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Across the High Seas, Panel 1


Across the High Seas, Panel 1
Eivind Heldaas Seland, University of Bergen
"Spaces, Places, and Things: Spatiality in early Indian Ocean exchange"

Steven Sidebotham, University of Delaware
"Berenike's Role in the Ancient Maritime Silk Road Based on Results of Recent Excavations"

Chapurukha Kusimba, American University
"Ancient Ties between China and East Africa"

 
Across the High Seas, Panel 2


Across the High Seas, Panel 2
Ariane de Saxcé, CNRS
"Trade Networks and Cultural Appropriations in South India and Sri Lanka at the Beginning of our Era"

James Lankton, UCL
"Roman Glass in Asia: Where, When and Why"

Osmund Bopearachchi, CNRS/UC Berkeley
"Indian Ocean Trade through Buddhist Iconographies"

 
Across the High Seas, Panel 3


Across the High Seas, Panel 3
Jun Kimura, Tokai University
"Voyage and Shipbuilding during the Maritime Silk Route's Period"

Derek Heng, Northern Arizona University
"Reconstructing Demographics, Social Hierarchies and Ethnicity in Early Second-Millennium AD Port-Cities in the Malacca Straits Region"

Hyunhee Park, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
"Theorizing Maritime Space through Premodern Sino-Islamic Connections"

 
Migrants, Monks, and Monasteries: Toward a History of South China Sea Buddhism


Migrants, Monks, and Monasteries: Toward a History of South China Sea Buddhism
JACK MENG-TAT CHIA
MARCH 8, 2018
Jack Meng-Tat Chia is a Senior Tutor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore and currently a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Center for Buddhist Studies, University of California, Berkeley. Born and raised in Singapore, he received his MA in East Asian Studies from Harvard University, and his PhD in History from Cornell University. He is currently working on his book manuscript, entitled Diaspora's Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea. This book seeks to contribute to our understanding of the connected history of Buddhism in China and Southeast Asia.
 
Reconfiguration of Ceramic Production and Trade in China at the Threshold of Global Trade: An Archaeological Perspective


Reconfiguration of Ceramic Production and Trade in China at the Threshold of Global Trade: An Archaeological Perspective
LI MIN
FEBRUARY 21, 2018
Li Min is associate professor of East Asian archaeology with a joint appointment at Department of Anthropology and Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at UCLA. He is also co-director of the landscape archaeology project in the Bronze Age city of Qufu, China.
 
Trans-Regionalism and Economic Co-Dependency across the South China Sea
Trans-Regionalism and Economic Co-Dependency across the South China Sea
DEREK THIAM SOON HENG
DECEMBER 6, 2017
Derek Heng is Professor and Chair of History at Northern Arizona University. He specializes in the pre-modern trans-regional history of Maritime Southeast Asia and the South China Sea, utilising textual and archaeological data to study the interactions between Southeast Asia and China, and their impact on the state formation process in coastal Southeast Asia.
 


The Mongols and the Changing Patterns of Indian Ocean Connections 2017 Annual Tang Lecture in Silk Road Studies
The Mongols and the Changing Patterns of Indian Ocean Connections

TANSEN SEN
November 3, 2017

Tansen Sen is Director of the Center for Global Asia, Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Professor, NYU. He received his MA from Peking University and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.
Maritime Diffusion of Buddhist Philosophical Thought and ArtNew video


Maritime Diffusion of Buddhist Philosophical Thought and Art
OSMUND BOPEARACHCHI, UC Berkeley/CNRS
SEPTEMBER 21, 2017
Osmund Bopearachchi is Adjunct Professor of Central and South Asian Art, Archaeology, and Numismatics, University of California, Berkeley, and Emeritus Director of Research of the French National Centre for Scientific Research (C.N.R.S.-E.N.S. Paris). A numismatist, historian, and archaeologist, he has published ten books, edited six books, and written over 150 articles.