Past Events

2017 Events

Happy Americans, Unhappy Japanese: How Software Engineers work; how they feel about it; and how they are rewarded
Colloquium
Speaker: Professor Yoshifumi Nakata, Doshisha University
Date: January 24, 2017 | 4:00–5:30 p.m.
Location: 2521 Channing Way — Institute for Research on Labor & Employment, IRLE Director’s Room
Sponsors: Institute of Research on Labor & Employment, Center for Japanese Studies

Yoshifumi Nakata Yoshifumi Nakata holds a PhD in Economics from UC Berkeley and has a long distinguished career researching the relationship between technology and employment related factors. He founded the Institute for Technology, Enterprise and Competitiv?e?ne?ss a?t Doshisha and recently stepped down as its long-term Director. His bio information can be found here.

Event Contact: margaret_olney@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑3415

 


Staging Courtesans: Liang Chenyu’s (1519-1591) Washing Gauze (Huansha ji) and the Performance Culture of Late Sixteenth-Century China
Colloquium
Date: January 27, 2017 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Speaker: Peng Xu, Center for Chinese Studies Postdoctoral Fellow 2016-2017
Discussant: Ling Hon Lam, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Location: 180 Doe Library
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image for Staging Courtesans: Liang Chenyu’s (1519-1591) Washing Gauze (Huansha ji) and the Performance Culture of Late Sixteenth-Century China This paper seeks to read Liang Chenyu’s dramatic masterpiece, Washing Gauze (Huansha ji), with reference to the rise of courtesans as “theater women” and the subsequent changes in the performance culture in the late sixteenth century. It argues that the play explodes the literary tradition to which it belong by staging female chorus, dance forms and their training sessions, and outdoors music performances. Despite the heroine’s identity as an ancient beauty with a patriotic career, she is portrayed in the play as a courtesan lover whose sexuality and talent in stage performance constitute a hidden source of energy that drives the central plot. By focusing on courtesan lovers and their performing arts as important inspirations for Liang Chenyu’s literary design, this paper revises the standard reading of the play as either a patriotic drama or a landmark in music history that served to promote Liang’s favorite music genre from concert to operatic music. This paper is part of my larger project that reconsiders the role theater women played in shaping the literary landscape of the late sixteenth century.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321

 


Stabilizing Quality in Inner Mongolian Milk
Lecture
Date: January 31, 2017 | 4:00 p.m.
Speaker/Performer: Megan Tracy, Sociology and Anthropology James Madison University
Moderator: Franck Bille, Visiting Scholar, UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative
Location: 180 Doe Library
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative

In this paper, I examine how actors attempt to transfer material and symbolic value and transfer notions of “human quality” across other notions of quality, such as product quality and the presumed caliber of particular places where production occurs. This transference of quality is embedded, for example, in notions that ethnic Mongolians are pre-disposed to produce a quality dairy product. I consider the manner in which various activities — such as milking cows, producing indigenous foods, and advertising — seek to stabilize notions of quality (as attached to particular objects and practices) via claims to notions of quality that are often presumed by actors to be stable and based on measurable characteristics that go into building a quality “X” — no matter what that X might be. In this exploration, I revisit notions of human quality — a focus of anthropological attention — and bring it into dialogue with work like Callon’s on how objects are qualified. These discussions are grounded in data collected within China’s domestic dairy industry in Inner Mongolia both before and after the industry’s epic product safety scandals.

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809

 


The US, China, and Cross-Strait Relations
Lecture
Date: February 1, 2017 | 12:15 p.m.
Location: Women's Faculty Club, Lounge
Speaker: Hung-Mao Tien, President, Institute for National Policy Research, and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Taiwan Moderator: T.J. Pempel, Political Science, UC Berkeley Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, Center for Chinese Studies

Hung-Mao Tien, President, Institute for National Policy Research, and former Minister of Foreign Affairs, Taiwan, will speak about cross-Strait relations under the new U.S. administration.

Hung-Mao Tien is Ph.D. in Political Science, the University of Wisconsin – Madison; Chairman of the Straits Exchange Foundation; President and board chairman, Institute for National Policy Research; Chief advisor to Taiwan’s National Council of Industries; Board member of several cultural and charity foundations as well as business corporations in Taiwan. Formerly the R.O.C. Minister of Foreign Affairs; Representative (Ambassador) to the United Kingdom, and Presidential Advisor. He also served as advisor to the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace and professor of political science in the US and Taiwan (on adjunct basis) universities; Author and co-author of numerous books and articles in English.

 


Film Screening: People are the Sky: A Journey to North Korea
Documentary Film
Speaker: Dai Sil Kim-Gibson, Filmmaker
Moderator: John Lie, UC Berkeley
Date: February 2, 2017 | 4:00–6 p.m.
Location: 180 Doe Library
Sponsor: Center for Korean Studies

Image from People are the Sky Director Dai Sil Kim-Gibson is the first Korean American filmmaker to be given official permission by the North Korean government to film inside its borders. In People are the Sky, Kim-Gibson’s eighth and most personal film, the filmmaker makes a pilgrimage to her place of birth in North Korea for the first time in nearly 70 years to explore if it is still home.

Kim-Gibson seamlessly weaves her own personal story as a native born North Korean with the fractious history of the North/South division and pinpoints the roots of North Korean’s hatred of the United States, giving Americans a much better understanding of the conflict. A mix of interviews, epic images, and graceful musings, People are the Sky offers some of the best political and social history of the relations between North and South Korea, and also a contemplative exploration of the meaning of home. The result is unprecedented, at times startling, for hers is an up close look of the hurts and desires, beauty and contradiction, pride and aspirations of the long held demonized nation.

Dai Sil Kim-Gibson is a writer and producer, known for Silence Broken: Korean Comfort Women (2000), Olivia's Story (2000), and America Becoming (1991).

Event Contact: cksassist@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑9787

 


Music and Song from Mongolia
Performing Arts - Music
Date: February 2, 2017 | 7:30 p.m.
Location: Cal State University, East Bay, Recital Hall (MB1055), Music Building
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Music Department, Cal State University East Bay, Department of Music

An exploration of the diversity of Mongolian music, from traditional folk to folk-inspired hip-hop, mixing ethnographic video and audio recordings, narration, and live musical performance.

Performers and speakers include:
 •  Charlotte D’Evelyn, Loyola Marymount University
 •  Urtaa Gantulga, Musician
 •  Tamir Hargana, Northern Illinois University
 •  Peter Marsh, California State University, East Bay
 •  Dimitri Staszewski, mongolmusicarchive.com
 •  Jennifer Post, University of Arizona
 •  Sunmin Yoon, University of Delaware

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809

 


Environmental Narratives in Mongolian Sound Worlds
Symposium
Data: February 3, 2017 | 1:00–6:30 p.m.
Location: 180 Doe Library
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Cal State University East Bay, Department of Music

Image from Environmental Narratives in Mongolian Sound Worlds Urbanization, globalization, and climate change have had a powerful effect on the ways Mongolians and Inner Mongolians relate to their environment, and this is transforming many of their cultural forms. This conference seeks to increase awareness of the relationships been musical expression and the ecological, economic and political issues impacting residents in different ethnic groups in both rural and urban Mongolia.

A Keynote Address by Erdene Luvsannorov will be followed by performances of Mongolian music and singing.

This symposium and workshop follow a concert, "Music and Song from Mongolia," to be held at Cal State University East Bay, 7:30 PM in Room MB1055.

Speakers and Performers:
 •  Andrew Colwell, Wesleyan University
 •  Charlotte D’Evelyn, Marymount Loyola University
 •  Erdene Luvsannorov, Inner Mongolian University of Art, Huhhot, China
 •  Peter Marsh, Cal State East Bay
 •  Jennifer Post, University of Arizona
 •  Tamir Hargana, Mongolian Musician
 •  Urtaa Gantulga, Mongolian Musician
 •  Dimitri Staszewski, mongolmusicarchive.com
 •  Sunmin Yoon, University of Delaware

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809

 


Annual Chinese New Year Banquet: Center For Chinese Studies
Special Event
Date: February 3, 2017 | 6:00–9:00 p.m.
Location: China Village, 1335 Solano Avenue, Albany, CA 94706
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies
Year of the Rooster

Year of the Rooster

祝大家春節快樂: 公雞神採奕奕, 母雞勤勞美麗! Please join the Center for Chinese Studies for our annual celebration of Chinese Lunar New Year. Let us welcome the Year of the Rooster with good food, prizes, and interesting conversations with old and new friends.

Event Contact: ccs-vs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6322

Download the menu here.

 


Mongolian Throat-Singing (Khöömii) Workshop
Workshop
Date: February 4, 2017 | 9:00 a.m. – 12 p.m.
Location: 1995 University Avenue — IEAS Fifth Floor Conference Room
Sponsors: Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley Mongolia Initiative, Department of Music, Cal State University East Bay

An opportunity to learn the Inner Asian vocal technique of throat-singing, through which one can produce multiple vocal lines simultaneously, from expert practitioners in an intimate learning environment. This workshop is offered in conjunction with the February 3 symposium "Environmental Narratives in Mongolian Sound Worlds."

Event Contact: ieas@berkeley.edu, 510‑642‑2809

 


From Mass Science to Participatory Action Research: Maoist Legacies in Contemporary Chinese Knowledge Production
Colloquium
Date: February 6, 2017 | 4:00–6:00 p.m.
Speaker: Sigrid Schmalzer, History, University of Massachusetts, Amherst
Discussant: Andrew F. Jones, East Asian Languages and Cultures, UC Berkeley
Location: 180 Doe Library
Sponsor: Center for Chinese Studies

Image from Environmental Narratives in Mongolian Sound Worlds One of the signature elements of Mao-era science was the insistence on mobilizing the masses. Today, propaganda accounts of such activities ring hollow — or at best perhaps chime quaint. Yet some Chinese social scientists are eagerly adopting the theory and language of "participatory action research," an academic field that emerged out of the 1960s and 1970s global radicalism in which Maoist political philosophy and epistemology played crucial roles. This lecture will cross national boundaries and the “1978 divide” to trace the influence of Maoism — and the place of China more broadly — in leftist academic movements around the world, with a specific focus on agricultural science and rural development.

Event Contact: ccs@berkeley.edu, 510‑643‑6321