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Upcoming Mongolia events at IEAS: Panel, Artist's Talk, Music, and Display

Mongolia events image

Mongolia, an emerging democracy caught between the giants of Asia, Russia and China, is the subject of an annual series of programs to be initiated this month at IEAS.

On April 29, a panel will address Mongolia prior to its Russian century, when it was under the sway of the Qing dynasty. Mongolian state formation, institutions, law, and culture, will be addressed by a panel drawn from UC Berkeley and Stanford University.

On May 7, all are invited to an afternoon of Mongolian art and music.

From April 22 to July 15, the IEAS Gallery will feature paintings by an artist who draws her inspiration from traditional Mongolian culture. A selection of photographs of contemporary Mongolia are also on view. All events are free and open to the public.


Exhibit

Wednesday,April 22, 2009 - Wednesday, July 15, 2009
Eternal Sky: Reviving the Art of Mongol Zurag
IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor

The "Eternal Sky" is a profoundly meaningful concept in Mongolian tradition. For a people ever on the move, criss-crossing the vast sweep of the Eurasian steppes, the ever-present sky was invested with spiritual significance. In the time of Chinggis Khan, it is believed, the eternal sky blessed the Mongol leader in his imperial ambitions. In our own time, as Mongolia seeks to re-establish its identity in Asia, the Mongol Zurag (literally: Mongol picture) is being reinvented. The traditions of the past are being revisited in art: the legendary power of Chinggis Khan, the brilliant flat colors of traditional arts, the crafts and activities of nomadic culture, and the celebration of life under the endless canopy of the Mongolian sky.

"Eternal Sky: Reviving the Art of Mongol Zurag," on view at the IEAS Gallery April 22 through July 15, features the work of artist and calligrapher Narmandakh Tsultem. Since 1988, when the decades-long repression under Mongolia's Soviet-style regime eased, Tsultem has taught Mongol Zurag style painting at Mongolian University of Arts and Culture. Her work encourages emerging young artists to look for their inspiration to the traditional culture of Mongolia.

Cosponsored by the Institute of East Asian Studies and the Center for Chinese Studies.



Panel

Wednesday, April 29, 2009
Mongolia: On the Eve of Modernity
IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor
4:00 PM

Mongolia is undergoing major changes, and negotiating its place in the contemporary world. With this in mind, this panel looks back to another moment of emergence prior to the era of Soviet domination, during the empire of the Qing. What systems, codes, and practices were put in place in this era, and how do these relate to Mongolia's subsequent development? Four panelists, two from UC Berkeley and two from Stanford, will present on aspects of Mongolia under the Qing, and explore the implications of their research.

Cosponsored by the Institute of East Asian Studies and the Center for Chinese Studies.



Artist's talk

Thursday, May 7, 2009
Mongol Zurag: Artist's Talk with Narmandakh Tsultem
IEAS Conference Room, 2223 Fulton Street, 6th Floor
4:00 PM

Artist and calligrapher Narmandakh Tsultem, whose work is featured in the IEAS Gallery exhibition "Eternal Sky: Reviving the Art of Mongol Zurag," (on view April 22 - July 15), has sought to capture the spirit of Mongolia's traditional arts in her work. Mongol Zurag (literally: Mongol picture) was largely neglected and suppressed in Mongolia during the seven decades of socialist regime, but has received renewed attention in recent years. With its flat and decorative quality, vibrant colors and distortion of forms, Mongol Zurag represents a distinctive form of visual expression in Mongolia. At a time when Mongolia seeks to re-establish its own identity in Asia, Narmandakh Tsultem, who has taught Mongol Zurag style painting at the Institute of Fine Art (IFA), Mongolian University of Arts and Culture (MUAC) since 1988, inspires and nurtures a new generation of artists exploring this idiom.

This event will feature Mongolian musical performances: khuumii (throat singing), morin huur (horse fiddle), and ever buree (horn).

Commenting on Mongolian traditional art and music will be ethnomusicologist and Mongolia specialist Peter Marsh, Music Department, Cal State University-East Bay.

Translation by Uranchimeg Tsultem, History of Art, UC Berkeley.

Cosponsored by the Institute of East Asian Studies, the Center for Chinese Studies, and the National Resource Center.


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