receiver. It is under this very concern about the encounters and the interactions between the European countries and the East Asian countries that I am conducting this current research project. The comparisons of the transmissions of the Dijian eastward and westward should shed more light on our understanding of the multi-layer aspects of the different cultures' encounters. I will study the context in which specific cultural interactions took place, with special focus on the agents of these encounters and transmissions as well as on the exuberant visual culture and material culture these books generated.



Chu‑Ping LO
Research Intensity, Business Services, and Trade

Eaton and Kortum (2001) employ a probabilistic formulation to a multi-country Ricardian model with a continuum of goods, in which all country endogenously share a common research intensity (relative to population growth) such that research intensities are invariant to relative incomes, then affecting relative incomes. However, the research intensities vary substantially even among OECD countries. I therefore extend their model by adding business services into production to show that the country-specific business service intensity is an important determinant to the research intensity. I argue that a country has a less distortion in its business service sector tends to have a higher business service intensity. It encourages the country to carry out more intensively the research activities, leading to the higher research intensity and then making a higher income to the country.



Chien‑Ming YANG
Neurobehavioral Aspects of Insomnia: Implications for the Association between Sleep and Emotion

The advance of sleep science for the past few decades has enhanced our understanding of the neurophysiological mechanisms of sleep regulation. However, insomnia remains to be one of the most common health-related complaints. Past researches have accumulated evidences supporting the contributing roles of psychological and behavioral factors in insomnia. The factors indicated include dysfunctional beliefs about sleep, stress, maladaptive sleep-related behaviors, emotion disturbances and hyper-arousal. We proposed a Neurobehavioral Model that depicts insomnia as a disruption of the neurophysiological mechanisms that regulate sleep and waking that can be resulted from psychological and behavioral factors. The presentation will illustrate the model and describe the results of our previous studies that demonstrated the association of insomnia with different etiological factors. Furthermore, the implications of this model for the association between sleep and emotion and some research ideas and on-going researches on this topic will be discussed.



Meiyu FANG
The Country Differences in the International Human Resource Management

The purpose of the study is to examine the relationships between high performance work systems (HPWSs) and organizational performance among US, China, and Taiwan. Although there are some researches evidences on the impacts of HPWSs on organizational and individual performance, there is few research examining the moderating roles of the cultural perspectives. This will be the major contribution of the current study. The present study will treat the national characteristics of the United States as base lines for comparisons with Taiwan and China. Then the author will use meta-analysis to calculate the effect sizes of HPWSs in different countries. In addition, the present study also raises an important issue of the generalizability of the theories built in US context. Furthermore, the present study plans to construct the comparative models and provide useful suggestions for the human resource management practices for the companies operating in Taiwan, China, and the U.S.



Chin‑Shou WANG
The Rise of Judicial Politics in Taiwan

The judiciary has played a more and more important role to the politics of Taiwan. For instance, the court determined the result for the litigious and controversial presidential election of 2004. On top of it, Taiwan's former President Chen Shui‑bian was found guilty and put in jail because of corruption cases. There is a new phenomenon for the politics of Taiwan, i.e. the rise of judicial politics. Unlike other countries whose judicial politics originated from constitutional courts, the rise of the Taiwanese judicial politics came from District Courts. There are three major causes for the rise of judicial politics in Taiwan. First, Taiwan's judiciary has become more powerful and independent due to the efforts of some reform-minded prosecutors and judges. Second, there exists a flaw to the democracy of Taiwan. As clientelism and corruption are rampant, many politicians have been prosecuted for corruption. Third, elections in Taiwan have become very competitive. When disputations in elections occur, politicians would appeal to the judiciary for a resolution.



Yao‑Ming HSU
WTO, Climate Change and China

The risk of climate change to our world is without doubt and the importance of relevant efforts for combating climate change are ongoing both at domestic and international level. At first, this research project mainly focuses on the specific regulatory paradigm of climate change, i.e., United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and Kyoto Protocol (and/or some possible future international regulatory instruments) and urges that such a mechanism must try to reach some harmonization between its implementation and the existing international trade rules codified in the World Trade Organization (WTO), no matter with the general norms such as non-discrimination principle or with the specific instrument such as the Agreement on Subsidies and Countervailing Measures (SCM). The recent panel report of Case Canada Renewable Energy in DSB of WTO in the end of 2012 just demonstrated this necessity of harmonization.

Based on the theoretical backgrounds and practical implications between Trade and Climate Change, the study will be followed by an eminent case study: China¡'s policies and laws relating to climate change. For now, China is under consultation for its measures concerning the wind power equipments (WT/DS/419) since the end of 2010. According to a panel report in Canada Renewable Energy case, it is very possible to resolve this dispute for the wind power equipments, politically and/or legally, between China and US, according to the legal arguments shown in Canada case.

However, a broader and thorough investigation about the climate change policies and laws in China would be finally needed for our comprehensive understanding. As we know, China is during the process of rapid industrialization and urbanization, her needs for energy security would be crucial for her economic growth. In the domain of energy and measures for mitigating the negative effects of climate change, she also invents some strategies, for example subsidies, to find a possible equilibrium between environmental protection and economic development. The conformity of these policies and norms to WTO rules would be necessarily examined in a wide-ranging framework.



Event Contact: 510‑642‑2809



Old Chang in New Bottles: New Light on the Dalai Lama Incarnation
2013 Khyentse Lecture
Speaker: Per K. Sørensen, University of Leipzig, Germany
Date: March 8, 2013 | 5:00–7:30 p.m.
Location: Alumni House, Toll Room
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for Old Chang in New Bottles: New Light on the Dalai Lama Incarnation Throughout history, countless Tibetan religious masters and major emanational lineages or Tulku hierarchies have identified themselves with Tibet's celebrated patron bodhisattva and national saint, Avalokiteśvara, and further back with the Tibetan monarch and national founding figure Srongtsen Gampo. These lineages and eminent religious figures were all to play decisive roles in shaping the political and religious life of Tibet.

The most prominent embodiment of this popular deity patron surely culminated in the universally recognized Dalai Lama lineage, a lineage and cult of the Great Compassionate One that was to legitimize and thus underpin the first theocratic nation-building in Tibet. A compelling narrative central to the national identity of the country, the lecture will offer new intriguing insights regarding the formation and rise of this institution — aspects hitherto unknown to most people.

Per K. Sørensen is professor of Tibetology and Central Asian Studies at the University of Leipzig. He is the author of numerous books and research papers, including Divinity Secularized, Tibetan Buddhist Historiography, and co-authored the trilogy Civilization at the Foot of Mt. Shampo, Thundering Falcon and Rulers on the Celestial Plain. He has traveled widely in the Himalayas, in Tibet and Bhutan where he headed a research project for 15 years. His main interests include Tibetan language and literature, history and cultural studies.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



Imagining in Isolation: Hong Kong Movies in Shanghai from 1949 to the Early 1960s
Lecture
Speaker: Jishun Zhang, Si‑mian Institute for Advanced Studies in Humanities, East China Normal University
Moderator: Wen‑hsin Yeh, Walter and Elise Haas Chair Professor in Asian Studies; Richard H. and Laurie C. Morrison Chair in History; Director, Institute of East Asian Studies
Date: March 11, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

In Chinese. Soon after Hollywood movies were banished in the early 1950s in China, a craze for Hongkong films swept over Shanghai, as the urban population found in film a fashionable form of cultural consumption. In an era of isolation, this phenomenon in China's cities is particularly striking. Watching Hongkong movies was at once a spontaneous group behavior and functioned as shared memory, enabling urban populations to imagine the outside Capitalistic World, and to escape ideological pressure. In a Shanghai marked by dramatic transformation, a new kind of popular culture developed.

This lecture by Zhang Jishun will take a socio-cultural perspective on Hongkong Movies in Shanghai, unveiling Shanghai People's reaction and attitude towards Hongkong movies, and tracing both continuity and disjuncture in a period of great social and cultural upheaval.

In Chinese, without translation.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



The Economic-Security Nexus in East Asia
Colloquium
Speaker: T.J. Pempel, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Moderator: Steve Vogel, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Date: March 12, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

At least since Immanuel Kant, analysts have debated the relationship between economics and security. Many so-called realists contend that a nation-state's primary concern must always be the protection of its territory from potential foreign military challenges. Thus, they should be dubious about committing the country's long term security to multilateral institutions and should be skeptical about the potential benefits of economic links to other states. A quite different view is offered by those who stress the peace-inducing power of cross-border economic transactions. Typically, this view holds that as countries become more interdependent economically and particularly as they create institutions embodying that interdependence, their incentives to engage in military conflicts with one another are diminished.

East Asia provides a valuable laboratory for investigating this general relationship. The countries of the region have typically become far more interdependent economically through expanded trade, foreign direct investment, the development of cross-border production networks, and monetary linkages. Moreover, an expanding network of regional institutions has enveloped most of them. But for a long period two countries, Burma-Myanmar and the Democratic People's Republic of [North] Korea have been conspicuous exceptions with their repressive military regimes, their economic isolation and poverty, and their apparent disdain for closer regional cooperation. Furthermore, East Asia also remains the locus of numerous intra-regional security hotspots tied to unresolved territorial divisions, nuclear proliferation, negative historical memories and high levels of domestic xenophobia, among other irritants. Importantly, however, despite such difficulties Northeast Asia has not seen a state-to-state shooting war since the Korean armistice of 1953 and Southeast Asia has been devoid of such wars since 1979.

Professor Pempel will examine the puzzling mixture of security tensions, economic linkages, regional institutions, and the absence of war in East Asia. His central concern will be to analyze the connected but often independent paths along which regional economic and regional security relations have been moving. The key aim will be toward deeper understanding of the region's recurring security tensions combined with the persistent avoidance of open shooting wars.

This talk is part of a series of lectures by IEAS Residential Research Fellows presenting their current research.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809






Japanese Society in Transition: Women, Family and Mental Health Issues
Panel Discussion
Speakers:
 •  Steven Vogel, Chair, Center for Japanese Studies; Professor,
     Political Science, UC Berkeley
 •  Susan Holloway, Professor, Graduate School of Education, UC Berkeley
 •  Michael Zielenziger, Author and Journalist
Date: March 13, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Image for Japanese Society in Transition: Women, Family and Mental Health Issues This panel discussion will build on the research behind three books: Suzanne Hall Vogel's The Japanese Family in Transition: From the Professional Housewife Ideal to the Dilemmas of Choice; Susan Holloway's Women and Family in Contemporary Japan; and Michael Zielenziger's Shutting Out the Sun: How Japan Created its Own Lost Generation.

Are Japanese women today more liberated or more constrained than they were in the high-growth era? Are Japanese mothers raising children differently from their mothers and grandmothers? Are Japanese people having trouble coping with an era of greater freedom and choice? Are they under more stress? The panel will address these questions and more, reviewing recent developments in Japanese society.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



"Chairman Mao Can Vote and So Can We": A History of Elections as State-Building Rituals in Twentieth Century China
Colloquium
Speaker: Joshua Hill, Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Chinese Studies, UC Berkeley
Discussant: Wen‑hsin Yeh, Professor, History; Director, Institute of East Asian Studies
Date: March 13, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: 223 Moses Hall
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Image for 'Chairman Mao Can Vote and So Can We': A History of Elections as State-Building Rituals in Twentieth Century China Elections have been an important part of mainland Chinese political culture for over a century. Beginning in the waning years of the Qing dynasty and continuing until the first decade of the People's Republic, Chinese governments devoted significant amounts of time and resources to the organizing of elections. Despite this, Chinese elections have generally been dismissed as charades because none of the regimes that ruled China in the twentieth century came to power through the ballot box. Instead, rulers expected these elaborately planned elections to serve an entirely different function: as ritual occasions for the training, education, and creation of citizens. The goal of voting was not to give voters the chance to change the government, but to give the government an opportunity to transform the electorate.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Telepathic Corpses, Snow Buddhas, and Flames Encased in Ice: Radical Hope in Lu Xun's Wild Grass
Colloquium
Speaker: Eileen Cheng, Asian Languages and Literatures, Pomona College
Date: March 14, 2013 | 12:30–2:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for Telepathic Corpses, Snow Buddhas, and Flames Encased in Ice: Radical Hope in Lu Xun's Wild Grass This talk examines images of decomposition and disintegration in Lu Xun's Wild Grass. Reminders of the ephemeral nature of life, these images also reflect the violence of language and the limits of representation — that is, the inadequacy of texts to fully or accurately capture the past and a present in the midst of disappearing. Yet, Lu Xun's prose-poems also contain an urgent plea: Of the necessity for commemoration. In spite of his doubts, Lu Xun harbored a "radical hope": that his texts, like epitaph inscriptions, might allow the spirit of the past and the once living to flicker alive, as sources of illumination for the present.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321

 


Fan Writing: The Cultural Transactions between North and South in Early Medieval China
Colloquium
Speaker: Xiaofei Tian, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Harvard University Date: March 15, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Fan Writing: The Cultural Transactions between North and South in Early Medieval China Many scholars have demonstrated that Lu Ji (261–303) and Lu Yun (262–303), scions of a prominent southern noble family who went north and served the Western Jin court at Luoyang, reveal an intense "southern consciousness" in their writings. In this paper I call attention to the Lu brothers' enthrallment with the north, with a special focus on Lu Ji's poetic inscription of his nuanced fascination with the northern culture. The paper argues that the Lu brothers were fans of northern culture, with Lu Ji's poetry in particular demonstrating many characteristics of modern fan writings, and discusses how Lu Ji's refashioning of the north in turn influences the creation of the cultural south during the period of disunion known as the Northern and Southern Dynasties (317–589).

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



The Rule of Mandates: How China Governs Over Law and Democracy
Colloquium
Speaker: Mayling Birney, International Development, London School of Economics
Date: March 19, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

The Rule of Mandates: How China Governs Over Law and Democracy The speaker will present evidence that China uses a distinctive form of governing, what she calls a "rule of mandates" in contrast to a rule of law. Under a rule of mandates, standards for accountability are relative rather than absolute, as lower officials are effectively directed to adjust the local implementation of the center's own laws and policies in order to meet the center's highest priorities. In China, this governing system has helped promote stability and growth, yet curtailed the potential impact of rule of law and democratic reforms. The speaker demonstrates this impact by drawing on evidence from original surveys, interviews, and archival work. Yet she also explains why this governing system is likely to become more problematic for China in the future, potentially jeopardizing even the economic growth and stability it has thus far supported.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Three Laughers and Six Friends: Designing Contemporary East Asian Gardens in the USA
Colloquium
Speaker: Marc Peter Keane
Date: March 20, 2013 | 12:30–2:00 p.m.
Location: 315A Wurster Hall
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Tiger Glen Garden. Photo by Alan Nyiri. The cultures of gardening in East Asia are among the most ancient in the world and are still vital to this day. Garden designer, Marc Peter Keane, who lived in Kyoto, Japan, for nearly 20 years will discuss the process of distilling and reinventing East Asian gardens for settings in the United States. The talk will look at two of his gardens: the recently completed Tiger Glen Garden at the Johnson Museum of Art and the Six Friends Garden designed for the Cornell Plantations. The Tiger Glen Garden depicts the tale known as the Three Laughers of the Tiger Glen, an allegory in which people overcoming differences of creed to find a unity of friendship. The Six Friends Garden is a contemporary expression of Japanese, Chinese and Korean gardening and literary culture.

Tiger Glen Garden wins the Golden A' Design Award (A-Prime Design Award)

The Tiger Glen Garden at the Johnson Museum of Art was chosen for the Gold level of the A' Design Award (A-Prime Design Award). The A' Design Award, based in Como, Italy, is an international award that aims to highlight the best designs, design concepts and design oriented products & services.

The general public announcement of the A' Design Awards will happen on April 15th. In the meantime a summary of the Tiger Glen Garden award can be seen here.

Photo by Alan Nyiri. Tiger Glen Garden.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



Bright Lights across the River: Competing Modernities at China's Edge
Colloquium
Speaker: Franck Billé, Postdoctoral Researcher, Department of Social Anthropology, University of Cambridge
Date: March 21, 2013 | 1:00–2:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Numata Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Bright Lights across the River: Competing Modernities at China's Edge. The two cities of Heihe (China) and Blagoveshchensk (Russia) stand right opposite each other across the Amur River. But if they are comparable in footprint and population size, they look drastically different. Having evolved from a small settlement two decades ago, Heihe is a very modern city, structured on an urban model that is emerging throughout China. By contrast, Blagoveshchensk looks like a typical Eastern European town and has remained practically unchanged in the last twenty years. The contrast increases even further at night, when the whole of Heihe's riverbank illuminates in very bright lights.

For the Russians in Blagoveshchensk, these lights are symbolically crucial. If they continue to see their town as an outpost of Russian cultural presence in the East, former assumptions of cultural superiority have been deeply undermined. Indeed, no longer viewed as a 'backward' developing country, China has now become a serious economic and geopolitical contender. This rise has been viewed by Blagoveshchensk residents with an ambivalent mixture of anxiety and fascination. For the younger generation, the lights increasingly signal the ushering in of a new kind of modernity, offered by an economically confident China where the future beckons and where everything seems possible.

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑3622



Living Without Dignity and Writing with Integrity
Colloquium
Speaker: Yan Lianke
Date: March 21, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Yan Lianke One of China's most successful writers, Yan will talk about writing fiction in China today. He sees the people's loss of dignity within Chinese culture and under Chinese state power and compromises made by authors faced with this lack of dignity and loss of intellectual integrity. The question is how to compromise in life while remaining faithful in one's writing. In the real world, dignified writing can only come from heroic characters.

Born in 1958 in Henan Province, China, he is the author of many novels and short-story collection, including Serve the People!, and has won China's two top literary awards, the Lu Xun for Nian, yue, ri (The Year, the Month, the Day), and the Lao She for Shouhuo (Pleasure). His most recent book, Lenin's Kisses, was listed as one of the top three books of 2012 by Evan Osnos of the New Yorker. Osnos comments: "This story of a village that decides to buy Lenin's corpse is Yan at the peak of his absurdist powers. He writes in the spirit of the dissident writer Vladimir Voinovich, who observed that 'reality and satire are the same.'"

Biography: http://paper-republic.org/authors/yan-lianke/

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Contemporary Nepalese Art Practice: A Conversation with Yuvak Tuladhar
Panel Discussion
Date: March 22, 2013 | 5:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Center for South Asia Studies

Image for Contemporary Nepalese Art Practice: A Conversation with Yuvak Tuladhar A panel discussion of art and religion in Nepal, organized in conjunction with the current exhibition at the Institute of East Asian Studies, "Cities of Devotion: Newar Buddhist Traditions and the Paintings of Yuvak Tuladhar" (on view through May 1, 2013).

Participants:
Atreyee Gupta, History of Art, UC Berkeley
Todd Lewis, World Religions, Holy Cross University
Sugata Ray, History of Art, UC Berkeley
Yuvak Tuladhar, Artist
Sanjeev Uprety, Central Department of English, Tribhuvan University, Nepal

Moderator:
Alexander von Rospatt, South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



On Family Values: A Question of Human Rights
Colloquium
Speaker: Henry Rosemont, Jr., Religious Studies, Brown University
Date: April 1, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for On Family Values: A Question of Human Rights In thinking about how to address the manifold economic, social, political and environmental problems facing the U.S. and the world today, it might prove useful to re-examine the early Confucian insistence on the family as the nexus of ethical, political and spiritual life. In the first place, while a great many families today can be characterized as sexist, oppressive, and/or just generally dysfunctional, many more of them are not, at least in the rich industrialized nations, and families are not going to disappear as an institution no matter what some people might wish. Moreover, admitting that "family values" has regularly been employed conceptually in the service of arch-conservative social and political orientations, reinforcing patriarchy, homophobia, and especially sexism, nevertheless, family values can, it will be argued, be modified along much more progressive social, political and economic lines when placed in an updated Confucian conceptual framework.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Women for Women: Gender Bias in the 2012 Presidential Election of Korea
Colloquium
Speaker: Jiyoon Kim, Asan Institute for Policy Studies
Date: April 2, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

The 18th presidential election of Korea in 2012 engendered numerous subjects to be discussed for electoral scholars. In particular, an incredible amount of attention was paid to the fact that a female president was elected in one of the world's most traditional and conservative societies. Some political pundits and scholars noted the disproportionately high support for Park among female voters, through which they attempted to explain Park's decisive victory.

This talk examines the source of the female voters' support for President Park Geun‑hye in the 2012 presidential election. Conventionally, Korean female voters are known to be more conservative than their male counterparts. However, it is not yet clear whether the female support for Park stems from the "gender affinity effect" or a pre-existing gender gap. Using the Asan Institute's Electoral Studies of 2012, this talk will explore which effect prevailed and contributed more heavily to Park's electoral victory.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Returning Souls: Documentary Screening with Filmmaker Hu Tai‑Li
Documentary Film
Speakers:
 •  Hu Tai‑Li, Filmmaker
 •  You‑tien Hsing, Geography, UC Berkeley
Date: April 3, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Image for Returning Souls: Documentary Screening with Filmmaker Hu Tai‑Li An intimate family story within a politically charged historical framework, "Returning Souls" unfolds in an environment where ancient cultures grapple with the power of western religions, national land policy, and the local politics of Taiwan. In the most famous ancestral house of Taiwan's matrilineal Amis tribe, carved pillars tell the community's most cherished legends. Some forty years ago, a strong typhoon toppled the house, after which the pillars were moved to the Institute of Ethnology Museum. The documentary follows the efforts of young villagers who, with assistance from female shamans, challenged tribal members and village representatives to communicate with the ancestors residing in the pillars. They eventually brought those souls back — rather than the pillars themselves — and began reconstructing the house. The documentary explores issues of identity politics and the anxieties of a generation caught in the crosshairs of modernity.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



The Missing Master: "China" in Zuoxiao Zuzhou's Music and Art
Lecture
Speaker: Zuoxiao Zuzhou, Musician and author
Discussant: Michael Timmins, Cowboy Junkies
Date: April 4, 2013 | 6:00–8:00 p.m.
Location: Faculty Club, Heyns Room
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities

Image for The Missing Master: 'China' in Zuoxiao Zuzhou's Music and Art From Zuoxiao Zuzhou's beginnings as an itinerant street vendor of cut-rate CDs and self-taught guitarist, he has developed a rich and distinctive musical idiom which draws playfully and with great passion on rock and roll, Chinese folk and operatic sounds, and electronic textures. His lyrics are complex, poetically ambiguous, sometimes scabrously funny, and full of heartbreakingly melancholic insights into the harsh and sometimes absurd social realities of post-socialist China. Zuoxiao Zuzhou's prolific work as a musician and film composer (with 15 albums of original compositions to date) has also garnered a great deal of attention outside of China. He's an electrifying performer, and has toured across China as well as in Europe.

He has also become a leading composer for independent Chinese films, working closely not only with Ai Weiwei, but also writing music for the most globally recognized film auteur of his generation, Jia Zhangke.

Zuoxiao Zuzhou's work as a maverick artist and public figure has been multi-faceted. He was one of the founding members and leading figures in the "East Village" artists village of the 1990s — a Beijing based group of artists who fueled the later explosion of Chinese visual and performance art in the global marketplace. His first band, No, was a pivotal experiment in avant-garde rock music, and its influence is still felt in underground and alternative music circles in Beijing. When faced with rampant censorship and music piracy in his solo career, Zuoxiao took the production, product design, and marketing of his music into his own hands, revealing his talent as one of the best studio sound engineers in contemporary China, while also pioneering a controversial new direct business model that eliminated political interference (by removing state-run music companies from the equation) and copyright infringement (by offering his music free on-line). He is also a novelist and memoirist, whose two published books feature wildly creative accounts of the artistic life in a country hell-bent on development at any cost. Whether in his books or his songs or his graphic art, Zuoxiao Zuzhou pushes the envelope artistically and politically, maintaining a tough, humorous, unflinching and clear-eyed empathy for those who have been silenced and marginalized.

Zuoxiao Zuzhou is the greatest popular Chinese musician of his generation, a brave and thoughtful voice of dissent, and an artist of rare talent and integrity.

See Morning Edition story on him: http://www.npr.org/2013/02/18/171900960/chinas-leonard-cohen-calls-out-political-corruption

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



China Goes Global: The Partial Power
Lecture
Speaker: David Shambaugh, Political Science and International Affairs, and Director of the China Policy Program, George Washington University
Moderator: Wen‑hsin Yeh, Professor of Modern Chinese History, and Director, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
Date: April 5, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Faculty Club, Heyns Room
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

David Shambaugh Most global citizens are well aware of the explosive growth of the Chinese economy, and China watchers have shed much light on the country's internal dynamics — China's politics, its vast social changes, and its economic development. In his discussion of his new book, China Goes Global, David Shambaugh focuses on how this increasingly powerful nation has become more active and assertive throughout the world.

Thirty years ago, China's role in global affairs beyond its immediate East Asian periphery was decidedly minor and it had little geostrategic power. As Shambaugh charts, though, China's expanding economic power has allowed it to extend its reach virtually everywhere — from mineral mines in Africa, to currency markets in the West, to oilfields in the Middle East, to agribusiness in Latin America, to the factories of East Asia. Shambaugh offers an enlightening look into the manifestations of China's global presence: its extensive commercial footprint, its growing military power, its increasing cultural influence or "soft power," its diplomatic activity, and its new prominence in global governance institutions. Shambaugh argues that China's global presence is more broad than deep and that China still lacks the influence befitting a major world power — what he terms a "partial power," and explores China's current and future roles in world affairs.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Hafu: a film about the experiences of mixed-Japanese living in Japan
Documentary film
April 7, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: 100 Genetics & Plant Biology Building
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Image for Hafu: a film about the experiences of mixed-Japanese living in Japan Bay Area premiere of the documentary, Hafu.

About the film...

With an ever increasing movement of people between places in this transnational age, there is a mounting number of mixed-race people in Japan, some visible others not. "Hafu" is the unfolding journey of discovery into the intricacies of mixed-race Japanese and their multicultural experience in modern day Japan. The film follows the lives of five "hafus" — the Japanese term for people who are half-Japanese — and by virtue of the fact that living in Japan, they are forced to explore what it means to be multiracial and multicultural in a nation that once proudly proclaimed itself as the mono-ethnic nation. For some of these hafus Japan is the only home they know, for some living in Japan is an entirely new experience, and others are caught somewhere between two different worlds.

Official film website.

Registration required: Free

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



Prosper or Perish: Credit and Fiscal Systems in Rural China
Colloquium
Speaker: Lynnette Ong, Department of Political Science; Munk School of Global Affairs, University of Toronto
Date: April 8, 2013 | 3:30–5:00 p.m.
Location: 202 Barrows Hall
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

The official banking institutions for rural China are the Rural Credit Cooperatives (RCCs). Although these co-ops are mandated to support agricultural development among farm households, since 1980 half of RCC loans have gone to small and medium-sized industrial enterprises located in, and managed by, townships and villages. These township and village enterprises have experienced highly uneven levels of success, and by the end of the 1990s, half of all RCC loans were in or close to default, forcing China's Central Bank to bail out the RCCs. In Prosper or Perish, Lynette Ong examines the bias in RCC lending patterns, focusing on why the mobilization of rural savings has contributed to successful industrial development in some locales but not in others.

Interweaving insightful and theoretically informed discussions of rural credit, development, governance, and bank bailouts, Ong identifies various sources for China's uneven development. In the highly decentralized fiscal environment of the People's Republic, successful industrialization has significant implications for rural governance. Local governments depend on revenue from industrial output to provide public goods and services; unsuccessful enterprises starve local governments of revenue and result in radical cutbacks in services. High peasant burdens, illegal land acquisition by local governments, and other poor governance practices tend to be associated with unsuccessful industrialization. In light of the recent liberalization of the rural credit sector in China, Prosper or Perish makes a significant contribution to debates within political science, economic development, and international banking.

Lynette Ong is Associate Professor in the Department of Political Science and at the Munk School of Global Affairs at the University of Toronto. She is the author of Prosper of Perish: Credit and Fiscal Systems in Rural China (Cornell University Press, 2012). Her publications have appeared in Comparative Politics, International Political Science Review, China Quarterly, Pacific Affairs, Journal of East Asian Studies, Asian Survey, Foreign Affairs, and Far Eastern Economic Review, among others.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



China's Ancient History Expansionism and Korea's Response
Colloquium
Speaker: Chang‑hee Nam, Professor of Political Science, Inha University
Date: April 9, 2013 | 12:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for China's Ancient History Expansionism and Korea's Response This talk will cover Beijing's newly raised claim that the ancient Korean kingdoms, Koguryo and Palhae, belonged to China. This history expansionism by China aims at generating an excuse for the country to occupy the northern part of North Korea in the event of an internal crisis in Pyongyang. Another reason is to amplify nationalistic pride by annexing dazzling jade civilizations outside the Great Wall border area in an effort to divert mounting public frustration over economic disparity and corruption in the country.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674

 


"Letter to Ren An" ascribed to Sima Qian (ca. 90 BCE)
Panel Discussion
Panelists:
 •  Steven Durrant, University of Oregon
 •  Waiyee Li, Harvard University
 •  Han van Ess, Ludwig Maximilian Universitat, Munich
 •  Michael Nylan, UC Berkeley
Date: April 10, 2013 | 3:00–5:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Many consider the curious "Letter to Ren An" (attributed to Sima Qian) to contain the most important insights into the motivations for writing history in early China, as it purports to describe Sima Qian's refusal to take the "honorable way out" by committing suicide, on the grounds that he must complete the monumental work of history begun by his father as an act of filial piety. As the the or (aka, the ), the joint work of the Simas is widely reckoned to be the single most powerful work of history-writing in the entire Chinese tradition (hence the continual analogies made to both Herodotus or Thucydides) and the ancestor of the entire genre, the longstanding controversies regarding the authenticity of the letter require some attention. Four leading Han historians have been convened for this workshop, each offering a different "take" on the Letter.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Exceptional and Chinese: Beyond China and the West
Lecture
Speaker: Wang Gungwu, Professor and Chairman of the East Asian Institute, National University of Singapore
Discussants:
 •  Aihwa ong, Anthropology, UC Berkelely
 •  Penny Edwards, South and Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
Moderator: Wen‑hsin Yeh, History, UC Berkeley, and Director, Institute of East Asian Studies
Date: April 10, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Faculty Club, Heyns Room
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies (CCS), Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Image for Exceptional and Chinese: Beyond China and the West Sixty years ago, Francis L.K. Hsu in his Americans and Chinese: two ways of life (1953), described the people of both countries as culturally and psychologically exceptional. Today all the talk is about two powerful countries, exceptional now in a different world. Like the book, this lecture will focus on people. Were Chinese who left China exceptional, or exceptional only after they left? Did it matter if they moved not to the West but within the region? When they remained or became Chinese, was that what distinguished them outside China? For several centuries, more than 90 per cent of them lived, worked and settled in various parts of the Nanyang or Southeast Asia. What was exceptional and Chinese about them, and what happens when China now seeks to be exceptional anew?

Professor Wang Gungwu is the Chairman of the East Asian Institute and University Professor, National University of Singapore and Emeritus Professor, Australian National University. He received his B.A. (Hons) and M.A. degrees from the University of Malaya in Singapore, and his Ph.D. at the University of London (1957). His teaching career took him from the University of Malaya (Singapore and Kuala Lumpur, 1957–1968, Professor of History 1963–68) to The Australian National University (1968–1986), where he was Professor and Head of the Department of Far Eastern History and Director of the Research of Pacific Studies. From 1986 to 1995, he was Vice-Chancellor of the University of Hong Kong. He was Director of East Asian Institute of NUS from 1997 to 2007.

Professor Wang is a Commander of the British Empire (CBE); Fellow, and former President, of the Australian Academy of the Humanities; Foreign Honorary Member of the American Academy of Arts and Science; Member of Academia Sinica; Honorary Member of the Chinese Academy of Social Science. He was conferred the International Academic Prize, Fukuoka Asian Cultural Prizes. In Singapore, he is Chairman of the Institute of Southeast Asian Studies; Chairman of the Lee Kuan Yew School of Public Policy at NUS; Vice-Chairman of the Chinese Heritage Centre; Board Member of the Institute of Strategic and Defence Studies at NTU.

This talk is part of the Institute of East Asian Studies Distinguished Speaker Series.

Event Contact: ccary@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Nostalgia and Resistance: Gender and the Poetry of Chen Yinke
Colloquium
Speaker: Waiyee Li, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Harvard University
Date: April 11, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: 370 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for Nostalgia and Resistance: Gender and the Poetry of Chen Yinke Using the later poetry and historical writings of Chen Yinke as example, the speaker will explore how gender roles and gender boundaries are brought to bear on moral and political choices in traumatic historical moments. Chen's use of feminine tropes aligns him with the tradition of indirect expression and allegorical meanings, and his empathy with notable women from history becomes a mode of cultural nostalgia that also amounts to a kind of political resistance.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



From Seal to Consort and Back Again: The Shifting Significance of the Term Mudrā in Esoteric Buddhist Literature
Colloquium
Speaker: David Gray, Religious Studies, Santa Clara University
Date: April 11, 2013 | 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for From Seal to Consort and Back Again: The Shifting Significance of the Term Mudrā in Esoteric Buddhist Literature

The Sanskrit term mudrā is an important "term of art" in tantric Buddhist literature, given the fact that it has special meanings in this context, distinct from its customary usage. While it retains its ordinary sense of "seal," the term also has several other special meanings, including the well-known "hand gesture" as well as the lesser-known "consort" or "sexual partner." In this talk I will endeavor to explore the history of this term in tantric Buddhist literature, and in so doing shed some light on the history of the development of tantric Buddhist traditions in India.

David B. Gray is Associate Professor of Religious Studies at Santa Clara University, in Santa Clara, California, where he teaches a wide range of Asian religions courses. His research explores the development of tantric Buddhist traditions in South Asia, and their dissemination in Tibet and East Asia, with a focus on the Yoginītantras, a genre of Buddhist tantric literature that focused on female deities and yogic practices involving the subtle body. His publications include numerous journal articles and book chapters, as well as The Cakrasamvara Tantra: A Study and Annotated Translation (New York: American Institute of Buddhist Studies, 2007), and the forthcoming books "The Cakrasamvara Tantra: Editions of the Sanskrit and Tibetan Texts" and "Tsong Khapa's Illumination of the Hidden Meaning: Maṇḍala, Mantra, and the Cult of the Yoginīs, An Annotated Translation of Chapters 1–24."

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104

Download a copy of the announcement here.



Samsung vs Apple: Can a Fast Follower Overtake a Market Leader?
Speaker: Tony Michell, Managing Director, Korea Associates Business Consultancy Ltd.
Colloquium
Date: April 12, 2013 | 12:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Numata Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for Samsung vs Apple: Can a Fast Follower Overtake a Market Leader? The court battles between Samsung and Apple around the globe have focused attention on the "rise" of Samsung, and to a new kind of competition between market leaders. Tony Michell, author of Samsung Electronics and the struggle for leadership of the electronics industry (2010), will talk about the steps by which Samsung rose to its present heights, and clarify some issues about Apple's introduction of the iPhone in 2007, and branding positions vs Samsung.

The talk will look forward to the future battles in convergence, and pose the question as to whether the future lies with Apple or with Samsung, the quintessential American company or the leading Asian electronics company?

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674

Download Tony Michell's bio here.

 


Advertising Censorship in the Times of Freedom: Producing "Smart" Consumers in South Korea
Colloquium
Speaker: Olga Fedorenko, Assistant Professor of East Asian Studies, New York University
Date: April 12, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for Advertising Censorship in the Times of Freedom: Producing 'Smart' Consumers in South Korea This talk is about the dilemmas and effects of advertising censorship in South Korea of the 2000s. Historically, South Korean advertising has been subject to rigorous scrutiny, with various semi-government and non-government agencies concerning themselves with before- and after-the-fact advertising review. As liberal ideologies proliferated in South Korea, advertising censors — the staff of various review boards and public representatives called upon to rule on unprecedented cases — found themselves in the uncomfortable position of administering unfreedom in a time when freedom was a paramount value. I draw on participant observation at a semi-government media censorship board and interviews with advertising censors to explore how they navigated the contradictory demands: to protect the unwary public by limiting advertisers' freedom, on the one hand, and, on the other, to cultivate themselves as liberal, open-minded individuals committed to governing others through freedom. Overall, I suggest that advertising censorship, though ostensibly limiting advertising discourses and curbing advertising abuses, in the end produced "smart" consumers, to use the censors' parlance — normative advertising consumers who, while open to be stirred by advertisements, did not expect an actual realization of advertising promises — thus granting the advertising industry a license to exaggerate and exploit emotions to ever greater degrees. Relating this argument to the South Korean realities of the 2000s, I suggest that "smart" advertising consumers are none other than the cynical subjects of late liberalism, whose hegemony has consolidated in South Korea since the democratization of the late 1980s, and especially after the 1997 Asian Debt Crisis.

Olga Fedorenko is Assistant Professor/Faculty Fellow at the Department of East Asian Studies at New York University. She received her PhD from the East Asian Studies Department at the University of Toronto in November 2012. Her dissertation, entitled "Tending to the 'Flower of Capitalism:' Consuming, Producing and Censoring Advertising in South Korea of the 00's," takes an anthropological approach to advertising-related practices in contemporary South Korea.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



East Asian Housing Markets: Comparisons, Linkages and Lessons in the Post-Crisis World
Lecture
Speakers:
 •  Robert Edelstein, Co-Chairman Fisher Center for Real Estate and Haas School
     of Business, UC Berkeley
 •  Cynthia Kroll, Fisher Center for Real Estate, Haas School of Business, UC
     Berkeley
 •  Ashok Bardhan, Fisher Center for Real Estate, Haas School of Business, UC
     Berkeley
Date: April 15, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

This study examines the interrelationships and linkages between and among China's housing market, China's economy, and those of other East Asian countries. Building from an understanding of the recent U.S. housing and financial market meltdown and its adverse impacts on the global financial markets, and the world economy, we explore similarities and differences in the market structures, institutional arrangements, financial systems, and regulatory history in the case of China and the Asian region; and draw upon ongoing research to analyze the linkages in goods and financial markets across the region, and how they influence housing markets and the broader economies of China, Hong Kong, South Korea, Singapore, and Japan. Specific questions addressed by our research include: How are housing markets in China driven by the underlying economic structure (including income distribution and land ownership), urbanization patterns and demographics? How did housing in East Asian countries fair during the crisis and its aftermath? How do government policies in this region affect land and housing markets?

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



From Colonial Subject to National Citizen: the Child in Korean Children's Magazines, 1937–1950
Colloquium
Speaker: Dafna Zur, Assistant Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University
Date: April 16, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for From Colonial Subject to National Citizen: the Child in Korean Children's Magazines, 1937–1950 The turn of the twentieth century brought with it an intense intellectual drive towards enlightenment in Korea, and one of the most significant targets of enlightenment was the child. The momentum toward reform and the gaze toward the future brought the child to the forefront of social discourse and made the child into a pliable image both textually and visually.

Dr. Zur's research examines a representative range of children's magazines along the political spectrum in order to demonstrate the ways in which the image of the child became a contested site of ideological inscription. Her presentation illuminates points of continuity and rupture in the texts and illustration of children's magazines written during the transition from late colonial to postliberation Korea.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Seamless Space: Home and Temple in the Contemporary Jōdo Shinshū
Colloquium
Speaker: Jessica Starling, Shinjo Ito Postdoctoral Fellow, Center for Japanese Studies, UC Berkeley
Date: April 17, 2013 | 5:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Image for Seamless Space: Home and Temple in the Contemporary Jōdo Shinshū More than 90% of Buddhist monks in Japan today are married and live together with their families in the temple. In the traditionally monastic sects, a publicly married clergy is a relatively recent development, dating roughly to the turn of the 20th century, and the phenomenon has produced no small amount of anxiety over its seeming incoherence with the ideal of world-renunciation. But in the Jōdo Shinshū, or True Pure Land School of Buddhism, the custom of clerical marriage dates back to the movement's inception in the 13th century, and Shin clerics and their families bring doctrinal resources to bear on their domestic life in the temple.

This talk focuses on the role of the priest's wife (known as the bōmori or temple guardian) in order to illuminate the seamlessness of private and public space and domestic and religious action at the temple. Drawing from Shin doctrinal sources and the narratives of wives themselves, as well as anthropological research on the construction of home and domesticity in contemporary Japan, I explore the implications of the temple family's boundary-crossing existence, in particular the role of temple wives in carrying out this "domestic religion."

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



South Korea's Latte Paradox: Inventing the Barista as a Service Professional
Colloquium
Speaker: Jee‑Eun Song, Korea Foundation Postdoctoral Scholar, Center for Korean Studies, UC Berkeley
Date: April 18, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for South Korea's Latte Paradox: Inventing the Barista as a Service Professional The barista profession gained its popularity in South Korea with the entrance of transnational coffee companies like Starbucks Coffee in 1999. Since then, the barista line of work has gained a particular meaning in South Korea as a highly trained and specialized profession. Based on ethnographic research and interviews with Starbucks baristas in Seoul in 2006, this talk addresses how South Koreans buy into the myth of Starbucks. I ask, how do baristas come to understand their work as something other than low paid flexible work? I explore the paradox of work in the consumer-oriented production-end of the service industry in neoliberal global economy when that work involves "coffee art." I position the work of baristas in the larger context of economic restructuring post Asian financial crisis (1997–1999) in order to problematize the neoliberal logic of capitalism that foregrounds self-reliant discourses of the individual and the self, as opposed to ideas of social resources or welfare. The desire to self-manage and promote the self, as is the case with the baristas, is part of the larger phenomenon of the neoliberal economic reform led by the state in the post-economic crisis. This talk complicates our understandings of global products, and how neoliberal policies become implemented in everyday cultural practices.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Forms of Exchange: China and the Muslim World
Conference
Speakers:
 •  Dawn Murphy, Princeton-Harvard China and the World Program
 •  Wang Suolao, Director, Center for Middle East Studies, School of
     International Studies, Peking University
 •  Dru Gladney, Anthropology, Pomona College
Date: April 18, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Faculty Club, Heyns Room
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Chinese have interacted with Muslim populations and communities for over a millennium — since the early days of maritime entrepots and silk road caravans — exchanging goods, arts, and ideas. Today, relations between China and the Muslim world remain complex and varied. China's increasing power brings a new hunger for markets and material, a hunger that has driven overtures to Muslim regions around the world. This conference considers historical connections and contemporary realities of Southeast Asian, Central Asian, and the Middle Eastern relations with China. What factors and interests mediate each region's interactions? To what extent has China has confronted or accommodated Islam, in its various forms, in pursuing its national interests? How has China negotiated international relations in light of recent events, such as a nuclear Iran or the surge of activism collectively called the Arab Spring? And in what ways has exchange with the Muslim world shaped Chinese thought, culture, and contemporary realities? This conference brings together specialists in historical and contemporary relations between China and Muslim regions for an exploration and assessment of interaction and exchange.

In this opening session, the following papers address China's relations with the Middle East:

  • Dawn Murphy: "Rising Revisionist? China's Evolving Relations with the Middle East in the post-Cold War Era"
  • Wang Suolao: "China and Islamist Regimes after Arab Spring"
  • Dru Gladney: "China's Middle East Pivot: The Past is not Prologue"

Opening remarks by Nezar AlSayyad, Professor of Architecture, Planning, and Urban History, and Chair, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, UC Berkeley

This conference continues at 9:30 a.m. on Friday, April 19, 2013, at the Institute of East Asian Studies.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Forms of Exchange: China and the Muslim World
Conference
Date: April 19, 2013 | 9:00 a.m.–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Middle Eastern Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Chinese have interacted with Muslim populations and communities for over a millennium — since the early days of maritime entrepots and silk road caravans — exchanging goods, arts, and ideas. Today, relations between China and the Muslim world remain complex and varied. China's increasing power brings a new hunger for markets and material, a hunger that has driven overtures to Muslim regions around the world. This conference considers historical connections and contemporary realities of Southeast Asian, Central Asian, and the Middle Eastern relations with China. What factors and interests mediate each region's interactions? To what extent has China has confronted or accommodated Islam, in its various forms, in pursuing its national interests? How has China negotiated international relations in light of recent events, such as a nuclear Iran or the surge of activism collectively called the Arab Spring? And in what ways has exchange with the Muslim world shaped Chinese thought, culture, and contemporary realities? This conference brings together specialists in historical and contemporary relations between China and Muslim regions for an exploration and assessment of interaction and exchange.

The opening session of this conference, on contemporary relations between China and the Middle East, takes place April 18 at the Faculty Club.

Speakers include:

  • David Atwill
    History, Pennsylvania State University
  • Peter Bartu
    International and Area Studies, UC Berkeley
  • Gardner Bovingdon
    Department of Central Eurasian Studies, Indiana
  • Michael Brose
    History, University of Wyoming
  • Kevin Caffrey
    Anthropology, Harvard University
  • James D. Frankel
    Religion, University of Hawaii, Manoa
  • Dru Gladney
    Anthropology, Pomona College
  • Engseng Ho
    History & Cultural Anthropology; Duke Islamic Studies Center, Duke University
  • Kwangmin Kim
    University of Colorado
  • Ma Jianxiong
    Anthropology, The Hongkong University of Science of Technology
  • Dawn Murphy
    Princeton University
  • Kristian Petersen
    Religion, Gustavus Adolphus College
  • Rian Thum
    History, Loyola University
  • Wang Suolao
    Director, Center for Middle East Studies, School of International Studies, Peking University
  • Wu Bingbing
    Arabic Language and Culture, Peking University

Closing Remarks by Wen‑hsin Yeh, History, UC Berkeley, and Director, Institute of East Asian Studies.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Controlled Burn: How China Uses Democratic Tools to Sustain Authoritarian Rule
Colloquium
Speaker: Peter Lorentzen, Assistant Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Panelist: Kevin O'Brien, Professor, Political Science, UC Berkeley
Date: April 22, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

Both the rise of popular protests and the growth of investigative journalism in China are often interpreted as constituting challenges by civil society and its reformist allies to the authoritarian state. In recent years, however, scholars have recognized that tolerating these phenomena may instead potentially strengthen the authoritarian state by relieving social pressures or providing useful information. This talk will discuss the logic and risks of this strategy, which must trade off the benefits of vertical information flow — from citizens to the center — with horizontal information flow — from citizens to each other. An analytical understanding of the interacting incentives, objectives, and information of different members of the state and of society helps to explain a number of puzzling phenomena in contemporary Chinese politics.

This talk is part of a series of presentations by IEAS Residential Research Fellows.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Imagination of a Nomad
Colloquium
Speaker: Insook Kim, Novelist and UC Berkeley Daesan Writer‑in‑Residence
Date: April 23, 2013 | 12:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for Imagination of a Nomad A talk by novelist and UC Berkeley Daesan Writer‑in‑Residence Insook Kim.

Note: This talk will be in Korean without interpretation.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674

 


Collecting and Theorizing Korea in Late 19th Century American Anthropology
Colloquium
Speaker: Robert Oppenheim, Associate Professor, East Asian Studies, University of Texas, Austin
Date: April 24, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image for Collecting and Theorizing Korea in Late 19th Century American Anthropology Korea as a research focus is commonly considered peripheral to the development of the American discipline of anthropology in late 19th century. In some quantitative sense, this is undoubtedly the case — far more research effort, indeed the preponderance of (proto-) anthropological work in the United States before 1900, was directed at Native American populations. Nonetheless, both this presentation and the larger project of which it is a part (on American anthropology of Korea before 1945) argue for Korea's significance to the formation of the discipline and as a vantage point through which important institutional and theoretical dynamics of anthropology in this period are revealed. These dynamics include, for example, the entanglement of anthropology with multiple modalities of political expansion, the interplay of forces and paradigms in the creation of museum and exhibition displays, and the role of area within universalist evolutionary theory.

In more concrete terms, the story of this presentation starts with the ethnological collection of Korean materials for American museums, which can be dated to roughly a half an hour after the signature of the first 1882 treaty between Chosôn and the United States. It passes through the first Korean exhibit at the United States National Museum (of the Smithsonian Institution) in 1889, and then to the relation of Korean participation in the 1893 World's Columbian Exposition to various anthropological transactions that also took place there. Its culmination is the first "Korea book" in American anthropology, Stewart Culin's Korean Games of 1895 — a book that centered and marginalized Korea (and East Asia) within the U.S. discipline in the very same stroke.

Robert Oppenheim received his PhD in anthropology from the University of Chicago in 2003, and is currently Associate Professor in the Department of Asian Studies and Director of the Center for East Asian Studies at the University of Texas at Austin. His first book, Kyôngju Things (University of Michigan Press, 2008), considered technical politics, the practices of heritage, and place-making in the South Korean historic city. Articles related to his present book project on American anthropology and Korea, 1882–1945, have appeared or are forthcoming in the Journal of Asian Studies, American Anthropologist, positions, Anthropology & Humanism, and Histories of Anthropology Annual.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Visualizing the Geography of Diseases in China, 1870s–1920s: An Overview of the Earliest Disease Maps of China
Colloquium
Speaker: Marta Hanson, Johns Hopkins University, Department of the History of Medicine
Date: April 26, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for Visualizing the Geography of Diseases in China, 1870s–1920s: An Overview of the Earliest Disease Maps of China Why write about maps of disease? Medical mapping is a way of thinking; they are also statements in an argument and evidence furthering a specific case. The function of medical maps is to visualize causal relationships. On the one hand, disease incidence, and on the other hand, potential causes — the climate or weather, water and air quality, geological features, or an unknown poison in the environment. Maps of disease are never merely descriptive but useful ways for researchers to think through the relationship between the nature of any given disease and the specific environment that produced it. They also legitimated new public health interventions. I interpret over 50 medical maps of disease in China from the 1870s to the 1920s as both analytical tools intended to visualize the relationship between space and disease and rhetorical strategies to further new colonial power relations. These disease maps also present a visual history of the major transformations in modern medicine within China from the mid nineteenth-century peak of medical geography to the eventual victory of laboratory medicine by the early twentieth century. Maps, like nineteenth-century vital statistics and Petri-dishes not only made causal relations newly visible, they also made new methods for controlling animal and human populations newly possible.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Writing the History of Japanese Literature
Colloquium
Speaker: Alan Tansman, Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Moderator: Dan O'Neill, Associate Professor, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Date: April 30, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

Image for Writing the History of Japanese Literature Three years ago Oxford University Press asked me to cram 1300 years of Japanese literary history into a one-hundred page book with no footnotes. At the time this seemed like a treat: liberation from the straightjacket of scholarly form and an invitation to go with the passion of taste over the policing of propriety. I could write about what I loved not what I knew the tradition valued. I could create my own tradition! But three years of reading through the tradition has left me internally conflicted, torn between love and responsibility, sifting among classics I have loved and classics I continue to fail to appreciate, and among the unsung works I can't imagine not putting front-and-center. Putting my map of Japanese literature on the page has been a humbling reminder of the man-made construction of tradition. This informal talk will be a presentation of my experience wrestling this book to the ground.

This talk is part of a series of presentations by IEAS Residential Research Fellows.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Dragon and Phoenix: Worship and Yin-Yang in Prehistoric Mythology
Colloquium
Speaker: Chen Wangheng, Philosophy Department, Wuhan University
Date: May 1, 2013 | 12:00–1:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for Dragon and Phoenix: Worship and Yin-Yang in Prehistoric Mythology Both Long (dragon) and Feng (phoenix) are imaginary beings whose images vary at different times. After a long period of change, their forms as we know them today were shaped during the Han dynasty (206 BC – 220 AD). This talk will explore the origins of the Yin and Yang, and prehistoric Long and Feng worship.

In Chinese with translation.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321

 


On the Western Study of Yogācāra Buddhism
Colloquium
Speaker: Alberto Todeschini, Visiting Scholar, Center for Buddhist Studies
Date: May 2, 2013 | 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Image for On the Western Study of Yogācāra Buddhism

Much attention has been paid, in the past few decades, to the Western encounter with Buddhism writ large. But the European and American encounter with Yogācāra Buddhism has received relatively little notice. Yogācāra, which arose in the first centuries of the common era, was one of the most significant philosophical developments of South Asian Mahāyāna. It was the subject of extended critique from Buddhists and non-Buddhists alike, and with the exception of Japan, classical Yogācāra did not survive as an independent school. Be that as it may, its influence was felt throughout the Mahāyāna world. This talk explores roughly the first century of the academic study of Yogācāra, highlighting the emergence of important trends such as the idealist interpretation of the school and notions surrounding the relationship between Yogācāra and meditative practice.

Alberto Todeschini received his Ph.D. from the University of Virginia after studying at the University of London and Lausanne. He specializes in South Asian Buddhism and is currently researching the function of dreams in Buddhism, the reception of Yogācāra Buddhism in 19th century Europe and North America, and the life of the nun Bhaddā Kuṇḍalakesā. He previously taught at the University of London, at Kathmandu University's Center for Buddhist Studies and at the University of Virginia, where he also worked at the Tibetan and Himalayan Library. He has been Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai fellow at the Research Institute for Buddhist Culture at Ryukoku University in Kyoto and visiting fellow at Kyoto University's Institute for Research in Humanities.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



The Rise of the Stability State
Lecture
Speaker: Carl Minzner, Associate Professor of Law, Fordham Law School
Moderator: Rachel Stern, Assistant Professor of Law and Political Science, Boalt Law School, UC Berkeley
Date: May 6, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Over the past two decades, the Chinese domestic security apparatus has expanded dramatically. "Stability maintenance" (weiwen) operations have become a priority for local Chinese authorities. Public security chiefs have risen in bureaucratic influence. Funding and personnel for state operations aimed at controlling citizen petitioners and social protest have surged. And control of the institutions responsible for addressing these issues has been vested in progressively more senior Party political-legal authorities.

But China remains far from a simple police state. To be sure, state authorities harass, detain, and arrest individuals they deem a threat to their rule. And vast numbers of state agents and informally recruited personnel have been employed to keep watch over selected political dissidents, citizen activists, and public interest lawyers. But heightened official sensitivity to social unrest has also led to state concessions to mobilized groups of aggrieved citizens, facilitated strategies of "rightful resistance" among petitioners, and prompted state authorities to revive Maoist-era populist judging practices and mediation institutions at the expense of late-20th century legal reforms.

This article argues that the birth of these trends dates to the early 1990s, when central Party authorities adopted new governance models that differed dramatically from those that of the 1980s. They 1) increased the bureaucratic rank of public security chiefs within the Party apparatus, 2) expanded the reach of the Party political-legal apparatus into a broader range of governance issues, and 3) altered cadre evaluation standards to increase the sensitivity of local authorities to social protest. Over the past twenty years, these practices have flowered into an extensive weiwen apparatus, where local governance is increasingly oriented around the need to respond to social protest, whether through concession or repression. Chinese authorities now appear to be rethinking these developments, but the direction of reform remains unclear.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Changing Conceptions of Female Beauty in Chinese History
Colloquium
Speaker: Prof. Bin Chang, CCS Visiting Scholar, Professor of Literature at Hebei University, PR of China
Date: May 7, 2013 | 4:00–5:30 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for Changing Conceptions of Female Beauty in Chinese History Throughout history, Chinese societies have exhibited unique conceptions of the ideal female. 2,500 years ago, the ideal woman would appear tall, strong, fertile, and able to engage in hard labor. Contrastingly, a true beauty during the Qin and Han dynasties was extremely slim and lightsome; legend held that the finest woman of the era could dance on the palm of one's hand. A beautiful Tang Dynasty woman was plump, fleshy, and perhaps downright fat. Women engaged in foot-binding beginning in the Song dynasty and the practice escalated during the Ming and Qing dynasties. From Song to Qing, for a woman to be regarded as truly beautiful she must exhibit the smallest feet. The Three-inch "Golden Lotus" foot (三寸金莲) is a product of painful binding, folding and breaking of a young female's foot. By the first half of the 20th century the "cheongsam woman," with her sensuous dress and Western-inspired curly hair, fair skin and slim frame, became a new standard of modern feminine beauty. Mao's reign (1950s–1970s) brought about a 'political ideology' of beauty: The ideal Chinese woman was shown in dull-colored work clothes and pictured as strong and hearty, with a thick waist and powerful arms and legs, and a round, solid face. By the 1980s, prominent Chinese beauties were portrayed in colored dresses and possessing flush, round faces — suggesting a transitional phase between the Maoist era and today's openly consumerist culture. Since the 1990s the standard for female beauty has transitioned yet again; Chinese women desire to be slim and tall, with full breasts, and faces accented by sharp, pointed chins. This presentation will demonstrate the changes of standards of beauty with archived photographs.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6322

Download Professor Bin Chang's biography here.



Migration, Parenting, and Children's Mental Health Adjustment: Studies of Chinese American Immigrant Families and Migrant Families in China
Lecture
Speaker: Qing Zhou, Assistant Professor, Psychology, UC Berkeley
Moderator: You‑tien Hsing, Professor, Geography, UC Berkeley
Date: May 8, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: IEAS Conference Room — 2223 Fulton, 6th Floor
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

Migration is becoming increasingly common in various parts of the world. Families can migrate from country to country or from region to region within the same country (e.g., from rural to urban areas). As families migrate and settle into a new country/region, family members experience changes in behaviors, habits, social relationships, as well as values and beliefs. My lab is especially interested in the influence of migration on parenting and parent-child relationships, and their subsequent effects on children's mental health adjustment. Existing research suggested that the impact of migration on children's adjustment is complex: while the process of migration might create challenges and risks for some children, it generates opportunities for and resilience in other children. Thus, much more research is needed to understand the processes and mechanisms in which migration influence child development. In this talk, I will present findings from two studies: 1) a study investigating the relations of families' cultural orientations to parenting practices and children's mental health adjustment in a sample of Chinese American children in immigrant families in the Bay Area; 2) a study comparing parenting practices and children's mental health and school adjustment between children of migrant families and children of native families in Beijing. These samples provide excellent opportunities to study the dynamic relations among culture, socio-economic status, family relations, and child development. These studies have implications for social and educational policies, clinical interventions, and services for children of immigrant families in the U.S. and children of migrant families in China.

This talk is part of a series of presentations by IEAS Residential Research Fellows.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



The Sound of Weaving at Ôzu
Exhibit
Speaker/Performer: Fukuko Katsuura, Independent craftswoman
Dates: May 15, 2013 – September 10, 2013, Monday – Friday* | 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Japanese Studies

Image for The Sound of Weaving at Ôzu The ancient arts of weaving and dyeing live on in the handwork of dedicated craftspeople such as Fukuko Katsuura. From a love of Japan's textile arts came a dedication to mastering traditional weaving. From a life lived on and of the land, came experiments in coaxing color from plants gathered and grown. "The Sound of Weaving at Ôzu" features a selection of her work in silk, paper, and other fibers dyed and woven, work that at once exemplifies centuries-old technique and personal vision. A series of illustrative photographs of the creative process supplement the display.

Public Event:
June 13, 2013
Institute of East Asian Studies Conference Room
2223 Fulton Street, Berkeley — 6th Floor

Weaver and dyer Fukuko Katsuura discusses textiles in the exhibition and demonstrates aspects of her craft. Free and open to the public.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809

* No event on May 27 and July 4, 2013



Weaving Discussion and Demonstration
Lecture
Speaker: Fukuko Katsuura, Weaver and dyer
Moderator: Joyce Hulbert, Textile Collections Manager at the San Jose Museum of Art
Date: June 13, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Japanese Studies

Weaver and dyer Fukuko Katsuura discusses textiles in the exhibition and demonstrates aspects of her craft. Katsuura, who grew up in the Japanese countryside, taught herself to weave, and to use plant dyes to obtain the colors she needed for her materials. This talk is offered in conjunction with the exhibit, "The Sound of Weaving at Ôzu," which is currently on view at the Institute of East Asian Studies and features a selection of her work in silk, paper, and other fibers dyed and woven.

This talk will be in Japanese, with English translation by Hidefumi Katsuura. A reception will follow the lecture.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Vision and Strength of the Korean Economy
Colloquium
Speaker: Yong‑Ho Baek, Professor of Public Policy, Ewha Womans University
Date: July 26 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

NOTE: Talk will be given in Korean without interpretation

Professor Yong‑Ho Baek will address the policy direction taken by the Lee Myung Bak Administration (2008–2013). From insights gained during a distinguished career in the Korean government, Professor Baek will also provide suggestions for Korea in the future.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



China and the Chinese World Order in the 1950s: A Research Workshop
Seminar
July 30 – August 3, 2013 | 10 a.m.–5:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies
Scholars from the U.S. and China present their research on the People's Republic of China during the 1950s. This is a closed workshop jointly sponsored by East China Normal University, Harvard University, and UC Berkeley. The agenda and paper titles is attached. UC Berkeley Students, faculty, staff, and visiting scholars may apply to audit by emailing ccary@berkeley.edu with subject line: Audit request — China in the 1950s. Papers will be presented in Chinese or English (no translation).

The Institute of East Asian Studies gratefully acknowledges the support of:

  • Li Ka‑shing Foundation Program in Modern Chinese History at the University of California, Berkeley
  • Fairbank Center for Chinese Studies, Harvard University
  • Harvard-Yenching Institute

Event Contact: ccary@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6492

Download a copy of the agenda here.



Why do Marxian Social Sciences Survive in Japan?
Conference/Symposium
Speakers:
 •  Hiroshi Onishi, Keio University
 • Kazuyasu Miyata, Hokkaido University of Education
 • Akio Kamitani, Visiting Scholar of CJS, Sapporo Gakuin University
Moderator: Andrew Barshay, UC Berkeley
Date: September 4, 2013 | 4:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Image for Why do Marxian Social Sciences Survive in Japan? More than 20 years have passed since the collapse of Eastern European socialist systems. It was thought that the world would move towards greater peace and democracy. But instead the gap between poverty and wealth has expanded worldwide, which has caused an increase in war and terrorism.

Due to these circumstances, we now see Communist Parties and socialist forces, that had been once despised, are regaining their power. The Communist Party in Japan, which started in 1922, has survived adverse winds against communism and socialism. The party made great progress in elections recently and has become what many see as the only alternative to the conservative governing body.

While the study of Marxian social sciences has been retracted in economics departments in universities worldwide, it still remains an important discipline. At this symposium we will present the possibility of Marxian social sciences and the Communist Party's survival, and how they could maintain their influences.

Moderated by Andrew Barshay, Professor, Department of History, UC Berkeley

Speaker 1: Hiroshi Onishi (大西広), Keio University, 'Still Powerful Japanese Marxian Economics — its base and development'

Speaker 2: Kazuyasu Miyata (宮田和保), Hokkaido University of Education, 'The difference in methodology between Marxian and neo classical economics'

Speaker 3 and coordinator: Akio Kamitani (神谷章生), Visiting Scholar of CJS, Sapporo Gakuin University,'The formation of the public organizational base of the independence type Communist Party'

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑;3415



The Self as a Process: Rāmakaṇṭha's Middle Ground Between Brahminical Eternalism and Buddhist Momentariness
Colloquium
Speaker: Alex Watson, Harvard University
Date: September 5, 2013 | 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

The paper concerns the Buddhist-Brahminical debate about the existence or non-existence of a self. First an analysis is given of what precisely separates the Buddhist and the Brahminical positions. Next the view of Rāmakaṇṭha — a little-studied 10th century Kashmirian thinker, belonging to the tradition of Śaiva Siddhānta — is introduced. We will see how he carves out middle ground between the two protagonists in this debate, and I will argue that those two occupy extreme limits, leading to an unnecessary polarization of the debate. Rāmakaṇṭha's view arguably provides better opposition to Buddhism, since it achieves what the Naiyāyika wants to achieve while making less extravagant metaphysical claims.

At the end I ask which is to be preferred, Rāmakaṇṭha's view or the Buddhist's. I argue that these two views are also unnecessarily polarized, and I outline a different philosophical position, which rejects both the contention that we have an unchanging essence (accepted by all the Brahminical thinkers and by Rāmakaṇṭha), and the contention that we are momentary (which came to be the mainstream view of Buddhist philosophy).

Alex Watson is the Sanskrit Preceptor at Harvard University. His publications include The Self's Awareness of Itself (2006), about the Buddhist-Brahminical Ātman debate, and (with Dominic Goodall and Anjaneya Sarma) An Enquiry into the Nature of Liberation (2013), about twenty different theories concerning liberation (mokṣa) and the nature of the liberated state. After a BA in Western Philosophy and Psychology (University of Oxford), he switched to Indian Philosophy and Sanskrit, completing an MA (SOAS, University of London), MPhil, DPhil and JRF (University of Oxford). He has held research fellowships at the EFEO, Pondicherry, India, a JSPS fellowship at Kyushu University, Japan, and has taught at the University of Vienna.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



Monkey Business: New Voices from Japan
Panel Discussion
Speakers:
 •  Masatsugu Ono  •  Yoko Hayasuke
 •  Roland Kelts
 •  Ted Goossen
 •  Motoyuki Shibata
Date: September 6, 2013 | 1:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, The Japan Foundation, The Nippon Foundation

Monkey Business: New Voices from Japan Two Japanese writers visit the Bay Area to discuss their writing, Japanese culture, and what it feels like to live in post-tsunami Japan. They will be joined by Roland Kelts, author of Japanamerica, Ted Goossen and Motoyuki Shibata, the editors of Monkey Business, the only English-language journal focused on Japanese literature, manga and poetry. There will be readings, discussions, and a Q&A session.

Masatsugu Ono (b. 1970) launched his career by writing about a mythical fishing village in southern Japan. Since then his scope has widened considerably, as he writes about Japan, France, and countries created by his imagination. He has published seven books of fiction and two books of essays. He is a recipient of the Asahi New Writer's Award and the Mishima Yukio Award, and has been short-listed three times for the Akutagawa Prize. He teaches French at Meiji Gakuin University.

Yoko Hayasuke (b. 1982) made her debut with the story "John," in the 12th issue of the Japanese Monkey Business. The English translation appeared in the 2nd issue of the English Monkey. "Eri‑chan's Physics" appeared in the 14th issue of the Japanese MB, and her stories have appeared in various literary journals including Waseda Bungaku, Subaru and Bungei.

Peter Orner (b. 1968) is the author of two novels — The Second Coming of Mavala Shikongo and Love and Shame and Love — two collections of short stories and two works of nonfiction. His latest story collection is Last Car Over the Sagamore Bridge. His first book, Esther Stories, has just been reissued with an introduction by Marilynne Robinson. Orner is the recipient of many prizes and fellowships. He teaches at San Francisco State University.

Roland Kelts is author of the best-selling Japanamerica, and his articles, essays and stories have been published in The New Yorker, Time, Zoetrope: All Story, The Village Voice, The Wall Street Journal, A Public Space, Newsday, Vogue, Cosmopolitan, The Yomiuri and The Japan Times among others. He has taught at a number of universities including New York University, Rutgers University and the University of Tokyo.

Ted Goossen (b. 1948) teaches Japanese literature and film at York University in Toronto and co-edits the English version of Monkey Business with Shibata. He is the general editor of The Oxford Book of Japanese Short Stories and has published translations of stories and essays by Hiromi Kawakami, Haruki Murakami, Yôko Ogawa, Sachiko Kishimoto, and Naoya Shiga, among others.

Motoyuki Shibata (b. 1954) teaches American literature and literary translation at the University of Tokyo. He received the 1992 Kodansha Essay Award for his book The Half-Hearted Scholar, and was the winner of the 27th Suntory Prize for Social Sciences and Humanities for American Narcissus. Among others, he has translated Paul Auster, Thomas Pynchon, Rebecca Brown, Stuart Dybek, Kelly Link, Steven Millhauser, Richard Powers, Charles Simic, and Barry Yourgrau.

This event will also be held on Thursday, Sept. 5th at 5 p.m. at the University of San Francisco, Xavier Auditorium, Fromm Hall. For more information, click here.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Tansaekhwa and the Case for Abstraction in Postwar Korea
Colloquium
Speaker: Joan Kee, Assistant Professor, History of Art, University of Michigan
Date: September 6, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Tansaekhwa and the Case for Abstraction in Postwar Kore Starting in the mid-1960s, a group of Korean artists began to push paint, soak canvas, drag pencils, rip paper, and otherwise manipulate the materials of painting in ways that prompted critics to describe their actions as "methods" rather than artworks. Later known as Tansaekhwa, or Korean monochrome painting, this loose constellation of works became the international face of contemporary Korean art and a basis for what later came to be known as contemporary Asian art. Yet Tansaekhwa's significance also lay in how its constituent artists offered another response to abstraction. Artists like Park Seobo, Ha Chonghyun, Kwon Young‑woo and Lee Ufan considered the possibilities of ink painting as extrapolated from its limitations, as well as questions of process that challenged the frontality of painting. This talk introduces Tansaekhwa and how some of its representative works made a case for abstraction as a way for viewers to engage productively with the world and its systems.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Taiwan Studies Digital Archives
Colloquium
Speaker: Ping‑hui Liao, Chuan‑liu Chair Professor in Taiwan Studies, Department of Literature, University of California, San Diego
Date: September 11, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Taiwan Studies Digital Archives My talk is on ways in which we can utilize digital archival materials on Taiwan's print and visual culture. The main objective is to familiarize scholars in related fields with such resources, so as to facilitate their teaching, research, information sharing, and creative design. A rich diversity of website materials have been made available over the years by such governmental, academic, commercial agencies as Taiwan's National Science Council, National Taiwan University, National Central Library, Taiwan Literature Center, Film Archive, National Palace Museum, IT Park Gallery, and Hanzhen Publishing, to mention just a few. A major integrative platform, National Digital Archives Program (www.ndap.org.tw) provides hyperlinks in accessing enormous amount of metadata, among them, National Taiwan's Huart, Ino, Tanaka, and many other valuable collections. I would like to highlight the roles of Taiwan as a hub of trans-Pacific cultural networks, especially in the production and circulation of anti-colonial discourse, Chinese modernist arts, sinophone literature and cinema, and so forth, functioning as a dynamic (albeit small) republic of letters and public sphere across the Chinese-speaking communities. Zhang Taiyan, for example, developed some of his most advanced ideas about modern Chinese state and multi-ethnic society when he escaped to Taiwan where he encountered Japanese colonial modernity first-hand and very briefly served as a column editor for the Taiwan Daily News (Nichinichi Shinpo). Liang Qichao also inspired many Taiwanese intellectuals of the time to organize themselves around cultural institutions and news media like Taiwan Youth (1920), to enlighten the "new people" at home and abroad. The constituency of such a public sphere through newspapers and print culture in Taiwan from 1896 on and of its lasting trans-regional impact, especially in the form of literary supplements and cultural criticism, can be better grasped with the publication of the digitalized versions of Taiwan Nichinichi Shinpo or Taiwan Xinmin, together with many colonial and postwar archives. In my talk, I would like to demonstrate how such digital links can be of use to courses and researches on modern Taiwan and East Asia. I shall cover topics ranging from colonial newspapers to modern art, sinophone writings, Taiwan cinema, smart cities, and sharing economy.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



3.11: Disaster and Change in Japan
Colloquium
Speaker: Richard J. Samuels, Massachusetts Institute of Technology
Date: September 12, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

3.11: Disaster and Change in Japan Japanese political entrepreneurs have used the March 2011 catastrophe in Tohoku (3.11) to nudge national policy in the direction of their own choosing. For some, 3.11 was a warning for Japan to "put it in gear" and head off on a new path. For others, the catastrophe was a once in a millennium "black swan," so Japan should "stay the course." Still others declared that 3.11 taught that Japan must return to an idealized past and rebuild what was lost to modernity and globalization. Battles among these perspectives on change — and contested appeals to leadership, community, and risk — defined post-3.11 politics and public policy in Japan, particularly in the areas of national security, energy policy, and local governance.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Info session/social for undergrads interested in Asian Studies major
Information Session
Speaker: Bonnie C. Wade, Chair, Group in Asian Studies
Date: September 12, 2013 | 5:10–6:30 p.m.
Location: 223 Moses Hall
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

Are you a UC Berkeley undergrad who's interested in finding out about the Asian Studies major or minor? Want to socialize with other students who study Asia? If so, please come to our information session and pizza social!

Event Contact: asianst@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑0333



Liu Xiaodong: Hometown Boy
Documentary Film
Speaker: Liu Xiaodong, artist
Discussant: Winnie Won Yin Wong, Rhetoric Department
Moderator: Andrew F. Jones, Chair, Center for Chinese Studies
Date: September 13, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

3.11: Disaster and Change in Japan Liu Xiaodong (b. 1963) studied at the Central Academy of Fine Arts in Beijing where he received a Bachelor of Fine Arts and a Masters of Fine Art in oil painting. Currently Liu teaches at the Central Academy of Fine Arts, Beijing, China. In the 1990s Liu became well-known for paintings of his friends, relatives, and daily life that reflect social problems on a wide scale. Liu's Hometown Boy series is a combination of childhood memories and his life journey. In this series of paintings, Liu put his childhood friends onto the canvases created in 2010 in his hometown, Jincheng. For the film, Taiwanese director Hou Hsiao‑Hsien accompanied Liu Xiaodong to Jincheng to film the interplay of past and present as seen through the eyes of the artist. The film screening will be followed by a panel discussion that will include the artist.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Obento: Japanese Culture in a Box
Workshop
Speaker: Debra Samuels, Cookbook Author
Date: September 14, 2013 | 11:00 a.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Obento: Japanese Culture in a Box "Food is an international language, a bridge across cultures. My objective is to educate, entertain and encourage people of all ages to be creative and to care about its preparation and presentation."

In this hands-on workshop, cookbook author Debra Samuels will introduce Japanese food history, discuss the comparison between U.S. and Japanese bento (弁当) cultures, conduct a cooking demonstration, and instruct the audience in how to prepare Japanese food in a bento box.

Samuels has been working with children and families for over twenty-five years. She is co-author with Taekyung Chung of The Korean Table (Tuttle Publishing, 2008), and author My Japanese Table: A Lifetime of Cooking with Friends and Family (Tuttle Publishing, 2011). She has lived abroad for more than a decade in Japan and Italy, where she studied Italian, Indian, Korean, and Japanese cuisine.

Registration required. This event will serve known food allergens.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



The Master Who Mistook Himself for a Monster: History as Artifice in Park Chan‑wook's Oldboy
Colloquium
Speaker: Peter Paik, Associate Professor of Comparative Literature, University of Wisconsin, Milwaukee
Date: September 16, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

The Master Who Mistook Himself for a Monster: History as Artifice in Park Chan‑wook's Oldboy Park Chan‑wook's most famous film, Oldboy, evokes polarized responses among critics and film scholars alike. Its detractors dismiss the film as a superficial exercise in stylized violence and gratuitous imagery. Film scholars have used critical paradigms drawn from Marxism and post-structuralism to interpret the film. This talk seeks to go beyond these approaches to examine Oldboy as an allegory of the South Korean experience of compressed modernity. It argues that the rapid development of South Korea has enabled historical types to flourish that have become unfamiliar in the affluent societies of the West, in particular the figure of the master who can conquer his desires and overcome his fear of death.

Drawing on the theoretical work of Nietzsche, Alexandre Kojéve, and Alexis de Tocqueville, this talk explores the question of what it means to create and portray such a human type once a democratic consumer society has emerged and closed off the possibility for any kind of authentic difference, especially the aristocratic values that have to do with the capacity to rise above oneself, one's physical appetites, and materialistic desires.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Unreal Estate: Tong Lam's Photographs of China's Unsettling Settlements
Exhibit — Photography
Speaker: Tong Lam, Visual Artist and Professor, History, University of Toronto
Dates: September 16 – November 6, 2013, Monday – Friday | 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Unreal Estate: Tong Lam's Photographs of China's Unsettling Settlements From the Soviet era to today; from the Mongol frontier to modern Guangzhou, Tong Lam documents what society has built and abandoned. The stories behind these photographs tell of hope, ambition, greed, resistance, and visions that have been crushed or cast aside. Some stories are of gleaming structures hauntingly unpeopled; some stories are of teeming populations surviving amid the squalor of urban ruins. With the frenzy of China's economic growth has come accelerated decay, leaving city and country alike scarred by the relics of past dreams.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



How to Live as a Full-time Writer in Japan
Colloquium
Speaker/Performer: Toh Enjoe
Date: September 17, 2013 | 4:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

How to Live as a Full-time Writer in Japan In this colloquium, award-winning author Toh Enjoe will explain the system behind modern Japanese literature from his point of view as a writer. From the peculiarities of the modern Japanese written language, to the way Japanese writers balance their household finances, to their relationships with publishers, and to the trends of modern Japanese literature, the topic will extend from the micro (Japanese characters) to the macro (social life).

Enjoe will also describe how it is possible for Japanese literature writers who write in Japanese to live in North America under the current system. In addition, he will give examples on how Japanese writers would respond when faced with the "global literature market."

Author Toh Enjoe was born in 1972 in Sapporo, Japan. He studied physics at Tohoku University, and went to receive Ph.D. for a mathematical physical study on the natural languages from the University of Tokyo. After working both in academia and the private sector, he's now a full-time writer whose works include Self-Reference ENGINE, Of the Baseball, and Moonshine. In 2010 he won the Noma Prize for New Writers for Uyushitan [烏有此譚], the Akutagawa Prize for Harlequin's Butterfly [道化師の蝶], and the Nihon SF Taisho award in 2012 and the Seiun Award in 2013 for his collaboration on The Empire of Corpses [屍者の帝国], the unfinished novel of his colleague Project Itoh [伊藤 計劃], who passed away in 2009.

Talk will be given in Japanese, with English translation by Beth Cary.

Photo courtesy of Shinchosha.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Outside Looking In: Everyday Life in North Korea
Panel Discussion
Date: September 17, 2013 | 5:30 p.m.
Location: Asia Society, Bechtel Conference Room, 500 Washington Street, San Francisco
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Asia Society of Northern California, Center for Korean Studies

Outside Looking In: Everyday Life in North Korea The North Korean people have endured poverty, malnutrition and famine, and gross human rights violations, including forced labor camps, public executions, and political repression. But our understanding of everyday life in North Korea and how it is changing is extremely limited. Most of the country is off limits to foreigners, and what coverage there is in Western media is heavily focused on the vagaries of the regime's ruling Kim dynasty and its nuclear weapons program.

Speakers discuss what life is really like inside North Korea. How have social and human rights conditions changed under Kim Jong‑un's reign? Who are the tens of thousands of North Korean defectors and what is life like for them today in other countries? For those who remain, is international aid reaching those who need it most?

Speakers:

  • Sunghee Jo, defector living in the U.S. since 2008; Founder, North Korean Refugees in the United States (NKUS)
  • Sandra Fahy, Professor of Anthropology and North Korea expert, Sophia University (Tokyo)
  • Blaine Harden, Author, Escape from Camp 14; Former correspondent, Washington Post
  • Philip Yun (moderator), Executive Director, Ploughshares Fund

Admission charged; buy tickets online at AsiaSociety.org/ASNC/events

Event Contact: mscarzellathorpe@asiasociety.org, 415‑421‑8707



The Uttaratantra Commentaries in 13th-Century Tibet
Colloquium Speaker: Tsering Wangchuk, University of San Francisco
Date: September 19, 2013 | 5:00&38211;6:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

The Uttaratantra Commentaries in 13th-Century Tibet The Uttaratantra is an early Indic treatise that discusses the concept of buddha-nature at great length. The text was first translated into Tibetan in the 11th century, and since then Tibetan masters have written a number of commentaries to the treatise from various doctrinal perspectives. This paper focuses mainly on the 13th-century Tibetan commentaries that laid the doctrinal foundation for later Tibetan scholars' formulations of ultimate truth.

Tsering Wangchuk received his PhD from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville. He is an Assistant Professor and the Richard Blum Chair in Himalayan Studies in the Department of Theology and Religious Studies at the University of San Francisco. His research interests include the intellectual history of Tibetan Buddhism and the Tibetan diaspora.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



Theses on the Translation of (Chinese) Architecture
Colloquium
Speaker: Andrea Bachner, Comparative Literature, Penn State
Date: September 20, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Theses on the Translation of (Chinese) Architecture This project takes the recent boom of architecture in China, accompanied by vibrant discussions about newness, tradition, and social justice as a basis for a reflection on discourses of globalization and translatability. The "architectural turn" in Chinese studies helps us understand how the real and virtual construction of space gives rise to politics of spatial and cultural relationality.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Negotiating the New in China: Urban Anxieties in the Arts and on the Ground
Lecture
Speaker: Philippe Pirotte, Adjunct Senior Curator, University of California, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Speaker: Max Woodworth, Geography, Ohio State University
Discussant: You‑tien Hsing, Geography, UC Berkeley
Date: September 23, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Center for Chinese Studies

Negotiating the New in China: Urban Anxieties in the Arts and on the Ground The films of Yang Fudong, currently featured at the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, and the photographs of Tong Lam, currently on view at the Institute of East Asian Studies, both explore realities of today's China. Adjunct Senior Curator Philippe Pirotte, who organized the Yang exhibition, and Geographer Max Woodworth, who has studied populations under stress from China's rapid change, will discuss problems related to China's urban and social change, and how these issues are explored in the arts.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Contemporary Japanese Politics: Institutional Changes and Power Shifts
Colloquium
Speaker: Tomohito Shinoda, Professor, International University of Japan
Date: September 24, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Contemporary Japanese Politics: Institutional Changes and Power Shifts Decentralized policy-making power in Japan had developed under the long reign of the Liberal Democratic Party (LDP). In the 1990s, institutional changes were introduced, fundamentally altering Japan's modern political landscape. Tomohito Shinoda tracks these slow yet steady changes to today in the operation of and tensions between Japan's political parties and the public's behavior in Japanese elections, as well as in the government's ability to coordinate diverse policy preferences and respond to political crises.

Electoral reform in 1994 resulted in the selection of Junichirō Koizumi, an anti-mainstream politician, as prime minister in 2001, initiating a power shift to the Democratic Party of Japan (DPJ) and ending LDP rule. Shinoda also details these government and administrative institutional changes and reveals how Prime Minister Koizumi took advantage of such developments to practice strong policymaking leadership. He also outlines the new set of institutional initiatives introduced by the DPJ government and their impact on policymaking, illustrating the importance of balanced centralized institutions and bureaucratic support.

Tomohito Shinoda is professor of international relations at the International University of Japan and received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University's School of Advanced International Studies. His publications include Koizumi Diplomacy: Japan's Kantei Approach in Foreign and Defense Affairs and Leading Japan: The Role of the Prime Minister.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Chan in Chinese Culture 《禪宗與文學》
Colloquium
Speaker: Sun Changwu, Department of Literature, Nankai University
Date: September 25, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Chan in Chinese Culture 《禪宗與文學》 Chan religion is one sect among Chinese Buddhist sects. It took form in early Tang and its institutional presence gradually declined by the end of the Five Dynasties. It is most famous for its guiding instruction: Clarify the heart and mind and your nature will appear. In belief, in ethical teachings, in structural conscious, in behavioral practices, it completely revolutionized Buddhism. Even after its institutional presence had declined, Chan deeply affected the realms of thought and culture, so that its influence continues up until today. It had an especially large impact on literary craft (from rhetorical formulae to the structures used in plots) and on the creative arts in general, not to mention the everyday lives of literary figures.

禪宗是中國佛教的一個宗派,形成于唐初,至唐末五代逐漸衰敗。它提出“明心見性”為綱領的宗義,在信仰、教義、組織形態、修行方式等方面對傳統佛教實行全面變革,具有“宗教革命”的作用與意義,成為推動唐代思想、文化發展的重要因素。即使在其總體形勢已經衰敗之後,仍在思想、文化諸領域造成廣泛、巨大、持久的影響,直到晚近。具體到文學領域,這種影響及於作家的思想觀念、行為理念、生活方式以及創作的思維方法、藝術技巧、語言運用等諸多層面。唐宋以降文學的發展,特別是文人創作,禪宗發揮了重大的積極作用。

In Chinese with English translation.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Current Challenges to US-China Relations
Lecture
Speaker: Dr. Cui Liru, Former President, China Institutes of Contemporary International Relations (CICIR)
Date: September 25, 2013 | 4:00–5:30 p.m.
Location: Sutardja Dai Hall, Banatao Auditorium Sponsors: Institute of International Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Current Challenges to US-China Relations Dr. Cui Liru, a widely respected analyst of China's foreign policy and until recently the President of CICIR, will visit the University of California, Berkeley to deliver a lecture on US-China relations on September 25. Cui studied in the US in the 1970s and returned to China where he was one of the foremost analysts of China's foreign policy. He rose through CICIR to become President and has been a fixture in US-China dialogues and US foreign policy forums. His lecture comes at an extremely important time in the relationship as China's disputes with Japan become more acute, as conflict looms in the South China Sea, and as the Obama Administration struggles to "rebalance" it's policies in Asia.

The lecture is open to the public and will be followed with questions and answers with Dr. Cui.

Open to all audiences.

Event Contact: 510‑642‑2474



The Military and Militarization of Republican China
Conference
Dates: September 27–28, 2013 | 10:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Institute of Research Department of the Republican China Modern History, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences, Center for Chinese Studies

The Military and Militarization of Republican China The Republican period in Chinese history saw wars on multiple fronts, with invasions from without and civil strife from within. The period was shaped by wars that traumatized and transformed society. Papers by scholars from China, the US, and Europe, including work informed by new archival materials and interdisciplinary in approach, analyze the issue of "militarization" and look into the way wars, and the institutionalization or routinization of violence, might have shaped the culture of Republican China.

Click here to go to the conference website.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Music of the Guqin
Performing Arts — Music
Speaker/Performer: Dai Wei, Shanghai Conservatory of Music
Date: October 1, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Music of the Guqin One of China's oldest instruments, the guqin is a seven-stringed, plucked zither long associated with literati culture because of its refined and contemplative nature. Dai Wei, associate professor at the Shanghai Conservatory of Music, will perform and discuss the instrument, its music, and history. Ms. Dai is a professional performer and a scholar of the various schools of the guqin.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



ARCH Lecture Series: Kengo Kuma
Lecture
Speaker: Kengo Kuma, Principal, Kengo Kuma & Associates
Date: October 1, 2013 | 6:30–8:00 p.m.
Location: Wheeler Auditorium
Sponsors: College of Environmental Design, Center for Japanese Studies

ARCH Lecture Series: Kengo Kuma Kengo Kuma's architecture draws on ancient Japanese traditions as well as today's international and innovative technologies. His use of materials might include paper and straw in small countryside villages, or experimental silicon skins in the city. Either way, it is important to him that his architecture be sensual, delighting the eye and inviting our touch. All of this may be out of step with what most architects are doing today, but perhaps that is exactly what makes Kuma such an exciting architect.

This event is co-sponsored by Muji, and is part of the Fall 2013 Lecture Series at the College of Environmental Design, UC Berkeley. For other lectures in the series, see: http:// ced.berkeley.edu/ events-media/ lecture-series/.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Is Venture Finance in China Possible?: The View form Silicon Valley
Lecture
Speaker: Arman Zand, SPD Silicon Valley Bank
Date: October 2, 2013 | 12:45–1:45 p.m.
Location: 100 Boalt Hall, School of Law Sponsors: Berkeley Center for Law, Business and the Economy, Center for Chinese Studies

Within the last few months China has taken steps to liberalize restrictions on interest rates, a move that may signify serious reform in its inefficient financial system and a more rational allocation of capital. That reform already includes efforts to increase lending to the private sector and venture business.

At this event, Arman Zand, Head of Technology and Finance at SPD Silicon Valley Bank in Shanghai, will analyze these challenges and opportunities. Mr. Zand will also explore some of the highs and lows of doing business in a fluctuating economic environment, touching on both daily life as well as the business settin.

Event Contact: bclbe@law.berkeley.edu



Professor Risley and the Imperial Japanese Troupe: How an American Acrobat Introduced Circus to Japan — and Japan to the West
Colloquium
Speaker: Frederik L. Schodt
Date: October 2, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Professor Risley and the Imperial Japanese Troupe: How an American Acrobat Introduced Circus to Japan — and Japan to the West On New Year's Eve, 1866, Professor Risley arrived in San Francisco from Yokohama, Japan. He was accompanied by the Imperial Japanese Troupe of acrobats and performers, who under his direction would amaze not only the residents of San Francisco, but also huge audiences on the East Coast and in Europe.

Risley was a famous acrobat in his own right, and the story of how he introduced circus to Japan, and how he triggered a craze in Japanese performers in the West (and contributed to the Japonisme movement), is part of a fasci¬nating lost-but-recently-uncovered history. In a presentation heavily illustrated with photographs and drawings, award-winning author Frederik L. Schodt will reveal the story of Risley and his troupe, who gave the world one of its first glimpses of Japanese popular culture.

Frederik L. Schodt is a writer, translator, and conference interpreter based in the San Francisco area. He specializes in currents of thought flowing between Japan and North America, and has written extensively on popular culture, technology, and history. He has won numerous awards, including, in 2009, the Order of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Rosette, for his work. In 2013, his book, Professor Risley and the Imperial Japanese Troupe, won the Circus Historical Society's Stuart Thayer Prize.

Links to:

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Health Care in Eleventh-Century China
Colloquium
Speaker: Nathan Sivin, History and Sociology of Science, University of Pennsylvania
Date: October 3, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Department of History

Health Care in Eleventh-Century China Almost everything we know about Chinese medicine before modern times is about classical physicians and their work. But most people before modern times — rural, illiterate, and poor — had no access to elite practitioners. The majority depended instead on healers who employed mostly local drugs, or on ritualists of the popular religion, Buddhism, or Daoism. This talk will discuss for the first time the whole spectrum of health care, and explore the interactions of ritual medicine with other kinds. It will also remark on the uses of this understanding in studying literature, history, and other fields.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321

 


The Interpretation of the Past in Modern Chinese Buddhism
Colloquium
Speaker/Performer: John Kieschnick, Stanford University
Date: October 3, 2013 | 5:10–6:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

The Interpretation of the Past in Modern Chinese Buddhism Over 1500 years, Chinese Buddhists developed a distinctive way of writing about the past, informed on the one hand by Buddhist doctrine, and on the other by a strong indigenous tradition of Chinese historiography. In the twentieth century, however, many of the core assumptions of Chinese Buddhist historiography became increasingly difficult to maintain. A new awareness of the history of Buddhism in India, Ceylon and elsewhere suggested that long held Chinese views about, for instance, the dates of the Buddha, were wrong, and the primacy of Mahayana as the last word of the Buddha began to look suspect. At the same time, Chinese academics, under the influence of the latest trends in Germany, Japan and America, championed radical changes in the writing of history — calling for greater rigor in the use of sources and an iconoclastic suspicion of the veracity of texts and events of cherished national history — that had profound implications for the history of Buddhism. In this lecture, I trace the changes in Buddhist historiography, primarily in the writings of Taixu 太虛 (1890–1947) and Yinshun 印順 (1906–2005). The story of their struggles to narrate the Buddhist past in the modern era reveal the exciting opportunities provided by the new ideas that flooded China in the twentieth century, the dangers of a harsh and fickle political environment, and the limitations of their unique social circumstances as erudite monks from humble family backgrounds.

John Kieschnick, Robert H. N. Ho Professor of Buddhist Studies at Stanford University, specializes in the cultural history of Chinese Buddhism. His representative works are The Eminent Monk: Monastic Ideals in Medieval Chinese Buddhist Hagiography (University of Hawai'i Press, 1997) and The Impact of Buddhism on Chinese Material Culture (Princeton, 2003). He is currently writing a book on the place of the past in Chinese Buddhism.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



Rethinking Ethics: A Confucian Challenge to Libertarianism
Colloquium
Speaker: Henry Rosemont, Jr., Religious Studies, Brown University
Date: October 7, 2013 | 12:00–1:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Henry Rosemont, Jr. Central to the moral (and political) arguments of libertarians are the grounding concepts of human beings as free and rational individuals. There have been numerous attempts by both liberals and conservatives to rebut the libertarian position, but because all of those attempted rebuttals are also grounded in the same concepts, they have not been successful in the past, and there is no good reason to think they will be any more so in thee future, because the libertarian position is but the logical extension of those concepts in the moral realm.It is also a reasonable, consistent and coherent position Thus everyone unhappy with libertarianism must seek new (or very old) grounding concepts of what it is to be a human being if they are to successfully combat it philosophically. Confucius offers an alternative grounding.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



The Revolutionary
Documentary Film
Speakers: Sidney Rittenberg; Irv Drasnin, co-producer & writer
Date: October 7, 2013 | 7:00–9:00 p.m.
Location: PFA Theater
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies, Asia Society Northern California

The Revolutionary Sidney Rittenberg arrived in China as a GI Chinese language expert at the end of World War II. Discharged there, he joined the Chinese Communist Party, and was an active participant in the Chinese communist revolution and its aftermath. An intimate of the Party's leadership, including Mao Zedong and Zhou Enlai, he gained prominence at the Broadcast Administration, one of the most important agencies of government. But in the convulsions of a giant country constantly reinventing itself, he twice ran afoul of the leadership, and served a total of 16 years in solitary confinement. He returned to the United States in 1980.

Rittenberg captivates the audience with his exceptional intellect, uncompromising honesty, and engaging personality. Over a five-year period, former-CBS journalist Irv Drasnin, interviewed Rittenberg to produce a compelling, complex and unique understanding of the 20th century's biggest revolution. From Sid's first meeting Mao in the caves of Yan'an, to his becoming famous and powerful during the Cultural Revolution, to his battling insanity in solitary, his journey and his profound insight illuminate a much greater history—told by an American who was there.

Trailer: http://revolutionarymovie.com/trailer.html

With an introduction by co-producer & writer Irv Drasnin.
Followed by a Q& A with Irv Drasnin and Sidney Rittenberg.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



The Confucian Analects in the Modern World: Five Generations: in celebration of the Norton Critical Edition
Panel Discussion
Panelists:
 •  Herb Fingarette
 •  Henry Rosemont
 •  Mark Csikzentmihalyi
 •  Michael Nylan
 •  Yuming He
 •  Luke Habberstad
 •  Tae Hyun Kim
Date: October 8, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

The Confucian Analects in the Modern World For the first time, the Norton Critical Edition celebrates not a modern classic, but a Classic written in classical Chinese. In honor of the Berkeley participants (faculty, past Ph.Ds, and present graduate students) who have participated in this path-breaking venture, we will have a roundtable discussion, where each contributor speaks for five minutes and then we open discussion to students.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321

 


Gutai's Phase Zero: When Pollock came to Osaka
Colloquium
Speaker: Reiko Tomii, Art Historian and Curator
Date: October 8, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: 370 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

The Confucian Analects in the Modern World One of the most experimental postwar Japanese collectives, Gutai Art Association is vital to our study of world art history and transnational art history. However, although its "prehistory" has been studied by examining the leader Yoshihara Jiro's prewar and wartime experiences in the domestic contexts, little attention has been paid to the decisive moment in 1951 when he had a firsthand experience with the work by Jackson Pollock and other Abstract Expressionists in Osaka.

Taking a cue from the critic Haryu Ichiro's 1979 comment on Gutai, in which he compared the off-the-wall group to the alien Martians, this paper reexamine another moment of Martian visit, the special display of the 1951 Yomiuri Independent Exhibition, which for the first time introduced the new American abstraction to the Japanese audience. To understand the radical nature of Yoshihara's embrace of the Irascibles at the time, this lecture will examine Tokyo's "period eye" (Baxandall), which was definitely skewed toward the eclectic French modernism. Yoshihara's eye will then be contrasted with it, through a close reading of two hitherto little studied texts on Pollock Yoshihara published in 1951 (Kansai bijutsu and Asahi shinbun), which contained the kernel of ideas that would become his guiding principles for Gutai.

Reiko Tomii is an independent art historian and curator, who investigates post-1945 Japanese art in global and local contexts. Long based in New York, she received her master's degree from Osaka University and her doctorate from the University of Texas at Austin.

Photo: © Otsuji Seiko, © Tokyo Publishing House, © Musashino Art University Museum & Library

Free and open to the public • Wheelchair accessible

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Śākyamuni Returns to Lumbinī: A Popular Theme in Newar Buddhist Art and Literature
Colloquium
Speaker: Gudrun Bühnemann, The University of Wisconsin-Madison
Date: October 10, 2013 | 5:10–6:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Śākyamuni Returns to Lumbinī: A Popular Theme in Newar Buddhist Art and Literature According to Newar Buddhists, Śākyamuni Buddha returned to his birthplace Lumbinī after his enlightenment. Depictions of his journey and visit to Lumbinī date back to the seventeenth century. They show the Buddha riding standing up on a Nāga while being attended by Hindu deities in service to him. The theme, known as the lumbinīyātrā, is represented in numerous paintings and in wood and metal work and became especially popular in nineteenth- and twentieth-century Nepal. This paper traces the history of the lumbinīyātrā by examining descriptions in texts and artistic representations and discusses elements of the yātrā which are also found independently in other contexts. In conclusion, it offers some thoughts on the significance of the theme.

Gudrun Bühnemann is a Professor in the Department of Languages and Cultures of Asia, The University of Wisconsin-Madison. She has published extensively on South Asian iconography and ritual. Details can be found at http://lca.wisc.edu/~gbuhnema/. Her recent books include Buddhist Iconography and Ritual in Paintings and Line Drawings from Nepal (Lumbini International Research Institute, 2008) and The Life of the Buddha: Buddhist and Śaiva Iconography and Visual Narratives in Artists' Sketchbooks from Nepal (Lumbini International Research Institute, 2012).

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



From "Big Brothers" to "Little Honeys": Corruption and Masculinity in the PRC
Colloquium
Speaker: John Osburg, Anthropology, University of Rochester
Date: October 11, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

From 'Big Brothers' to 'Little Honeys' Drawing from my own ethnographic research with wealthy entrepreneurs as well as several recent insider accounts of corrupt officials' activities in China, this paper examines many of the practices associated with corruption — distributing favors, keeping mistresses, luxury consumption, etc. — as gendered practices. I argue that corruption should be understood primarily not in terms of wayward individuals but as a fundamentally social phenomenon — as the result of the dominance of the norms, obligations, and values of officials' local social worlds over norms enshrined in law. Many of these norms and values — ideals of hierarchy, loyalty, and masculine solidarity; notions of sexual privilege and consumer pleasure; and modes of status and power derived from patronage are intertwined with evolving configurations of elite masculinity that straddle both government and business worlds in China. This paper highlights some key aspects of this emerging elite masculinity and their significance for understanding the political economy of the PRC.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



'We Are Not Fighting Against the Commies:' The War Film Genre and Politics of History in Recent South Korean Cinema
Colloquium
Speaker: Kyu Hyun Kim, Associate Professor of History, University of California, Davis
Date: October 14, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

'We Are Not Fighting Against the Commies' In this talk, designed to be a part of my ongoing engagement with the problem of representing history in Korean cinema, I will focus on a select group of recent Korean films directly depicting or set against the North-South conflicts following the 1945 liberation, culminating in the Korean War (1950–1953), including Welcome to Dongmakgol (2005), 71 Into the Fire (2009), A Little Pond (2009), In Love and the War (2010), The Front Line (2011) and Jiseul (2012), to discuss how these films address the question of historically representing the war experience. My interpretations of these films will differ significantly from the existing academic analyses (heavily psychoanalytic or otherwise textually-focused) in that I will try to illuminate these films in view of their interactions with the genre conventions of war film, as well as in relation to the changing socio-cultural perceptions of the post-liberation history and the Korean War that cannot be entirely attributed to shifting tides in the politics of left and right. I will hopefully demonstrate that, instead of simply following the (elite- or media-generated) politically charged understanding of the post-liberation history, these films are reflecting complex patterns of interaction among cinematic conventions, cultural habitus, select invocation of memories and historical data, and the anxieties and fantasies of contemporary Koreans in relation to global modernity.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Along the Alpine Road: Encounters between the Sichuan Basin and the Wei River Valley in Material Culture
Colloquium
Speaker: Jay Xu, Asian Art Museum, San Francisco
Date: October 15, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Center for Chinese Studies, Institute of East Asian Studies

Along the Alpine Road This lecture presents a story seldom told in Qin's history: about the Sichuan Basin, lying south of the Qin domain in the Wei River valley. Sichuan was a land richly endowed with natural resources, economic products, and manpower. Communication between the two lands was legendary for its difficulty, with two mountain ranges presenting formidable barriers. Despite the harsh terrain, the Qin army managed to invade and conquer the Sichuan Basin in 316 BCE via alpine roads hewn on steep mountainsides. The success provided the Qin with new routes to attack an arch rival, the kingdom of Chu, and a large laboratory and supply base in its quest to establish a unified empire. The Sichuan invasion in 316 BCE therefore constituted a signature moment in the history of China, yet it is far less emphasized in the general story of Qin's unification of China compared to its conquest of the six major kingdoms. The present lecture examines the archaeological record of interactions between the Sichuan Basin and the Wei River valley in the early Bronze Age as well as the time before and after 316 BCE, and discusses their expressions in material culture.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Imagined Borders, Deadly Threats: Where the South and East China Sea Crisis is Heading
Panel Discussion
Date: October 18, 2013 | 3:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies, Center for Korean Studies, Center for Japanese Studies, Asia Society of Northern California

The South and East China seas continue to be a site of at best negotiation and at worst belligerence. Since 2010 territorial disputes over such areas as the the Senkaku/Diaoyu island group have intensified, raising anxieties over destabilized international relations across the region in both Asia and the US. A panel of experts revisit the crisis in the region, followed by discussions with UC Berkeley faculty analyzing the evolving situation and the role of the US in the wake of its "pivot to Asia."

Speakers:

  • Ralf Emmers, Associate Professor, S. Rajaratnam School of International Studies, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore
  • Kuan‑Hsiung (Dustin) Wang, Professor, Political Science, National Taiwan Normal University
  • Tara Davenport, Fulbright Scholar, Yale University and National University of Singapore
  • Greg Poling, Research Associate, Southeast Asia Program, Center for Strategic and International Studies

Discussants:

  • T.J. Pempel, Political Science, UC Berkeley (Moderator)
  • Lowell Dittmer, Political Science, UC Berkeley
  • Daniel Sargent, History, UC Berkeley

Abstracts:

Ralf Emmers
"The US Rebalance to Asia and the South China Sea Dispute"

The United States calls itself a "resident Pacific power." US President Barack Obama has in recent years reinvigorated American strategic influence in the region through a pivot or rebalance to Asia. This talk assesses how and the extent to which the US rebalancing has impacted the South China Sea disputes. The South China Sea is at the center of competing territorial, economic, and strategic interests. The issue is complicated by the number of disputants. While the claimants to the Paracel Islands are the People's Republic of China (PRC), Taiwan, and Vietnam, six states assert ownership over the Spratly Islands and/or their surrounding waters, namely, Brunei, China, Malaysia, the Philippines, Taiwan, and Vietnam. The presentation first examines the origins and main characteristics of the US rebalancing to Asia before describing the traditional American position on the sovereignty disputes in the South China Sea. It argues that the United States has not taken sides in the disputes and has restricted its interest to the preservation of the freedom of navigation. It then discusses whether and to what extent Washington has changed its position in recent years in response to renewed Chinese assertiveness in the disputed waters. It also reviews regional responses to the US involvement and concludes by assessing its impact on the peaceful management of the South China Sea disputes.




Dustin Kuan‑Hsiung Wang
"China's Marine Policy on Asserting Sovereignty over Islands in East and South China Seas: Legal and Political Perspectives"

Observing from the heated developments over the Diaoyutai Islands in the East China Sea with Japan and Spratly Islands in the South China Sea with the Philippines and Vietnam, it is a common criticism what China has done in enhancing its maritime claims is through coercion and intimidation towards its neighbours. Is it really so? Also, what kind of policy tools that China operates to express its determination in maintaining sovereignty over those islands?




Tara Davenport
"The Philippines' Arbitral Proceedings Against China on the South China Sea Disputes: Latest Developments and Legal Implications"

Sabre-rattling and confrontations at sea. Claim and counter-claim. Protest and counter-protest. Undoubtedly, the South China Sea has been the stage of one of the most complex international disputes in recent years. The sovereignty dispute between multiple state actors over small offshore features in the South China Sea and the accompanying claims to maritime resources surrounding such features have long been a flashpoint for tension in the region. The technical and legal questions are complicated enough but coupled with the competing threads of nationalism, history and big power geopolitics that are inherent in the South China Sea disputes, a long-term solution does not appear to be in sight.

In 2012, in an unprecedented move that took the international community by surprise, the Philippines initiated arbitral proceedings against China under Annex VII of UNCLOS over the latter's claims in the South China Sea, including the validity of China's u-shaped line. Opinion is divided on whether the Philippines' course of action will move the disputes towards a peaceful resolution or whether it will exacerbate an already precarious situation. In this regard, the Seminar will give an overview of the Philippines-China arbitral proceedings and will outline the latest developments. It will then explore possible outcomes of the arbitral proceedings and discuss the legal and political implications of each of these outcomes.




Greg Poling
"The South China Sea in Focus: Clarifying the Limits of Maritime Dispute"

Satellite imagery and geospatial analysis tools offer an unprecedented opportunity to harness new technologies in order to help resolve boundary disputes. In The South China Sea in Focus: Clarifying the Limits of Maritime Dispute, Gregory Poling uses these tools to provide a first and necessary step toward tackling the overlapping maritime disputes in the South China Sea: determining which waters are and are not in dispute under international law. Mr. Poling uses geographic information system (GIS)–based maps to provide an easily understandable benchmark against which policymakers and academics can judge the claims and actions of the South China Sea claimants. Only if the parties to the dispute are willing to clarify their sovereignty claims and agree on what is legally in dispute will they be able to effectively manage tensions and agree to joint development in the region.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



An Informal Police State: Coercive Tactics and Regime Stability in China
Colloquium
Speaker: Xi Chen, Department of Political Science, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
Date: October 21, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

An Informal Police State: Coercive Tactics and Regime Stability in China The paper aims to explain a noticeable increase in the use of informal, and sometimes illicit, coercive tactics by the Chinese state since the 1990s. The trend can be explained by the Chinese government's response to the gap between high demand and short supply of state coercion in the reform era. Chinese model of economic development and stability maintenance creates strong demand for state coercion. However, the transition to a market economy has transformed many social and political institutions previously used for social control. While the Chinese state has attempted to meet the challenge by strengthening coercive apparatuses, its mass line ideology and legal reforms have considerably constrained its empowerment of coercive state agencies. Consequently local officials often have to resort to informal coercive tactics. Through the rituals of punishing local officials for such coercive measures that have led to serious consequences, the Chinese government has managed to reduce their damage to the regime legitimacy. This explanation highlights the need to re-conceptualize authoritarian states in order to understand the patterns of state coercion.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



"Officialism": A Political Analysis of Traditional Chinese Society
Colloquium
Speaker: Yu Keping, China Center for Comparative Politics and Economics, Peking University
Date: October 22, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Officialism: A Political Analysis of Traditional Chinese Society The author formulates a new paradigm, "officialism" (guanbenzhuyi), and uses it to analyse China's traditional society. The term "officialism" has been used in recent years in contrast to "people-centric ideology" (民本主义) and, sometimes, in contrast to "capitalism". In this study "officialism" is used to mean "power standard" (权力本位). It is both an ideology and an official-centric socio-political system. In traditional Chinese language, "official (官)" broadly encompassed both "bureaucrat (僚)" and "clerk (吏)" and in a narrow sense mainly referred to an administrative official. This study uses the term in the broad sense and refers generally to the whole official bureaucratic stratum represented by the emperor.

The author argues that "officialism" is a political culture and socio-political system which takes official power as its core element. Under this system, relationships of official power are the most important social relationships. They become the basic standard for measuring a person's social value, and they are the determining factor influencing a person's social status and social attributes. In traditional China, the ideology of rule by the emperor as the superior moral person (junzhuzhuyi) was the highest form of "officialism". Despotism is the representative characteristic of "officialism". "People-centric ideology" is only the political ideal that is the antithesis of despotism. The democratic rule of law is the only way of smashing "officialism" and of spurring traditional political civilization to head towards modern political civilization.

Professor Yu is a co-author of the book "Democracy is a Good Thing: Essays on Politics, Society, and Culture in Contemporary China."

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



China's 'Unreal Estate': Visual Artist Tong Lam in Conversation with Ling Hon Lam
Lecture
Speaker: Tong Lam, Visual Artist and Professor, History, University of Toronto
Moderator: Ling Hon Lam, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Date: October 23, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Unreal Estate: Tong Lam's Photographs of China's Unsettling Settlements In conjunction with the exhibit of his photographs at IEAS, "Unreal Estate," visual artist Tong Lam will discuss his haunting images of Chinese cities and structures, as well as his images of elsewhere in Asia, the US, and Europe featured in his new book Abandoned Futures. A Book Signing and Exhibition Reception will follow.

Click here to read more about the exhibit.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Panel on 1970s South Korean Literature, Film, and State-sponsored Visual Art
Panel Discussion
Panelists:
 •  Youngju Ryu, Assistant Professor of Modern Korean Literature, University
    of Michigan
 •  Ji Sung Kim, Department of Film & Media, UC Berkeley
 •  Yuri Chang, Department of Art History, Binghamton University
Moderator: Elaine Kim, Professor, Department of Ethnic Studies, UC Berkeley
Date: October 24, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Berkeley YWCA, Main Lounge, 2600 Bancroft Way, Berkeley, CA
Sponsors: UC Berkeley Ethnic Studies, Center for Korean Studies

Panel on 1970s South Korean Literature, Film, and State-sponsored Visual Art Literature: In 1970s South Korea, poet Kim Chi Ha became an international symbol of democracy when he challenged — in writing, in prison, and on trial — the legtimacy of the military dictatorship. Last year, Kim returned to center stage as a staunch ally of the dictator's daughter and a mouthpiece of the ultraconservatives who supported her election as South Korea's president. This talk will explore the changing place of committed literature in the ongoing struggle over the meanings of South Korean modernization.

Film: South Korea has often been touted as the quintessential demonstration of the superiority of free market capitalism for 'developing' the Global South. This talk explores the experience of neoliberalism from the vantage point of post-IMF South Korean cinema. In films like 'The Host,' for instance, the monster can be seen in relation to U.S. empire-building in South Korea, which has served as a 'host' for the American military for almost seven decades.

Visual Art: This presentation explores the politics of representation of power and memory in public space by examining cultural exhibitions — in particular the monumental art projects sponsored by the South Korean government for the 1988 Seoul Olympics and the 1995 Gwangju Biennale — as attempts to manipulate traumatic historical memory with a spectacle of capitalist success.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



The Remaking of Li Qingzhao in Late Imperial and Modern China
Colloquium
Speaker: Ron Egan, East Asian Languages and Cultures, Stanford University
Date: October 25, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Faculty Club, Heyns Room
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

The Remaking of Li Qingzhao in Late Imperial and Modern China This talk examines the way that the critical and scholarly tradition struggled to find a way to accommodate the woman poet Li Qingzhao (1084- ca. 1150s), who had burst into the largely male domain of writing with a brilliance that could not be denied. But this was a woman's talent, plus it was coupled with a penchant for delivering caustic remarks about other writers of her day (all male), so that it proved difficult for many arbiters of culture to accept. Consequently, the critical tradition found both ingenious and ingenuous ways of reformulating her and making her into someone it could live with and even admire. This talk examines the forces involved in this transformation of Li Qingzhao, which culminated in the late Qing dynasty, was written into the earliest twentieth-century histories of Chinese literature, and is still very much with us today.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Artist as Producer and Kitsch: The Ethnographic Turn and the Colonial Collection
Colloquium
Speaker: Nayoung Aimee Kwon, Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor of Korean and Japanese Cultural Studies, Duke University
Date: October 25, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

Artist as Producer and Kitsch: The Ethnographic Turn and the Colonial Collection In the 1930s, with Japan's expansions into the Asian continent, colonial Korean culture in general, and literature in particular, came to take important roles as both subject and object of such imperial expansions. This paper reexamines the colonizer and colonized binary by re-contextualizing the rise of translated texts packaged as ethnographic "colonial collections." In particular, this paper historicizes the ethnographic turn relegated to colonial culture by examining the rise of colonial collections as a manifestation of mass-produced objects of colonial kitsch at this time. The complex position of the colonial artist/writer cum (self-)ethnographer situated in between the colony and the metropole embodies an uncanny contact zone as the artist and work of art become reified as objects of imperial consumer fetishism. In the colonial encounter, the artist as producer and the art object of his or her labor meld into indistinguishable and interchangeable forms, as producer and product of kitsch. In such relations of colonial alienation, cultural producers struggled to map out spaces as agents of artistic expression, while agency for the colonized artist often meant further alienation through self-ethnography or through mimicry of the colonizer's racialized forms and discourses.

Nayoung Aimee Kwon is Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Professor of Asian & Middle Eastern Studies, Arts of the Moving Image and Women's Studies at Duke University. Her research considers colonialism and postcolonial legacies in the Asia-Pacific, focusing on Korea and Japan in the global context. Her book, Disavowing Empire: The Conundrum of Collaboration and Modernity in Korea and Japan (forthcoming from Duke University Press), examines controversial encounters of Japanese and Korean writers and translators in the Japanese empire and their postcolonial legacies. She has also co-edited (with Takashi Fujitani) a special issue of the journal Cross Currents (May 2013) on the antinomies of the colonial film archive in East Asia.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



The Study of Jainism: A Symposium in honor of Prof. Padmanabh Jaini's 90th Birthday
Symposium
Date: October 26, 2013 | 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Location: 220 Stephens Hall, Townsend Center for the Humanities
Sponsors: Center for South Asia Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Townsend Center for the Humanities, Catherine and William L. Magistretti Chair in South and Southeast Asian Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Berkeley Center for the Study of Religion

Padmanabh Jaini The symposium brings together a select group of leading experts of Jainism from Europe and the US who work in different arenas of Jain Studies and represent different disciplines, including textual studies, anthropology, history, and art history. They will present papers on different aspects of Jainism drawing upon their current research. In this way the current state of Jain Studies will be brought to bear in its disciplinary breadth. This is to allow for discussions on past accomplishments and also the challenges and the new directions that may be envisaged for this important and still rather neglected field of study.

The symposium is organized in honor of Prof. Padmanabh Jaini who has pioneered the study of Jainism in the English speaking world. His The Jaina Path of Purification (first published in 1979) has brought the study and knowledge of Jainism to a broader English speaking public, and his numerous further publications — such as his book Gender and Salvation: Jaina Debates on the Spiritual Liberation of Women (1991) and his Collected papers on Jaina Studies (2000) — have made him one of the leading scholar in this field. Even as he is about to become a nonagenarian he continues to work and publish at the forefront of Jain Studies, and will also present himself.

Participants:

  • Prof. Christopher Chapple, Indic and Comparative Theology at Loyola Marymount University
  • Prof. John Cort, Director of Denison University Department of Religion
  • Prof. Paul Dundas, Reader in Sanskrit at the University of Edinburgh
  • Dr. Peter Flügel, Chair of the Centre for Jaina Studies at SOAS, University of London
  • Prof. Phyllis Granoff, Religious Studies, Yale University
  • Dr. Shalin Jain, S.G.T.B. Khalsa College, University of Delhi
  • Prof. Padmanabh Jaini, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
  • Prof. Robert Goldman, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
  • Prof. Olle Qvarnström, Centre for Theology and Religious Studies, Lund University
  • Prof. Alexander von Rospatt, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley
  • Dr. Audrey Truschke, ACLS Fellow at Stanford University
  • Dr. Kristi Wiley, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, UC Berkeley

Program:

9:00 — Welcoming Remarks

9:10–10:30

Phyllis Granoff — "The Stages of Life"
Olle Qvarnström — "Jain and Buddhist Critique of Samkhya Philosophy"

10:30–10:50 — Coffee Break

10:50–12:10

Paul Dundas — "Hemacandra Maladharin's Allegorical Narratives"
Padmanabh Jaini — "A South Indian Jaina Rathayatra in Tulu Nadu Jain Bramanical Priests and Brahminisation of Temple Rituals"

12:10–1:10 — Break

1:10–2:30

Peter Flügel — "Wishful Thinking: The Padmavati Shrine at Humcha"
John Cort — "Digambar Jains in Gujarat"

2:30–2:50 — Coffee Break

2:50–4:50

Robert Goldman — "Ahiṃsa Warriors: Epic Heroes and Avatāras in Jaina Narrative Literature"
Kristi Wiley — "Nigodas Revisited"
Alexander von Rospatt — "Beyond Jainism: Reflections on the Survival of Indic Buddhism in Nepal"

Click here to visit the symposium website.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu510‑642‑3608



The Return of the Native: The Debate over a "Second-Generation" Ethnic Policy
Lecture
Speaker: Mark Elliott, Mark Schwartz Professor of Chinese and Inner Asian History, Harvard University
Moderator: Wen‑hsin Yeh, Professor, History, UC Berkeley
Date: October 28, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

The Return of the Native: The Debate over a 'Second-Generation' Ethnic Policy The world has watched China grapple with fraught, sometimes violent, minority relations. Always sensitive and sometimes taboo as a topic of debate, China is now displaying a surprising openness to discussion. The last few years have seen a vigorous public policy debate emerge in China over the need for a "second-generation" ethnic policy. This debate is remarkable for two reasons. Though nationalities policy is a notoriously sensitive subject within China, the debate is happening openly, in the pages of academic journals and on the Internet. A second remarkable feature is the degree to which anthropological theory and a comparative framework have come to shape the debate. This paper first explores the main positions in the on-going policy discussion; it then goes on to argue that, rather than comparing China's non-Han peoples to minority immigrant populations in the industrialized democracies, the better comparison is to native or aboriginal peoples in those places. It then considers the reasons why this angle is completely missing from the present debate.

This talk is part of the Institute of East Asian Studies Distinguished Speaker series.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Daoist Vocabulary in Early Chinese Buddhist Translations? A Reappraisal
Colloquium
Speaker: Jan Nattier, Hua Hin, Thailand
Date: October 31, 2013 | 5:00–6:30 p.m.
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

It is commonly held that when Buddhism was first transmitted to China, this foreign religion was understood — or rather, misunderstood — through a Daoist conceptual lens. The first Buddhist translators, so we are told, made free use of Daoist terminology, creating confusion thaat was only cleared up centuries later, when Kumārajīva and his colleagues began to eliminate such terms from Buddhist discourse. According to this scenario, Chinese Buddhist translations followed a clear trajectory of "progress," with the inappropriate choices made by early translators being rectified in the more careful work of their successors. This paper examines some of the indigenous religious terminology used during the first two centuries of Buddhist translation activity in China. As it hopes to show, the actual pattern of usage is much more complicated — and more interesting — than the simplistic picture of the early appropriation, and subsequent abandonment, of "Daoist" religious terms.

Jan Nattier did her undergraduate work in comparative religion (specializing in Buddhism) at Indiana University, where she also began graduate training in the Department of Uralic and Altaic Studies. She completed her Ph.D. at Harvard University under the Committee on Inner Asian and Altaic Studies (specializing in classical Mongolian and Tibetan). She has taught at Macalester College, the University of Hawaii, Stanford University, Indiana University, and the University of Tokyo, in addition to serving as a research professor at the International Research Institute for Advanced Buddhology (Soka University). Her publications include Once Upon a Future Time: Studies in a Buddhist Prophecy of Decline (on Buddhist predictions of the decline and disappearance of Buddhism), A Few Good Men: The Bodhisattva Path according to the Inquiry of Ugra (on early Mahāyāna Buddhism), and A Guide to the Earliest Chinese Buddhist Translations: Texts from the Eastern Han and Three Kingdoms Periods, as well as a number of articles on early Mahāyāna Buddhism, Chinese Buddhist translations, and Buddhism in Central Asia. She is now living and working in Hua Hin, Thailand, where she is engaged in the study of 2nd and 3rd century Chinese Buddhist translations.

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



The Butterfly Lovers, the Cultural Revolution, and the Arts in China: Symposium
Symposium
Date: November 1, 2013 | 4:00–5:00 p.m.
Location: Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive
Sponsor: Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive in collaboration with the Center for Chinese Studies

What is the impact of post-Mao Cultural Revolution aesthetics on the arts in China today? Find out at a symposium organized in conjunction with Shanghai Ballet's performance of The Butterfly Lovers at Cal Performances. Participants include SanSan Kwan (Theater, Dance, and Performance Studies), Andrew Jones (East Asian Languages and Cultures), and Xiaomei Chen (East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Davis). A guided tour of Beauty Revealed is offered prior to the event, at 3 p.m.

Organized by Cal Performances in collaboration with the Center for Chinese Studies at UC Berkeley.

Museum Theater. Admission free

Event Contact: 510‑642‑0808



Ten‑you Gumi: Ancient Character Performance and Workshop
Performing Arts
Performer: TEN‑YOU GUMI
Date: November 1, 2013 | 7:30 p.m.
Location: Alumni House
Sponsors: Center for Japanese Studies, International Ambassadress for Community Education and Development

Ten‑you Gumi: Ancient Character Performance and Workshop Join us for this exciting performance of Kodai‑moji by artist TEN‑YOU and her group TEN‑YOU GUMI, accompanied by Eden Aoba Taiko. Kodai‑moji refers to ancient Chinese characters found on turtle shells, bones or bronze inscriptions from the time of Yin or Shang dynasty (17th century BC – 11th century BC). The practice of Kodai‑moji is a rare, primitive and sacred art.

In her performances, the artists use large-format papers, thick paintbrushes, with Chinese ink, wine and coffee. This exhibition allows us to appreciate that writing is not only a technique or practice with utilitarian purposes, but a path of evolution and personal development. Much more than trying to be a good calligrapher, TEN‑YOU gives importance to the intention and the process, separating it from the result. This allows for the birth of a free and creative work.

The audience will be allowed to try this form of calligraphy with the artists after the performance.

TEN‑YOU GUMI are visiting from Japan to support Fukushima Children's Fundraise "WE CARE" event by IAm‑ced.org at TATAMI Multiart Center in El Cerrito on November 3, 2013.

Coordinated by Global Education-International Ambassadress for Community Education and Development.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Protecting the Vulnerable: a Discussion of Legal Reform and Civil Society in China
Colloquium
Speaker: Guo Jianmei Date: November 5, 2013 | 4:00–5:00 p.m.
Location: Boalt Hall, School of Law, Room 100
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Protecting the Vulnerable: a Discussion of Legal Reform and Civil Society in China Please join Berkeley Law and the Center for Chinese Studies at a roundtable discussion with Ms. Guo Jianmei to learn more about China's rapidly growing civil society sector and the differences it can make in the lives of women, youth and others around the country.

Ms. Guo, one of China's preeminent public interest lawyers, has fought for women's rights in China for more than 17 years; handling legal aid and public interest litigation cases on behalf of women, researching rights protection, and preparing draft laws to protect and promote women's rights in China.

Drawing on her many years of experience as both a public interest lawyer and pioneer of Chinese non-governmental organizations (NGOs), Ms. Guo will outline recent political developments within China, including recent legal reform efforts such as reforms to China's public interest law and will also discuss the critical role NGOs are playing to help promote and protect the rights of protecting marginalized and vulnerable groups. Ms. Guo will provide insights to the NGO climate in China pulled from her direct experience in building organizations from the ground up, and examine both the existing legal structure and potential developments that could benefit civil society and China as a whole.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321



Empire as a Moral Problem: Religious Cosmopolitans and Colonial Modernity in Northeast Asia
Colloquium
Speaker: E. Taylor Atkins, Presidential Teaching Professor of History, Northern Illinois University
Date: November 6, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Korean Studies

Empire as a Moral Problem: Religious Cosmopolitans and Colonial Modernity in Northeast Asia In the early twentieth century, against the backdrop of colonial violence, the Japanese annexation of Korea, and World War I, religious and secular groups in East Asia voiced support for a new ethos of humanitarian internationalism.

This presentation examines the confluences between millenarian "new religions" such as Chŏndogyo (Korea), Ōmotokyō (Japan), and Daoyuan (China), Bahá'ís, Esperantists and other groups espousing world peace, gender and social equality, and religious unity. Under the scrutiny of the Japanese imperial state, these communities presented teachings that were inimical to colonial hierarchies, but they had to do so without resort to the standard means and methods of social, economic, and political reform, such as protests, provocative civil disobedience, lobbying, electioneering, coercion, and either the threat or actual use of political violence.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Sôgi Contra Shinkei: The Aesthetics of Deference
Colloquium
Speaker: Steven Carter, Professor, Stanford University
Date: November 6, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Sôgi Contra Shinkei: The Aesthetics of Deference Accounts of behavior in renga gatherings usual focus on ritual order as embodied in rules and conventions. In this paper I argue that in the pedagogical writings of the renga master Sôgi (1421–1502) we detect something that goes beyond that, demonstrating a commitment to the needs and ideals of the group and the poetic ideal of ushin, or "deep feeling" that I call the aesthetics of deference. I argue that this "attitude" or "posture" is apparent among the writings of Sôgi in particular, especially when we contrast him with his teacher Shinkei and the latter's aesthetic of the "chill and spare." Of course, we all know that it was Sôgi's aesthetic that prevailed, at least in the short term, and at the end of my talk I will attempt to explain why.

Steve Carter is Yamato Ichihashi Professor in Japanese History and Civilization at Stanford University. He received his PhD in the Department of Oriental Languages at UC Berkeley in 1980. Before coming to Stanford, he taught at UCLA, Brigham Young University, and the University of California, Irvine. He is author of "The Columbia Anthology of the Japanese Essay" (forthcoming), Haiku Before Haiku: From the Renga Masters to Bashô, Householders: The Reizei Family in Japanese History, Unforgotten Dreams: Poems by the Zen Monk Shôtetsu, and several other books.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑624‑3415



Beyond the Samurai: Bushido as Politics, Philosophy, and Ideology
Colloquium
Speaker: Chris Goto‑Jones, Professor, Comparative Philosophy and Political Thought, Leiden University
Date: November 8, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: 3335 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Beyond the Samurai: Bushido as Politics, Philosophy, and Ideology Few images of Japan are more intoxicating than that of the honourable samurai. Indeed, many students and scholars are drawn to the field of Japan Studies by the romantic idea of the samurai and their apparent code of conduct, bushidô. Until the recent pre-eminence of manga and anime as cultural emblems of Japan, bushidô was unquestionably the most alluring, and remains the most resilient, icon of Japan on the international stage.

And this is no accident: bushidô was explicitly and deliberately created in the twentieth century precisely to serve this function.

This presentation interrogates the meaning and dimensions of bushidô in modern Japan, elaborating it as a sophisticated and multivalent landscape interacting with the borders of ethics, politics, philosophy, and ideology. Bushidô emerges through the historical development and invention of multiple canons, each suited to different arenas of social and political life in the twentieth century. In the end, bushidô should be seen as a unique but globalized intellectual asset, arising from Japan but not delimited by it.

Chris Goto‑Jones (BA, MA, Cambridge; MPhil, DPhil, Oxford) is Professor of Comparative Philosophy & Political Thought at Leiden University, where he is also the dean of Leiden University College in The Hague. Recent work includes, Political Philosophy in Japan: Nishida, the Kyoto School and Co-Prosperity (New York: Routledge, 2005), (ed.) Re-Politicizing the Kyoto School as Philosophy (New York: Routledge, 2008), and A Very Short Introduction to Modern Japan (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2009). He is presently completing a book for Cambridge University Press, "Beyond the Samurai: Bushidô as Politics, Philosophy, and Ideology" (2013).

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3156



Korea Peace Day
Special Event
Featured Speaker: Charles Hanley, Pulitzer-prize Winning Journalist
Discussants: Deann Borshay Liem, Producer, Director, and Writer, Mu Films; Ramsay Liem, Professor Emeritus of Psychology, Boston College
Date: November 8, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: David Brower Center, Goldman Theater, 2150 Allston Way, Berkeley
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies and Center for Korean Studies

Korea Peace Day Special Lecture by Charles Hanley (Pulitzer Prize-winning Journalist) — "No Gun Ri: No Reconciliation Without Truth"

Although South Korea's Truth and Reconciliation Commission has investigated many of more than 200 alleged cases of what it categorizes as civilian massacres committed by U.S. soldiers during the Korean War, a war that has yet to be ended with a peace treaty, the U.S. government has investigated only one, the refugee killings at No Gun Ri. The U.S. government's 300-page report on that inquiry exonerated the U.S. military of wrongdoing. President Clinton stated that the evidence was not clear that there was responsibility "high enough in the chain of command." In reporting their findings, however, the U.S. Army investigators ignored and left undisclosed many of the most relevant documents and testimony. The most significant example is the "Muccio letter," in which the U.S. ambassador to South Korea informed the State Department that the Army, fearing infiltrators, had decided to fire on South Korean refugees approaching U.S. lines despite warning shots. The No Gun Ri carnage began the next day.

Film Screening of Memory of Forgotten War (A film by Deann Borshay Liem and Ramsay Liem)

Four Korean American survivors testify to the brutality of the Korean War and the pain of divided families, 60 years later. Interwoven with the history of the war, their stories speak loudly for a long overdue end to the unresolved Korean War.

Panel discussion by Paul Liem (Korea Policy Institute), Sarah Sloan (ANSWER Coalition), and Stephen McNeil (American Friends Services Committee)

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Satire and National Identity in North Korean Comedy Series My Family's Problem
Colloquium
Speaker: Immanuel Kim, Assistant Professor of Asian and Asian American Studies, Binghamton University
Date: November 12, 2013 | 3:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Satire and National Identity in North Korean Comedy Series My Family's Problem Media coverage of the DPRK in the past and today hardly focuses on the production of comedy films. The stern and dismal portrayal of the nation-state leaves anything but the consideration of its citizens' ability to laugh at their own national crisis for observers outside of the DPRK. However, this kind of representations from the media (both in and outside of the DPRK) not only perpetuates the seemingly draconian regime but also ossifies the presuppositions of the nation-state. Scholars on North Korean film have made attempts to understand the country through its film medium, only to conclude that film serves as yet another tool for raising the ideological consciousness of the viewers and for nation-building. In fact, such studies on North Korean film often examine dramatic films or melodrama, assuming that the grand narrative of the DPRK is articulated through the repository of such serious and nationalistic films. Comedy films, on the other hand, may offer a new or add to the existing scholarship on North Korean film by projecting a slightly different understanding of the process of the cultural production. This article examines the process of making Uri Ji Munje (My Family's Problem), which debuted in 1973, as the agent of laughter for the North Korean audience as well as for any viewers. By utilizing the North Korean film critic Kim Yong's analysis of the film, this article highlights comedic moments in My Family's Problem that have posed problems in the filmmaking process. Kim Yong writes that situating the problematic wife of the protagonist as the source of national crisis has enabled the filmmakers to overcome some of the lackluster moments typified in other DPRK films and has intensified the comedic value of the film. This article elaborates on two of Kim's implications: first, the domestic space, occupied by the wife of the protagonist, is the agent of political subversion; and second, the subversive potentiality of the domestic space inversely targets national politics (or the duty of men) as the true source of comedy.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Intertextual References as Sources to Reconstruct Implicit Readings of Early Chinese Texts: A Case Study of the Huainanzi
Presentation
Speaker/Performer: Tobias Zürn, University of Wisconsin Madison
Date: November 13, 2013 | 2:00–4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor), Numata Conference Room
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Intertextual References as Sources to Reconstruct Implicit Readings of Early Chinese Texts: A Case Study of the Huainanzi The presentation maps out how the Huainanzi appropriates what kind of Zhuangzi passages in the chapters "Originating [in] the Way" (Yuan dao) and "Activating the Genuine" (Chu zhen). It is widely known that the Huainanzi refers to a variety of sources leading to its arguable classification as an eclectic text. However, very little work has been done on how to interpret and use these complex networks of intertextual references. It will be asserted that Liu An's masterpiece creates such an elaborate dialogue with the Zhuangzi that we may reconstruct an early Western Han reception of the classic that displays a predilection for self-cultivational, cosmological, and political aspects. The presentation suggests that the extensive use of intertextual references in early Chinese texts allows us to reconstruct many voices on classical texts that have been hitherto unrecognized.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu



Taking Buddhist Philosophy of Mind Seriously: 2013 Toshihide Numata Book Prize Presentation and Symposium
Symposium
Date: November 15, 2013 | 3:00–7:00 p.m.
Location: Jodo Shinshu Center, 2140 Durant Avenue, Berkeley, CA 94704
Sponsor: Center for Buddhist Studies

Taking Buddhist Philosophy of Mind Seriously The 2013 Toshihide Numata Book Prize award winner is Daniel A. Arnold (The University of Chicago Divinity School) for his book Brains, Buddhas and Believing: The Problem of Intentionality in Classical Buddhist and Cognitive-Scientific Philosophy of Mind (Columbia University Press, 2012).

Program:

3:10 pm
Welcome on Behalf of Bukkyo Dendo Kyokai
Rev. Brian Nagata

3:15 pm
Prize Presentation
Robert Sharf, Chair, Center for Buddhist Studies

3:20 pm
Keynote Address
Nāgārjuna's Critique of Motion as Philosophy of Mind
Daniel A. Arnold, University of Chicago

4:20
Coffee/Tea Break

4:30 pm
Symposium
Taking Buddhist Philosophy of Mind Seriously
Daniel A. Arnold, University of Chicago
John Taber, University of New Mexico
Evan Thompson, 2014 Visiting Numata Professor, UCB
Parimal Patil, Harvard University

Event Contact: buddhiststudies@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑5104



70th Anniversary of the Korean Language Program at UC Berkeley
Panel Discussion
Panelists:
 •  Kay Richards, Korean Language Lecturer, Retired, University of California,
    Berkeley
 •  Kijoo Ko, Korean Language Program Coordinator, University of California,
    Berkeley
 •  Hye‑Sook Wang, Associate Professor of East Asian Studies, Brown
    University
 •  Hyo Sang Lee, Associate Professor of East Asian Languages and Cultures,
    Indiana University, Bloomington
Date: November 15, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

70th Anniversary of the Korean Language Program at UC Berkeley Program:

Kay Richards (UC Berkeley, Retired)
History of the Korean Language Program at UC Berkeley

According Prof. Bong Yoon Choy's autobiography, "Song of a Wandering Soul," the first class of Korean-language instruction at UC Berkeley was established by him in the spring semester of 1943. It was one of the earliest Korean-language programs in the United States. Richards' association with the Korean language program at UC Berkeley began in 1968 and lasted, off and on, until her retirement in 2008. She taught for almost 35 years. During these years, Richards observed many changes, mostly growth and development, but also challenges and dreams for future. She will share some of these observations as part of this talk.

Kijoo Ko (UC Berkeley)
Current Status of the Korean Language Program at UC Berkeley

This talk will give an overview of the current status of the Korean language program at UC Berkeley, including its size, format, and curriculum. The speaker will also discuss recent changes to the program and present on prospects for the future.

Hye‑Sook Wang (Brown University)
Korean Language Education in U.S. Higher Education: History, Evolution, and Prospects

In this presentation, the speaker will briefly discuss how Korean language programs at colleges and universities in the United States were established and evolved, as well as various contributing or adversely affecting factors that occurred along the way. She will then discuss major changes in the teaching environment in recent years and the challenges that Korean language programs will likely face in the future. Accomplishments made in the field of Korean language education in the United States over the past eight decades will also be discussed in the context of prospects for the future.

Hyo Sang Lee (Indiana University)
What Do We Teach?: The Fallacy of Teaching Grammar in Korean Classes

Grammar we teach in a foreign language class is supposed to be a description of systematic ways in which the native speakers of the language speak. The grammar descriptions in virtually all Korean language textbooks, however, do not reflect the ways in which native Koreans speak, but rather what grammarians and linguists have generalized and prescribed. This presentation will show how the grammar descriptions in major Korean language textbooks are misguided and in fact misguide learners. The speaker will argue for the need of contextualized and usage-based grammar in Korean language education.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Opening the Eyes, Inviting the Relics: Cambodian Buddhist Paintings Exhibit Opening
Performing Arts
Date: November 20, 2013 | 4:30 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Institute of East Asian Studies

In celebration of the opening of the exhibit "Framing the Sacred: Cambodian Buddhist Painting," a purification ceremony and talk by Buddhist monks wil lbe performed. Explanations and discussion will be provided by Penny Edwards and Trent Walker, UC Berkeley.

For further information on this exhibit, see the exhibit website.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Framing the Sacred: Cambodian Buddhist Painting
Exhibit – Painting
Date: November 20, 2013 – March 20, 2014 every Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday & Friday | 9:00 a.m.–5:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Buddhist Studies, Department of South & Southeast Asian Studies, Center for Southeast Asia Studies

Framing the Sacred: Cambodian Buddhist Painting Buddhist paintings in Cambodia serve in rituals, for teaching, and as a means of making space sacred. Displayed works on cloth and glass from the collection of Joel Montague embody both the religious stories and doctrines of Cambodian Buddhism and the traditions of Cambodian culture.

For further information on this exhibit, see the exhibit website.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809

 


Terunobu Fujimori's Tearoom Studies
Colloquium
Speaker: Terunobu Fujimori, Architect; Architectural Historian
Date: November 21, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Japanese Studies

Terunobu Fujimori's Tearoom Studies About 400 years ago in Japan, chashitsu (茶室, literally "tea rooms"), a rare type of building in the world, was born. Its features include:

  1. Unbelievably narrow space — the smallest example of which measures only 1.8 square meters;
  2. A small opening to enter;
  3. Windows that allow light into the room, but cannot be used to look outside;
  4. A hearth, so you can enjoy tea with boiling water;
  5. An abundance of variation in the architectural space despite its size.

You enter this small space for four hours to discuss the arts of paintings, calligraphy, flowers, teacups, kettles, and the taste of the tea, all of which are presented in the room.

There are many mysteries surrounding how these tearooms and their minimalist spaces came about. In this lecture, I will present my own theory, and how it relates to the Renaissance architecture of Europe at the time, as well as introduce examples of my own work on chashitsu.

The sophisticated buildings of Japanese architect Terunobu Fujimori (born 1946) combine the archaic, eccentric, poetic and the ecological — almost all of them are made of simple, traditional materials such as earth, stone, wood, coal, bark and mortar. Often referred to as a "surrealist" architect, Fujimori designs buildings that stand on stilts, rest in trees, support plant ecosystems and rise from the ground at vertiginous angles.

Talk will be given in Japanese, with English translation by Beth Cary.

Free and open to the public. Wheelchair accessible.

Event Contact: cjs-events@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415



Perspective Painting in Late Imperial China: A Symposium In honor of James Cahill
Symposium
Moderator: Sophie Volpp, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Discussant: Pat Berger, History of Art, UC Berkeley
Speakers:
 •  Eugene Wang, Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art, History of
    Art & Architecture, Harvard University
 •  Richard Vinograd, Christensen Fund Professor in Asian Art, Department of
    Art & Art History, Stanford University
 •  Nancy Berliner, Curator of Chinese Art, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston
Date: November 22, 2013 | 3:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive, Center for Chinese Studies

Perspective Painting in Late Imperial China: A Symposium In honor of James Cahill In tribute to James Cahill's fundamental insights regarding Chinese experiments with perspectival representation during the late-imperial period, the Institute for East Asian Studies will host a symposium on perspective in Chinese painting to accompany "Beauty Revealed," an exhibition at the UC Berkeley Art Museum and Pacific Film Archive.

Abstracts and Speaker Information

Nancy Berliner, MFA, Boston
Bapo, Images of a Vanishing Culture without a Vanishing Point

Bapo, "eight brokens," a Chinese painting motif that arose in the 19th century, depicts assemblages of torn calligraphies, worm-eaten rubbings, burnt paintings and other damaged fragments of the literati world. Inscriptions on the works often nostalgically bemoan the disintegration of the great ancient Chinese artistic traditions. The artists creating bapo generally depicted the two-dimensional remnants in a very naturalistic manner and as if they were pasted onto the surface of the painting, resulting in a trompe l'oeil effect. In a seemingly radical change from much of Chinese painting, the bapo artists retreated from any interest in foreground and background or vanishing point perspective and instead focused viewers' eyes on the surface of the painting. This talk will trace the evolution of bapo, how the attention to the surface developed from earlier Chinese decorative formats and how individual artists explored varied directions employing this innovative new art form.

Nancy Berliner is the Wu Tung Curator of Chinese Art at the Boston Museum of Fine Arts. She received her AB from Harvard College, her PhD from Harvard University's Department of the History of Art and Architecture, and a certificate of matriculation from the Central Academy of Art in Beijing. She previously worked as a guest curator of the MFA's exhibition "Beyond the Screen: Chinese Furniture of the 16th and 17th Centuries" (1996). Beginning in 2000, she was the curator of Chinese art at the Peabody Essex Museum, Salem, Massachusetts, where, she curated the exhibition "Emperor's Private Paradise: Treasures from the Forbidden City" (2010) and initiated the Yin Yu Tang House project, which involved transferring a Chinese merchant house to the PEM.

Richard Vinograd, Stanford University
Vanishing Points

This paper will engage some prominent themes of the symposium, the exhibition, and in Jim Cahill's scholarly writing — visual culture encounters, pictorial spatiality, and images of women — through the notion of vanishing points. Taking as a point of departure hybrid images such as the early Qing period oil-painted screen "Ladies in Phoenix Tree Shade," my remarks will address the deployment of perspectival devices in intercultural spaces, and outline some possible extended implications of vanishing points in those contexts.

Richard Vinograd is the Christensen Fund Professor in Asian Art in the Department of Art & Art History at Stanford University, where he has taught since 1989. Dr. Vinograd's research interests include Chinese portraiture, landscape painting and cultural geography, urban cultural spaces, painting aesthetics and theory, art historiography, and inter-media studies. He is the author of Boundaries of the Self: Chinese Portraits, 1600–1900 (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1992); co-editor of New Understandings of Ming and Qing Painting (Shanghai: Shanghai Calligraphy Painting Publishing House, 1994); and co-author of Chinese Art & Culture (New York: Prentice Hall and Harry N. Abrams, 2001). He has published more than thirty journal articles, anthology chapters, conference papers, and catalogue essays on topics ranging from tenth-century landscape painting to contemporary transnational arts.

Eugene Wang, Harvard University
How Did Chinese Landscape Painting Find Its Soundtrack? Cahill's Dark-Toned Gong Xian Once More

James Cahill's contention that the European chiaroscuro was a major source of inspiration for Gong Xian's (1618–1689) dark-toned landscape has fueled much debate and controversy. Taking Cahill's cue and picking up where Cahill left off, Professor Wang asks a set of further questions: why was there a need for chiaroscuro-like landscapes in the early Qing? What did Gong's landscape try to accomplish? The talk goes on to address two large issues:

  • How did the medium of brush-and-ink landscape acquire a "voice" or "soundtrack" effect?
  • How did Chinese landscape amount to "history painting"?

Eugene Wang is the Abby Aldrich Rockefeller Professor of Asian Art at Harvard University. A Guggenheim Fellow (2005), he received an Academic Achievement Award (2006) from Japan in recognition of his book Shaping the Lotus Sutra: Buddhist Visual Culture in Medieval China. He is the art history editor of the Encyclopedia of Buddhism (2004). His extensive publications range from the early to modern and contemporary Chinese art and cinema. He serves on the advisory board of the Center for Advanced Study of Visual Art, National Gallery of Art, Washington, D.C. His currents projects include a book on bio-visuality in early China and a study of the voice effect in Chinese scroll painting.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809



Overcoming the Asia Paradox: Key Issues Hindering Further Integration in East Asia and Korea's Role
Conference/Symposium
Speakers:
 •  Daniel Sneider, Associate Director for Research, APRC, Stanford
    University
 •  Tai Ming Cheung, Director, Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation,
    UC San Diego
 •  Kathleen Stephens, Koret Fellow and Former U.S. Ambassador to the
    Republic of Korea, Stanford University
Moderator: T.J. Pempel, Jack M. Forcey Professor of Political Science, UC Berkeley
Date: December 2, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Overcoming the Asia Paradox

Schedule and Abstracts

4:00 – 4:15 p.m. — Opening
T.J. Pempel (UC Berkeley)

4:15 – 4:25 p.m. — Congratulatory Remarks
Han Dong Man (Korean Consul General)

4:30 – 4:50 p.m.
Daniel Sneider (Associate Director for Research, APRC, Stanford University) Topic: "Korea-Japan Relations Under Stress"
Relations between South Korea and Japan are increasingly tense, causing growing concern in the U.S. that the dysfunctional nature of their relationship might undermine American security interests and stability in the region. At the center of these tensions remain the unresolved issues of wartime history and the impact of nationalism on public opinion and official relations. Is there a path way toward reconciliation that can overcome the "Asian Paradox?"

4:50 – 5:10 p.m.
Tai Ming Cheung (Director, Institute on Global Conflict and Cooperation, UC San Diego) Topic: "China and the Dynamics of Arms Races in East Asia in the 21st Century"
Is an arms race in the making or already underway in East Asia that pits China against the United States and other Asian states? If the intensifying armament drives that are taking place across the region, especially by big powers such as China, India, and Japan, are being driven by action-reaction dynamics, what are the implications for regional security, including for the Korean Peninsula? This presentation examines the nature and drivers of China's military modernization to assess whether this constitutes an arms race or not.

5:10 – 5:30 p.m.
Kathleen Stephens (Koret Fellow, Stanford University and Former U.S. Ambassador to the Republic of Korea) Topic: "North Korea: Obstacle or Catalyst for Regional Integration?"
Continuing tensions on the divided Korean Peninsula dramatically underscore the long-standing challenges to efforts at regional integration in Northeast Asia. At the same time, initiatives such as the Six-Party Talks have been seen as potentially strengthing regional cooperation through addressing multilaterally one of the most persistent security and economic problems in the region. The 2005 Joint Statement of Principles committed the parties to working toward a new security mechanism in the region. What are the prospects for such an approach? What would be the impact of increased regional integration on the DPRK? How far can it go absent progress on denuclearization and other goals on the Korean peninsula?

5:30 – 6:00 Panel Discussion/Q&A

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674



Feet, Sorcerers, and Sea Slugs: Cursing Translation in Eighteenth Century China
Colloquium
Speaker/Performer: Carla Nappi, History, University of British Columbia
Date: December 6, 2013 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Location: Institute of East Asian Studies (2223 Fulton, 6th Floor)
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Feet, Sorcerers, and Sea Slugs: Cursing Translation in Eighteenth Century China Jawbone! Maggoty! Bloated lout! For anyone fascinated by translation and the metamorphoses that it can engender, an Ovidian playground can be found in Qing texts devoted to the verbal arts and the rendering of written and spoken utterances across the many languages of the empire. Epithets offer an especially rich and challenging case for the historian of translation, and the pages of mid-Qing dictionaries and phrasebooks are full of insults rendered in all of their multilingual horribleness. Eighteenth-century Manchu speakers had a particularly colorful lexicon ready at hand to hurl at objects of their discontent. With Manchu curses as a point of departure, this talk will take the transformations of translated invective as a case study to explore the material landscape of decaying language in the high Qing empire.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321

 


Pyongyang via Almaty: Post-Socialist Visions of North Korea
Panel Discussion
Panelists:
 •  Lisa Sangmi Min, Ph.D. Student, Anthropology, UC Berkeley;
 •  Y. David Chung, Professor of Art & Design, University of Michigan;
 •  Alexander Kan, Writer
Moderator: Steven Lee, Assistant Professor of English, UC Berkeley
Date: December 6, 2013 | 4:00 p.m.
Location: 370 Dwinelle Hall
Sponsors: Center for Korean Studies, Institute of Slavic, East European, and Eurasian Studies

Pyongyang via Almaty: Post-Socialist Visions of North Korea The goal of this panel is to reveal new perspectives on North Korea through the artistic and literary work of three recent visitors to it. What distinguishes these visitors is that each of them is an expert of the former Soviet Union's Korean diaspora, or Koryo Saram, members of which helped to establish North Korea in the 1940s and 50s. Thus, the panel will look at contemporary North Korea through Koryo Saram eyes — Pyongyang via Almaty, Kazakhstan. It will use the experiences of Soviet-led socialism and its collapse to explore this little-known country beyond the limits of totalitarianism.

Lisa Sangmi Min (UC Berkeley)
Topic: "Meet Vladimir Ilyich Lenin Shin"

194 kilometers marks the distance between Seoul and Pyongyang, equivalent to a two-hour drive. If one considers the metaphysical distance, it is a different story, for the two cities remain worlds apart, illegible to each other in many ways. A sojourn in Kazakhstan, however, makes possible a bridging of the Southern and Northern Korean worlds. This presentation will be a phenomenological walk through several encounters with Kazakhstani Koreans (also known as Koryo Saram), each revealing new paths for entering North Korea.

Y. David Chung (University of Michigan)
Topic: "Pyongyang: Homeland of the Imaginary"

North Korea exists for most people as an imaginary place, created from television clips and newspaper articles. Portrayed as a nation of uncompromising dictatorship, a land of famine, and a people ruled by an ideology whose hatred for the United States is matched in fervor only by the adoration of their deified leaders, North Korea is a country that remains an enigma to the world. Artist and filmmaker David Chung will discuss how research on Koryo Saram, his 2007 documentary on the Koreans of Kazakhstan, led him on a trip into North Korea, the birthplace region of his parents. He will show clips from Koryo Saram as well as scenes of Seoul and Pyongyang from a new video short.

Alexander Kan (Writer)
Topic: "Lasting Call: My Return to North Korea"

In September 2012, the Kazakhstani Korean author Alexander Kan returned to Pyongyang, the place of his birth. As a result of geopolitical feuds, he left the country with his Soviet Korean mother in the early 1960s, never to see his North Korean father again. This talk details Kan's subsequent development as an author, specifically his engagement of historical loss through the lens of Russian and Western modernism. It then uses this lens to examine contemporary North Korea — finding there potential sources of redemption, and applying to the country lessons from the post-Soviet transition.

Event Contact: cks@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑5674