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Visual bilingualism and the funerary space





Visual bilingualism and the funerary space:
Keys to understanding the spatial semiotics of Central Asian tombs in 6th century China


PÉNÉLOPE RIBOUD
Institute for the Study of the Ancient World, NYU
April 17, 2019
Pénélope Riboud, an Assistant Professor of Chinese History and Art History at Inalco in Paris, is a historian and an art historian who focuses on the society and visual culture of Medieval China. She was trained in France as a historian and an archaeologist at Université Paris 1- Panthéon Sorbonne, then as a sinologist at the National Institute of Oriental Languages and Civilizations (Inalco-Langues’O) in Paris where she received her PhD in 2008. She is currently spending a year as Visiting Research Scholar at the Institute for the Study of the Ancient World at New York University.
 
Calculation and Cosmographyūtra





Calculation and Cosmography:
Formal Continuities in Buddhist Art along the Gansu Corridor,
from Dunhuang to Labrang Monastery

JON SORIANO, UC Berkeley
March 13, 2019
Jon Soriano is a PhD Candidate in the History of Art department at UC Berkeley, working with his advisor Pat Berger on a dissertation regarding the material culture of the Kālacakra tantra between the Gelugpa Gaden Phodrang and the Qing court. Jon has master’s degrees in Asian Studies and Ethnology, and has worked for the National Palace Museum in Taipei and the Berkeley Art Museum. He is the current recipient of the Dallan and Karen Leong Clancy Fund for Silk Road Studies, as well as funding from the Dunhuang Foundation.
 
Mongol ‘Translations’ of a Nepalese Stupa:
Architectural Replicas and the Cult of 
Bodnāthe Stūpa/Jarung khashar in Mongolia






Mongol ‘Translations’ of a Nepalese Stupa: Architectural Replicas and the Cult of Bodnāthe Stūpa/Jarung khashar in Mongolia
ISABELLE CHARLEUX, Peking University
February 21, 2019

Isabelle Charleux is director of research at the CNRS (National Centre for Scientific Research, Paris) and deputy director of the GSRL (Group Societies, Religions, Laicities, National Centre for Scientific Research–Ecole Pratique des Hautes Etudes-PSL, Paris). Her research interests focus on Mongol material culture and religion. She published Nomads on Pilgrimage. Mongols on Wutaishan (China), 1800–1940 (Brill, 2015) and Temples et monastères de Mongolie-Intérieure (Paris, 2006), as well as scholarly articles on various topics such as miraculous icons in in Mongolia, Inner Mongolian mural paintings, and visual representation of past and present figures of authority in the Mongol world.
 
From the Upper Indus to the East Coast of China: On the Origin of the Pictorial Representation of the Lotus Sūtra



From the Upper Indus to the East Coast of China:
On the Origin of the Pictorial Representation of the Lotus Sūtra

HAIYAN HU-VON HINÜBER, Peking University
January 30, 2019
Trained in Indology and Buddhist Studies in China (Peking University, MA) and Germany (Göttingen, PhD), Haiyan Hu-von Hinüber has held professorial appointments, teaching and serving as research scholar at the universities of Freiburg, Copenhagen, Vienna and Erfurt. She has also been visiting scholar in France, Japan and China, and she has served as Professor-at-large at the Faculty of Historical and Cultural Studies, Shandong-University (China). Recently she has served as senior researcher at Shenzhen-University (China), and currently she is attached in the same capacity to the Center of Buddhist Studies, Peking University.
 
The History and Science of Paper in Manuscripts of Central Asia


The History and Science of Paper in Manuscripts of Central Asia
AGNIESZKA HELMAN-WAżNY
DECEMBER 3, 2018
Agnieszka Helman-Ważny (Centre for the Study of Manuscript Cultures, University of Hamburg, and the Department of Books and Media History, Faculty of Journalism, Information and Book Studies, University of Warsaw) is a paper scientist and the author or co-author of four books and over forty scholarly articles.
 
Across the High Seas, Panel 1


Across the High Seas, Panel 1
MAY 2018
Eivind Heldaas Seland, University of Bergen
"Spaces, Places, and Things: Spatiality in early Indian Ocean exchange"

Steven Sidebotham, University of Delaware
"Berenike's Role in the Ancient Maritime Silk Road Based on Results of Recent Excavations"

Chapurukha Kusimba, American University
"Ancient Ties between China and East Africa"

 
Across the High Seas, Panel 2


Across the High Seas, Panel 2
MAY 2018
Ariane de Saxcé, CNRS
"Trade Networks and Cultural Appropriations in South India and Sri Lanka at the Beginning of our Era"

James Lankton, UCL
"Roman Glass in Asia: Where, When and Why"

Osmund Bopearachchi, CNRS/UC Berkeley
"Indian Ocean Trade through Buddhist Iconographies"

 
Across the High Seas, Panel 3


Across the High Seas, Panel 3
MAY 2018
Jun Kimura, Tokai University
"Voyage and Shipbuilding during the Maritime Silk Route's Period"

Derek Heng, Northern Arizona University
"Reconstructing Demographics, Social Hierarchies and Ethnicity in Early Second-Millennium AD Port-Cities in the Malacca Straits Region"

Hyunhee Park, John Jay College of Criminal Justice
"Theorizing Maritime Space through Premodern Sino-Islamic Connections"

 
Migrants, Monks, and Monasteries: Toward a History of South China Sea Buddhism


Migrants, Monks, and Monasteries: Toward a History of South China Sea Buddhism
JACK MENG-TAT CHIA
MARCH 8, 2018
Jack Meng-Tat Chia is a Senior Tutor in the Department of History at the National University of Singapore and currently a Postdoctoral Scholar at the Center for Buddhist Studies, University of California, Berkeley. Born and raised in Singapore, he received his MA in East Asian Studies from Harvard University, and his PhD in History from Cornell University. He is currently working on his book manuscript, entitled Diaspora's Dharma: Buddhism and Modernity across the South China Sea. This book seeks to contribute to our understanding of the connected history of Buddhism in China and Southeast Asia.
 
Reconfiguration of Ceramic Production and Trade in China at the Threshold of Global Trade: An Archaeological Perspective


Reconfiguration of Ceramic Production and Trade in China at the Threshold of Global Trade: An Archaeological Perspective
LI MIN
FEBRUARY 21, 2018
Li Min is associate professor of East Asian archaeology with a joint appointment at Department of Anthropology and Department of Asian Languages and Cultures at UCLA. He is also co-director of the landscape archaeology project in the Bronze Age city of Qufu, China.
 
Trans-Regionalism and Economic Co-Dependency across the South China Sea
Trans-Regionalism and Economic Co-Dependency across the South China Sea
DEREK THIAM SOON HENG
DECEMBER 6, 2017
Derek Heng is Professor and Chair of History at Northern Arizona University. He specializes in the pre-modern trans-regional history of Maritime Southeast Asia and the South China Sea, utilising textual and archaeological data to study the interactions between Southeast Asia and China, and their impact on the state formation process in coastal Southeast Asia.
 


The Mongols and the Changing Patterns of Indian Ocean Connections 2017 Annual Tang Lecture in Silk Road Studies
The Mongols and the Changing Patterns of Indian Ocean Connections

TANSEN SEN
November 3, 2017

Tansen Sen is Director of the Center for Global Asia, Professor of History, NYU Shanghai; Global Network Professor, NYU. He received his MA from Peking University and Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania.
Maritime Diffusion of Buddhist Philosophical Thought and ArtNew video


Maritime Diffusion of Buddhist Philosophical Thought and Art
OSMUND BOPEARACHCHI, UC Berkeley/CNRS
SEPTEMBER 21, 2017
Osmund Bopearachchi is Adjunct Professor of Central and South Asian Art, Archaeology, and Numismatics, University of California, Berkeley, and Emeritus Director of Research of the French National Centre for Scientific Research (C.N.R.S.-E.N.S. Paris). A numismatist, historian, and archaeologist, he has published ten books, edited six books, and written over 150 articles.